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t Now the real question is do I have enough change to get on the bus?

YOUR GOOFY GRASSROOTS GUIDEBOOK TO COLUMBUS! Vol 2 • Issue 1

This issue’s Tour Guides: • michael s. Brown • alisa caton • Johnny diloretto • nick Frye • cheryl harrison • ryan kovalaske • erin mccalla • Tommy mcclure • chet ridenour • Joe vargo • Bob vitale • Josh Weiker • ayana Wilson

Today’s specials: • Walk ThrouGh WesTerville • cameron miTchell Q&a • ride WiTh a local: coTa • karaTe coyoTe


NORTH BY NORTHWEST September 28 - October 4 Nominated for three Academy Awards, including Best Screenplay After Madison Avenue advertising executive Roger Thornhill (Cary Grant) is mistaken for a government agent, he is kidnapped and interrogated by foreign spy Phillip Vandamm (James Mason). After an unsuccessful attempt to eliminate Thornhill, Vandamm frames him for murder. Now a hunted man, Thornhill tries to escape on a train, where he meets the beautiful Eve Kendall (Eva Marie Saint). Eve helps him hide from the police--but is she as innocent as she seems?

VERTIGO October 5 - 11 Nominated for two Academy Awards This adaptation of the French novel D’entre les morts weaves an intricate web of obsession and deceit. It opens as 6FRWWLH)HUJXVRQ -DPHV6WHZDUW UHDOL]HVKHKDVYHUWLJRDFRQGLWLRQUHVXOWLQJLQDIHDURIKHLJKWVZKHQDSROLFHRIÀFHU is killed trying to rescue him from falling off a building. Scottie then retires from his position as a private investigator, only to be lured into another case by his old college friend, Gavin Elster (Tom Helmore).

THE BIRDS October 12 - 18 Nominated for an Academy Award in Special Visual Effects Based on the 1952 novella THE BIRDS by Daphne du Maurier. The story begins in a San Francisco pet shop and culminates at a house in Bodega Bay, where the characters’ sense of security is slowly eroded by the curious behavior of the birds in the area. Things take a truly ugly turn when hundreds of birds converge on a children’s party. Once the onslaught begins, there’s virtually no letup.

REAR WINDOW October 19 - 25 Nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Director and Best Screenplay /DLGXSZLWKDEURNHQOHJSKRWRMRXUQDOLVW/%-HIIULHV -DPHV6WHZDUW LVFRQÀQHGWRKLVWLQ\VZHOWHULQJFRXUW\DUGDSDUWPHQW To pass the time, the binocular-wielding Jeffries stares through the rear window of his apartment at the goings-on in the other apartments. One afternoon, seemingly mild-mannered salesman Lars Thorwald pulls down his window shade and his wife’s incessant bray comes to a sudden halt. Out of boredom, Jeffries concocts a scenario in which Thorwald has murdered his wife. Trouble is, Jeffries’ musings just might happen to be the truth...

PSYCHO October 26 - November 1 Nominated for four Academy Awards including Best Cinematography and Best Director Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) is unhappy in her job and frustrated in her romance with hardware store manager Sam Loomis (John Gavin). One afternoon, Marion is given $40,000 in cash to be deposited in the bank. Minutes later, impulse has taken over and Marion takes off with the cash, hoping to leave Phoenix for good and start a new life. Thirty-six hours later, paranoia and exhaustion have started to set in, and Marion decides to stop for the night at the %DWHV0RWHO7KHQHUYRXVEXWSHUVRQDEOHLQQNHHSHU1RUPDQ%DWHV $QWKRQ\3HUNLQV FKHHUIXOO\PHQWLRQVWKDWVKH¡VWKHÀUVWJXHVWLQZHHNV


03. Letter from the Editor 04. Eat Local 06. Drink Local 08. Craft Local 10. Listen Local 12. Listen Local 14. Fashion Local 16. Cbus Occasions Map 18. Network Local 20. Develop Local 22. Transport Local 24. Give Local 26. Convene Local 28. Walk with a Local: Westerville 30. Talk with a Local: Cameron

OWNER & PUBLISHER Christopher Hayes

terly throughout Ohio. Live Local! Columbus is a free publication provided solely for the use of our readers. HEADQUARTERS Any person who willfully or knowingly obOutlook Media, Inc. 815 N High St, Bsmt Ste G tains or exerts unauthorized control over Columbus, OH 43215 more than 5 copies of any issue of Live 614.268.8525phone Local! Columbus with the intent to pre614.261.8200 fax vent other individuals from reading it shall www.outlookmedia.com be considered guilty of the crime of theft. Violators will be prosecuted. SALES Alexis Perrone / aperrone@outlookmedia.com The views expressed in Live Local! ColumChad Frye / cfrye@outlookmedia.com bus are those of the individual authors Wolf Starr / starr@thesbb.com and do not necessarily reflect the views, policies, or personal, business, or profesNATIONAL ADVERTISING Rivendell Media - 212.242.6863 sional practices of Outlook Media, Inc. or its staff, ownership, or management. Live ADVERTISING DEADLINES Local! Columbus does not guarantee the Reservations by the 15th of the month prior to accuracy, completeness or reliability of publication. Art in by the 20th. any interpretation, advice, opinion, or view presented. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bob Vitale / bvitale@outlookmedia.com Outlook Media, Inc. does not investigate or accept responsibility for claims made MANAGING EDITOR in any advertisement. Outlook Media, Inc. Erin McCalla / emccalla@outlookmedia.com assumes no responsibility for claims arising in connection with products and servPHOTOGRAPHERS: ices advertised herein, nor for the content Andrew Williams (Westerville, interview, of, or reply to, any advertisement. All mafashion, COTA), Brandon Jones, Ayana terial is copyrighted ©2013 by Outlook Wilson Media, Inc. All rights reserved. WRITERS: Michael S. Brown, Alisa Caton, Johnny DiLoretto, Nick Frye, Cheryl Harrison, Ryan Kovalaske, Erin McCalla, Tommy McClure, Chet Ridenour, Joe Vargo, Bob Vitale, Josh Weiker, Ayana Wilson CYBERSPACE http://www.livelocalcolumbus http://facebook.com/livelocalcolumbus Live Local! Columbus is published and distributed by Outlook Media, Inc. quar-

Oh, How We’ve Changed...

in our concepts.

My niece moved to Columbus last fall, and sometimes I think she already knows this town better than I do.

I’ve seen those changes, too, and I’ve been here for less than a decade.

no longer orbits a German Village-to-Clintonville axis, and we’re going to prove it. We’re going to a different community each quarter and taking a look around with someone who knows it well. First stop: Westerville, where the 2006 end of a 127-year-old alcohol ban has brought new life to a picturesque Uptown district. A few highway exits short of Polaris, you can sip locally made wine, grab some good Thai, enjoy fine chocolates and buy enough cool tchotkes to fill a dozen Liz Lessner restaurants.

I remember a Sbarro and a burger joint at City Center when I first came to Columbus for a two-day tryout at The Dispatch in 2004. There was an Au Bon Pain next door, a cafeteria at the Courthouse and not much else to choose from. By the time I hope this quarter’s edition of I left my Downtown job last fall, Live Local! Columbus helps we’d rotate lunches between guide Jessica and you as you Market 65, Tip Top, Si Senor, El explore central Ohio. Whether Arapazo, Caffe Daniela, Exploryou’ve lived here six months ers Club, Double Happiness and Bill Morgan, an Uptown jewelry maker who bought the first like my niece, nine years like I other innovative places. legal beer in Westerville since have, or a lifetime like Cameron Live Local! writers also are of- the Rutherford B. Hayes adminMitchell, who chats with istration, was my guide for your fering up suggestions in this Johnny DiLoretto on Page 30, guide to Uptown Westerville. It’s our writers are on a mission to issue for everything from winon Page 28. tertime cocktails (Page 6) to share what’s new, what’s new spring fashions (Page 14). Mike to you, or what’s familiar, beloved and totally unique about Brown reviews the latest Down- As you live locally over the comtown housing plans on Page 20, ing months, let this issue of the home we share. and Chet Ridenour takes a look Live Local! Columbus be your guide. We’ll see you again in the Mitchell, the man credited with at groups that socialize over spring. elevating the restaurant scene cocktails on Page18 in what was once considered a Bob Vitale meat-and-potatoes town, says he I hope you’ll enjoy a new feaEditor-inhas seen big changes in the 20 ture we’re introducing in this Chief years since he entered the busi- edition. ness. We have more variety on our menus and more creativity We think cool and hip and local She’s on an adventure — working hard, to be sure, but also brunching, shopping, dining, partying, playing, participating, tailgating, volunteering and most of all, exploring.

publish local • publish local • publish local • publish local • publish local • publish local

Table of Contents

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Till Dynamic Fare:

