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With many major operators falling foul of wider economic burdens, the runway is cleared for a wave of ‘no frills’ airlines to soar over Africa

BUSINESS TIES BETWEEN

EGYPT AND ETHIOPIA 24 Groundbreaking waste-to-energy project provides local opportunity

LITHON PROJECT

CONSULTANTS 32 Meeting the needs of a changing environment and expectant clients

NATIONAL WATER AND

SEWERAGE CORPORATION 46 Embracing a strong sense of servant leadership

3M AFRICA 74

Accelerating future growth through a business strategy revision

AFRICA OUTLOOK ISSUE 38 FEATURING: AZURI TECHNOLOGIES | LOBELS BISCUITS & SWEETS | MANUFACTURING INDABA


W E L C O M E Small Operators Making a Big Difference While the theme of market-leadership and industry dominance inevitably holds similar dominance over Africa Outlook each month - the sector elite sharing stories of success and forecasts of trends to come - we have taken the opportunity in this issue to hone in on a couple of unsung heroes either quietly changing the face of industry, or creating a sustainable future for With many major operators falling foul of wider economic burdens, the runway is cleared for a wave of ‘no frills’ airlines to soar over Africa Africans outside of the continent’s boardrooms. Propelling the issue is a focus on the disconnect between large international airlines on the continent, and the low cost, no frills competitors who are now beginning to eat into their market share. With the likes of South African Airways and Kenya Airways struggling to maintain the industry stronghold they have traditionally always enjoyed in their respective regions, never has there been a more opportune time for budget operators to swoop in and extract custom from them. The likes of Fastjet, FlyAfrica.com and Skywise are capitalising on what the IATA reports to be a record-breaking increase in people taking flight across the continent; begging the chicken and egg question: is it the low costs that are bringing in the larger numbers, or are the larger numbers creating more potential for a more competitive and diverse market share? Early verdicts suggest a more open sky than has ever been seen before above Africa. Another progressive enterprise with big plans is Azuri Technologies, a business tackling the need for small domestic power in emerging markets by introducing pay-as-you-go models and printed plastic solar technologies to help power rural Africa. Continuing along the themes of sustainability and resource conservation is our sector focus which hones in on growing business ties between Egypt and Ethiopia, and the subsequent Tawazon-Messebo Cement project’s unveiling to set an example for waste-to-energy initiatives and green solutions. The National Water and Sewerage Corporation in Uganda helps bridge the gap between small sustainability schemes, and the large companies driving them; paving the way for our company showcase assortment which includes the likes of Lithon Project Consultants, Motheo Construction Group, Lobels Biscuits & Sweets, HBS Africa Consulting Engineers, RSwitch and Masumali Matthew Staff Maghji Insurance Brokers. Editorial Director, WWW.AFRIC AOUTLOOKMAG.COM

BUSINESS TIES BETWEEN

EGYPT AND ETHIOPIA 24 Groundbreaking waste-to-energy project provides local opportunity

LITHON PROJECT

CONSULTANTS 32 Meeting the needs of a changing environment and expectant clients

NATIONAL WATER AND

SEWERAGE CORPORATION 46 Embracing a strong sense of servant leadership

3M AFRICA 74

Accelerating future growth through a business strategy revision

AFRICA OUTLOOK ISSUE 38 FEATURING: AZURI TECHNOLOGIES | LOBELS BISCUITS & SWEETS | MANUFACTURING INDABA

Outlook Publishing

EDITORIAL Editorial Director: Matthew Staff matthew.staff@outlookpublishing.com Deputy Editor: Emily Jarvis emily.jarvis@outlookpublishing.com

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BUSINESS Sales Director: Nick Norris nick.norris@outlookpublishing.com Operations Director: James Mitchell james.mitchell@outlookpublishing.com Sales Manager: Tom Cullum tom.cullum@outlookpublishing.com Heads of Projects: Arron Rampling arron.rampling@outlookpublishing.com Donovan Smith donovan.smith@outlookpublishing.com Project Managers: Callum Philp callum.philp@outlookpublishing.com Callam Waller callam.waller@outlookpublishing.com Eddie Clinton eddie.clinton@outlookpublishing.com Joshua Mann joshua.mann@outlookpublishing.com Stuart Parker stuart.parker@outlookpublishing.com

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OUTLOOK PUBLISHING Managing Director: Ben Weaver ben.weaver@outlookpublishing.com Chairman: Mark Weaver CONTACT Outlook Publishing Ltd Woburn House, 84 St Benedicts Street, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 4AB, United Kingdom Sales: +44 (0) 1603 959 652 Editorial: +44 (0) 1603 959 655 SUBSCRIPTIONS Tel: +44 (0)1603 959 655 Email: matthew.staff@outlookpublishing.com

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In this issue of Africa Outlook...

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NEWS

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AFRICAN AIRLINES Low Costs, Open Skies

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AZURI TECHNOLOGIES Pioneering Affordable Energy

All the latest top stories across the month from Africa

Getting the discount revolution off the ground

Powering the momentum for change through powerful innovation

S E C T O R

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F O C U S

ENERGY & UTILITIES Growing Business Ties Between Egypt and Ethiopia

Groundbreaking waste-toenergy project provides local opportunity

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SHOWCASING LEADING COMPANIES Tell us your story and we’ll tell the world

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T E C H N O L O G Y

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C O N S T R U C T I O N

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LOBELS BISCUITS & SWEETS Bringing First-Class Standards to Zimbabwe

Improving customer engagement through a dynamic marketing strategy

LITHON PROJECT CONSULTANTS Bringing Hope to People and Communities

RSWITCH LIMITED Switching to a Cashless Economy Adding value for clients and partners the smart way

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AIRTEL MALAWI Telecoms Right on Your Doorstep Following the Group ethos to provide affordability, accessibility and unmatched quality

Meeting the needs of a changing environment and expectant clients

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MOTHEO CONSTRUCTION GROUP Leaving a Legacy

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Capitalising on South Africa’s infrastructure needs

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PEARL DAIRY Stronger Bones, Smarter Minds

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MASUMALI MEGHJI INSURANCE BROKERS Pairing Expertise with Innovation Offering a competitive way to manage risk and protect investments

Contributing to a healthy mind and body

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OILIBYA Fuelling Growth on a Continental Scale

Your energy partner in Africa

HBS AFRICA CONSULTING ENGINEERS (PTY) LTD Africa’s Engineers of Choice Bringing the highest level of value engineering to every project

NATIONAL WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION Water for All: Delivering the Promise Embracing a strong sense of servant leadership

E V E N T

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CONLOG (PTY) LTD Solutions for Utilities

Think smart, think Conlog: the worldwide leaders in prepaid solutions

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3M AFRICA Regional Restructure Generates Growth

Accelerating future growth through a business strategy revision

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INVEST IN DATA CENTRE AFRICA

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AFRICA ENERGY FORUM (AEF)

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MANUFACTURING INDABA

Initiating the next phase of data centre development across the continent

A platform for European investors to meet with Africa’s power sector

Manufacturing the future

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Local Pharma Production Presents Strategic Opportunity for Ethiopia The Ethiopian Government is offering tax incentives to increase in-country production of medicines in order to improve the quality of its healthcare The Government of Ethiopia is offering tax and loan incentives to encourage local pharmaceutical production that will ultimately reduce the cost of drugs, increase job opportunities, improve economic growth and enhance foreign exchange inflow. Ethiopia has previously relied heavily on pharmaceutical imports - or international manufacturers with a footprint in the country - to meet a growing consumer demand for medicine. As a result, several initiatives will be rolled out to improve the quality of healthcare in the country, owing to a large gap in

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the supply and demand of drugs. “The Government has encouraged local pharmaceutical production with tax-free loans for up to five years and a 100 percent exemption on custom duty for imports on capital goods,” said Frost & Sullivan Industry Analyst for Transformational Health, Aditi Bhalla. “Furthermore, an income tax exemption for five years is provided to manufacturers exporting 50 percent of their products, or supplying 75 percent of their products or services as production or services input. The time for production registration has also been reduced to a month for local manufacturers.”

A study from Frost & Sullivan, Analysis of the Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Market, found that the market earned revenues of US$620 million in 2015 and estimates this to reach $1.01 billion in 2020. Ethiopia has an increasing requirement of antibiotics, as well as anti-infective drugs, given the high incidences of communicable diseases in the country and an ever-growing population. This in turn is fuelling the need for chronic care medication. “In recent years, Ethiopia has increased its healthcare investments, resulting in a remarkable improvement in health indicators and achievement of health-related Millennium Development Goals,” observed Bhalla. “By delivering a host of incentives, the Government is addressing the needs of citizens, as well as encouraging trade across borders to bring in foreign exchange.” In addition to rolling out programmes like the Growth and Transformational Plans (GTP-I, GTP-II) and Health Sector Development Plan, the Government has also partnered with the World Health Organisation. This collaboration has led to the launch of the National Strategy and Plan of Action for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Development, which will urge domestic production and strengthen the national medicine regulatory system. Analysis of the Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Market is part of the Life Sciences Growth Partnership Service programme. Frost & Sullivan’s related studies include: Healthcare System Development in Tanzania and Ethiopia, An Overview of the South African National Development Plan 2030 and the Industrial Policy Action Plan, Global Nextgeneration Sequencing Trends, and Pharmaceutical Industry in Ghana and Nigeria.

GO TO WWW.AFRICAOUTLOOKMAG.COM/NEWS FOR ALL OF THE LATEST NEWS FROM AFRICA


E N E R G Y & U T I L I T I E S

Shaping the Direction of South African Energy South African Energy Minister, H.E. Hon. Tina Joemat-Pettersson has confirmed his attendance at Southern Africa Energy & Infrastructure Summit (SAEIS), taking place between 4-6 May. More than 30 speakers from the SADC region will celebrate regional cooperation at the meeting and discuss the future of energy production; promoting energy and infrastructure projects that require both private and public-sector support in order to be realised in the region. The South African Minister will address investor questions on regional cooperation and South Africa’s supporting role within the SADC.

Additionally, the ‘African Forum for Utility Regulators (AFUR)’ has provided its backing of the meeting with 10 heads of regional regulation bodies attending. Regulators will contribute publically on the agenda as well as taking time at the meeting to privately debate a deeper, more integrated strategy to support private sector engagement and public sector needs. DBSA, World Bank, OPIC, IFC, DBSA and AFC are all backing the projectfocused working group, which is an extension of EnergyNet’s longstanding partnership with Mozambique and

CONSTRUCTION

Bridging the Engineering Skills Gap The engineering skills gap in South Africa is well documented, but what is not necessarily more widely understood is the loss of engineering professionals as a result of the bizarre way the industry has calculated fee income up until now. Simon Berry, Director at Fresh Projects, an online business platform tailor-made for South African-built environment professionals, said that the industry has, for decades, been at the mercy of an imbalanced playing field with dire consequences. “Built environment professionals have often under-quoted on projects, offering unsustainable discounts, even as much as 70 percent, to get appointed. The knock-on effect of this is more serious

Simon Berry, Director, Fresh Projects

these backbone investors. “Having worked with the Mozambique Government for 14 years now, we understand the landscape and the role the country can play regionally; therefore when a number of our private and public sector partners suggested we expand our offering to focus on energy and infrastructure projects regionally, it seemed the right move considering the rapidly changing role of SADC and SAPP to deliver greater integration,” said Veronica Bolton Smith, Regional Director, EnergyNet. than many realise. With a discount of that magnitude, projects then have to try cover costs with as little as 30 percent of the fee that they should be earning, which is not feasible for any professional team. This immediately impacts the earning potential for everyone and the long-term viability of a business.” According to Berry, there is a disconnect between built environment fee guidelines and the real costs. The fee guidelines are based on the value of construction works whereas the true cost to deliver the services is based on the number of hours of professional input. So the issue lies in not knowing what the real cost is from the outset. These teams need a better understanding of the actual cost of a project, and how much leverage they have to offer discounts against tariffs, before it compromises the entire project and industry.

GO TO WWW.AFRICAOUTLOOKMAG.COM/NEWS FOR ALL OF THE LATEST NEWS FROM AFRICA

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Nielsen Survey Reveals Nigeria’s Online Shopping Potential According to Nielsen’s Global Connected Commerce Survey, Nigerians are outpacing global purchasing rates across several categories in online retail, pointing to what the Survey suggests is “the new retail reality”, as digital devices and ecommerce enable Nigerian consumers to shop wherever and whenever they choose. Nielsen Africa Retailer Services and Ecommerce Managing Director, Harsh Sarda commented: “The shift towards mobile purchasing reflects a larger trend that is occurring in retail: proximity shopping. Across all regions, smaller format stores that are close to work or home are growing fastest, and nothing offers greater convenience or proximity than the mobile device in consumers’ pockets. “As more consumers adopt an ‘on-demand lifestyle’ and turn to mobile devices to shop, the most successful retailers will be those that optimise and differentiate their mobile experience to enhance the in-store experience of shoppers, using ‘personalisation’ to adapt to the specific realities of each market.”

Nielsen Africa Retailer Services and Ecommerce Managing Director, Harsh Sarda

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S E N E R G Y & U T I L I T I E S

Overcoming Africa’s Infrastructure Deficit Research shows that addressing the infrastructure gap remains critical to facilitate sustainable economic growth on the continent, with gender equality a pivotal concern. Infrastructure Africa 2016 will discuss these pressing issues in a bid to ensure Africa’s sustainable development.

Overcoming gender inequality and gender-related legal restrictions would increase annual GDP growth in sub-Saharan Africa by 0.75 percent, according to the OECD. Infrastructure investment contributes as much as two percent to the GDP, with particularly positive effects in East and Central Africa. In absolute terms this means that for every dollar spent on public infrastructure development, the GDP of a country rises up to US$0.25. Infrastructure Africa 2016 will also host the inaugural Africa Inclusive Infrastructure Forum (AIIF) from 9-10 June, 2016 at the Sandton Convention Centre. This stream will address the question of how to strengthen women’s economic inclusivity in African infrastructure as a strategy to boost growth and ensure its sustainability.

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“Greening” Africa’s Industrialisation A new report launched during African Development Week, titled ‘Greening Africa’s Industrialisation’, argues that a greener approach to industrialisation is the only viable option for the continent’s continued development. Dr Fatima Denton, Director of the ECA’s Special Initiatives Division said that green initiatives offer the continent the opportunity to move from the periphery of the global economy to the centre. “Now we have an incredible opportunity to configure our own industrialisation. Africa has an opportunity to take advantage of its ‘late-runner’ status and it has huge potential to become a front-runner in this new pathway, to basically reshape

Fatima Denton, Director of the ECA’s Special Initiatives Division

its own economies and reshape it in a way that it can own.” Although African countries’ carbon emissions are low compared to other countries, going green can boost growth. Denton continued: “This is no longer an issue of choice. We have to take this pathway because it makes good economic sense.”