Nature & Nurture When we use the term dynamic, it often refers to something outrageous, forwardthinking and downright enticing. It’s the perfect word to describe the food and atmosphere at Till Dynamic Fare, the artisanal spinoff of Dragonfly Neo-V Restaurant. It brings biodynamic produce together with restraint in the kitchen to produce food that’s mouth-watering and gratifying. Located in an offthe-beaten-path King Avenue gallery space that makes you feel as if you could be somewhere sipping in Soho, Till (as the locals call it) has a regular clientele that’s just as diverse. That’s the smallest thing about what makes this place so cool. First off, chef and owner Magdiale Wolmark is a Pfeiffer Center-trained agriculturist who believes whole-heartedly in biodynamic farming. That leads him to grow a lot of his own ingredients and also to source locally so he can personally assess the credibility of the techniques and the attitudes of the farmers. Biodynamic farming is a holistic approach that considers the farm as an individual to be treated with respect and extreme care. In many ways it’s the godfather of organic agriculture. The farms are self-contained and self-sustaining, and animal compassion is as important as tilling the soil. Female cows aren’t dehorned, so the flavor of both milk and meat is rich and authentic. There are rigorous standards and certifications, and Wolmark insists on visiting each site, driving up to six hours at a time to get the beef for what he calls the best burger in the city. And it just might be. The BD Burger is succulent and tastes exactly the way all

those burger joints wished their burgers tasted: like real, fresh beef, no additives, no frills. The beautiby Ayana Wilso ful, rich n meat is mildly grassy and even a little sweet, and I dare you to take a first bite that doesn’t result in delightful juices running down through your fingers. It’s served on a housemade roll with roasted red peppers that taste like smoky candy, thinly sliced local onion, and from-scratch aioli that’s simultaneously creamy and buoyant. This burger will make you rethink what a burger in this town could, and should, taste like, and Wolmark makes no apologies for that. His first priority is nutrition, ignoring expressions like “health food,” which he doesn’t believe in. He thinks all food should, and could, be health food – even meat. “Restaurant means ‘to restore’ … and I wouldn’t be doing my job if I wasn’t nurturing people with my food. It’s more than just an eating experience, it’s one that (thinks about) how to be nurturing with the food you eat,” he said. So if you’re a local looking for a place to get a sandwich and a beer in the middle

of the week, or an urbanite looking for a trendy dining experience on the weekend, Till is the kind of spot you want to find. It’s important to the chef that his menu is accessible and adventurous, so pig tails and escargot find a home next to vegetable stews and mac ’n’ cheese. Elegant cocktails are just as popular as the cabernet on tap. Case in point: the Hops & Dreams, a luscious concoction that utilizes Ballantine Scotch, Lillet Rouge (a distant cousin of Campari) and beer. For those who’ve ever had a glass of sorrel, this is its wicked — and much more fun — older sister. If you haven’t, you should just go in and try one and let your mind be blown, because much like the chef here, bartender Adam takes his time to carefully craft every drink using only the best elements to thrill your palate. Wolmark has been at this spot in the southern end of the University District for some 10 years now, and he’s not planning to go anywhere soon. “It’s a feeling I have about this place … and in business. I go a lot on feeling,” he said.

January, and it will continue to be a trendsetter in the Columbus food scene for the foreseeable future. Its somewhat remote location perfectly mirrors what you’ll find there: a restaurant with cuisine that’s just a little off the path more frequently traveled. But it’s also inviting, and sometimes challenging, nonetheless. It’s the best possible metamorphosis Dragonfly could have taken, and we wait with bated breath for the next stage in this delicious evolution.

Go! Till Dynamic Fare 247 King Ave , University D istrict 614.298.9986 tillfare.com

Hours: Mon-F ri 11am-midn ight, Sat 9 am midnight, Sun 9am-9pm Brunch: Sat-Su n 9am-3pm Happy hours: Mon-Fri 4pm6pm

Till Dynamic Fare celebrated one year in


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The next few months are going to be cold. We live in Ohio and it’s winter, so there’s no point being surprised or complaining about it. But bartenders and mixologists around Columbus are helping to make the best of the cold season with original cocktails that will warm your heart, throat and, uh, liver. Let’s check out a few of the hottest drinks around Columbus. Cider You can’t get much more local than the Hot Dickens Cider from Knead Urban Diner, made with Watershed Bourbon, Ohio apple cider and Saigon cinnamon simple syrup.

Lindey’s has a Spanish Cappucino with Kahlua, espresso, steamed milk and cinnamon, as well as the Cafe Lindey’s, made with Tia Maria, Kahlua, Baileys and fresh brewed coffee. Other Hot Favorites

Tip Top Kitchen and Cocktails has a signature Stoli Karamel Apple with warm spiced cider and a shot of Salted Karamel vodka.

by Cher

yl Harris

on

Some? e n o y r e v E ! t o H t Likes i

The 44 Cider from Barrel 44 is made with bourbon, butterscotch schnapps and cinnamon-steeped Ohio apple cider for heat and sweet. Coffee Mojoe Lounge has a Nutty Irishmen as well, in addition to the Turtle, which is made with Baileys, Kahlua, Buttershots, hot coffee and topped with whipped cream.

At-Home Bartender I asked two of the best bartenders in town to share a favorite recipe for your DIY hot drinking pleasure. Mitchell Thompson, Head Bartender at Taj Bar

Cris Dehalvi, Head Bartender at M

Manitoba 3 oz. Watershed Bourbon ½ oz. brown sugar and apple cider simple syrup (this I make at home by simmering 1 cup of brown sugar and 1 cup of apple cider)

Hot Toddy 1½ oz. Jameson Gold Irish whiskey ¼ oz. Grand Marnier 3 oz. brewed Earl Grey tea 1 oz. Mockingbird Meadows Citrus Zing honey ¼ oz. fresh lemon juice

Heat a cocktail glass by filling it with steaming hot water and allowing it to sit. Heat the above ingredients, empty the cocktail glass of the hot water and pour the ingredients into the warm glass. Garnish with a cherry and serve.

Build all in glass mug, stir well, garnish with cinnamon stick.

Taj Bar serves a Hot Honey Mate that will warm you up with Yerba Mate tea, Barenjager Honey Liqueur and a squeeze of lemon served in a warm glass with a lemon garnish. For something sweeter, M has a rich hot chocolate with a touch of green chartreuse and cognac, served with freshly whipped cream on top and chocolate shavings. Cheryl Harrison is the editor of DrinkUpColumbus.com, a site dedicated to the latest news and reviews about breweries, bars, spirits, wine and events in Columbus. You can follow her on Twitter @CherylHarrison.

Go! •Knead Urban Diner: 505 N High St, 614.228.6323, kneadonhigh.com; hours: Tue-Thu 11a-3p and 5p-10p, Fri 11a-3p and 5p-11p, Sat 10a-2p and 5p-11p, Sun 10a-2p, Mon closed •Tip Top Kitchen and Cocktails: 73 E Gay St, 614.221.8300, tiptopcolumbus.com; hours: 11a-2a every day •Barrel 44 Short North: 1120 N High St, 614.294.2277, barrel44.com; hours: Mon-Fri/Sun 4p-2:30a, Sat 11:30a-2:30a •Mojoe Lounge: Short North, Downtown, German Village, Easton and Port Columbus, mojoelounge.com •Lindey’s: 169 E Beck St, 614.228.4343, lindeys.com; hours: MonThu/Sun 11a-10p, Fri-Sat 11a-11p •Taj Bar: 2321 N High St, 614.299.7990, tajmahalcolumbus.com; hours: Tue-Thu 11:30a-2p and 5p-9:30p, Fri-Sat 11:30a-2p and 5p10p, Sun 11:30a-2p and 5p-9p, Mon closed •M at Miranova: 2 Miranova Pl, 614.629.0000, matmiranova.com; hours: Mon-Thu 5p-10p, Fri-Sat 5p-11p, Sun closed


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491 N Park St • Park Street District • parkstreetcantina.com


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There’s a Map for That Six years ago, I stumbled on Anne Holman’s Etsy site where she sells jewelry that incorporates antique maps.

Photos by Brandon Jones Photography

tinues to make today. It also includes rings, charms, tuxedo studs, earrings and pins.

I saw really inBut Holman’s interesting handterest in maps crafted necklaces and antiques and cufflinks of was born long Paris, Rome, New before 2004. York. My sister had just returned “Had I not home from living in become an a England, and I artist, I l l McCa n i r E thought she might would have by like to wear Stoke-onlikely become an Trent — the city where archaeologist. My uncle was an arshe studied — close to her heart. chaeologist for the Smithsonian, and my great-grandmother was an A custom piece was an option, but assistant to a cartographer in Washwould Holman be able to find a map ington, D.C. at the turn of the cenof the odd little town? My query tury. So I like to think of myself as was soon answered: “I am happy to giving new life to these things that say that I have several maps of are part of my history and continuStoke-on-Trent. If you order by the ing my family story along with mak15th, I can have it ready for ing jewelry that tells the story of Christmas for you!” other peoples’ lives and families,” she said. To this day, it is my sister’s favorite gift I’ve ever given her. She owns dozens and dozens of antique maps and atlases, all dating Holman’s Antique Map Jewelry line back to the late 1800s and early originated from a sculptural instal- 1900s. It all started with a yardlation she made for a gallery show sale purchase, and the search has in 2004 titled, “Inheritance.” It was been ongoing: “I look all over the a collection of almost 50 necklaces, place for them, but I have found each containing a sample of soil each one myself in some dusty corfrom locations that held some signif- ner, nearly forgotten.” icance to her family and friends. The Eastern European towns are She sealed each in a glass vial, and among the more challenging locahand-made sterling bands and caps tions to find, as borders and documented the latitude and longispellings have changed because of tude from where it was collected. politics or war. The top of each was a bezel setting featuring an antique map of the lo- “I have learned so much in recation. searching the history of different towns. I’m sure most people don’t This evolved into more wearable realize what goes into locating necklaces and cufflinks and grew each place,” Holman said. “There is into the full line of jewelry she con- a story and soul behind what I am

making, and the reason I designed this line of jewelry was one that was truly genuine and meant quite a lot to me and the people who inspired them.” She has made so many custom pieces that is has been hard to keep track of all the cities: “I used to keep a big map in my studio that I pinned all the locations from which I had made a piece of jewelry until I moved my studio and had to take it down. It was getting pretty full!” Holman’s jewelry is made sustainably in her Columbus studio. She is committed to a green studio practice, designing and fabricating settings one-by-one with certified recycled sterling silver. She also teaches undergraduate metals and jewelry classes at Columbus College of Art & Design. Not into maps, but appreciate true heirloom quality? She has other lines as well, including jewelry set with reclaimed glass from early 1900s costume jewelry, and ecofriendly wedding bands made from certified recycled precious metals.