GO TO WWW.AFRICAOUTLOOKMAG.COM/NEWS FOR ALL OF THE LATEST NEWS FROM AFRICA


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Migration Provides Opportunity for Africa

FINANCE

East Africa Driven by non-Commodity Growth According to Standard Bank, East Africa’s property developers are combating local currency volatility by adopting the appropriate funding structures to mitigate risk in the current economic environment. While growth has slowed in many

commodity-linked markets in Africa, non-commodity driven markets, particularly in East Africa, have continued to perform well. “Developers will need to do robust feasibilities in order to understand how economic conditions can affect their returns over time and they also need to consider buffering themselves against potential risks such as currency volatility by utilising appropriate funding structures,” said Gary Garrett, Head of Real Estate Finance at Standard Bank.

for growth in African agriculture. Having showcased more than 100 machines, Vision of the Future was the biggest spectacle of MF farm machinery and agricultural services held by the Company; placing emphasis on supporting a new Massey Ferguson (MF), a worldwide generation of farmers. brand of AGCO, invited farmers and agricultural dealers from across Africa to attend its exciting ‘Vision of the Future’ farm mechanisation event at the AGCO Future Farm in Lusaka, Zambia, which took place at the start of April. The event has been hailed as a major catalyst for ideas focused on farm mechanisation as a key driver F O O D & D R I N K

Galvanising African Agriculture through Farm Mechanisation

According to Takyiwaa Manuk, the Director of the Social Development Policy Division at the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), migration inside the continent should be seen as an opportunity, and not a “brain drain”. Speaking during the ECA’s African Development Week in Addis Ababa, Manuk said that 80 percent of Africans who migrate do so inside the continent. At a side event on international migration in Africa, a panel of experts deconstructed the main causes of the negative perceptions on migration in Africa with a view to changing the discourse around migration and discussing the future of migration on the continent. TECHNOLOGY

Orange Invests in Nigerian Ecommerce Heavyweight World-renowned telecommunications Company, Orange, is to become a shareholder in Africa Internet Group (AIG) as a result of a deal which will initially see investments of up to $85 million. AIG, founded in Nigeria in 2012, already counts Goldman Sachs, MTN and Germany’s Rocket Internet among its shareholders. “With this strategic investment, Orange now has the capacity to play a leading role in the fast-growing ecommerce market in Africa,” Stéphane Richard, chairman and CEO of Orange, said in a joint statement with AIG. “This investment will enable us to significantly develop our ability to market products and services...” he added.

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TELL US YOUR STORY

AND WE’LL TELL THE WORLD AFRICA OUTLOOK is a digital and print product aimed at boardroom and hands-on decision-makers across a wide range of industries on the continent. With content compiled by our experienced editorial team, complemented by an in-house design and production team ensuring delivery to the highest standards, we look to promote the latest in engaging news, industry trends and success stories from the length and breadth of Africa. We reach an audience of 165,000 people across the continent, bridging the full range of industrial sectors: mining; oil & gas; logistics; resources; manufacturing; construction; engineering; technology; food & drink; retail; finance; and healthcare. In joining the leading industry heavyweights already enjoying the exposure we can provide, you can benefit from FREE coverage across both digital and print platforms, a FREE marketing brochure, extensive social media saturation, enhanced B2B networking opportunities, and a readymade forum to attract new investment and to grow your business. To get involved, please contact Outlook Publishing’s Managing Director, Ben Weaver, who can provide further details on how to feature your company, for free, in one of our upcoming editions.

W W W. A F R I C A O U T LO O K M A G . C O M Tel: +44 (0) 1603 959 650 Email: ben.weaver@outlookpublishing.com


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Low Costs, 12

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efore Fastjet launched low-cost flights between Harare and Dar es Salaam last year, the option to travel even medium-length distances was a tumultuous challenge for the majority of potential consumers, but it now appears that the skies are the limit for airlines - and subsequently consumers - just short of premier status. Fastjet is just one of a large wave of low-cost airlines launching or expanding operations across the continent as they seek to capture middle-income travellers who are tired of dangerous road journeys but cannot afford major international carriers. It is this middle ground that represents opportunity not only for passengers in need, but also for the lowcost, previously domestically-focused airlines to expand their horizons and tackle the larger multinationals. The new airlines hope to undercut larger carriers by offering ‘no frills’ services in the same fashion as the likes of Easyjet and Ryanair in Europe,

and the results are already being seen one year on. Average prices at the end of 2015 had already dropped by around 40 percent, with passenger numbers consequently rising in what can be perceived as a chicken and egg scenario. Did the cheap prices bring in the masses, or did a wider customer base enable new airlines to reduce their prices? Either way, as Zimbabwean businessman, Jonathan Jabangwe asked Reuters’ Joe Brock in September, 2015: “Why aren’t these flights all over Africa? With the global economic situation, every dollar counts.” Admittedly, it hasn’t all been doom and gloom for the continent’s larger operators; Ethiopian Airlines has been thriving on an ever-broadening international scale in recent times and continues to act as a trailblazer in regards to both service provision and innovation. However, for every success story like this, there are two or more examples of traditionally larger national airlines under increasing financial pressure;

Open Skies The past few years have seen an increase in low-cost, ‘no frills’ airlines across Africa, and with the major operators falling foul of wider economic burdens, the runway is cleared for them to soar Writer: Matthew Staff

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South African Airways (SAA) and Kenya Airways grabbing the most headlines. Considering the general growth of Africa’s aviation industry escalating by around five percent at present - faster than any other region - it doesn’t take a genius to realise that custom and market share is venturing further away from the traditional providers and landing in the laps of newer, independent operators. According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), passenger numbers on the continent are expected to double to as much as 300 million in the next 20 years, and theoretically, the arrival of airlines like Fastjet could capitalise heavily on the gap that exists between themselves and the traditional elite.

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‘Open skies’ versus protectionism

However, it is by no means a given. A similar gap remains in the rules and regulations that either encourage or disallow such discounted options for travel to exist on a large scale, and it is this discrepancy – and the solution of it – which could play a significant role in dictating continental air travel in the future. Despite an ‘open skies’ agreement being signed nearly three decades ago, the prospect of widespread competition at the time was barely an issue, and now that it is, the trend of protectionism has overridden the agreement in many cases, to the benefit of the larger carriers. “African countries continue to champion national airlines, despite nearly all ventures resulting in losses or bankruptcy,” Brock said in his article written for Reuters in late 2015. “SAA has been subject to several Government rescues in recent years. Kenya Airways posted record losses this year and may need a $500-$600 million bailout. Nigeria is considering re-launching a state airline and tiny Djibouti said this month it would revamp its previously bankrupt national carrier. “If governments were more pro-competition and reforms were imposed it could add $1.3 billion a year in revenue to African economies and create 155,000 jobs, the IATA says.” Fastjet boss, Ed Winter told Brock that he believed Government protectionism to be the main reason “why Africa is so far behind the rest of the world”.

Realistic proposition

Perhaps though, it’s just a lull where only the major African airlines are being truly effected as a result of their countries’ wider economic burdens, and once they recover, they will rejoin the market elite to find smaller nations up at the top of the tree with them; driven by low-cost airlines who were

The likelihood of a truly ‘open sky’ across Africa is looking more and more realistic

‘According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), passenger numbers on the continent are expected to double to as much as 300 million in the next 20 years...’

busy at work while the former licked their wounds. Fastjet is already veering further away from the likes of South Africa to focus on its native Tanzania and surrounding East African markets. FlyAfrica.com is similarly thriving out of its Zimbabwe base, with plans to expand into West Africa in the near future. And for those who do remain focused on South Africa, at least they can do so in the knowledge that they won’t be blown out of the water by their larger competitors quite as comprehensively as they once would have been. Kulula, Mango, FlySafair and Skywise are just four, new low-cost examples of the revolution that seems to be occurring. The aforementioned East is seemingly already catered for too, and if the likes of FlyAfrica.com can activate the main economic powerhouse, Nigeria in the process of its western ventures, then the likelihood of a truly ‘open sky’ across Africa is more of a realistic proposition than many powers that be would either wish for or lead others to believe.

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PIONEERING Affordable Energy Azuri Technologies is well on its way to addressing Africa’s critical energy access challenges Writer: Matthew Staff

zuri Technologies identified the opportunity for small domestic power in emerging markets using a pay-as-you-go model back in 2012 and, following a rapid piloting phase, the Company has moved to its own premises and is concentrating on the development of a printed plastic solar technology set to power rural Africa. We spoke with the Company’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Simon Bransfield-Garth about Azuri’s sociallydriven goals, the challenges being

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of any PayGo Azuri has the widest reach Africa solar service in sub Saharan in sub-Saharan Africa of any PayGo solar service Azuri has the widest reach


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targeted and what the future has in store for energy provision on the continent. Africa Outlook (AfO): Looking back to inception, what were the initial focuses and goals of Azuri Technologies, and what time frames were put in place for the kind of goals you were targeting? Simon Bransfield-Garth (SB-G): The Company was established in 2012 from another start-up, Eighth19 Ltd, which focuses on the development of research from Cambridge University,

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and has become a pioneer of printed plastic solar materials. Azuri’s goals are not just to reduce fuel emissions and costs for off-grid households but to enable whole communities to be more productive from access to the knowledge economy. Using ‘smart’ devices and the distributed renewable power needed to drive them, individuals are able to access services previously only available in urban areas, allowing productivity and income growth within the whole community. With some 600 million people currently off-grid

in sub-Saharan Africa alone, it will be many years before everyone has access to power but distributed solar is delivering power to ever increasing numbers of customers that have no grid access. AfO: To this end, what have been the core programmes, products, technologies and incentives put in place by Azuri since inception, and across what geographic footprint? SB-G: At Azuri’s core are cuttingedge solar home systems and the unique ‘path to market’ that the

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PayGo business model enables. Azuri focuses on using the latest technology to address the challenges of underserved communities by delivering some of the most advanced solar lighting technology available into rural emerging markets. Access to the consumer is via in-region partners with extensive in-country networks that facilitate rural reach, and provide a distribution network of local entrepreneurs who are integrated into the local community. Through our partnerships, we have reached isolated rural areas that would otherwise be inaccessible. This partnership model enables Azuri to reach a broad audience and

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is currently active in more than 12 different countries within Africa; the widest reach of any provider. AfO: In response to what socioeconomic challenges in Africa have these products been introduced? SB-G: Africa falls victim to a number of socio-economic challenges, including access to healthcare, employment, and education, to name a few. Many of which could be dramatically reduced if there was widespread access to electricity. Azuri products directly address the electrification issue which plagues rural communities and by doing this, also provides a basis for people to help

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“Pd’E observed that 98 percent of Azuri customers claimed improvements in health, 84 percent save money, and 85 percent reinvest the saved money in food, education, and healthcare� themselves. Azuri customers spend on average 50 percent less on PayGo top-ups compared to the kerosene and phone charging fees that are replaced. This not only provides significant health benefits, but also enables families to spend the money they save on things which directly benefit them like education, food, or even agricultural equipment.


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AfO: How much research and collaboration has been carried out in order to identify the optimum products required in your target region? SB-G: Azuri has found that collaboration with all stakeholders within emerging markets is vital for success. A business model which suits one region in Africa, will probably not suit another. An example of this is the process which is carried out when calculating PayGo plans. Prior to deployment, Azuri liaises with local partners to conduct market research, so that a unique payment plan for each region may be calculated. One of the main motivations for doing this is

a rural community’s revenue stream may be extremely seasonal, due to agriculture being a common source of income. PayGo allows the family to pay more when their income is greater in harvest season and less when crops are being grown. This flexibility means sustainable financing of the system on a customer level is far more achievable, as payments can be made in sympathy to other financial outgoings the family may have at the time. AfO: What have been the subsequent results of your influence in Africa thus far? SB-G: An independent study by Planete

d’Entrepreneurs (Pd’E) was carried out in 2014, measuring the impact that Azuri products have on rural communities in Kenya. The results were astounding! Pd’E observed that 98 percent of Azuri customers claimed improvements in health, 84 percent save money, and 85 percent reinvest the saved money in food, education, and healthcare. The success of Azuri’s business model has received recognition from USAID’s Development Innovation Ventures (DIV), with $1 million awarded to support the establishment of PayGo solar power in Rwanda.

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The two-year programme is funding the creation of a distribution channel as well as the supply of 10,000 Azuri pay-as-you-go solar systems. Besides developing Rwanda itself, the project intends to provide a template that can be replicated in similar low-income geographies. Azuri was also announced as a Global Technology Pioneer Company by the World Economic Forum and was the 2015 winner of the UNFCCC “Momentum for Change” awards at the Paris COP21 climate conference.

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“Azuri continues to innovate, both in terms of technology and its business model. We are currently releasing products which contain a fascinating new energy management system, called HomeSmart™”

AfO: Looking forward, what further products and technologies are Azuri looking to introduce over the next couple of years and what effect does the Company hope and expect these to have? SB-G: Azuri continues to innovate, both in terms of technology and its business model. We are currently releasing products which contain a fascinating new energy management system, called HomeSmart™. This pioneering technology monitors usage patterns and daily climatic

HomeSmart™ will tailor the amount of light and charging available so that power is there when the customer requires

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HomeSmart™ intelligent solar home systems Azuri’s new HomeSmart™ technology is a self-learning, artificial intelligence feature of our solar home systems. While conventional solar home systems work well in sunny conditions, they often shut off early on cloudy days because they run out of power. HomeSmart™ uses learning technology to monitor both climatic conditions and historical customer usage patterns to ensure a full night of light, even following cloudy days. This is believed to be the first time that such machine-learning approaches have been used in small domestic solar home systems, and marks the next step in intelligent automation. For off-grid customers, solar energy is often the only access households have to electrical power for lighting, phone charging, radio, TV and other essential devices. Without the grid, customers rely solely on the stored power to provide services at night and if that power is insufficient, households are often forced back to solutions such as candles and kerosene lamps.

conditions to optimise the system for each individual customer. When battery charging conditions are less than optimal, for instance in rainy season, the Azuri system will tailor the amount of light and charging available to the customer, so that power is still available for as long as the customer typically requires it, basing this on precalculated usage patterns. This is an example of “reverse innovation”, where Azuri is deploying to extremely remote regions technology which is decades ahead

Home lighting product

of the technology generally found in “developed” markets. Azuri continues to develop solutions, giving customers the opportunity to progressively upgrade from lighting, and small device charging, to devices which offer internet access, and products which can generate incremental income. AfO: And looking at the bigger picture, what would you then hope and expect to be able to report back to me in terms of both Company and social achievements three-five years from now, as a result of Azuri Technologies’ products? SB-G: Azuri is a leading provider of PayGo solar powered systems, deploying systems that enable households and can power small scale manufacturing and agriculture. In three-five years, we will not have completely addressed the problem of energy access in Africa but we expect to be well on the way to doing so.

Energising rural Africa: Simon Bra nsfield-Garth at TEDx Imperial Co llege

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A global communications partner & world-class cellular network.

One of South Africa’s leading Cellular and Data Service Providers. MTN provides this service through an extensive infrastructure network that includes not only communication channels, but also physical buildings that house the network and data equipment that makes the cellular and data service possible. The data and cellular service is power intensive and MTN actively finds new energy efficient solutions to deal with the increase in power consumption due to

the dramatic rise in demand for data and cellular communication. In itself, using any phone to contact a person instead of driving to meet the person, reduce the universal Carbon Footprint. One of the objectives of MTN is to become the preferred cellular and data provider of all South Africans while reducing energy cost and the actual carbon footprint of South Africa.


Reducing our carbon footprint First ever natural gas tri-generation plant that powers a data centre. The tri-generation plant at the MTN Innovation Hub, JHB is capable of generating 2MW electricity and reclaiming heat to generate cooling.

Egoli gas is responsible for the supply and distribution of natural gas to site

Fairlands, South Africa www.mtn.co.za


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Growing Business Ties Between Egypt and Ethiopia

The solid waste management subsidiary of Egyptian-based Qalaa Holdings has signed a five-year contract to supply an Ethiopian cement company with a waste-to-thermal energy solution to bring about the end of coal in its production processes Writer: Emily Jarvis

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ith waste-to-energy projects on the continent only now beginning to pick up speed, the TawazonMessebo Cement project in Ethiopia is setting an example for not only greener solutions to coal-fired energy creation, but it is a welcome reminder of how forging equally crucial, strong industry relationships on the continent is helping to reach ongoing energy and climate change targets. Dr Hisham Sherif, Chief Executive Officer of Qalaa Holdings subsidiary, ECARU, explains how its groundbreaking waste-to-energy project will

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provide local opportunity through job creation and directly address Ethiopia’s dependence on fossil fuels for industrial activities like cement making. Africa Outlook (AfO): Tell me more about the Tawazon-Messebo Cement project and Qalaa Holding’s involvement. What economic factors did you consider when choosing Ethiopia as the location for the project? Hisham Sherif (HS): Tawazon is Qalaa Holdings’ subsidiary Company for investment in solid waste management projects in Africa and the Middle East. It has

Solid fuel pellets made from biomass

extensive operations in Egypt and an international project book in Sudan, Nigeria, Libya, Oman, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Syria and now, Ethiopia.

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“This is a groundbreaking project since the vast majority of cement plants in Ethiopia are still using coal as their main source of energy”

Hisham Sherif, Chief Executive Officer, Qalaa Holdings subsidiary, ECARU

The Egyptian Company for Solid Waste Recycling (ECARU) is one of the two companies controlled by Tawazon, which supplies alternative solid fuel, biomass (BDF) and refused derived fuel (RDF) as sources of energy to Egypt’s leading cement companies for the past five years. By working with Messebo in Ethiopia we saw a great opportunity

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to implement a groundbreaking waste-to-thermal energy project that provides a viable and environmentally friendly alternative source of thermal energy. Messebo is a large Ethiopian cement facility located in thew town of Mekelle, 780 kilometres from Addis Ababa. Like most cement companies in the country, Messebo is currently using coal as its main source of thermal energy. Under the terms of the agreement with Messebo, ECARU will provide the technology for the collection, transportation and processing of local biomass into an environmentally friendly alternative solid fuel. ECARU will be the technology and services provider for supplying the equipment and system that will convert 100,000 tonnes of biomass annually into the source of thermal energy for Messebo’s kilns. Thus, biomass will gradually replace coal in the production process bringing significant cost savings. We are very confident in signing this agreement because we are

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keen to grow business ties between Egypt and Ethiopia. Ethiopia has a good regulatory framework and its Government supports industry. For example, last year the Government drafted the Cement Industry Development Strategy (2015-2025) to overcome related challenges and spur faster growth in the sector. Furthermore, this agreement with Messebo Cement will provide us with a platform to expand our footprint in Ethiopia, which is one of the fastestgrowing economies on the continent. AfO: How important are waste-toenergy projects like this in areas such as Ethiopia, where biomass/ thermal projects are in their infancy? HS: This is a groundbreaking project since cement plants in Ethiopia are still using coal as their main source of thermal energy. In addition to being harmful for the environment through its emissions, the use of coal drives the costs of production up in Ethiopia since coal must be imported. Waste-to-energy technology provides


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an environmentally friendly and cost-efficient alternative solid fuel that can gradually replace coal. It is particularly useful for heavy industries such as cement manufacturing since it reduces production costs and increases the competitiveness of the sector. Biomass is a renewable, carbon neutral energy source that comes from agricultural residues that would otherwise be openly burned. This waste to thermal energy solution for heavy consuming energy industries can help authorities to reduce pollution, create green jobs and address overall dependence on fossil fuels. Moreover, waste-to-energy has the potential to address another of Africa’s pressing issues: municipal solid waste treatment and disposal. The United Nations predicts that twothirds of the world’s population will

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“ECARU has honed wasteto-energy technology and operational capability to produce high quality alternative biomass fuel from farm waste and municipal solid waste”

live in cities by 2050, with 90 percent of the growth taking place in Asia and Africa. This urban population boom has already started to pose challenges for many African countries such as Egypt and Ethiopia, especially in terms of solid waste management projects. This can have spill over effects such as disease. However, with waste-to-energy technologies, such as those Tawazon use just outside Cairo, we can turn this problem into an opportunity. We hope that the ECARU-Messebo Cement partnership can lead a paradigm shift that demonstrates the hidden energy value in both agricultural waste and municipal solid waste, and paves the way for further innovative projects that will ultimately change the energy landscape in Africa.

Biomass is a renewable, carbon neutral energy source that comes from agricultural residues that would otherwise be openly burned

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AfO: To what extent are biomass/ waste-to-energy projects gaining more attention on the continent in comparison to more traditional renewable methods such as wind and solar? HS: According to the IEA, biomass as a source of thermal energy – largely in the form of firewood – already accounts for almost half of Africa’s total primary energy supply and more than 60 percent for sub-Saharan Africa; compared to about five percent for other sources of renewable energy such as solar, wind and geothermal energy. However, waste-to-energy technology is still in its infancy and represents a very small proportion of the biomass energy created in subSaharan Africa. Yet, compared to traditional renewable methods such as wind and solar power, waste-to-energy projects have often been overlooked by international and African policymakers. This is unfortunate, for one thing, since

Agriculture is the backbone of many African economies

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“While traditional renewable energy sources are essential for solving Africa’s energy woes, we hope business leaders and policy-makers will invest more time and money in enabling more innovative alternative sources of energy”

agriculture is the backbone of many African economies and the millions of tonnes of waste produced by the industry could be transformed into a useful product. ECARU has honed waste-to-energy technology and operational capability to produce high quality alternative solid fuel (BDF) from agricultural waste, and RDF from municipal solid waste. Projects like this one help in putting the technology on the radar of policymakers in Africa. AfO: Can you talk me through how the project in Ethiopia is going to be funded from an investor perspective, but also the role that entities in the private sector such as yourself can play in funding the future of renewables on the continent more generally? HS: We believe that the private sector and entrepreneurship play critical roles in promoting this technology. This particular deal has the private sector on both sides, and it is win-win for both, with benefits for society on top.


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There is a big revolution and growing opportunities for using biomass as a raw material in the industrial sector

AfO: How do you hope the renewable trend will develop in the medium-term and how does Tawazon intend to capitalise on this trend? HS: Waste-to-energy technology makes sense for a Company like Messebo because it cuts costs and also has a positive social and environmental impact. These attractions mean that the technology has the potential to take off in Africa, especially considering the scale of agriculture and household waste. While traditional renewable energy sources are essential for solving Africa’s energy woes, we hope business leaders and policy-makers will invest more time and money in enabling more innovative alternative sources of energy. Waste-

“Waste-to-energy technology makes sense for a Company like Messebo because it cuts costs and also has a positive social and environmental impact”

The scale of the energy and environmental challenges that Africa faces means that innovative solutions cannot be left to governments alone. Private sector-led initiatives such as these are vital in solving Africa’s energy challenges. AfO: What other opportunities are surfacing for Tawazon to explore in sub-Saharan Africa in the future? HS: Tawazon/Qalaa Holdings’ international market strategy for using biomass for the industrial sector does not only focus on alternative solid fuel as a source of energy. There is a big revolution and growing opportunities

ECARU’s operation will be based in Mekelle, located 780 km from Addis Ababa and will reportedly hold a production capacity of two million tonnes of cement per annum

for using biomass as a raw material in the industrial sector; such as fibre board manufacture, building material, furniture manufacture, insulation panels and pulp and paper industries. This will help society from an economic standpoint by creating jobs for the jobless and saving foreign currency, while on the environmental side it will reduce CO2 emissions and air pollution.

to-energy initiatives are gathering momentum across the globe, which means that the technologies used are becoming cheaper and more efficient. Tawazon is a multinational Company doing business across borders. We are well positioned and confident to lead growth of wasteto-energy on the continent.

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PHOTOGRAPH: WWW.CONSTRUCTIONWEEKONLINE.COM

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is a leading business-to-business publication promoting and showcasing the leading companies across an array of sectors on the continent. Appearing in both digital and print, the publication is aimed at boardroom members and hands-on decision makers, reaching more than 165,000 business executives. Each month we feature leading companies and business executives by profiling their operations and success stories. Covering areas of best practice, capital investments, the supply chain, innovation and continuous improvement, we aim to promote all that is good about the industry and the region, with your company taking centre stage throughout it all. Producing business profiles across the full range of sectors and every corner of the continent, Africa Outlook is the platform to promote your business success.

Read on for this month’s profiles. Emily Jarvis, Deputy Editor emily.jarvis@outlookpublishing.com


If you want to enjoy the exposure and coverage we can offer, please feel free to contact us to discuss the opportunity further. Tell us your story and we’ll tell the world. Matthew Staff, Editorial Director Tel: +44 (0) 1603 959 655 matthew.staff@outlookpublishing.com


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BRINGING Lithon Project Consultants is taking a methodical yet proactive approach to new projects and opportunities, with Namibia’s mass housing initiative at the forefront of its attentions in 2016 Writer: Matthew Staff Project Manager: James Mitchell

Husab Mine access road during construction

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Frikkie Holtzhausen, MD

attentions towards the next five years of growth in line with the philosophies that helped incept the business to begin with. The proudly Namibian Company has long been one of the major industry players across project management, multidisciplinary engineering, and mining services across both SADC nations, and much of late-2015 was spent further honing this offering via extensive recruitment drives and sector expansions. Lithon’s Managing Director (MD), Frikkie Holtzhausen recalls: “One of the more important success stories is that we have managed to recruit well-qualified and experienced staff in specific divisions, which up to now has been a great challenge due to the scarcity of such people locally in Namibia. “This allowed us to formalise and expand our transportation division through appointing some of the critical staff needed for that sector.” Immediate fruits of the Company’s labours were seen in the attainment of major transportation contracts across both road and railway domains, leading into what is shaping up to be a pivotal year of transformation. “We commenced 2016 with a strategic planning session; reconfirming our focus for the next five

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Please contact us if you would like to discuss particular projects with us and let us help you create what you envision for your company

Uundenge Investments CC 3 Weber Street Windhoek West, Namibia

Tel: +264 61 308 282 Fax: +264 61 307 218 Email: uundengeinvestments@yahoo.com


General Building Construction

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years, the core of our business and commitment by us as shareholders towards Lithon, and towards each other as owners,” Holtzhausen says. “This was very constructive and a necessary step as we need to be aligned in mind and soul towards what we do. The strategic plan is to be completed by the end of April, 2016, approved and implemented immediately afterwards.” A further re-confirmation of the Company’s vision and commitment among senior management was also achieved as a result of the plan’s formation, laying the foundations for what Holtzhausen believes will be a proactive period of continuous market improvement to come. “Our current market share has been properly defined as part of the process as well as the risks associated with the same, in order to gear ourselves accordingly,” he explains. “New disciplines or services we need to be

Completed Husab Mine access road

We have competed for and were fortunately successful in obtaining major projects in the transportation sector, both roads and railways

Lithon Project Consultants, Windhoek head office

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able to provide in-house will meet the changing environment and needs of our clients and we are actively putting the necessary resources in place for that.”

Major projects

A strengthening of Lithon’s South African office is compounding such an ethos as the Company prepares not only for an assault on the industry, but also for any challenges that attempt to bite back at the business too. Inevitably, careful timing and execution of works in South Africa are essential given the market challenges surrounding Lithon’s key industries in the country, but this certainly isn’t to say that the Company is struggling from a project perspective in general. “We have competed for and were fortunately successful in obtaining major projects in the transportation sector, both roads and railways,” Holtzhausen notes. “In order to provide the services required, we


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established excellent and close relationships with specialist companies that provide the ancillary services apart from the normal engineering services required for such projects. This is excellent exposure for our staff and a skills transfer is taking place. “We are also providing specialist in-house services for the compilation of Master Development Plans and Integrated Spatial Development Framework investigations which includes inundation studies for local authorities. This is specifically important for the northern areas of Namibia, where development is restricted due to annual flooding of large areas.” The provision of flood line studies and consequential analysis further compounds works in this area and has become a pre-requisite for local authorities in terms of town development; while also paving the way for the business to develop

Completed river pumpstation at the Ndonga Linena irrigation scheme

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Cosmo Construction & Civils cc.

We’re building on the Rock C ont ac t u s Email: cosmo@iway.na Malani@cosmo.com.na Tel: +264 64 221260 Fax: +264 64 221914

in-house competencies in executing infrastructure auditing and assessment studies for NGOs and utility companies alike. “This is a new field and a new market that we foresee will become more of a requirement as many institutions lose the in-house capacity to perform this themselves,” the MD details. Another market that Lithon has capitalised on in more recent times is the aforementioned transportation sector, having become a major role player as such; but also within the residential domain, aligning itself with the Government’s commitment to provide mass housing to the people of Namibia. Holtzhausen continues: “This goes hand-in-hand with the provision of serviced land. Everybody in the consulting engineering Industry should assist our President, His Excellency, Dr Geingob to pursue his vision in

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this regard by becoming involved and to support his endeavours also by advising those tasked with the implementation of his plan.�

Qualifications, skills and experience

IMAGE: KERRY MCNAMARA ARCHITECTS INC

IMAGE: KERRY MCNAMARA ARCHITECTS INC

As a proudly Namibian enterprise, Lithon has always sought to enrich the lives of those around it by aiding with such policies, and is now in a better position than ever to do so having put in place the new disciplines and services associated with its recent strategic plan. This exists as part of an even wider ongoing strategy revolving around internal developments and the kinds of capital investments that are required to keep up with the Company’s own external, project-related growth. This largely incorporates the continuous upgrading and improvement of both administrative systems and internal technologies, as well as a constant monitoring of the wider facilities themselves to adopt such modern practices. Ultimately though, the success of the business from an operational point of view rests on the competency of its staff who drive Lithon forward on a daily basis.

Completed Oshakati open market

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Completed Oshakati open market


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Lithon Windhoek team wearing pink in support of Breast Cancer Awareness Day, 2015

“We believe in getting the right people on the bus and for that reason we aggressively search for the right people with the right qualifications, skills and experience,” Holtzhausen emphasises. “We have thus been fortunate in recruiting critically scarce staff for specific positions. We further identify appropriate and properly accredited training courses for our staff in order to better equip them for the roles they have to perform. “In order to retain staff, our remuneration strategy is based on paying market-related salaries and, where necessary in critical areas, we are prepared to pay a premium in order to achieve the same. “We also recently created an employee trust with the aim of giving ownership to identified staff on a selective basis, whereby they obtain shareholding and we thus ensure that the young team members become part of the ownership of the Company; thereby ensuring the future of Lithon.”

Hope to people and communities

That aforementioned future certainly looks bright, but in what can be a volatile industrial terrain, it has always been essential for Lithon to surround itself with equally competent and

Silo at Mashare irrigation scheme

forward-thinking partners, creating mutually beneficial synergies across the board to aid not only with the physical operations, but the behindthe-scenes facets that safeguard the Company’s sustainable longevity. “We have established excellent and close relationships with companies that provide specialist ancillary services across our supply chain, which provides us with a wider spectrum of services to provide our clients, in order to really be a one-stop service provider,” Holtzhausen says. “We are also in discussion with educational institutions to improve the quality and standard of young engineers produced by such institutions in Namibia. “We will become actively involved in assisting such institutions in developing curricula and training

programmes, and to ensure that young freshly qualified engineers are provided with the necessary practical exposure in order to professionally register.” A further agreement with one of the larger NGOs to accommodate some of their young engineers and give them practical experience under the guidance of a professionally registered engineering firm similarly emphasises the responsibility that Lithon places on itself in Namibia’s industrial sector; and is also complemented by corporate social responsibility efforts outside of its core works via its non-profit Lithon Foundation, which aims to “glorify God by bringing his love and hope to people and communities”. As Lithon now looks towards implementing its new strategies in 2016, it can also be safe in the knowledge that there are lucrative sectors to apply its one-stop offering and socially enriching solutions within, and Holtzhausen is as confident as ever that this can be applied in both Namibia and South Africa. “The provision of mass housing to the people of Namibia is one key area,” he concludes. “We are in regular contact with senior Government officials and we assist them with advice in terms of effective implementation. “We are also providing consulting services at reduced rates in order to ensure the success of the same. We are however not the only Company that assists the Government in this manner and it is encouraging to see that so many companies realise the importance of this project and are prepared to make a contribution towards it. “Having a fully-fledged and multidisciplinary office in South Africa that serves the rest of Africa is our final mission for the coming years. We, however, are following a responsible approach in this regard and believe in taking each step when the time is right for it.”