Go! You can find Ann Holman’s work at the following locations: Online stores: anneholman.com, anneholman.etsy.com Celebrate Local (Easton): 4030 The Strand E, 614.245.0241, celebratelocal.wordpress.com Wholly Craft: 3169 N High St, 614.447.3445, whollycraft.net Argo & Lehne Jewelers: 3100 Tremont Rd (Upper Arlington), 614.457.6261, argolehne.com Columbus Historical Society: columbushistory.org Tigertree: 787 N High St, 614.299.2660, shoptigertree.com


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… And Now, for Something Completely Different Enjoy the exquisite musical architecture: crescendos and decrescendos, cataclysmic changes in the structure and direction. Sure, it’s everything you’d expect from an orchestra and classical music, but witnessing it live There are plenty of other musical options, in- is a whole new experience. This is true cluding one that might be a bit off your radar strength of sound, accurately coordinated to be unanimously unbalanced from the highs when you’re pondering the local music to the lows (or inversely so), all of which menu. We’re talking about local orchestras only seem to be in place in order to jostle and fine arts music “scene.” your most curious and lingering abstract thoughts. Although there are a number of ensembles performing at concert halls and college camImagine the level at which the minds of puses across central Ohio, here are two to start you off: Promusica Chamber Orchestra these composers were functioning to create such massively incorporated yet elaborately and City Music Columbus. detailed compositions. It was best (para)phrased by Prince Franz Joseph von PrOMuSiCa ChaMber OrCheSTra This local group usually performs in the gor- Lobkowitz at the premier of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony when he said, “Ugh, dude, geous Southern Theatre, Downtown. While it’s just sooo gnarly.” it’s probably exactly what you’d imagine a classical orchestra to look like, it’s Promusica’s sound that goes far beyond any stereo- The Promusica Chamber Orchestra 2012-13 Season runs through May, so you have typical expectations. plenty of opportunities to experience this lovely little fancy slice of Columbus. Pull out As far as the musical selection, of course there are the titans: Mozart, Beethoven and that spiffy outfit, get a date, grab some (local!) grub before the show, enjoy the Bach, but some of my favorites include Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky and music, then post-concert cocktails. Trust me, it’s the perfect menu for a classy evening out during the really intense times, even some Rachmaninoff. Maybe I’ve lost you on some on the town. of the names, but I assure you Promusica plays an amazing variety of incredible classi- CiTy MuSiC COLuMbuS City Music Columbus is a locally based group cal music. that brings incredible world music to central So you say the bars and late nights aren’t really your thing, or maybe you just need a break from the blaring loud music and crowded shoulder-to-shoulder shows.

by Jos

Ohio. The 2013 season features the styles of Native American, Israeli, Indian, Eastern European, American jazz and opera music. These concerts are either hosted at the Lincoln Theatre in the KingLincoln District or at the Via Vecchia Winery in the Brewery District.

In November, I had the pleasure of catching the fascinating flamenco finger-picking Israeli-born guitarist, David Broza. His first song began with a beautiful, elaborate acoustic intro, and then he started to sing … in Hebrew. Being a non-speaker, it was a bit odd at first. I had no idea what he was singing about, and it really distracted me from paying attention to his music. Then after his first song, he assured the audience, “If you don’t know what I’m saying, just assume that I’m singing about love.” It was funny for one, but it really and more importantly was an effective way of telling my brain to get over the language barrier. With my newfound clarity, I was ready and able to enjoy some world music. There were no bells and whistles here, no flashy lights or smoke machines, just one man sitting on a very well-lit stage with his guitar. He played a tremendous variety of styles and sang in a language that I do not speak nor even remotely understand. I found myself enthralled despite and also within my lack of understanding. After a few songs, you

h Weik er

stopped worrying about the words and really

honed in on the passion and progressive design of the music at every moment. The City Music Columbus shows are a bit more laid-back and comfortable, which is great when you want to find some good music but don’t feel like getting super dressed up to go out. Also, the group brings in individual acts for every show, so every concert has a completely unique feel. The City Music Columbus 2012-13 Season began in October and runs through April.

Go! ProMusica Chamber Orchestra: 614.464.0066, promusicacolumbus.org City Music Columbus: 614.223.3093, citymusiccolumbus.com Southern Theatre: 21 E Main St, 614.340.1896, capa.com/venues/southern-theatre Lincoln Theatre: 769 E Long St, 614.384.5640, capa.com/venues/Lincoln-theatre Via Vecchia Winery: 485 S Front St, 614.893.5455, viavecchiawinery.com


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The Coyote ! n i a g A s t n u H

just happens organically. by Nick Everyone Frye knows where they need to fit within the music, and by jamming the songs out we can easily figure out who needs to do what or what needs to change. The important part to us is that we keep writing together as a whole,” Horn said.

Andy Dodson, who produced the band’s first album (Inner Animals), had been in contact with Jerry DePizzo (O.A.R.) and asked if he would be into working with the group. He quickly agreed. DePizzo then brought in Mike Landolt, who produced Maroon 5’s Songs About Jane.

“We were so lucky to have these guys helping us along the way. We had been playing these songs for so long, so it was nice to Karate Coyote’s first shows were played at have that exchange of ideas between proThe five members have released their self- the Tree Bar, the venue Ryan says played a ducers and songwriters,” Vescelius said. “Jerry and Mike would listen to the songs, vital role in shaping the band. They had titled, sophomore album. They recently opened up for acts Matt & Kim and Spoon some of their best and not-so-great shows and if they weren’t thrilled with a part of one song, they would recommend different there. at the LC, and their single, “Ride on Pegaideas or sounds to try out until it sounded sus,” has been featured on CD102.5 during right.” “I remember being yelled at by the manrotation. ager for acting like a rock star and not Brian Lucey, who worked with the Black showing up until 8pm,” Horn said. They’re clearly doing something right. Keys and the Shins, mastered the album in the end to give it a radio-quality sound. House parties were another part of the Ryan Horn (guitar/lead vocals) and Eric Vescelius (lead guitar/vocals) met while at- band’s growth, learning to perform with people partying hard not more than a foot The sound of the album has an ’80s undertending Ohio University and teamed up away, knocking brand new keyboards over tone with clean, muted guitars and synth with Eric’s old high school mates, Nic above focused drums driving the songs and getting a bit too close for (sweaty) Jados (bass) and Ted Bigham (drums) in June of 2007 after moving back to Colum- comfort. Those kinds of experiences aren’t tastefully. The album also incorporates bus post-college. The band was starting to always fun, but they’re in a way essential newer, vibrant sounds and layered vocals that are akin to artists like Metric and Two to becoming a tight band with stories to take form. Door Cinema Club. tell. Nic’s sister, Kendra (keyboard/vocals), There are hardly any “album songs” in the joined the group several months later, and “One party became so insane that we mix (songs that wouldn’t necessarily be things finally clicked. They have a variety ended up just having to end the set short considered hits). There are simply and pack up.” of influences, such as the Pixies, Broken hooks after hooks that make the Social Scene, Interpol and the Talking record easy to listen to without skipKarate Coyote’s new album is a collection Heads. You can hear bits and pieces of of girl-boy pop music that undoubtedly will ping tracks (listen to the chorus of those bands in their songs. excite listeners of various genres, flavored “Cat-O-Pillar” and you’ll know what I mean). It takes a certain chemistry to have a suc- with tasteful guitar licks and a tightercessful band, and these guys certainly have than-ever rhythm section that would make Not only are the songs catchy, but the that advantage. “The song writing process Ric Ocasek from The Cars proud. Karate Coyote has come a long way from playing reckless house parties and hole-inthe-wall bars.

layered harmonies and backing vocals are the icing on the cake. When the group balances the vocals with the rest of the instrumentation, though intricate in design, it comes together seamlessly and packs a heavy punch. Karate Coyote has been through the initiation trials of the music scene with its history of playing for the reckless, but the band’s sound has grown through the years. They’ve been rewarded with being one of Columbus’ top bands, and they enjoy a supportive fan base. Take a moment to sit and listen to the music and lyrics and find out what these guys and gal have been through, and who they are. The next step for the group is to find management so they can take some of the weight off their shoulders from doing the dirty work that comes with being a band (booking, press kits, websites) and focus on writing and playing.

Go! Karate Coyote is scheduled to play Feb 9 at the Ohio Union during BuckeyeThon, an OSU fundraiser for Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Visit buckeyethon.osu.edu for more information about the two-day event, Feb 8-9. You can listen to samples of Karate Coyote, learn more about the band, and purchase its music and merchandise at www.karatecoyote.com. The band’s music also is available on iTunes.


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fashion local • fashion local • fashion local • fashion local • fashion local 14

Spring is in the Air, So Let’s Play! It’s time to put away your trendy winter coats and fashionably warm boots - including those Uggs that you refuse to leave in 2010. If you haven’t noticed, department stores and boutiques are clearing out all fall/winter looks and making room for spring lines. Spring trends for 2013 will wake up your inner fashionista or fashionisto that’s been hibernating during the heavy snow season Mother Nature so generously gifted us.