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Leaving a

Legacy Having traded for just six months, Motheo Group’s new subsidiary, Motheo Infrastructure Contractors, is already showing huge potential as a welcome complement to its existing construction offering Writer: Emily Jarvis • Project Manager: Arron Rampling

Rental accomodation in Mrikana, Rustenburg

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nown in South Africa for its focus on empowerment, gender equality and quality construction, Motheo Construction Group continues to be driven by the significant national need to fulfil basic housing requirements, while remaining an agile, sustainable and adaptable market player. With almost two decades of experience working in the affordable housing sector, Motheo is often the first selection to win Government contracts as a solid choice capable of meeting construction timelines with the help of local subcontractors throughout the various stages of any given project. “Today, we have more than 80,000 houses in our portfolio; with a total order book in excess of R5.5 billion. Each project sees us go above and beyond Government requirements for use of local subcontractors, initiating skills transfer with local businesses,” says Tim Potter, part-Owner and Director of Motheo Construction Group.

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Finetown, Ennerdale, Gauteng

The recent shift in Government funding towards South Africa’s infrastructure development - particularly in the transport, communication, road and energy sectors – has seen Motheo bolster this already extensive reputation for Government housing projects with activities in the private sector in order to remain competitive in an increasingly saturated market.

Last year, Motheo Infrastructure Contractors was borne from blue-sky thinking with the aim of generating additional revenue for its shareholders. “Six months into operation and I am pleased to say that we have a significant number of potential orders on the table that could change the face of our business,” says Potter. “Led by likeminded entrepreneur and experienced businessman, Archie Rutherford, the Company is generating a totally new stream of income that has ticked the private sector box so to speak.” From this diversification into civil engineering, Motheo is expecting an extra R50 million worth of work in the pipeline by June with the long-term goal to double the size of the business within three years; countering the current slowdown felt in the affordable housing sector.

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Group CEO, Dr Thandi Ndlovu, receiving an award for Business Woman of the Year

Today, we have more than 80,000 houses in our portfolio; with a total order book in excess of R5.5 billion

G R O U P

“Working in the private sector has many advantages; including the growing amount of working capital, timely payment for work and a streamlined process from start to finish in most cases. Given that Government spending patterns have had a knockon effect that has limited affordable housing projects, public funding is now being given to a number of priority infrastructure projects, and we want to be a big part of this,” he explains. As the Government is South Africa’s biggest client, Motheo see this market shift as an opportunity to grow staff numbers once again and capitalise on the infrastructural needs of municipalities, provincial and national Government. “The Government remains keen to spend with us based on decades of experience and a proven track-record for projects all over South Africa, bar the Western Cape. A good example of one of our most recent ventures was the R254 million Reeston Project for the Buffalo City Municipality, providing more than 4,000 South Africans with their own home,” explains Potter. Supporting this notion, Motheo was accredited as a social housing institution (SHI) in 2015 which, combined with recent managerial changes at the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA), promises to streamline the housing grant process and create increased opportunities on a more continual basis for the Company. “We are in a good position overall,” says Potter. “Furthermore, for every project we complete, we leverage the support of local SMEs. By disseminating opportunities to others in the market around us, we can empower and engage more people; this is what Motheo is proud to be known for.”

Empowerment

Motheo’s strong position as a level 2 B-BBEE Company serves to further

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Installation of line shops at Sandton Station, working in partn


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FEM was founded in 1936 for the express purpose of providing workers’ compensation insurance cover for the building and construction industry. FEM provides the following services: • Mandatory compensation insurance terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act (COIDA) • COIDA provides cover for employees who are injured or contract an industrial disease or are killed in the course of their employment • Administration of COIDA benefits • Guidance and advice on preventing injuries in the workplace • Promotion of Health and Safety initiatives in the Construction Industry

Pioneering the cause to help reduce road accidents and save lives. To find out more please visit www.fema.co.za or call 011 359 4300

SK Building & Painting Contractor

*High pressure cleaning & painting of roofs *Renovations *Painting: interior & exterior *Epoxy to floors We are a select team of professional builders and painting contractors with a wealth of experience in the building trade. We carry out a full range of services from large painting projects to renovations with reputable clients.

Bhai: +27 71 4746515 Aakram: +27 61 0717151 Office: +27 31 5059558

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solidify this centralised notion of empowerment, with the Group’s Chief Executive known locally for her devotion to a better standard of healthcare and living conditions for South Africans. “The Group CEO, Dr Thandi Ndlovu, is still very much involved in the day-to-day running of the business, particularly when it comes to community projects and breeding a Company culture of gender equality,” says Potter. Amongst its activities to engage with training those of all ages, Motheo is regularly engaged in internships in line with the wider industry trend to increase the number of young people interested in a career in the construction sector. “This is in addition to the comprehensive training conducted by external practitioners that we organise on a regular basis,” he adds.

L-R: Tim Potter, part-Owner and Director, Dr Thandi Ndlovu, CEO and Co-Founder, Farai Sika, Group Finance Manager and Chris Cudmore, Co-Founder

New residences and ARV added to existing Rietvlei Hospital

The development and construction of the Constitution Hill Women’s Memorial at a project cost of R350,000

The Reeston project in Buffalo City Municipality provided more than 4,000 South Africans with their own home

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Motheo’s Second Creek won the Best Informal Settlement Upg

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Since humble beginnings as one woman’s ambition to empower South African people through the provision of better living conditions – providing ordinary people with a means to escape poverty – Motheo Construction Group is now looking at ways to pass the reins onto a new, younger management team who will embody that same Company culture. “The business has come a long way since its initial aims and goals. Now, as the Company’s directors begin to reach ‘the afternoon of their careers’, they must engage in passing on their skills to the younger generation. We must not lose the Motheo identity in the process,” Potter emphasises. He concludes: “Our core business going forward will remain the same and continue to answer the significant national need for affordable housing. However, our diversification into civil engineering through Motheo Infrastructure Contractors is already showing huge potential and highlights the promise that the private sector holds for us.”

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Water for All: Delivering the Promise Delighted customers, a delighted workforce and social empowerment are all key in NWSC’s pursuance of being the leading customercentred water utility in the world Writer: Matthew Staff • Project Manager: Tom Cullum ational Water and Sewerage Corporation (NWSC) has been Uganda’s source of sustainable water provision and delivery since 1972 and is now in the middle of a five-year strategy which will see the Company strive towards its goal of bringing “Water for All”. Doing so for the benefit of “delighted customers” via a “delighted workforce”, the 100 percent Government-owned public utility is mandated to provide both water and sewerage services in urban centres and towns around the country, but beyond this initial remit, the Company has gone to great lengths to ensuring such a provision displays the kind of innovation and sustainability previously unseen in Uganda. Now operating across 157 urban centres and catering for an

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approximate population of seven million people, such phenomenal growth epitomises this proactive, enriching ethos. “Only two years ago, the Corporation operated in only 24 towns,” NWSC’s Managing Director (MD), Dr. Eng Silver Mugisha highlights. “In line with its Five-Year Strategic Direction, 2013-2018, NWSC has continued to formulate and implement innovative programmes aimed at achieving the goal of sustainable service delivery. “The Corporation is continuously extending its service footprint to more areas across the country in line with The National Development Plan, Vision 2040 and the manifesto of the ruling NRM Government of ensuring 100 percent service coverage.” The Corporation’s desire to increase service coverage across the country has been distilled into its Water for All programme that is being implemented across NWSC-operational areas. Mugisha continues: “Water for All is a pragmatic, innovative and transformational programme designed by management to address the above challenges in a holistic and systematic manner, in order to improve service delivery and create efficiency gains for customers. Our focus is 100 percent service coverage by 2018.” Complementing this is the implementation of performance improvement programmes aimed at

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SUMADHURA TECHNOLOGIES LIMITED

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elping to develop local capacity through a tailored service and equipment maintenance offering, Sumadhura has invested more than US$25 million into Uganda’s water sector since establishment in 1999; and is now considered to be among both the top 50 brands and top 100 companies in the country today. Since 2000, the Company’s portfolio has expanded from both production and geographic standpoints thanks in-part to securing major clients such as The Ministry of Water and Environment, NWSC, UNDP and UNICEF.

NWSC has installed similar public stand posts across the country as a means of ensuring services reach the urban poor

increasing the Corporation’s customer base, especially in virgin areas; a strategy which has proved especially fruitful during the recent dramatic expansion of operations. “Between 2014 and 2016, our customer base increased from 366,330 to 415,838 subscribers, a growth of more than 14 percent,” Mugisha says. In the past two years, the growth in the number of subscribers has shifted from an average of 22,000 to more than 30,000 connections annually. “Plans are underway to carry out a baseline survey in all our operational areas to establish the actual water

service coverage, currently estimated at 78 percent.”

At the forefront of service delivery

Such growth, and the existence of the Corporation itself, is cognisant of the growing demand for water and sewerage services, mainly emanating from the growing number of towns. As a consequence, the need to invest back into infrastructural development is of paramount importance and, as such, NWSC has this year launched the second phase of its Infrastructure Service Delivery Plan (ISDP) with the aim of increasing water

Between 2014 and 2016, our customer base increased from 366,330 to 415,838 subscribers, a growth of more than 14 percent

The Company now has additional operations across the DRC, Burundi, South Sudan and Zambia.

www.sumadhuratechnologies.com

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unaco Group of Companies has been in operation since 1992. Our headquarters are based in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and we have offices throughout the East African community. Over the years, we have developed a network of first-class manufacturers worldwide who provide quality products that suits the needs of our clients. We pride ourselves on being able to offer sustainable and affordable solutions to water providers across the region. Our aim is to offer high-level professional services and strive to provide our clients with innovative products and solutions that will ensure their needs are satisfied.

www.junacogroup.com

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◉◉◉◉SERVICES◉◉◉◉ TECHNOLOGIES

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◉ Geophysical investigation drilling of hand pumps, production and geo thermal wells. (Supply and installation of custom designs). ◉ Electric, solar, wind powered water pumps, roof top solutions, energy saving LEDs’ along with generators and grid power to provide hybrid solutions. ◉ Supply, installation and service of engineering equipment, trucks, tractors, earth moving equipment from across the globe. ◉ Construction of urban and rural water supply systems, group housing projects, technical schools and health centers etc

Sumadhura Technologies Limited Plot No. 83 Chorey Crescent Port Bell, Luzira, Kampala, Uganda E: response@sumadhura.co.ug www.sumadhuratechnologies.com

www.junacogroup.com

Junaco Group of Companies provide a comprehensive range of products and services relating to water treatment, purification, supply and distribution business.

◉ Over the years Sumadhura has earned a special recognition for its top notch after sales service.

TA N Z A N I A Junaco (T) Ltd, Head office 10th Floor, IPS Building, Samora/ Azikiwe Street, P.O.Box 77756 Dar es salaam, Tanzania. Phone: +255 222 137 772 Mobile: +255 655 008 170 +255 655 008 077/ +255 655 008 161 Email: info@junacogroup.com

UGANDA Junaco U Ltd Industrial area, 7th street, Oxford building, suite 5 P. O. Box 36503, Kampala, Uganda Mobile: +256 700 197 415 Email: judith@junacogroup.com

K E N YA Junaco Trading Kenya Ltd P.o box 21193_00505, The Greenhouse, ngong road, Nairobi 2nd floor suite 5 Phone: +254 721 243 561 Email: ketta@junacogroup.com

We particularly deal with water treatment chemicals, waste water treatment, water meters, valves, pipes, water pumps, fittings and composite manhole covers.

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supply, reliability and access through a series of mains extensions. Mugisha details: “Last financial year, 1,448 kilometres of water mains and 38 kilometres of sewer mains were extended in the various parts of our operational areas. “The growth in new water mains more than tripled from the 470 kilometres laid in 2013-2014 and this is a tremendous improvement compared to previous years when the Corporation used to extend an average of 80 kilometres of water mains per annum.” The ultimate aim of the ISDP is to subsidise customer connections by extending the pipe network closer to customers’ premises, thus reducing connection costs. Complementing this though, the Corporation has also taken bold measure to problem solve ahead of time - especially when it comes to intermittent water supply in newly operated-in towns - by implementing initial quick-win measures in the

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upstream to enhance both production and reliability of water supply. “The implementation of ISDP and WSSP programmes has successfully improved water supply reliability and accessibility. Areas previously devoid of services now have piped water services, while a number of dry zones (areas with inadequate supply) have been converted into wet zones with more regular water supply regimes,” Mugisha says. To drive such vital and timely initiatives, the Corporation naturally relies heavily on the refinement of its internal structure and, most importantly, its employees responsible for providing unparalleled levels of customer service. “Whether you are big or small, you cannot give good customer service if your employees don’t feel good about coming to work,” Mugisha quotes Martin Oliver. “The Corporation lays emphasis on capacity enhancement of its staff and recognises that they are

( N W S C )

NWSC is is extending the pipe network by more than 1,000km every year

at the forefront of effective service delivery. “Staff motivation and empowerment are key in pursuance of our vision of being the leading customer-centred water utility in the world. We therefore ensure that our staff have the right tools and means to effectively deliver services.”

Servant leadership

Promoting environmental conservation

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To this end, during the 2014-15 financial year, NWSC management implemented a new structure aimed at realigning business processes to the skills and expertise available within the organisation, culminating in the creation of three new deputy Managing Directors as well as three new supervisors in different regions. As per the Corporation’s project evolutions, the new impetus is driven by NWSC’s Five Year Strategic Direction, 2013-2018, and the overall goal to transform Uganda from


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a “peasantry to a modern and prosperous economy as enshrined in the National Development Plan (NDPII) and Vision 2040”. Mugisha notes: “Its implementation has indeed revived our commitment to continuous improvement in service delivery to our customers. The five thematic areas of the Strategic Direction include: financial sustainability, infrastructure growth, increased coverage, learning and innovation, and customer delight and meeting stakeholder aspirations. “A multiplicity of undertakings aligned to the above focus areas is being implemented through well thought out performance improvement programmes and annual action plans at various levels.” These hone in on areas of investment across infrastructure and subsidies to the urban poor, as well as uplifting the profile of water and sewerage services and enhancing

NWSC is promoting water and sanitation practises among school children

NWSC engages in corporate social responsibility initiatives

collaborations with stakeholders to make this a more viable and manageable mission. Mugisha adds: “The NWSC, like most water utilities in developing countries, is faced with a number of challenges that include, among others, rapid urban population growth causing demand to outstrip supply. This results in low service coverage - especially in informal settlement and water shortages - high levels of non-revenue water, and deteriorating raw water quality. “All these challenges are intertwined and affect NWSC’s competitiveness to serve its customers.” Once again, this is where NWSC’s Water for All programme comes into its own as a pragmatic and forwardthinking rebuttal to such difficulties, further compounded by an overall philosophy of servant leadership. “As an organisation, we have embraced a strong sense of servant leadership and our primary focus is on an increased number of people receiving better services,” Mugisha concludes. “We at the NWSC are confident that in the next three-five years, we will have reached our target of 100 percent service coverage in all our areas of operation. “Our current investment in infrastructure expansion; uplifting the profile and delivery of water and sewerage services; provision of subsidised services to the urban poor; and enhanced collaboration with various stakeholders will give us tangible benefits in reliable, sustainable and efficient service delivery gains. “These gains will be best demonstrated by increased geographical coverage, water supply reliability, efficient operations, a strong and sustainable financial position, and increased participation in catchment protection; moving considerably closer to our mantra of Water for All for Delighted Customers by a Delighted Workforce.”

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Solutions As a worldwide leader in electricity meter solutions, Conlog is rightfully taking the opportunity to celebrate its achievements which now date back an impressive 50 years Writer: Matthew Staff • Project Manager: Tom Cullum

onlog is celebrating its 50 year anniversary in style as the South African pre-payment electricity meter Company looks to build upon an already worldwide influence that sees more than 70 utilities reaping the financial benefits of its revenue management solutions. Each day, as many as 3,000 households thrive as a result of the implementation of Conlog’s numerous devices, giving the Company the world’s largest installed base of more than eight million STS prepaid meters; as well as claiming the accolade of the broadest product offering comprising meters, vending, revenue

management, maintenance, consulting, training and support. Building such a presence might be expected of a business that’s been in operation for more than five decades, but as any Company would testify, to maintain such sustainable success over such a long period of time is

no mean feat, and the now Schneider Electric-owned entity has celebrated the achievement accordingly. “Since the inception of the South African prepayment industry in the late 1980s, Conlog has been at the forefront of innovative solutions that meet the needs of utilities across the world. In fact, the majority of our revenue comes from outside South Africa’s borders,” Dudley Miller, Conlog General Manager, told BizNis Africa in April. “This comprehensive and holistic approach enables customers to reap the full benefit of their investment and ensures sustained success into the future.”

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At the forefront of innovative utility solutions

Established in 1965 initially as an electronics design Company, the evolution that has taken place since epitomises how successful Conlog has been, not only in adapting its range of products and services, but purely by virtue of the volume and geography that the business now caters for. “With systems that are available in English, Arabic, French, Spanish and Portuguese, our products have been able to reach millions,” Miller added during the interview. “Conlog engineers are well equipped with the knowledge and experience required to develop products that constantly outperform the rest.”

Evolving and adapting its range of products and services

Over and above the call of duty

Since day one, Conlog has built a name for itself in continuously providing innovative solutions to everyday challenges, the electric utilities market becoming a natural focus in trying to positively influence as many households as possible with such an ethos. “Our pioneering spirit has enabled us to retain our position of leadership in the industry and has helped us stay relevant to the market,” Conlog’s website affirms to that end. “We are passionate about solving challenges with innovative technological solutions and... now have the world’s largest base of prepaid solutions. “We have been specialising in

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prepaid solutions for more than 20 years. Our footprint spans across four continents and 20 countries. Over 70 utilities use Conlog metering solutions, and we have thousands of vending units installed around the world, with over 400 revenue management systems internationally and locally.” Essentially, by partnering with Conlog, clients are partnering with the world’s best, with a support team and staff base trained to meet such a title.

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At present, these skills are being applied internally via a focus on supply chain investments, software developments and revenue management, but the importance of all internal refinements are seen in the end range of products and services unleashed around the world. Spanning meters, solutions and services, and software; the former ranges from single phase meters to three-phase meters and even wireless solutions. “Our meters are particularly favourable for those who seek to manage their energy consumption and create new strategies to use energy more efficiently,” the Company explains. Regarding solutions and services, the Company adds: “We at Conlog believe in going over and above our typical call of duty, providing you with expert advice and recommendations on which metering solutions to go for. “We are passionate about delivering


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innovative technology solutions to our clientele in order to promote smart and efficient energy consumption and conservation.”

Holistic solutions

The third facet, software, comprises revenue management software, vending middleware, meter management, and head end systems, and perhaps best demonstrates the Company’s premier differentiator in the form of its technological innovation. “These [systems] enable you to manage your vending architecture effectively and efficiently,” Conlog notes. “Our technical team is always at hand to help with any post-installation queries that you may have.” As a metering solutions provider not only to utilities, but also to municipalities and property management companies across Africa, South America and the Middle East, the business also has a strong focus on big data analytics and smart city solutions to broaden its potential reach even further, and it is this scope that backs up the claim of being a worldwide leader. Winning awards on an almost yearly basis further supports the title, often recognised as a trailblazer for a series of industry firsts including the development of the standard for the secure transfer of credit, the design of the industry’s standard wall-base for electricity meters, and the development of the common vending system, among many others. All of which fits into Conlog’s vision of enabling its customers to manage their energy to be more effective and efficient, to ultimately improve the quality of life for all. The Company adds: “We are a metering Company offering holistic solutions to utilities to improve efficiencies in energy management, through quality products and services, by conducting ourselves in an open, transparent and ethical manner.”

An engineering team equipped with knowledge and experience

Swan Electrical Distributors Pty (Ltd) is an equal opportunity electrical distributor which supplies quality products and services to the electrical industry.

www.swan-electrical.co.za Phone: +27 11 314 0202 Fax: +27 11 314 2782 Email: sales@swan-electrical.co.za

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BRINGING FIRST- CLASS

STANDARDS to Zimbabwe

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Having invested in branding and marketing activities in line with industry trends, Lobels is now preparing for the next stage of its capex strategy which will serve to increase export market opportunities and production capacities Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Josh Hyland

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obels Biscuits & Sweets’ prosperous and dynamic history has been a direct result of continuous improvement and monitoring of the latest industry trends in order to shape the future direction of the brand. With more than six decades of manufacturing expertise and an unrivalled local knowledge of Zimbabwean produce, the Company has recently turned its attention to creating engaging and dynamic marketing campaigns to increase customer interaction; taking note of customer feedback and using this

information to develop the Lobels brand. “As a result of new appointments in our marketing division, together with linkages to a very talented advertising house, we feel more connected to our customers and can be more responsive to customer feedback which is a crucial determiner for brand success,” explains David Lecluse, Marketing Manager for Lobels Biscuits & Sweets. Synonymous with quality, taste and the wide range of products available on wholesaler and supermarket

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shelves for generations, Lobels is one of the country’s largest and oldest food producers. Since identifying a gap in the market for biscuit manufacturing approximately 50 years ago, to complement its already booming bread manufacturing business, the Company ceased bread production at the turn of the century to focus on developing the confectionery arm of the business. Supported by passionate branding, and a value-for-money product made from the finest ingredients, Lobels Biscuits & Sweets has now turned its attention to consolidating ahead of a 2017 capital expenditure (capex) plan to expand in existing export markets, as well as penetrate new ones.

European standards

Lobels has not only been taking note of confectionery trends in sub-Saharan Africa, but the Company has identified synergies with other international markets outside of the continent

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where Lecluse says the Lobels brand can “compete with its superior, consistent and competitively-priced quality product range”. “Provided we have the ability to transport efficiently at a reasonable cost then we can look at further export opportunities that will benefit the Company. Of course, we have to make sure that our product is right for the market in question: moving to healthier ingredients and creating specific products for these markets are just two considerations,” he highlights. “Our new wire-cut cookie range aimed at the growing middle-class in Southern Africa is an example of our diversification success.” From its head office, manufacturing unit and main distribution depot located in Bulawayo, Lobels currently exports to Zambia, South Africa, Botswana, Angola and the UK, with local distribution handled by the Company’s own fleet. Having identified

CODCHEM PVT LTD

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odchem Pvt Ltd, incorporated in 1989, is a leading manufacturer and distributor of food flavours, colours and preservatives, used in a variety of industries including the pharmaceutical industry. Our products are also used in beverages, bakery products and as flavouring for dairy produce. Throughout Zimbabwe, Codchem is the sole manufacturer of food flavours and colours, and our business objective is to fill the gaps created in the food and beverage industry in the country. Address Head Office Bay 1, Cavan Ind Park, 144 Mutare rd, Msasa, Harare T +263-4-480260 | +263 487711-2 E sales@codchem.co.zw

www.codchem.co.zw

Lobels has benefited hugely from its appointment of Shift Engage, a talented advertising agency responsible for the Company’s new branding and marketing campaigns

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Leading Manufacturers and Distributors of Food Chemicals We

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the nation!

PHARMACEUTICALS

BEVERAGES SUGAR CONFECTIONARY

DESSERTS DAIRY FLAVOURINGS

BAKERY & GENERAL USE www.codchem.co.zw tel: +263 4 487711/2 +263 4 480260     Head Office Bay 1, Cavan Ind Park, 144 Mutare rd, Msasa, Harare

Manufacturers of food flavours and colours

The experts in moving your trophies and freight from/to Zimbabwe to/from any destination in the world.

A superior, consistent and competitively-priced quality product range

P O BOX 706, BULAWAYO, ZIMBABWE TEL: +263 9 474154/5/6/7 FAX: +263 9 474151 www.zimbabwe-freight-consultants.com

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The only thing holding us back from reaching these new export markets is our production capacities, and we are continually re-valuating this in order to carry on growing

The use of highly skilled, experienced bakery consultants from Europe has had a positive impact on sales

Malawi, Madagascar, Mozambique and Mauritius as welcome additions to this export market portfolio as part of the capex plan, Lecluse is confident that this can be achieved once capacities at the factory are enhanced. He notes: “The only thing holding us back from reaching these new export markets is our production capacities, and we are continually re-evaluating this in order to carry on growing. We have undergone a significant plant capital expansion already in 2014, with another planned expansion next year to further improve product quality and our efficiencies which will allow us to continue on our growth path. “Furthermore, investment in our distribution fleet, ancillary equipment and other essentials is ongoing.” By leveraging the latest European standards, technologies and machinery – including the installation of new ovens, creamers and wrappers from Europe – Lobels has ensured that when it comes to biscuits and sweets,

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the brand stands head and shoulders above the competition and catches the customer’s eye. “Customer feedback from these activities is invaluable as it tells us that we are doing things right,” he says. “The use of highly skilled, experienced bakery consultants from Europe, combined with a raw and wrapping material supplier base, who have access to latest advances in technology and international baking trends, has set us apart from local competition and made a positive impact on sales in our export markets as well as locally,” he adds.

Openness and honesty

As a customer-centric Company, Lobels places emphasis on attention to detail when dealing with clients; ensuring that constant communication is filtered throughout all levels of the organisation. With an almost entirely Zimbabwean team, the Company is driven to making sure that its workforce meets the stringent


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training requirements that match European standards. “Zimbabwean people are naturally resilient and resourceful, hardworking and a pleasure to work with. There is an inherent community spirit in the workplace which, ultimately, results in the achievement of our goals. Our employees undergo continual training through the use of consultants and seminars - both on-site and external - and we make sure to encourage diligence and creativity which results in a solid work ethic and first-class standards,” affirms Lecluse. Building long-term business partnerships based on honesty and openness is another aspect of the business that Lobels is proud of; particularly locally, where the Company has recently focused on strengthening its ties to help the local economy grow in the current challenging climate.

Utilising the naturally resilient and hardworking local Zimbabwean workforce to reach its goals

Adopting international manufacturing standards to grow in a challenging economic environment

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“Achieving the maximum potential out of our mutual partnerships will see us retain these relationships – both locally and internationally - for the long-term, and will help spread the Lobels name and bolster our reputation in Africa,” he says. “Furthermore, to further engrain ourselves locally, we participate in corporate social responsibility activities. Adopting the naturally community-spirited philosophies of Zimbabwe, we continually give back to the underprivileged. It is a real pleasure assisting those who need it most and importantly the customers that support us know that we are involved in such activities,” Lecluse further details.


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Following a capex plan for success

Lobels is proud of its brand and business direction

Achieving the maximum potential out of our mutual partnerships will see us retain these relationships...

“The installation and launch of our fifth automatic biscuit oven, in conjunction with several new lines will create the spare capacity needed to enable us to actively pursue export prospects in the immediate geographies. In addition, consideration is being given to the development of a manufacturing unit north of the equator to ensure we can penetrate a larger proportion of Africa,” he comments. Lecluse concludes: “Our marketing Continued expansion emphasis and brand strategy With next year’s capex plan promising will further support our internal to increase capacities and open new investments and show the customer export opportunities, Lecluse is just how proud we are of the Lobels confident that the long-term growth of brand name and where we are headed the Lobels name is secure. in the future.”

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Stronger Bones Smarter Minds earl Dairy is contributing to a healthier and stronger Uganda as it leverages huge amounts of scientific expertise and innovation to expand the distribution of its infamous LATO Milk branded products across the country and wider region. Established with the aim of applying the best in science and sector expertise to its milk products, the Company’s goal is to provide families with an enhanced nutritional option across its range, optimising a series of technologies and facilities able to process as much as 500,000 litres a day. “Pearl Dairy Farms Ltd. (PDFL) is the Dairy arm of the MiDCOM Group of Companies. With a manufacturing unit based in the Mbarara District of Uganda in East Africa, the intent of

Pearl Dairy is expanding beyond its Ugandan stronghold to edge closer to its wider aspirations of becoming the best dairy product manufacturer in the world

the setup was to help the local Writer: Matthew Staff dairy farmers by generating a constant demand for milk in Project Manager: Sammy Wilkinson the region and educate them to adapt to cleaner and more hygienic to become the market leader across milk production techniques, and to the provision of each of its products, contribute towards the growth of the in each region of operation. With a dairy industry as a whole,” the Company factory area spanning more than 15 explains. “With the use of latest milk acres, and a LATO Milk brand with processing equipment and ultrahousehold familiarity in Uganda and modern technology, we strive to serve beyond, Pearl Dairy is one of the the society with various milk products leading lights as part of this proud such as milk powder, ghee and butter heritage. oil, all sold under the brand name - LATO. “The team behind the brand is Uncompromising quality constantly striving to provide the Incorporated within the Company’s consumer with an alternative to extensive portfolio is a series of expensive western brands.” market-leading dairy products; all of Evolving and developing in line which initially introduced to fill an with the latest industry trends since evident gap in the market, but later its inception in 1937, there was an and continuously honed in order immediate vision of the wider Group to meet consumer demands across

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areas of food safety, nutrition and choice diversification. The one consistent facet across all products, however, is the levels of science and sophistication that goes into the production process. For whole milk powder, for instance, it “is obtained by the process of twostep dehydration of full-cream liquid milk”, the Company explains. “The first step is condensing the liquid milk and then drying it in a spray drying tower. It consists of mechanical spraying of condensed milk in a special tower where, in contact with hot air, dehydration of falling drops of milk takes place. Readymade powder is subject to cooling.” This process alone results in the production of milk chocolate, ice cream, sauces, yogurts, cheeses and baking products and is replicated via equally refined processes during the manufacture of skimmed milk powder, instant full cream milk powder, butter oils and ghee.

Whole milk powder is obtained by a two-step dehydration process from full-cream liquid milk

Our vision is to become the trusted market leader in innovative and world-class dairy products across Africa and the Middle East

Across all, one of the key trends being monitored and implemented in recent years has surrounded areas of quality control and food safety, which Pearl Dairy has subsequently been synonymous with mastering. “PDFL processes milk and provides milk products of uncompromising quality. We strive to demonstrate due diligence during the production and distribution of quality milk and milk products,” the Company expresses on its website.

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[This includes] “complying with all applicable national legislations and regulations; maintaining a quality and food safety management system across the entire production process; preventing pollution to the environment by minimising generation of waste; providing quality products while enhancing environmental awareness, employee and product safety; and the continual improvement of the integrated management system”.