Supermodel Naomi’s Short North Adventure On a bright sunny day, supermodel Naomi is walking through the oh-so fabulous Short North. Every sidewalk and cobblestone alley is her runway. The servers at Level Dining Lounge stop and stare out the window as this heeled beauty glides across the sidewalks, effortlessly avoiding the large cracks that have been the demise of many. With her Givenchy Pansy Print Silk Clutch from Jinny in hand, she comes to a sudden halt between the entries of Rowe Boutique and Lady Bird Boutique. Which should she enter?

To wake your fashion senses, let’s play a game. When I was young, I loved reading those Choose Your Own Adventure game books, where you decided the fate of the character by choosing which path to take or 1. Rowe: Move forward to Scenario A. which page to read. The book would have 2. Lady Bird: Move forward to Scenario B. three or more different endings depending on which path you took your character. Scenario A As Naomi enters into Rowe, her eyes diLet’s put a fashion twist on this and have rectly go to a beautiful yet simple blue some fun! Let’s see if you can survive the romper on display, by Dolce Vita. Naomi has fashion drama unfolding below... been searching for the perfect outfit for her

vacation later in the month. Without any hesitation, Naomi purchases the piece and continues her journey in the Short North. Go to Scenario C. Scenario B As Naomi enters Lady Bird, the reflecting light from two golden machine-gun images on an oversized tank catches her eye. Could it be that she’s found the same shirt that country music star Leann Rimes has been sporting all over the place? Yes, it is! It’s the Columbus line KiK Vantage, and Lady Bird just started carrying it. Impressed with the offerings of Lady Bird, Naomi decides to purchase the simple yet chic shirt along with another KiK Vantage shirt that has a silhouette of a kitty cat along with the words Ain’t Free. Move forward to Scenario C. Scenario C After a quick stop at Rigsby’s Kitchen for Dollar Oyster Monday and a happy-hour chardonnay, Naomi is ready to do more

by Tommy McClure

shopping. Should Naomi head back in the direction she came from and go to Homage? Or should she move forward and go to Substance? 1. Homage: Move to Scenario E. 2. Substance: Move to Scenario F. Scenario E Naomi has heard about these famous Surf Ohio shirts from the ’70s that were resurrected by Homage. After being tempted by Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams and peeping in the window of Ray’s Living Room to see some amazing art, Naomi reaches Homage. Inside she finds the new Surf Ohio raglan


LLC_15 FASHION 2 1/25/13 6:38 PM Page 1

Congratulations! You helped Naomi discover the wonderful offerings of Columbus! Naomi will surely come back and visit our capital city and do more shopping.

straight in the eyes is a brass dragonfly necklace on a vintage chain. Her journey to Substance isn’t without a few other stops: On Paper, for a one-of-a-kind birthday card for one of her girlfriends, and Phia Salon, for more Aveda hair product. Once Naomi reaches Substance, she snatches up the necklace she had admired on the website and is relieved nobody else got her precious dragonfly. Exhausted from her busy day, Naomi catches a pedicab back to the Harrison House Bed & Breakfast. As she’s riding under the Short North arches with the breeze hitting her face, she smiles and thinks to herself, “Columbus is such an amazing city.”

Scenario F An obsession of Naomi’s is dragonflies — anything and everything. While she’s enjoying her chardonnay and oysters, she decides to pull up Substance’s website on her iPhone. Staring her

Congratulations! You helped Naomi discover the wonderful offerings of Columbus! Naomi will surely come back and visit our capital city and do more shopping. (What? Did you think there was a scenario in

sleeved, off-the-shoulder women’s shirt and immediately purchases it. With a smile on her face, oysters and chardonnay in her belly, and shopping bags in her hand, Naomi decides to head back to her hotel room at the brand new Hilton Columbus Downtown. As she walks down High Street, Naomi looks up at the Short North arches now gleaming with transitioning colors of light and whispers to herself, “I really love this city.”

which she’d end up poorly dressed?!)

your “man clutch.”

Spring 2013 Trends For the ladies: White is the popular color, followed by yellow and then bright green. All happy colors! For evening dresses, monochromatic black is the trending color this season. Geometric shapes and patterns and elegant stripes are in. Large prints and broken-up prints on separates and even dresses are a trend this season.

Remember: “Life is a series of photographs. You should always try to look your best.” — by me.

The document clutch is big enough to carry your iPad, but it’s still elegant enough to carry to an fashionable event. Look for shoes to include lots of metallic and shiny plastic. Hair parted to the side leaves a clean look, while a bushy bang leaves a fun look.

Jinny: 844 N High St, 614.291.3600, shopjinny.com; hours: Tue-Thu/Sat 11a-6p, Fri 11a-7p, Sun 12p-4p, Mon closed Rowe: 718 N High St, 614.299.7693, roweboutique.com; hours: Mon-Sat 11a-7p, Sun, 12p-5p Lady Bird: 716 N High St, 614.298.8133, ladybirdfashion.com; hours: Mon-Sat 11a7p, Sun 12p-5p KiK Vantage: kikvantage.com Homage-Short North: 17 Brickel St, 614.221.5693, homage.com; hours: MonSat 11a-8p, Sun 12p-6pm Substance: 783 N High St, 614.299.2910, shopsubstance.com; hours: Mon-Sat 11a6p, Sun 12p-5p

For the gents: The crisp and clean all-white look is in. Neon colors are in for pants, shirts, shoes, etc. Believe it or not, double-breasted jackets are back! Stripes any way you can get it are trending this season. Loud accessories — watches or colored shoe laces, for example — can bring a subtle wardrobe to life. A trendy portfolio case should replace your over-the-shoulder leather bag, and we’ll call it

Tommy McClure is the founder of CMH Fashion Week (@cmhfashionweek) and executive director of the Greater Columbus Film Commission (@filmcolumbus). You can follow Tommy himself on Twitter, too, at @tommytime.

Go!


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MARCH 22-23 Columbus Gay Men’s Chorus/Until There’s a Cure @ Lincoln Theatre, 769 E Long St, 614.228.2462, www.cgmc.com: 8p; $30.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 4 Fleetwood Mac @ Nationwide Arena, 200 W Nationwide Blvd, 614.246.2000, www.nationwidearena.com: 8p; $49.50-$149.50.

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FRIDAY, MARCH 22 SPANK! The 50 Shades Parody @ Southern Theatre, 21 E Main St, 614.469.0939, www.capa.com: 8p; $35.75-$45.75.

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SUNDAY, MARCH 10 Bon Jovi @ Nationwide Arena, 200 W Nationwide Blvd, 614.246.2000, www.nationwidearena.com: 7:30p; $19.50-$155.

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 3 Arnold Sports Festival @ Greater Columbus Convention Center, 614.431.2600, www.arnoldsportsfestival.com: Thu 6p-11p, Fri-Sat 8a-10p, Sun 8p-6p. $15, $10 in advance.

TUESDAY, MARCH 5 Muse @ the Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr, 1.800.ARENA.01, www.schottensteincenter.com: 7p; $49.50.

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SUNDAY, MARCH 17 Saint Patrick’s Day Parade & The Irish Family Reunion. Parade runs from Nationwide and High down High to Broad to Veterans Memorial, 300 W Broad St, 614.221.4341, shamrockclubofcolumbus.org: 11:30a-7p.

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 St. Patrick’s Day Celebration @ Historic Dublin, Bridge and High St, 800.245.8387, www.irishisanattitude.com: 7:30a-5p; free.

FEBRUARY 20-24 Disney on Ice @ Nationwide Arena, 200 W Nationwide Blvd, 614.246. 2000, nationwidearena.com: 7p; $17-$48.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 11 Columbus Clippers Home Opener vs. Indianapolis @ Huntington Park, 330 Huntington Park Ln, 614.462. 5250, www.huntingtonparkcolumbus.com: 7:05p; $6-$12.

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APRIL 19-21 Columbus Pet Expo @ Ohio Expo Center, 717 E 17th Ave, 614.644.3247, www.columbuspetexpo.com: Fri 11a-8p, Sat 10a-8p, Sun 11a-6p; $9 advance, $11 at door.

SATURDAY, APRIL 6 Monster Truck Nationals @ the Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr, 1.800.ARENA.01, www.schottensteincenter.com: 7p; $6$12$20-$50.

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FEBRUARY 21-23 Short North Stage: Ordinary Days @ The Garden Theatre, 1187 N High St, 614.725.4042, www.shortnorthstage.org: Thu-Sat 8p, Sun 3p; $23.

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SATURDAY, APRIL 20 Earth Day @ Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, 4850 W Powell Rd, 614.645.3550, www.columbuszoo.org: 9a-5p; $14.99.

FEBRUARY 8-9 Second City @ Lincoln Theater, 769 E Long St, 614.469.0939, www.capa.com: 8p; $30.

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SATURDAY, APRIL 27 The Columbus Crew vs DC United @ Crew Stadium, I-71 and 17th, thecrew.com: 7:30p; $23$50.

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 Maroon 5 @ Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr, 1.800.ARENA.01, www.schottensteincenter.com: 7:30p; $26.50-$72.50.

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Christian Marclay: The Clock @ Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St, 614.292.3535, www.wexarts.org: 11a-11a; free for members and college students, $8 general public, $6 senior citizens.

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columbus occasions map • columbus occasions map • columbus occasions map

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3 Chicago @ Shadowbox Live, 503 S Front St, 614.416.7625, www.shadowboxlive.org: 2p and 7p (every Sunday in Feb); $30.