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Strong foundation

Ultimately, Pearl Dairy aims to continue a legacy put forward upon its inception to combine state-of-the-art manufacturing technologies and aggressive strategic marketing in order to find perfection and persistent quality products; all at competitive prices for the benefit of the Company’s customers and stakeholders, alike. “Our vision is to become the trusted market leader in innovative and world-class dairy products across Africa and the Middle East,” the business adds. And here lies another pivotal facet of Pearl Dairy’s continuous improvement ethos, revolving around its international footprint. While already present in Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya, Rwanda has become the latest domain in which LATO Milk is looking to make an impact. “On the heels of its successful retail launch in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania, LATO Milk was introduced in Rwanda in April,” a Company press release stated. “The instant full cream milk powder which

We are proud to be associated with

Tax

Global Expertise • Local Knowledge Kenya | Uganda | Tanzania | Rwanda | Burundi | Zambia | Somaliland/Somalia PKF Firms in Eastern Africa are member firms of the PKF International Limited network of legally independent firms and do not accept responsibility or liability for the actions or inactions on the part of any other individual member firm or firms.

www.pkfea.com

Combining state-of-the-art manufacturing technologies and strategic marketing to create a quality product

was the first product to be delivered from our portfolio was accompanied with a sustained soft launch marketing campaign aimed to boost awareness and engage customers in Rwanda. The reception so far has been very positive. “This two-phase launch activity was planned out separately for retail and wholesale markets. The customer feedback from both these avenues has been tremendously insightful. The sampling phase, particularly in supermarkets (retail), generated significant interest and augmented sales and gave us a strong foundation to build upon and take LATO mainstream in Rwanda.” With the smart money being placed on Pearl Dairy achieving the same levels of success in Rwanda as it has done so already in Uganda, the Company has edged yet another step closer to its aspirations of becoming “the best dairy product manufacturer in the world”.

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Engineers of Choice AFRICA’S

Maitmia in Abuja, Nigeria, a US$220 million mixed-use project

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BS Africa Consulting Engineers has spent more than three decades honing its high level of experience and technical knowhow from working in some of the continent’s developing construction markets, to offer uncompromising engineering and construction techniques that are the right fit for Africa. Robert Huff, Managing Director recalls: “When we started out in South Africa in 1987, we embraced the ethos of value engineering in all of our projects and delivered the most cost-effective designs. At that time this approach was novel and hugely successful for us, and consequently we were repeatedly awarded with some of the largest building and civil construction projects of that period.

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HBS Africa Consulting Engineers continues to establish itself by consolidating world-class expertise and cost effective designs into its service offering throughout the African continent Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Arron Rampling “After showcasing our skills and strong desire to succeed we were appointed by the British Government to expand embassies throughout Africa in 2003. Essentially, we were given the

opportunity to show that HBS had what it took to operate in Africa, and was flexible enough to adapt to the varying economic and physical environments without compromising on quality assurance or cost-effectiveness.” This desire to further succeed and the in-depth understanding of the local markets has translated into more than US$500 million worth of iconic developments benefitting from the HBS approach to business on the continent today. “Involved during the initial project planning stage right through to completion, our work can be the difference between viable and nonviable projects; making it crucial that we use our experience of operating in Africa’s challenging environments to produce the best final result possible,” he adds.

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ver the past three decades, the CKR Group has become a global player in the multidisciplinary MEPDF consulting engineering fields. CKR operates from offices in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban and Pretoria offering full coverage of South Africa and the African region. CKR global operations include offices in Dubai and Chennai. By offering a diverse range of consulting services, we afford our clients the choice of all-encompassing MEPDF and IT engineering services with numerous benefits of providing value engineering, supervision and overall integration of the various engineering disciplines under a single platform. T +27 11 217 7300 E office@ckr.co.za

Levy Business Park in Lusaka, Zambia is HBS’ flagship commercial project, comprising a double level 35,000m2 retail shopping centre

Flagship projects

Specialising in consulting, civil and structural engineering, HBS Africa continues to put itself forward for all types of projects across Africa where it can showcase its abilities and partner with clients to work as an enthusiastic team to provide new and appropriate engineering solutions to developments. Its flagship foray into larger commercial projects started with the development of Levy Business Park in Zambia in 2010; comprising retail, offices, structured parking and hotel elements. “Opened in 2012, the US$160 million Levy Business Park in Zambia signalled the start of the bigger projects yet to come our way,” David Freeme, HBS Africa Structural Director, says. “We are now proud to continue working on some of the most iconic developments across Africa; helped by the organic expansion of our associated offices across 15 countries on the continent.” HBS Africa has since been selected

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Opened in 2012, the US$160 million Levy Business Park in Zambia signalled the start of the bigger projects yet to come our way

www.ckr.co.za to work on projects for some of the biggest names across the continent, including the US$58 million 14-storey EcoBank headquarters (25,000 square metres) in Accra, due to be completed in December this year; the US$40 million Union Offices, (12,000m2) in Accra; the US$45 million 335 Place Offices in Accra, (15,000m2); and most recently, the US$220 million Maitama mixed-use development in Nigeria (80,000m2).

Imparting knowledge

“HBS employees not only get a chance to implement and learn new engineering techniques, but they can also put their stamp on these iconic structures to add to their personal portfolio by working with us,” details Freeme, who was keen to emphasise the lesser talked about benefits behind the scenes. For each project undertaken, HBS works with local engineers in a partnership. It is this value-add


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ENGINEERING EXCELLENCE THE FULL PACKAGE CKR offers professional engineering services in the following fields:

· Electrical · Electronic · ICT · Mechanical · Fire Services · Wet Services

The Oval, Ground Floor, East Block Wanderers Office Park, 52 Corlett Drive, Illovo, South Africa Tel: +27 11 217 7300 | Fax: +27 11 217 7335 e-mail: office@ckr.co.za | website: www.ckr.co.za

The offices at Levy Business Park cover 6,000m² with 25,000m² of structured parking

Levy Business Park is valued at US$150 million

Levy Business Park also incorporates the Southern Sun Hotel

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proposition and experience promise for local engineers and consultants that distinguishes HBS Africa as a Company that values each and every individual. “Ultimately, this helps us to forge better client relationships and a deep-rooted understanding of

335 Place, Accra, Ghana

market needs. Our ethos and culture of development has resulted in HBS Africa becoming the engineers of choice for many developers, institutions and corporates,” says Huff. Operating in Africa’s often challenging economic and physical environments was initially a learning curve for the Company, with many modern engineering construction techniques unavailable or modified to suit the local environment. He explains: “When we entered Ghana five years ago for example, we were, at first, unable to obtain a high enough grade of concrete strength for high-rise buildings. We therefore saw this as an opportunity to utilise our knowledge and visit local ready-mix concrete suppliers and laboratory testing facilities to implement techniques and introduce equipment to ensure we could be supplied with higher concrete strengths. “We also have introduced piling and lateral support systems for larger and deeper building basements. This

335 Place Offices in Accra, Ghana will comprise 15,000m2 of office space

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results in cost-effective structures with increased GLA with a resultant increase in rentable income in tandem with construction cost reduction, which results in higher returns for investors.” Deploying a similar approach to skills transfer when working with local joint venture partners, HBS Africa has become known for its concerted focus on improving local engineering standards, skill levels and quality control methods. “Our ‘African solutions for African Developments’ ethos was very much a product of our time spent on the continent and it continues to develop in tandem with the latest IT infrastructure, social media, state-of-the-art 3-D drafting and design technologies and so on in our strive for continuous improvement and engineering excellence,” Freeme emphasises.

Value engineering

Having spent decades refining the quality of its products and services, from both a technical and cost-

Union Place, Accra, Ghana


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L-R: Peter Chiesa, Civils Director, Robert Huff, Managing Director and David Freeme, Structural Director

effective standpoint, HBS Africa now has a value engineering proposition capable of tackling any project of any size. “We earned our place in a niche market in the early years, but by putting ourselves forward as a consultancy firm big enough to deal with large projects, yet structured to give Directors attention from start to completion of every project. We have a

Barclays Bank head office in Accra, Ghana

EcoBank’s new Accra headquarters will be 14-storeys with basement parking over a total area of 25,000m2

The US$23 million Capital Place in Accra, Ghana is a modern commercial office park comprising three office blocks with basement parking covering 6,000m2

recognised ability to deliver a tailored personal service; ensuring face-toface interaction with our clients and delivering a project within cost and time constraints,” details Huff. “We believe the best form of marketing is the work that we do,” Freeme further adds. HBS Africa has a future expansion

programme in place to support this all-encompassing value-add approach in a competitive market. Huff explains: “Driven by both client and investor movements, the Company is looking at expansion opportunities all the time.” With two joint venture projects currently in talks in the Ivory Coast, a mixed-use project in Uganda, as well as

openness to proceed with opportunities in East Africa and Rwanda, HBS Africa aims to continue developing its reputation as the engineer of choice, demonstrated in-part by its local construction knowledge and aptitude for continuous innovation in Africa. As a result, the Company predicts US$300 million worth of new projects in East and West Africa over the next five years. “Innovation never stands still and neither do we. HBS Africa stays ahead by making sure our work is completed to an international standard, which makes our clients successful; translating into our own success,” he concludes.

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Generates Growth Regional Restructure

3M’s latest Africa expansion plan has demonstrated the brand’s ability to integrate into new and challenging markets while solidifying its global reputation as a manufacturing innovator Writer: Emily Jarvis • Project Manager: Arron Rampling

© 3M 2015. All rights reserved.

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riven by Africa’s continuous economic improvement, steady population growth and the subsequent emergence of new customers across a diverse range of industry sectors; technology and innovation major, 3M is currently reaping the benefits of restructuring its African business. Having been present in South Africa for more than 40 years and 10 years in the North Africa region – with operations in Kenya and Nigeria following in 2012 – 3M has secured a strong foothold in the healthcare, safety, communication and automotive industries, while mining, oil & gas, consumer, healthcare and energy hold the potential to cement the Company’s future growth. 3M has more than 65,000 products being sold worldwide, serving customers through five business groups and is best-known for manufacturing some of the world’s most familiar brands, including Post-it®, Scotch®, ScotchBrite®, Filtrete™, O-Cel-O™, Nexcare™, and Command™. A result of strong profits over the past decade in the Middle East and Africa (MEA) region, the restructuring strategy initiated in 2013 was designed to improve geographic coverage on the African continent and to accelerate future growth. 3M’s operations were divided into two regions - 3M South Africa and 3M Africa – in a bid to leverage and align market commonalities. The latter comprises North, East, Central and West Africa - including Egypt, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Francophone countries, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Ethiopia, DRC, Zambia, Angola, Nigeria and Ghana – while the former consists of South Africa and its common border countries of Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Mozambique. Spearheaded by Walid Feghali, Managing Director of 3M Africa, and

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Best known for manufacturing some of the world’s biggest brands

Ismail Mapara with as many as 400 individuals employed by the Company across the continent today - known affectionately as 3Mers - 3M strives to live up to its reputation as an “innovation Company that never stops inventing”. “Six of the world’s fastest growing countries are in Africa and the continent has been a key priority for us. The restructuring of our organisation in Africa will help us further expand our presence, explore new opportunities and build local capacities to increase penetration. This development is a testament to 3M’s commitment in supporting our wide network of customers across the Middle East and African markets,” commented Feghali.

Financial stability

3M’s recent announcement of Group profits for the full-year, 2015 reiterated the success and future potential for the Company’s expansion strategy on a global scale, highlighting

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the significant amount of planning undertaken to remain innovation leaders in an increasingly saturated marketplace. “The fourth quarter capped-off a year of disciplined execution from our global team with a solid margin and cash flow performance,” said Inge G. Thulin, 3M’s Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer alongside the release of the Group profits. “Throughout 2015 we controlled the controllable, while investing in the business and also returning significant cash to shareholders. “It was an important year as we prepared and positioned our Company

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for long-term success. We strengthened and focused our portfolio, made significant investments in the business to support growth, and made good progress in moving toward a more efficient business model through business transformation and our corporate restructuring. We are building an even stronger and more competitive Company for 2016 and beyond.” He continued: “As we celebrate our accomplishments, we recognise the magnitude of the global challenges we are all looking to address. This will not be easy, and it will require shifts in how we operate, how we make long-term decisions and how we collaborate. But we firmly believe that, by working with our customers and partners, and by empowering people to exercise their own creativity and passion, we can drive the transformational changes necessary for the success of both business and society.”

Leading from the front

Guided by a vision “to add value, and to lead with technology and innovation solutions that advance peer companies, enhance homes and improve the lives of customers, communities and country”, 3M’s African operations benefit from Group-wide support channels and leading international manufacturing

...we firmly believe that, by working with our customers and partners... we can drive the transformational changes necessary for the success of both business and society


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techniques and equipment to answer the endless array of customer needs. The Company’s committed team of 3Mers work closely together to help create a more sustainable manufacturing future and quality products for customers, as well as supporting the community via regular corporate social responsibility initiatives. Led by the Group’s culture of creative collaboration, 3M “captures the spark of new ideas and transforms them into thousands of ingenious solutions” in tandem with “helping everyone, everywhere, live a better life”. “We intend to do this by designing products that support our customers’ sustainability efforts, embedding sustainable practices across our supply chain, and, perhaps most importantly, joining together with a shared purpose,” the Chairman detailed. It is this willingness to engage and remain flexible in new markets that distinguishes 3M from the competition; particularly in African markets which have a set of specific challenges and industry trends. Passing final comment on 3M MEA’s expansion plans across Africa, Irfan Malik, Area Vice President 3M Middle East & Africa said: “3M’s expansion across new geographies in Africa is driven by our underlying strategy to enhance our penetration in emerging markets by increasing customer relevance with the aid of our proven global technology platforms and prioritising focus on key industries that are expected to grow multi-fold in the coming years.” He concluded: “The MEA region is one of the fastest growing geographies for 3M globally and we are committed to not only infuse fresh investments across key countries, but also introduce tailor-made innovations relevant for the specific needs of the industries operating in the region.”

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Proud sole supplier of 3M Patient Warming portfolio, including 3M Bair Hugger®and 3M Ranger® product ranges. We are an official distributor for all 3M Healthcare products within Southern Africa. Delivering cost effective, quality healthcare products to all South Africans in a sustainable and socially responsible manner for

over 20 years.

For more information visit www.augmedsa.com

3M Africa is still reaping the benefits from restructuring

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CASHLESS Economy RSwitch Limited has been Rwanda’s elected provider of e-payment switching since its inception in 2003 and continues to drive the country’s digital finance evolution 13 years on Writer: Matthew Staff Project Manager: Donovan Smith Switch continues to fly the flag for Rwanda in bringing the next generation of financing and banking to a country engulfed in the possibilities of a digital

revolution. Assigned as the national e-payment switch operator in the East African nation in 2003, the Company was initially established with the vision of running Rwanda’s electronic payment system before expanding to serve as a financial interoperable solutions entity. Driven by the Company’s SmartCash brand which enables electronic payment settlements - as well as interoperability and other financial solutions - the business remains the only fullyfledged player in a niche sector thriving under the influence of digital finance developments; both in Rwanda and for international parties looking to partner in the country. “SmartCash is RSwitch’s local debit card scheme issued by banks in Rwanda allowing customers to make transactions across ATMs, POSs and online,” explains the Company’s Head of Commercial, Jean Claude Gaga. “Our vision is to be able to interconnect all the

wireless services in the country through a solution that allows them to communicate; to find a robust solution to implement all these systems and to be able to transact with each other, both in and outside of Rwanda. “Not only are we processing transactions but we are also supporting the different monitoring and maintenance schemes for ATMs in Rwanda as well as offering leasing and advisory services to empower our clients and to get the best return on investment.” This remit over the past 13 years has transpired in building Rwanda’s mobile saturation to as much as 80 percent, nationwide, and - as part of RSwitch’s fiveyear growth plan - it is this indicator of things to come which is driving the Company’s current and future investment plans; capitalising on the mobile revolution and making processes easier across the board for an increasingly-enthused audience.

Strong indigenous brand

While international competition remains a challenge for the sole niche operator, RSwitch still strives to ensure that it is a continuously improving entity, evolving with clients’ concerns in mind. Primarily, this revolves around two key facets in the form of price and proximity. Bringing the best contemporary services as close to as many people as possible, as affordably as possible, is just one element of a local philosophy that continues to motivate RSwitch’s efforts to this day.