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FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 3 Central Ohio Home & Garden Show @ Ohio Expo Center, 717 E 17th Ave, 614. 644.3247, www.dispatchevents.com: Sat 10a-8p, Sun 10a-6p, Tue-Fri 12p8p; $12.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 Matchbox Twenty @ Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St, 614.469.9850, www.capa.com: 7:30p; $39-$75.

THURSDAY, MARCH 7 Nathan Englander @ Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E Broad St, 614.464.1032, www.thurberhouse.org: 7:30p; $20 adults, $18 students/seniors.


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MARCH 22-23 Columbus Gay Men’s Chorus/Until There’s a Cure @ Lincoln Theatre, 769 E Long St, 614.228.2462, www.cgmc.com: 8p; $30.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 4 Fleetwood Mac @ Nationwide Arena, 200 W Nationwide Blvd, 614.246.2000, www.nationwidearena.com: 8p; $49.50-$149.50.

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FRIDAY, MARCH 22 SPANK! The 50 Shades Parody @ Southern Theatre, 21 E Main St, 614.469.0939, www.capa.com: 8p; $35.75-$45.75.

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SUNDAY, MARCH 10 Bon Jovi @ Nationwide Arena, 200 W Nationwide Blvd, 614.246.2000, www.nationwidearena.com: 7:30p; $19.50-$155.

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 3 Arnold Sports Festival @ Greater Columbus Convention Center, 614.431.2600, www.arnoldsportsfestival.com: Thu 6p-11p, Fri-Sat 8a-10p, Sun 8p-6p. $15, $10 in advance.

TUESDAY, MARCH 5 Muse @ the Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr, 1.800.ARENA.01, www.schottensteincenter.com: 7p; $49.50.

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SUNDAY, MARCH 17 Saint Patrick’s Day Parade & The Irish Family Reunion. Parade runs from Nationwide and High down High to Broad to Veterans Memorial, 300 W Broad St, 614.221.4341, shamrockclubofcolumbus.org: 11:30a-7p.

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 St. Patrick’s Day Celebration @ Historic Dublin, Bridge and High St, 800.245.8387, www.irishisanattitude.com: 7:30a-5p; free.

FEBRUARY 20-24 Disney on Ice @ Nationwide Arena, 200 W Nationwide Blvd, 614.246. 2000, nationwidearena.com: 7p; $17-$48.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 11 Columbus Clippers Home Opener vs. Indianapolis @ Huntington Park, 330 Huntington Park Ln, 614.462. 5250, www.huntingtonparkcolumbus.com: 7:05p; $6-$12.

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APRIL 19-21 Columbus Pet Expo @ Ohio Expo Center, 717 E 17th Ave, 614.644.3247, www.columbuspetexpo.com: Fri 11a-8p, Sat 10a-8p, Sun 11a-6p; $9 advance, $11 at door.

SATURDAY, APRIL 6 Monster Truck Nationals @ the Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr, 1.800.ARENA.01, www.schottensteincenter.com: 7p; $6$12$20-$50.

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FEBRUARY 21-23 Short North Stage: Ordinary Days @ The Garden Theatre, 1187 N High St, 614.725.4042, www.shortnorthstage.org: Thu-Sat 8p, Sun 3p; $23.

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SATURDAY, APRIL 20 Earth Day @ Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, 4850 W Powell Rd, 614.645.3550, www.columbuszoo.org: 9a-5p; $14.99.

FEBRUARY 8-9 Second City @ Lincoln Theater, 769 E Long St, 614.469.0939, www.capa.com: 8p; $30.

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SATURDAY, APRIL 27 The Columbus Crew vs DC United @ Crew Stadium, I-71 and 17th, thecrew.com: 7:30p; $23$50.

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 Maroon 5 @ Schottenstein Center, 555 Borror Dr, 1.800.ARENA.01, www.schottensteincenter.com: 7:30p; $26.50-$72.50.

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Christian Marclay: The Clock @ Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St, 614.292.3535, www.wexarts.org: 11a-11a; free for members and college students, $8 general public, $6 senior citizens.

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columbus occasions map • columbus occasions map • columbus occasions map

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3 Chicago @ Shadowbox Live, 503 S Front St, 614.416.7625, www.shadowboxlive.org: 2p and 7p (every Sunday in Feb); $30.

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FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 3 Central Ohio Home & Garden Show @ Ohio Expo Center, 717 E 17th Ave, 614. 644.3247, www.dispatchevents.com: Sat 10a-8p, Sun 10a-6p, Tue-Fri 12p8p; $12.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 Matchbox Twenty @ Palace Theatre, 34 W. Broad St, 614.469.9850, www.capa.com: 7:30p; $39-$75.

THURSDAY, MARCH 7 Nathan Englander @ Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E Broad St, 614.464.1032, www.thurberhouse.org: 7:30p; $20 adults, $18 students/seniors.


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network local • network local • network local • network local • network local

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Creative Networking There’s something to be said about the bonds formed through shared experiences over alcohol — and I’m not talking about those blackout keggers from your college days.

showcases a craft, and attendees learn from - or participate in — the demonstrations. It’s casual, interactive, fun and most definitely social. The three founders — Charles Erickson, Greg Turner II and Matt Reese, all entrepreneurs themselves — envisioned a unique mix of idea-sharing, industry-networking and friendly socializing in their first social-event collaboration.

As Erickson puts it, “We are not event hosts so much as facilitators of creation.” And to that end, the founders have brought together many engaged minds. Turner sees the bigger picture as well: “Motive is an open invitation, a call to order and cadence for artists, owners, creators, educators and independents to imr prove themselves, their craft u o n e Rid and Columbus.”

Sometimes many of us just need a little liquid t by Che courage to calm our nerves enough to allow ourselves to meet and connect with new people. And when that happens, the possibilities that open up are endless.

I was on stage as a bachelor last year. The connections and collaborations that came from the people I met have been invaluable Jessica Burley, a Columbus native and Ohio University alumna, founded this local to growing my network and opportunities startup to provide a relaxed, stress-free op- in Columbus over the past year. portunity for the pretend-painter inside of us. She wanted a way to support local jobs May these meetups be your guide — and and businesses and found it in this unique the drinks be the slide — to whatever motivates you. meetup for the casual artist. The events are regularly scheduled in bars and winerCheers. ies around town, and participants get to take an art class without committing to a series or buying expensive equipment. out their vision.

Coming up in February, I’m on the host committee for Date2Remember, a networking and fundraising event scheduled for Feb. 23 at LC Pavilion.

This dress-to-impress event hosted by the Columbus Young Professionals Club is a live charity date auction in which bacheMatt Reese, owner of We Are Glitterati, lors and bachelorettes are matched with has seen first-hand how some of the conexciting local gift pairings that go to the nections can turn in to customers through highest bidders. On the runway, people are these meetups and how the networking fusing their own talents, personality and piece of the puzzle seems to come organiflair with local fashion brands like Jones Luckily, there are a few great opportunities cally from the friendships formed there. Select Custom Clothiers and S.W.A.G.G. in central Ohio that allow you to jump right Erickson curates a unique soundtrack Revolution Apparel to sell the complete exin and get involved. each week, and there is even a special, cre- perience package. ative mead from Brothers Drake that carThe most exciting opportunity I’ve come ries its namesake. Attendees are treated to great local dining across has to be a movement called Social and dessert options — along with a fully Motivation for the Creative Class, better If you’re looking for a more hands-on way stocked bar — to help grease those social known as Motive. to socialize and express your creativity, barriers in all of us. This year’s charity reColors & Bottles might be the perfect cipients are the United Way of Central Every Monday night at the Brothers venue to meet others who aren’t afraid of Ohio and City Year Columbus. Drake Meadery, a local artist or artisan mixing an ale or some vino to help bring

Go! Social Motivation for the Creative Class (Motive) @ Brothers Drake Meadery: 26 E 5th Ave, 614.388.8765, brothersdrake.com; Motive: 6p-10p Mon; BD hours: Mon-Tue 4p-11p, WedThu 4p-12a, Fri 4p-2a, Sat 1p-2a, Sun closed We Are Glitterati: weareglitterati.com Colors & Bottles: colorsandbottles.com Columbus Young Professionals Club: cypclub.com Jones Select Custom Clothiers: jonescustomclothing.com S.W.A.G.G. Revolution Apparel: swaggrevolution.com


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LLC_20 DEVELOP_LLC-editorial_layout 1/25/13 9:11 PM Page 1

develop local • develop local • develop local • develop local • develop local • develop

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by Mic hael S

. Brow

n

More of Everything!

Downtown Housing Is Just the Start So now, we’re 201 years old. Bicentennial plus one. Let the third century begin. The year 2013 is standing over us with a gallon of high-test and a match, ready to motivate the more daring architects, developers and neighborhood leaders to do more. The energy connecting historic Downtown neighborhoods glows brighter than the wild days of westward expansion. As the construction continues and as new plans are drawn up, attitudes are changing and the money is finally moving to catch up with the times. Urban-ism-ization-palooza is afoot in Columbus. Old prejudices and nay-sayers can take a break as the obvious becomes common knowledge. Downtown and its ’hoods are cool, and certain people really want to live there. Columbus’ Downtown Commission heard more than 80 cases last year, including 21 new building projects with 692 new apartments, for a total of $150 million in new, private investment. Columbus’ booming mini-districts are creating ripples and demand. Old-school development godfathers are supplementing their suburban deals by putting real money into Downtown. Bob Weiler is investing in the Highpoint on Columbus Commons building, and there is continued development by the

Edwards Companies to the north and east historic preservation. of Gay and 3rd streets. A total of 260 units As the cold light of 2013 sharpens every are going in on Long Street. shadow in the center of the city, an interesting mix of people are throwing off the Several other major projects are either comfy blankets and defining where we live, under construction or in design. After years of turning down projects — even with love, dance and design our futures for the next 20 years. massive incentive offers — the pack that sprawled the suburbs into three counties is Looking back: Sifting through the remains suddenly finding its way around Downtown. of 2012 is nice, like Polaroids of old friends, but life is moving too fast to get sentimenThe spurts of development are reaching a tal over one good year. Ending the year on crescendo to the point where some of the a high note, our congrats to Columbus old school are publicly intoning of doom Commons, picked as the most significant after boom for apartment living Downtown. project of the year by the Columbus Downtown Development Commission. Time will tell, but I think we win. Rental occupancy is higher than 96 percent in the In 2012, there were 250 events at the core with waiting lists at many properties, Commons, from food-truck festivals to the and all demographic signs point to progres- holiday fair to Pelotonia, and more than sive growth. Even if some feel there’s an 100 events took place at the new pavilion. overbuild coming, more supply is good for Carter Development’s 302-unit Highpoint the generation demanding the housing. Not building is currently under construction, only does it give them diverse options on and the recently announced Lifestyle where they live, but it also will bring down Communities’ 88-unit apartment building the rates and allow more people into the on the northwest corner of High and Rich market. streets will soon break ground. Now one of the key challenges will be pushing for more dynamic, interesting architecture, sustainable infrastructure and quality-of-life amenities that are second to no other city in America. The community also will continue to wrestle with issues of

What will Downtown look like as construction ramps up and then not 100, not 350, but thousands of new residents hit the streets Downtown, in the Short North, Italian Village, King-Lincoln, Franklinton and the Brewery District? We’re going to

need more of everything: More Mikey’s Late Night Slices, more local coffee roasters, more bike racks, more bodegas, more shops and yes, more sunglasses. The future is that bright. We are living just below the cloud line, less than half-way up the mountain of potential. In the coming years, the winds of 2012 and 2013 investments will blow clear the mist to reveal how much farther we can climb. And the view only gets better from here up. Michael S. Brown is the director of development and public affairs at Experience Columbus. To share, yell, gossip or otherwise engage, please contact him at mbrown@experiencecolumbus.com or follow @DestinationCbus on Twitter

Go! Highpoint on Columbus Commons: 190 S High St, 855.258.8345, highpointcolumbus.com Edwards Long Street apartment project: 45 N 4th St, 614.280.0600, neighborhoodlaunch.com Lifestyle Communities: 230 West St, 614.918.2000, lifestylecommunities.com


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LLC_22 TRANSPORT_LLC-editorial_layout 1/25/13 11:51 PM Page 1

transport local • transport local • transport local • transport local • transport local

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Titus

Erin

photos by Andrew Williams

COTA Carries Columbus Car troubles were the last straw for Liz Samuelson. When her car broke down a couple years ago and the cost of keeping it on the road grew too steep, the German Village resident decided to go without a vehicle for the daily commute to Fulcrum Creatives, a Short North marketing firm where she’s a principal. Before making her final decision to eschew car ownership, Samuelson was using the bus a few times a week. Ever since, she has relied on her bike and the Central Ohio Transit Authority to get her where she needs to go.

COTA to get to work. She said traveling by bus takes some of the stress out of her commute. It also saves her the frustration of searching and paying for parking Downtown. “I can sit on the bus and read a book or listen to music or play backgammon on my phone. It’s a great 20 minutes to get ready for the day and a great 20 minutes to decompress from the day,” she said. Samuelson agreed that taking the bus to work can lower the anxiety of dealing with traffic — and other drivers — in the morning.

“I think our culture is so car-dependent and once people actually give it a try they would actually prefer it,” she said.

“I think the positives of riding public transportation outweigh the positives of driving a car,” she said.

Most central Ohio residents rely on their cars to get to work and other activities. Traffic jams are a way of life, and that’s why even those who have the option to drive, choose COTA. In 2012, people took 18 million trips by bus, and officials hope new service plans and routes will add to that number.

Weather is also an irritant, but COTA offers free rides during Level 2 and Level 3 snow emergencies in an effort to keep cars off the road. Hoppe said it’s one of the perks she sees to riding the bus, even though some complain of having to wait in wet conditions at a bus stop.

COTA charges $2 for each one-way local trip.

“That’s probably more worth it, you don’t have to deal with driving in rain and snow,” she said.

Erin Hoppe, executive director of VSA Ohio, owns a car but still frequently uses

Samuelson said she has saved more than money by riding the bus. Environ-

mental reasons are another large part of why she no longer drives a vehicle. “It’s a small thing I can do to reduce my carbon footprint.”

“A lot of people don’t have it on their radar because they are so used to using their cars. Columbus is a very carfriendly city,” LeFlore said. “If I asked my neighbors here in Reynoldsburg which bus to take to get Downtown, they would have no clue.” n to a C lisa

by A

In 2010, COTA decided to go green and introduced six new hybrid buses to its fleet. The buses have LED lights and 48 percent better fuel efficiency. COTA is also buying buses that use cleaner natural gas. “I appreciate they are trying to increase the natural gas buses and be more environmentally friendly,” Hoppe said. A common misconception is that bus service is just for Downtown. Titus LeFlore works at Nationwide but lives in Reynoldsburg. He takes the bus about three times a week to avoid traffic and to save gas. He participates in COTA’s Park and Ride program, which allows suburban passengers to park at designated bus stops and take an express bus Downtown. Titus said he thinks more people would take the bus if they were educated on how to use it.

Hoppe agrees that many people just haven’t tried the bus because they’re unfamiliar with it. “When it comes to transportation and getting somewhere on time, people get nervous. There’s really nothing to be apprehensive about,” she said. ed note: Liz is on the cover

Go! COTA’s website — cota.com — has a trip planner that allows you map out your bus route by typing in your starting point and destination, plus the time and date of your trip. You can also find route maps and complete fare information.


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LLC_24 GIVE_LLC-editorial_layout 1/25/13 9:12 PM Page 1

give local • give local • give local • give local • give local • give local 24

New Year: A New You Have you set a new year’s resolution or two for 2013? Are you already finding a few a bit more difficult than you expected to maintain? Need some extra support?

There are nonprofits throughout the community that can help you on the path to a better you. Let Community Shares member charities help you keep those resolutions. Our members have lots of programs and benefits to help you accomplish your goals to make this the best year ever. Get in better shape Yoga is the perfect way to de-stress after a hectic day and helps you get in shape. Try yoga at the Center for Wholeness. The center offers classes for multiple experience levels of yoga and diverse teachings. Classes typically last for eight weeks. For a full schedule of classes please visit their website, cfwohio.org. If you’re looking to join a gym, consider the YMCA. Benefits include group exercise classes, child-watching, access to any of the 12 local branches and any YMCA across the country, plus free towels, lockers and additional YMCA services. For additional information on memberships, you can go to the YMCA of Central Ohio website at ymcacolumbus.org.

Bike to work and everywhere Avoid the rush-hour traffic and build a workout into your daily routine by biking to work. Consider Biking can help you keep that resolution with maps, bike safety, recommendations and more, all available at considerbiking.org. Eat healthy The right foods can help fuel you through those grueling days and give you the energy you need for a great workout. Local Matters can teach you the best foods to purchase, especially those grown locally, as well as how to prepare them. Find a listing of farmers markets, community gardens, community-supported agriculture and additional resources at localmatters.org. If you’re looking to go organic and local, the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association offers the Good Earth Guide, which links consumers to local foods available from organic and ecological farms and gardens. The guide can be found on their website at oeffa.org. Improve your communication Twitter, Facebook, email, phone calls, text messages, instant messages... there’s no

limit to the ways we can what to do with leftover communicate today, but are material, be sure to check ke we really getting the most out Habitat for Humanas al ov by Ryan K out of it? Compassionate ity’s ReStore before going Communication of Central to the hardware chain. The ReOhio teaches nonviolent communication, Store has two locations — at 3140 Westerwhich allows for fulfilling relationships, re- ville Rd and 240 N Wilson Rd — and each solving conflicts, inspiring others and offers new and gently used building matemore. Discover more at nvcohio.org rials at a discount. Individuals and businesses who are remodeling or demolishing Get involved in your community a property donate reusable materials to Are you looking to connect and give back the store. to your community more this year? A great way is to volunteer with a local non- After you finish the remodeling, you will profit. Be sure to contact your favorite probably be inspired to do some redecoratnonprofit to see if they have any opportuing. You can donate the furniture that nities available. If you’re unsure about does not fit the new décor to Furniture what you want to do, sign up with ColumBank of Central Ohio. Your used furniture bus Gives Back. They partner with local will go to a family in need, and the Furninonprofits to offer a variety of volunteer ture Bank provides free pickup. For more opportunities in the evening or on the information on donating furniture and weekends each month. You only commit to scheduling a pickup, go to furniturethe opportunities you’re interested in and bankcoh.org. available to help. You can get more inforRyan Kovalaske works for Community Shares of Mid mation and sign up for their e-newsletter Ohio, a coalition of local nonprofits. What resolution at columbusgivesback.org. Home makeover Each new year also brings the desire for completing more home improvements. Whether it be remodeling, additions, finishing a project or trying to figure out

or goals have you set for the year? Share them with Ryan on Twitter @rkovo715. Photo courtesy of Consider Biking