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nternational payments Company, Veneka is one of Africa’s foremost providers of payments technology solutions. These expert solutions allow millions across the continent further access to financial services. Veneka is proud to have powered the RSwitch Interoperability project and we wish to congratulate RSwitch on being the first switch in East and Central Africa to attain interoperability. This project will enable the seamless transfer of money between Rwanda’s banks, microfinance institutions and mobile network operators. Veneka is pleased that its innovative technology continues to help level the playing field in developing countries. T +27 (0) 11 568 0200 E info@veneka.com

John Rwangombwa, Governor of National Bank of Rwanda and Shen Yongxiang, Chinese ambassador to Rwanda

“Even within the Company’s workforce, RSwitch has 96 percent local talent, and then in terms of doing business with partners, we focus mainly on local businesses and local aggregators that are supporting different terminals and facilitating different platforms,” Gaga says. “I would definitely say we are building a strong indigenous brand here at RSwitch.” This is not to say that the skills and technologies being applied are limited domestically though. Offering modern systems either in-line with, or often ahead of, international standards is a trademark mission instilled by the Company as it keeps a close eye on the most pressing of global trends accordingly. This inevitably strengthens RSwitch’s concerted goal to be influential on an international scale when it comes to aiding Rwandan transactions across borders, and is compounded by a complementary

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www.veneka.com/prism

SmartCash Local banks are facing a major challenge in terms of the cost to print debit cards and to have their card base in the country, so RSwitch sees this as a great opportunity to add value for clients and partners

SmartCash is RSwitch’s local scheme of debit cards currently issued by banks in Rwanda. Also on-board for the scheme are microfinance institutions and SACCOs. With the SmartCash card, all customers are able to make transactions across ATMs, POSs and online. It’s a cashless way of making payments.


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pool of talent comprising professionals from the surrounding region and even as far afield as South Africa. And, as Gaga emphasises, this all culminates in a much more turnkey offering, exclusive to the Rwandan and regional audience. “We have exclusivity across a number of aspects, not least by our SmartCash scheme,” he says. “It is a requirement where all bank terminals, by regulation, are mandated to accept SmartCash during transactions, so we’re talking about people being able to transact - using our scheme - across 350 ATM terminals and 3,000 POSs in the country alone.”

In for a boost

A billboard in Kigali showing a POS payment campaign between SmartCash and Banque Populaire du Rwanda

Such a commanding influence is impacted further by RSwitch’s strong relationship with Central Bank, linking all other banks as a consequence, and this emphasises another key facet of the Company’s rapid rise to success: its integral strategic partnerships.

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“Take SmartCash for instance. The cards are issued by more than 60 percent of banks, and we have marketing partnerships with many of them, working on a B2B basis to ensure that we all drive awareness and push activation of this scheme in various locations,” Gaga says. “Considering the setup in Rwanda, the banking facilities and infrastructure is not necessarily as you’d expect elsewhere in the world so it is important to have activation campaigns where we can engage with the masses and get some of these banking services closer to their homes.” Further engagements with regulators forms another crux of the business’s overall influence across the sector; with a special monitoring team on-hand to support partnering banks on all major issues with terminals, network stability and individual transactions. One such partnership announced

at the end of 2015 saw RSwitch team up with international payments Company, Veneka to try and further ease access to financial services among banks, mobile network operators, microfinance institutions, as well as Savings and Credit Cooperatives (SACCOs), in Rwanda; epitomising the kinds of relationships that have helped evolve the country’s digital finance industry so extensively since 2003. “We are delighted to offer a fully integrated platform to Rwanda’s

We are delighted to offer a fully integrated platform to Rwanda’s financial institutions to further enable an all-inclusive financial industry

Gaga adressing genocide widows in Rwanda’s eastern province during the handover ceremony

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financial institutions to further enable an all-inclusive financial industry. Our local and regional financial institutions are in for a boost,” RSwitch’s Chief Executive Officer, Daniel Barrientos said at the time of the announcement. This initiative alone will help to interlink financial institutions, to create a seamless interface between banks, MFIs, and mobile network operators in Rwanda, and to ultimately allow customers to transfer or receive money across institutions.


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Community engagement As part of community engagement activities, RSwitch each year joins Rwanda and the rest of the world in commemoration of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide against the Tutsis. This year RSwitch commemorated the genocide with genocide widows under AVEGA Agahozo and donated Rwf5 million in one year to Mutuelle De Sante (Health Insurance). Genocide widows pose for a picture with RSwitch staff after the handover of Mutuelle de Sante

In just the next couple of years, we want to be able to process all transactions inhouse and to be able to do this across all channels, whether it’s mobile or cardbased

Gaga adds: “A further exclusivity is also being seen in terms of our processing as part of international schemes and we are currently undergoing certification to print debit cards locally for the likes of Visa and Mastercard. “Local banks are facing a major challenge in terms of the cost to print debit cards and to have their card base in the country, so RSwitch sees this as a great opportunity to add value for clients and partners.” The constant will to grow its offering and expand the levels of service being distributed across Rwanda through new schemes such as this continue to make RSwitch a vital figurehead for the country’s financial development, and as technological progression runs parallel to such an ethos, the Company can now undoubtedly look forward to even more exciting ventures in the future. “In just the next couple of years, we want to be able to process all transactions in-house and to be able

to do this across all channels, whether it’s mobile or card-based,” Gaga concludes. “On top of that, we will be producing and issuing cards for banks on a local level. “And then of course there is security. We are certified and responsible for ensuring that security standards are at global standards and we will progress again this year to help our clients get computerised and integrated with these schemes more effectively and safely.”

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TELECOMS RIGHT ON YOUR Since taking on the position as Airtel Malawi’s new Managing Director, Charles Kamoto promises to pick up where his predecessor left off to fulfil the Company’s continuous expansion plans Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Donovan Smith

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he appointment of Charles Kamoto as Airtel Malawi’s new Managing Director at the beginning of March, 2016 marked the start of a new chapter for a Company that is part of the largest mobile network in the world. Having previously established a presence as an internet provider under the guidance of Heiko Schlittke, as part of a strategy involving the continuous expansion of Airtel Malawi’s distribution network to increase market reach across rural areas, Kamoto is now tasked with driving the Company’s strategic leadership in the country; further integrating the Airtel brand within the local community via a

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targeted focus on the Airtel philosophies of accessibility, affordability and unmatched quality. The second Malawian to hold the position of Managing Director, Kamoto promises to fulfil the above strategy by leveraging his extensive background in telecoms, having previously worked for TNM, where he held the position of Chief Commercial Officer prior to joining Airtel. The legacy left by Heiko has already seen Airtel Malawi begin to expand its 3G footprint to such an extent that the network increased its data penetration rate by almost 100 percent during his leadership. Moreover, other key drivers for growth - including Airtel Money, new customer service


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shops, an ongoing partnership with Freebasics by Facebook and the launch of Premier Plus - have combined to form the framework for Airtel Malawi’s investments in 2016.

Reliable connectivity

In a bid to ensure speedy and stable access to its data services, Airtel Malawi has intensified its 3G site upgrades with the strategic replacement of some of its 556 2G spots, starting with upgrades in urban areas as part of a significant wave of network investment to increase its current 3G transmitting spots across the country. Throughout the course of Summer, 2015, the Company carried out upgrades at nine locations across major cities, including in the capital, Lilongwe.

“Access to speedy and reliable internet is a must,” said Airtel Malawi’s Public Relations Officer, Edith Tsilizani during the unveiling. “We will keep on carrying out these upgrades to make sure that subscribers enjoy the best internet experience in Malawi.” One notable 2G-3G upgrade spot was at Kabwazi Trading Centre in Dedza. Misheck Kavuta, Airtel Malawi Zonal Business Manager commented: “A wireless 3G network is desirable because of the extremely fast data transmission speed which allows for streaming of videos and also allows fast downloads and uploads. “The people of Dedza, specifically Kabwazi and the surrounding areas, can now experience amazing mobile

multimedia applications which they couldn’t enjoy previously.” The conversion of Kabazi into a 3G zone in July, 2015 took the total number of 3G zones to more than 200 sites since the start of the exercise in 2014.

Added value

Since proudly declaring that Airtel Money has registered more than one million users in Malawi, the financial services platform has also been boosted with the addition of a crossborder transfer service, representing yet another strategic pillar and driver of growth for the Company. Launched in August, 2015, Airtel Money customers are now able to leverage the Group-wide financial inclusion

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service and distribution network to transfer cash, facilitate remittances and affordably conduct regional trade. “We are offering convenient and affordable cross-border transactions through Airtel Money’s robust and ubiquitous network. As a Company, we are committed to deepening financial inclusion, creating cashless ecosystems and regional integration in Africa and beyond,” said Kamoto during the announcement. Malawi joins the four other African countries – namely Niger, Zambia, Rwanda and the DRC – in the borderless Airtel Money transactions capabilities.

Premier Plus

To further demonstrate its unwavering commitment to its customers, Airtel Malawi launched the Airtel Premier Plus service in the last quarter of 2015; a specially tailored service and benefits programme for customers who have been equally committed to the brand.

Kamoto explained during the launch: “We initially segmented some customers to Airtel Premier, but over time we also discovered that even for the Airtel Premier category, customers’ needs still varied significantly. So we have regrouped some from Airtel Premier to a segment called Airtel Premier Plus.” Launched almost four years ago by the wider Bharti Aritel Group, Airtel Premier Plus is now available across the majority of Airtel’s African operations, providing customers with next-level customised services and benefits in recognition of their value to the business; including discounts with various partners in the hospitality and lifestyle industries. “We have listened to our customers; answering the demand for a personal, fast and efficient onestop experience...Our mission is to provide the best-in-class customer experience,” he added.

Airtel Malawi is known locally as a significant contributor to the wellbeing of the country’s people

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alawi is positioned as the warm heart of Africa, and this same warmth and hospitality is integral to the Sunbird culture. Sunbird is the only hotel chain operator in Malawi, and has seven hotels and resorts strategically located throughout this majestic country. Sunbird has been synonymous with Malawian hospitality for more than 40 years, and has set new standards of excellence. With newly refurbished rooms, first-class restaurants, swimming pools, gyms and multiple conference and banqueting facilities, Sunbird offers widely diverse and memorable experiences at its unique business and leisure hotels.

T +265 (0) 1 773 388 E centralres@sunbirdmalawi.com

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Convenience on your doorstep

Often making the headlines for reaching out to rural communities on both corporate and CSR fronts, Airtel Malawi is known locally as a significant contributor to the wellbeing of the country’s people beyond the remit of telecommunications. In November last year, the Company tied together the launch of a new Airtel Express Shop in Luchenza, with a donation of medical equipment worth K2.6 million to the local Chonde Health Centre. The Company also opened a number of additional Express shops in 2015 across Kasungu, Karonga, Mzuzu, Mangochi and Zomba. The new Airtel shops provide customers with access to Airtel Money services, purchase airtime and handsets, offer replacement SIM cards and also allow customers to connect to the Airtel internet on their mobile devices via an in-store data experience zone offering free Wi-Fi and assistance. February, 2016 marked the opening of the Company’s 18th express shop

February, 2016 marked the opening of the Company’s 18th express shop in Chikwawa

in Chikwawa, indicative of Kamoto’s continued emphasis on getting closer to the customer and addressing the challenges that individual customers are facing. He explained: “Airtel is now taking its services right to the customer’s doorstep and at the same time, this is cementing our position as the country’s leading mobile network provider. The development will help ease the burden our customers were experiencing when faced with problems that required them to travel to Blantyre to seek customer care services that could not be solved

over the phone. “I want people to use this service centre to the maximum because, apart from helping them with different problems, customers will have a great opportunity to experience our excellent products and services...” Kamoto has promised that Airtel will continue to provide more exciting services to its 3.5 million customers in Malawi, and one of the ways it plans to do this is by strategically segmenting customers to better understand and meet customer needs over time. “The goal is to establish ourselves as the number one data and smartphone network in Malawi by offering more flexible bundles, affordable packages, products and services than anyone else. This includes a partnership with Freebasics by Facebook, an initiative which we rolled out in Malawi last year to provide free access to basic services such as health, employment and local information, without the data charge,” the Company summarised.

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EXPER ISE with Innovation ocusing on refining and enhancing the already vast experience levels of its staff to bolster a steady performance during the current economic slump, Mombasa-based Masumali Meghji Insurance Brokers Ltd has been able to strengthen and explore growth opportunities at a time when other industry players in East Africa are consolidating.

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Having held a presence in Kenya for more than three decades, Masumali Meghji Insurance Brokers is now streamlining efficiencies with the help of technology to target new regional growth opportunities

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Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Callum Philp

Taking into account the latest industry trends as part of a long-term growth plan, the 35-year-old broker is now keenly interested in spreading its wings and complementing the current head office with additional branches across the region to increase client reach; a feat only possible in-part due to the purchase of the state-of-the-art SofTrends Solutions’ IBMS software in recent years. Masumali Meghji’s Chief Executive


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Officer, Hasnain Meghji recalls: “Purchasing IBMS has been a vital stepping-stone to growth as it has automated the majority of our work. Furthermore, the software has also integrated and re-engineered the Company’s operational processes. This has reduced costs, increased scale and transformed operational practices, putting us on the highway of growth.”

Expert brokers

Masumali Meghji, Chairman, Masumali Meghji Insurance Brokers

As one of the largest independent insurance brokers operating in the Coast Province of Kenya, Masumali has built a formidable reputation in the local area, known by a wide variety of clients – namely multinationals, corporates and individuals – for its competitive products and services; spanning private and commercial motor insurance, medical and pension schemes, employee benefits, marine cargo and hull insurance, travel and emergency, personal insurance, construction and engineering insurance, commercial and industrial insurance, political violence & terrorism, and risk management and analysis. “Although our core business is in commercial and industrial covers, we also handle all aspects of personal insurance covers for all sectors and clientele,” Meghji adds. East Africa as a whole is witnessing strong growth in the insurance market, with Kenya taking centre stage as the financial hub for regional activity and showcasing the latest industry innovations. Masumali has leveraged this wider trend to remain competitive in an increasingly saturated market under fire from economic unrest. Meghji explains: “Most businesses these days are operating in survival mode. But take a look at the ones whose performance has been steady and locally-rooted in terms of staff and regular training programmes. This is what sets our Company apart from our competitors and is helping

Masumali workers highlight the campaign to keep Mombasa clean

us to flourish in the current economic environment. By focusing on the continuous improvement of our vast experience and wide knowledge base, we are proud to have held steady for more than thirty years and counting.” Moreover, being a proud member of the Global Broker Network (GBN) has helped Masumali distinguish itself as a professional brokerage institution and serves to reiterate to potential clients that they are in safe hands. “GBN connects us to different regions and clients. To our clients, being associated and part of GBN will be a good confirmation to them that they are dealing with a reputable company that is globally known,” he summarised.

Innovation and education

In order to remain ahead of the industry curve, Masumali has been quick to call-upon technology to improve internal efficiencies and develop modern branding techniques. Meghji highlights: “We have invested in a quality Company website that clearly outlines our products and services, as well as newsletters designed to educate our existing

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clients on what their policies entail so they know there are no hidden extras in our policies. Additionally, we now use social media platforms to further enhance interaction with both new and old clients. “In terms of value-add, we have also come up with credit facilities and premium financing for our key clients. Before a client’s policy expires we send or even call to notify them that their policy is due for renewal; and if new policy terms have been introduced, we try and keep them on track and in-theknow.” In support of this customer-centric approach, the Company has also been working closely with clients and community partners to encourage and strengthen community alliances. With plans to begin opening new branches in strategic locations across the East African region on the horizon, Masumali is hoping to extend this community reach wherever it operates in the future. “While we plan to expand into other regions, our customer service levels will not differ. For any progress to be made, these new facilities must be equipped to a very high standard and utilise the IBMS software from the word-go,” he adds.