LLC_25 1/25/13 7:49 PM Page 1


LLC_26 CONVENE_LLC-editorial_layout 1/24/13 10:55 PM Page 1

convene local • convene local • convene local • convene local • convene local

26

Columbus Pumps You Up…

With Fitness and Art! The Arnold Sports Festival keeps getting more pumped up every year, and whether you’re a bodybuilding enthusiast or just like keeping in shape, there’s plenty to discover at the festival this year.

photo: Arnold Spor

ts Festival

The fest will take place Feb. 28 through March 3 at venues all around Downtown. This year, 18,000 athletes will compete in 45 different sports and events, making the Arnold the largest multi-sport festival in In tandem with the exhibition, the nation. CATCO is staging “Red,” a two-man play about Mark Rothko and his assistant as You probably know the Arnold Sports Fes- they work on murals for the Four Seasons tival features some of the best weightliftrestaurant. Rothko’s assistant, Ken, is ing and bodybuilding competition in the played by Experience Columbus alumnus country, but you can also watch folks com- Tim Simeone – go cheer him on! The play peting for titles in ballroom dancing, juruns at Studio One in the Riffe Center jitsu, gymnastics, archery and even from Feb. 13 to March 3. Scottish Highland games – like caber-tossing and hammer-throwing. You can even And to tie it all together, if you love both check out jump-rope competitions, where sports and art, the Columbus Museum of the current world record-holder for speed- Art has some great paintings in its permajumping (984 jumps in 3 minutes) will be nent collection, especially those by Columthe woman to beat. bus native George Bellows. New this year, in addition to the Scottish Highland games, is the Arnold Survival Race, a family-friendly 5K obstacle run with climbing walls to overcome and mud pits to dash across. That will be at Berliner Park on March 3. The Arnold Fitness Expo, at the Greater Columbus Convention Center, is March 1-3 and features more than 700 exhibitors offering fitness apparel, equipment, training tools and more. The Arnold is a great opportunity to check out some of the high-protein menu offerings around the city, but you might want to wait until after the fun to order up a Thurmanator from the Thurman Café in German Village. (I have a feeling the lines might be a little longer than normal; luckily they’ve added a carry-out window!)

Mark Rothko, No. 8, 1949, Oil and mixed media on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of The Mark Rothko Foundation, Inc., 1986.43.147, © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko / Arts Rights Society (ARS), New York

Decade on Feb. 1. The exhibition will include 37 works, mainly from the National Gallery of Art, and will focus on the peby J riod of 1940oe Va 1950. rgo

If you’re more of an art-lover than a sports fan, Columbus, as always, has you covered. The Columbus Museum of Art will open Mark Rothko: The Decisive

To find more great events, festivals and exhibits happening in the city we all love, visit experiencecolumbus.com.

Go! Arnold Sports Festival: locations throughout Columbus, 614.431.2600, arnoldsportsfestival.com Arnold Survival Race: Berliner Park, 325 Greenlawn Ave; 888.418.0978, thesurvivalrace.com/columbus-oh-5k-race-2013 Thurman Café: 183 Thurman Ave, 614.443.1570, thethurmancafe.com; hours: Mon-Sun 11a-2:30a (kitchen closes earlier) Columbus Museum of Art: 480 E Broad St, 614.221.6801, columbusmuseum.org; hours: Tue-Sun 10a-5:30p, Mon closed CATCO: Studio One/Riffe Center, 77 S High St, 614.469.0939, catco.org


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Start Living Local! www.livelocalcolumbus.com


LLC_28 WALK WITH A LOCAL_LLC-editorial_layout 1/26/13 1:16 AM Page 1

walk with a local • walk with a local • walk with a local• walk with a local• walk with a local

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What’s Up(town) in Westerville? ********* Bob takes a tour of the hisortic suburb

Shelley & Bill

photos by Andrew Williams

Wa

lly Westerville,” said Morgan, a lifelong resident who with his wife, Shelley, owns the Main Street jewelry store, Morgan’s Treasure. “Our economy was suffering a little bit.”

Just a few short years ago, antiques in Uptown Westerville were as much metaphor as merchandise. The suburb was growing outward, but its core was sleepy. Small-town quaintness was viewed — often unfairly, sometimes not — as small-town blandness.

Vitale

Morgan paid $150 for the honor of buying the first legal beer served in Westerville since an 1879 bombing scared away the town’s only saloon. (“I was the one who bought the first round,” Carl added.)

by Bob

“I used to be the only place open until 7 o’clock,” said Wally Carl, whose Old Skool Skate Shop on College Ave was a destination for shoppers but rarely a discovery people Morgan gave Live Local! the honor of an Uptown tour that kicked off what we hope will just stumbled upon. “Everything closed at become a regular series that expands the 6:30.” boundaries of central Ohio residents who like to eat, drink, shop and live locally. And then Bill Morgan popped open a Bud. And Westerville snapped out of it. Here’s what we discovered when we toured Westerville with a local: After a 127-year ban on alcohol sales that earned Westerville the title of “Dry Capital of the World,” voters approved liquor sales that “Everyone who lives in Westerville loves Westerville,” said Morgan, who grew up in began in January 2006. the community and met his wife, Shelley, More restaurants opened. People stayed out when both were teenagers. They raised their later, and businesses kept the lights on. More family and opened their business here seven years ago. Their son owns the bike shop businesses moved in, and some pretty cool across the street. ones got a new look. “There has been a revitalization of Uptown

Westerville, population 36,665, has expanded

north past Polaris Parkway, east to Hoover Reservoir, west to I-71 and south to I-270. We took our walk, though, around Uptown, which remains the heart of the community. The city has been offering $15,000 grants to help businesses restore historic storefronts. There’s a movement in town, too, to restore an old State Street theater that will be vacated soon by the Amish Originals Furniture Co. Uptown already has been restored figuratively by a collection of new and old shops and restaurants. On State Street you can buy old-school doughnuts at Schneider’s Bakery, where Otterbein University students line up at 1am for doughnut-and-milk specials. The Davey Crockett, a cinnamon-twist doughnut with maple icing, is the most popular, but Morgan’s favorites are the cream horns. (Erin McCalla, our Westerville-born-and-raised managing editor, swears by the Nut Toppers.) You can get new-school coffee down the street at Java Central, where beans are organic, certified Fair Trade and freshly roasted.

Chocolaterie Stam is the Westerville (and only Ohio) location of a Dutch chocolatier that has 15 shops in the Midwest and the Netherlands. Specialties include dark and milk chocolates that feature white chocolate centers infused with flavors such as lemon or champagne. There are chocolate-covered espresso beans, jars of licorice, and a selection of gelato and sorbetto. “There seems to be a little more hip feel, a few more shops that are different for Uptown, anyway,” said Naomi Fuller, who opened Thrill Vulture Tatooing on College Avenue in 1995. “It brings in more people.” More people makes parking difficult sometimes, admitted Ted Kerr, owner of Uptown Strings, which sells electric and acoustic guitars and other fretted string instruments. On the plus side, though: Parking is free. If you’re used to Columbus’ parking-meter vultures, you might be a little hesitant to walk away from your car at first, but you won’t feel the did-they-or-didn’t-they anxiety when you return. (Uptown Strings, by the way, offers banjo lessons, and who doesn’t need those? The store has guitar teachers, banjo teachers and mandolin teachers, according to Kerr. Adults are welcome: The oldest students are 72 and 74.)


LLC_28 WALK WITH A LOCAL_LLC-editorial_layout 1/26/13 1:17 AM Page 2

Go!

Old Bag of Nails was the first place to get a liquor license in Westerville when voters ended the city’s dry spell. One of the newer spots offering adult beverages is Good Vibes Winery, where owner Tony Klausing has been making, serving and selling every bottle since August.

for just three years, and it’s one of Morgan’s favorites. Owner Farm Saechao said the restaurant’s most popular dish is Thai Grille Fried Rice, which features shrimp, chicken, tomatoes, pineapple, cashews, egg and veggies.

selling unique items of past eras.” It was named a Readers’ Choice by Suburban News Publications in 2011.

The store doesn’t focus on one particular category or time period. There are toys and board games, Carl has been around for more than books and albums, clothing, linens a decade in his skate shop. He’s an- and household items, political memorabilia and more. other business owner who has “I make it, I bottle it, I label it. I do turned a pastime into his livelihood. everything,” he said. “I’ve been skating longer than most And that brings us to the Morgan end of Uptown, a portion of Main of these kids have been alive,” he Klausing, who worked in the teleStreet just west of State where Bill said. Old Skool carries more than com field for 30 years until he and Shelley Morgan run their jew100 boards in stock, as well shoes, turned his hobby into a new career, elry story on one side and their son, shirts and accessories. makes 28 different wines and Mason, runs Westerville Bike Shop names them all after classic rock He’s also another Westerville native across the street. songs. “Let It Be” is a popular Borwho decided to set up shop in his deaux blend. “Superstition” is a hometown. He grew up three blocks Bill opened his store in 2006 as a Chardonnay blend. “Hang on Sloopy” is a best-selling black rasp- from Uptown and has seen the area full-service jeweler — repairs and evolve. sales — and Shelley started full-time berry Merlot. two years ago. “At 58, we’re just getGood Vibes has begun monthly food“It’s cool that Westerville has someting started,” he joked. and-wine events in which particithing besides antique stores in pants pay $40 for several courses here,” he said. Morgan’s Treasure sells wedding and several wines. Klausing also rings and custom pieces that Bill dehas begun moving his wine-making The antique stores aren’t bad, signs. His showcases and portfolio equipment to a storefront next door though. You could spend a day ininclude rings, necklaces and earso passersby can watch the process. side Westerville Antiques, which rings. lists its specialty as “buying and Thai Grille has been on College Ave

Mason Morgan bought the Westerville Bike Shop three years ago and will celebrate its 40th anniversary in business this year. He does repairs — he worked at other shops for a decade — and sells bikes, tires, parts, clothing and accessories. “This job is pretty awesome,” he said. What better reason? In Morgan’s Treasure, a Top 10 list for shopping locally caught our eye: 1. Keep dollars in the neighborhood. 2. Embrace what makes us different. 3. Get better service. 4. Create and keep good jobs. 5. Promote competition and diversity. 6. Help out the environment. 7. Support community groups. 8. Put your taxes to good use. 9. Vote with your dollars. 10. Invest in the community.