Increasing market share

Holding a strong belief that choosing the right technologies to support the business can potentially revolutionise Masumali’s operations, Meghji says that innovation is

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Speed and accuracy are at the heart of making right decision for your business. Every successful organisation has to go through a comprehensive market research process which enables management to make the right decision

at the forefront of the Company’s continuous improvement strategy going forward; representing a vital pillar of its newfound East Africa-wide client push. “IBMS is testament to this and marks just one key indicator where technology has helped us to grow our market share, financial figures and overall competitiveness. Provided we complement this with experienced brokers, then technology can be used as a tool to help solve not only complex client problems, but we can utilise it to plan the future scalability of our business,” he details.

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Hasnain Meghji, CEO, Masumali Meghji Insurance Brokers Ltd


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Meghji concludes: “Speed and accuracy are at the heart of making right decisions for your business. Every successful organisation has to go through a comprehensive market research process which enables management to make the right decisions. This is something that can be quantified with the help of technology. “It is with all these processes that we hope to realise excellence in the next three-five years. We hope to achieve total customer satisfaction, attractive rates and packages for our clients both new and old, timely and prompt delivery of policies and insurance, quick and perfect handling and finalising of claims without complications, and with full client satisfaction. Once all our targets have been reached, we have high expectations to ultimately scale-up from being an insurance broker, to an insurance company.”

The Masumali team ensures quick and perfect handling and finalising of claims, free of complication

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ame O I L I B Y A

FUELLING GROWTH ON A

Continental Scale OiLibya forms a presence in 18 countries across Africa as it stays true to an initial vision of contributing to the economic and social development of a continent Writer: Matthew Staff Project Manager: Eddie Clinton

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uelling the growth of its customers, business partners, stakeholders and communities across Africa, OiLibya’s role as a key player in the African energy industry is taking on even more weight in 2016 as its core values of being a truly continental figure sees its physical presence emanate its way across all regions. Now spanning 18 countries, the Company has found a balance between alleviating any sector slowdowns and capitalising on the


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general economic development seen in much of Africa and - from its Group’s UAE headquarters - continues to drive further into the continent. “Our presence in 18 African countries makes us a prominent member of the communities where we operate, contributing to their economic and social development, and therefore to that of the continent as a whole,” the Company states. “Loyal to its African character, OiLibya strives to be a responsible African Group, operating in accordance with key African ethical values; integrity;

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honesty and equity.” Now employing a diverse array of 1,500 employees, subsequently generating around 20,000 indirect jobs, and meeting the needs of upwards of 250,000 customers a day, the business also boasts more than 1,000 service stations, eight blending plants, more than 60 fuel terminals and is present in more than 50 airports across the continent; and the business is positive that there is room for even more improvement in the future. “Over the past few years Africa has been experiencing unprecedented

economic growth, foreseen to continue, and possibly accelerate over the next decades,” the Company explains. “This has been accompanied by a strong increase in the demand for energy, which in turn has provided opportunities and, at the same time, led to an increase in competition in the African downstream oil market. “These opportunities, needless to say, come with new challenges and more responsibilities, particularly with regard to safety and environment.

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DAKAWOU TRANSPORT LTD

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akawou Transport Limited is family owned and started operations more than 25 years ago, with one tank trailer delivering oil products locally. Due to the dedication and motivation of its principles and employees, the Company has grown to be one of the largest independent LPG, petroleum and dry cargo haulers in the East and Central Africa region. In 2014 the Company diversified into transhipment of transit product from Tanzania to the East Africa region and in 2015 diversified into cement transportation, transporting bulk cement alongside our other services, helping us carry out our vision of meeting all the needs of our customers.

The Company has diversified its service remit to incorporate both consumer and business sectors

“OiLibya started its presence in Africa over 20 years ago, and while continually striving to improve, expand operations and build partnerships in the communities where it operates, the team never loses sight of OiLibya’s core values of fair competition, adherence to ethical principles and respect for the communities where it operates.”

Exceptional service, care and quality

With the Group incepted in 1993, a series of migrations, expansions and investments have dictated the Company’s evolution to this day; growing both organically and by way of acquisition. Between 2004 and 2008 alone, the business bought five Shell affiliates in Niger, Chad, Djibouti, Ethiopia and Sudan, as well as a further nine ExxonMobil affiliates across much of Eastern, Western and even Northern Africa. Enhancing its influence not just on

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The OiLibya brand, which was created less than 10 years ago, has already helped us to gain significant market awareness across Africa and beyond

T +254 (020) 24466 11 +254 (020) 823337 E info@dakawou.com

a geographical scale, but also on an internal offering level, the Company has subsequently diversified and expanded its service remit to incorporate both consumer and business sectors; offering fuels, lubricants, LPG, shops and services, and card services to the former, and a whole host of sectorspecific solutions to the latter. Industrial and wholesale, supply and trading, upstream activities, retail, aviation, marine, lubricants and card services all fall under OiLibya’s enterprise service portfolio, and despite the wider parent Group having eight brands under its stewardship, all products are marketed under the OiLibya banner. “OiLibya is the brand and trading name used by the Libya Oil Holdings Ltd Group, and represents exceptional service, care and quality,” the Company notes. “The OiLibya brand, which was created less than 10 years ago, has already helped us to gain significant market awareness across


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Doing Right all the time

DAKAWOU TRANSPORT LTD exceeding expectations

DAKAWOU TRANSPORT LTD exceeding expectations

One of the largest independent LPG, petroleum and dry cargo haulers in the East and Central Africa region. With over 25 years experience our fleet has grown to 170 trucks having a workforce of 230 dedicated staff. Box: 28934 Nairobi 00200 Kenya. Loc: Off Mombasa Rd, Embakasi.

Our clients

Tel: +254 (020) 2446611 +254 (020) 823337

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Fax: +254 (020) 823162

Mobile: +254 721 970 300

E-Mail: info@dakawou.com

Transporting from Kenya and Tanzania to Kenya | Uganda | Rwanda | Burundi | DRC Congo | South Sudan | Zambia

20 At OiLibya, we 15

OiLibya operates across 18 different countries providing products and services for retail, commercial, aviation and marine

Africa and beyond. “The speed with which we have managed to achieve this recognition reflects our drive and the singleminded pursuit of our goals. We believe that the simple, elegant look

consider our employees to be our most important asset. We are committed to provide a work environment which enables our diverse workforce to be fully motivated in their job

of our brand reflects our focus on attaining the objectives that we set ourselves.”

Pacesetter

Pursuing excellence through agility, professionalism, hard work and concern for safety, it is arguably the latter of the four principles that epitomise how OiLibya would most like to be known for, with social responsibility and continental enrichment forming the crux of all operations conducted across the business, and indeed the wider Group. Encouraging collaboration, respect, teamwork and long-term partnerships, the nurturing of ethical attributes such as integrity and honesty have gone a long way in creating prosperity in each of its 18 countries of operation, and - with the ‘charity begins at home’ ethos brought to mind - it is OiLibya’s employees that benefit first and foremost.

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OiLibya Aviation Fuels Supply is a key player in Africa, providing Jet Fuel (JET A1) to more than 100 commercial airlines and general aviation customers in more than 50 airports

“At OiLibya, we consider our employees to be our most important asset. We are committed to provide a work environment which enables our diverse workforce to be fully motivated in their job,” the Company emphasises. “To this end we have designed a human resources strategy which aims to consolidate at the forefront among our competitors, with the target to become the pacesetter in our industry. “The said strategy aims to ensure that our staff are remunerated in accordance with local industry standards, as well as to allow them to work in an environment where diversity, innovation, professionalism in doing

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The Company also specialises in marine fuel and lubricant products


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“Our mission is to energise our people and delight our partners by providing responsible energy solutions...”

business, and a strict compliance to both local law and internal code of conduct relating to the Company governance, are highly valued.” Taking on board employees’ opinions and ideas has been a key driver behind OiLibya’s realisation of its initial vision, to be one of the key downstream players in shaping African energy and empowering African-born prosperity. “Our mission is to energise our people and delight our partners by providing responsible energy solutions, and to ensure a good return on investments to shareholders,” the Company concludes. “OiLibya’s aim is to invest in Africa’s future and to be ‘your energy partner in Africa’.”

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INVEST

IN

DATA

CENTRE

AFRICA

E V E N T

2016

F O C U S

Initiating the next phase of data centre development across the continent investment opportunity, galvanise interest and significantly impact the development of digital technologies across the continent. We hope that the summit will better serve the unique needs of Africa’s developing and important market,” he added. Datacloud Europe has emerged as the EMEA region’s largest gathering of the leadership of data centre and cloud. The premier forum will attract more than 1,800 executives from more than 60 countries as well as play host to more than 90 exhibiting companies; delivering the perfect platform to meet and discuss the latest developments in data centre and cloud, to ultimately secure real-time deals. Sponsor and exhibitor opportunities are now open. Take early action to assure your participation in what will be the EMEA’s largest infrastructure and IT event, including the co-located Invest in Data Centre Africa. THIS YEAR, DATACLOUD Europe has expanded its service offering by co-locating the inaugural Invest in Data Centre Africa event at the Grimaldi Forum, Monaco on 8 June, 2016. The one-day summit is the first of its kind and will explore the next phase of data centre and public cloud development across the continent; current and future investment in Africa data centres, subsea cables, terrestrial fibre, cloud, IT investment and risk, the availability of funding and future industry plans. For investors, the summit will identify where the next hot spots are, how infrastructure opportunities –

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including fibre, network, cloud and data centres – will be valued and financed, the level of risk involved, and ask what currently prevents the hyperscales from building infrastructure in Africa. “Africa is a growth story for the next decade,” commented Philip Low, Managing Director of BroadGroup. “Attendees will be able to hear from industry leaders and companies pioneering the evolution of digital networks and critical facilities across the continent. “No forum so far has focused on this tremendous opportunity to explain the much needed data centre

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E V E N T

D E TA I L S

WHEN: 8 June, 2016 WHERE: Grimaldi Forum, Monaco WEBSITE: www.datacloudcongress.com/africa


New for 2016 Invest in Data Center Africa 8 June 2016

NETWORKING THE FUTURE OF AFRICA’S DATACENTERS. A special summit colocated with Datacloud Global Congress, Grimaldi Forum, Monaco. In this timely event exploring the next phase of data center development across the continent, Invest in Data center Africa uniquely brings together the leadership of operating companies across the continent together with investors, hedge funds, private equity firms, banks, financiers, regional growth funds, government investment agencies, legal counsel and solutions companies and consultancies engaged in the sector. Key themes: • Market Assessment and Outlook: Africa Data Centre Landscape: Based on new research by BroadGroup • Infrastructure Investment and Challenges 1 - Energy: A realistic perspective for data center operators and investors. • Infrastructure Investment and Challenges 2 - Fiber and Connectivity: Subsea and terrestrial fiber connectivity in Africa and planned developments • Investor Roundtable: Criteria for data center funding, valuation, and security of debt servicing for Africa. • Africa Data Centre Leadership Panel: The first ever leadership panel for the continent. • How will Data Centre companies scale in Africa? The development of pan-European data center businesses has revealed the value in scale and country coverage. Will the same business model apply to Africa? • Invest in Africa: Pitches for data center, cloud, hosting investment. • Case Study - Overseas Data Center Investors: Case studies of development, deployment and ROI. • Data Center Taxonomy for Africa: Build, Prefab or Modular? What is the right approach? • Regulatory and Legal Developments impacting data center development in Africa: Regulation at country and regional level will impact datacentres. The panel highlight new developments across the region. • Winners and Losers in Africa Data Centre Development.

www.datacloudcongress.com/africa

@InvestDCAfrica


AFRICA

ENERGY

FORUM

2016

E V E N T

F O C U S

A platform for European investors to meet with Africa’s power sector THE 18TH AFRICA Energy Forum (AEF) will take place in London this year from 22-24 June at the O2 Intercontinental hotel, and is set to welcome 2,000 c-suite global power sector professionals to the capital. The conference is designed as a platform for European investors to meet with African stakeholders to discuss investment opportunities in Africa’s lucrative energy sector. AEF 2016 comes to the UK’s capital this year to align with the overriding theme of mergers and acquisitions, capitalising on London’s status as a global financial hub and its wealth of investment experience. As Africa’s biggest trading partner, the EU accounts for approximately one fifth of global foreign direct investment (FDI) coming into Africa, reflected by the growing appetite of European investors and project developers to attend the Forum; accounting for more than a quarter of attendees in 2015. Six African Ministers, 14 heads of utilities and 12 heads of regulatory bodies in Africa have confirmed their attendance to date; comprising experts from South Africa, Ghana, Mozambique, Nigeria, Morocco, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Cameroon,

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Burundi, Namibia, Madagascar, Zambia, Bénin, Burkina Faso, Mali, Lesotho and Central African Republic. African Ministers will update attendees on the investment landscape in their respective countries during the opening government keynote address of the conference. Other sessions will explore topics such as how global businesses can tap into merger and acquisition opportunities on the continent, how to accelerate renewable energy uptake, increase the bankability of projects, and encourage partnerships between the public and private sector, alongside targeted industry seminars hosted by existing investors. An exhibition of 80 solution providers enables attendees to network throughout the three days of the conference. The Africa Energy Forum is open to c-suite investors and developers with a vested interest in Africa’s energy and industrial sectors.

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E V E N T

D E TA I L S

WHEN: 22-24 June, 2016 WHERE: London InterContinental O2 CONTACT: Amy Offord, Marketing Manager AEF@energynet.co.uk Tel: +44 (0)20 7384 8068 WEBSITE: www.africa-energy-forum.com


forum sponsor

MOBILE APP SPONSOR

WHERE AFRICA’S PUBLIC SECTOR COMES TO MEET THE WORLD’S BEST SOLUTION PROVIDERS

SPONSORS Forum Sponsor

Country Sponsor

Exhibitor Sponsor

Lead Sponsors

Strategic Partners

Registration Sponsor

Wi-Fi Sponsor

Platinum Lounge Sponsor

Networking Village D Sponsor

Lanyards Sponsor

Lunch Day 2 Sponsor

Speakers’ Lunch Sponsor

App Sponsor

Media Village Sponsor

Delegate Badges Sponsor

Seat Cover Sponsor

Media Partners include

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT US AT: AEF@ENERGYNET.CO.UK AND QUOTE: AEF_AO

www.africa-energy-forum.com


MANUFACTURING

INDABA

E V E N T

F O C U S

Manufacturing the future The two-day Manufacturing Indaba conference and exhibition, hosted in Africa’s largest manufacturing city, is the only African event of its kind and affirms government and industry’s strategic focus to revitalise and re-industrialise South Africa’s manufacturing sectors amidst intense challenges. The third annual Manufacturing Indaba takes place on 28-29 June, 2016 at Emperors Palace, Ekurhuleni. The inaugural Small Business Indaba will take place on the 27 June at the same venue. SOUTH AFRICA HAS developed an established, diversified manufacturing base that has previously shown its resilience and potential to compete in the global economy. The South African manufacturing sector presents an opportunity to significantly accelerate the country’s growth, combat youth unemployment and boost job growth by focusing on manufacturing operations and exporting South African products to the African market.

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The Manufacturing Indaba:

• Is the only manufacturing event of its kind on the African continent; • Is endorsed by the Department of Trade & Industry (the dti), the City of Ekurhuleni, the Manufacturing Circle, the Department of Science and Technology (DST) and the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) and leading manufacturing firms; • Has provincial events that travel across the country; • Is the strategic lobbying platform of choice for South Africa’s biggest manufacturers and;  • The place where new manufacturing ideas & innovations are revealed.

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E V E N T

D E TA I L S

WHEN: 28-29 June, 2016 WHERE: Emperors Palace, Kempton Park, South Africa WEBSITE: www.manufacturingindaba.co.za


Africa Outlook - Issue 38  
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