Morgan’s Treasure: 12 W Main St, 614.882.4401, morganstreasure.com; hours: Tue-Fri 10a-6p, Sat 10a-5p, SunMon closed Old Skool Skate Shop: 11 E College Ave, 614.865.0421, oldskoolskateshop.com; hours: Mon-Fri 1p-7p, Sat 12p-6p, Sun 12p-5p Amish Originals Furniture Co.: 8 N State St, 614-891.6257, amishoriginals.com; hours: Mon/Wed 10p-8p, Tue/Thu-Sat 10a5p, Sun closed Old Bag of Nails: 24 N State St, 614.794.6900, oldbagofnails.com; hours: Mon-Thu 11a-11p, Fri-Sat 11a-12a, Sun 10a-10p Schneider’s Bakery: 6 S State St, 614.882.6611, find them on Facebook; hours: Mon 6a-12p, Tue-Thu 1:30a-6p, Fri 1a-6p, Sat 1a-3p, Sun closed Java Central: 20 S State St, 614.839.0698, java-central.com; hours: Mon-Thu 7a-9p, Fri 7a-10p, Sat 8a-10p, Sun 9a-5p Chocolaterie Stam: 79 S State St, 614.898.7826, stamchocolate.com; hours: Mon-Thu 11a-8p, Fri-Sat 11a-9p, Sun 12a6p Thrill Vulture Tatooing: 16 W College Ave, 614.890.6424, thrillvulture.com; hours: Mon-Sat 12p-8p Uptown Strings: 18 N State St, 614.794.2183, uptownstrings.com; hours: Mon-Thu 11a-8p, Fri 12p-5p. Sat 10a-4p Good Vibes Winery: 2 S State St, 614.392.2202, good-vibes-winery.com; hours: Tue-Wed 2p-7p, Thu 2p-9p, Fri 2p10p, Sat 12p-9p, Sun-Mon closed Thai Grille: 15 E College Ave, 614.865.4515, thaigrille.blogspot.com; hours: Mon-Sat 11a-10p, Sun 12p-9p Westerville Antiques: 2 N State St, 614.882.2354, westervilleantiques.com; hours: Mon-Sat 10a-5p, Sun 1p-5p Westerville Bike Shop: 29 W Main St, 614.891.5654, westervillebike.com; hours: Mon-Fri 11a-6p, Sat 11a-5p, Sun closed

For more information about all the businesses in Uptown Westerville, visit shopuptownwesterville.com. From April to September, the Westerville Convention & Visitors Bureau hosts 4th Friday events at the end of each month.


LLC_29 1/26/13 1:23 AM Page 1

Farm

Go!

Penny & Mason

Tony Ted Old Bag of Nails was the first place to get a liquor license in Westerville when voters ended the city’s dry spell. One of the newer spots offering adult beverages is Good Vibes Winery, where owner Tony Klausing has been making, serving and selling every bottle since August.

Thai Grille has been on College Ave for just three years, and it’s one of Morgan’s favorites. Owner Farm Saechao said the restaurant’s most popular dish is Thai Grille Fried Rice, which features shrimp, chicken, tomatoes, pineapple, cashews, egg and veggies.

lists its specialty as “buying and selling unique items of past eras.” It was named a Readers’ Choice by Suburban News Publications in 2011.

The store doesn’t focus on one particular category or time period. There are toys and board games, Carl has been around for more than books and albums, clothing, linens a decade in his skate shop. He’s an- and household items, political mem“I make it, I bottle it, I label it. I do orabilia and more. other business owner who has everything,” he said. turned a pastime into his livelihood. “I’ve been skating longer than most And that brings us to the Morgan Klausing, who worked in the teleend of Uptown, a portion of Main of these kids have been alive,” he com field for 30 years until he Street just west of State where Bill said. Old Skool carries more than turned his hobby into a new career, and Shelley Morgan run their jew100 boards in stock, as well shoes, makes 28 different wines and elry story on one side and their son, shirts and accessories. names them all after classic rock Mason, runs Westerville Bike Shop songs. “Let It Be” is a popular Boracross the street. He’s also another Westerville native deaux blend. “Superstition” is a who decided to set up shop in his Chardonnay blend. “Hang on Sloopy” is a best-selling black rasp- hometown. He grew up three blocks Bill opened his store in 2006 as a from Uptown and has seen the area full-service jeweler — repairs and berry Merlot. sales — and Shelley started full-time evolve. two years ago. “At 58, we’re just getGood Vibes has begun monthly foodting started,” he joked. “It’s cool that Westerville has someand-wine events in which particithing besides antique stores in pants pay $40 for several courses Morgan’s Treasure sells wedding here,” he said. and several wines. Klausing also rings and custom pieces that Bill dehas begun moving his wine-making The antique stores aren’t bad, signs. His showcases and portfolio equipment to a storefront next door though. You could spend a day ininclude rings, necklaces and earso passersby can watch the process. side Westerville Antiques, which rings.

Mason Morgan bought the Westerville Bike Shop three years ago and will celebrate its 40th anniversary in business this year. He does repairs — he worked at other shops for a decade — and sells bikes, tires, parts, clothing and accessories. “This job is pretty awesome,” he said. What better reason? In Morgan’s Treasure, a Top 10 list for shopping locally caught our eye: 1. Keep dollars in the neighborhood. 2. Embrace what makes us different. 3. Get better service. 4. Create and keep good jobs. 5. Promote competition and diversity. 6. Help out the environment. 7. Support community groups. 8. Put your taxes to good use. 9. Vote with your dollars. 10. Invest in the community.

Morgan’s Treasure: 12 W Main St, 614.882.4401, morganstreasure.com; hours: Tue-Fri 10a-6p, Sat 10a-5p, SunMon closed Old Skool Skate Shop: 11 E College Ave, 614.865.0421, oldskoolskateshop.com; hours: Mon-Fri 1p-7p, Sat 12p-6p, Sun 12p-5p Amish Originals Furniture Co.: 8 N State St, 614-891.6257, amishoriginals.com; hours: Mon/Wed 10p-8p, Tue/Thu-Sat 10a5p, Sun closed Schneider’s Bakery: 6 S State St, 614.882.6611, find them on Facebook; hours: Mon 6a-12p, Tue-Thu 1:30a-6p, Fri 1a-6p, Sat 1a-3p, Sun closed Java Central: 20 S State St, 614.839.0698, java-central.com; hours: Mon-Thu 7a-9p, Fri 7a-10p, Sat 8a-10p, Sun 9a-5p Chocolaterie Stam: 79 S State St, 614.898.7826, stamchocolate.com; hours: Mon-Thu 11a-8p, Fri-Sat 11a-9p, Sun 12a6p Thrill Vulture Tatooing: 16 W College Ave, 614.890.6424, thrillvulture.com; hours: Mon-Sat 12p-8p Uptown Strings: 18 N State St, 614.794.2183, uptownstrings.com; hours: Mon-Thu 11a-8p, Fri 12p-5p. Sat 10a-4p Good Vibes Winery: 2 S State St, 614.392.2202, good-vibes-winery.com; hours: Tue-Wed 2p-7p, Thu 2p-9p, Fri 2p10p, Sat 12p-9p, Sun-Mon closed Thai Grille: 15 E College Ave, 614.865.4515, thaigrille.blogspot.com; hours: Mon-Sat 11a-10p, Sun 12p-9p Westerville Antiques: 2 N State St, 614.882.2354, westervilleantiques.com; hours: Mon-Sat 10a-5p, Sun 1p-5p Westerville Bike Shop: 29 W Main St, 614.891.5654, westervillebike.com; hours: Mon-Fri 11a-6p, Sat 11a-5p, Sun closed Westerville Bike Shop: 29 W Main St, 614.891.5654, wordpress.westervillebike.com; hours: Mon-Fri 11a-6p, Sat 11a-5p, Sun closed

For more information about all the businesses in Uptown Westerville, visit shopuptownwesterville.com. From April to September, the Westerville Convention & Visitors Bureau hosts 4th Friday events at the end of each month.


LLC_30 Interviewb_LLC-editorial_layout 1/25/13 9:57 PM Page 1

talk with a local • talk with a local • talk with a local • talk local • talk with a local

30

photo: andrew williams

Cameron’s ’90sand ’00s-era success with the new restaurant rules in town, especially the whole source-local, eat-local philosophy that permeates nearly every dining conversation lately. But when I asked him if he was down with that trend, he flat-out said “no.” I very nearly wanted to make sure he knew that this interview was for Live Local! Columbus. But the way he sees it is, he’s a business, it’s a trend — an expensive one — and he can’t get enough locally sourced product for his many operations to make it worthwhile.

And, well, that makes sense. You can’t begrudge the guy his business model, and you can’t deny his charitable contributions. Mitchell has carved out a unique niche o t here, and he has t e r Lo nny Di survived and by Joh thrived on his instincts and entrepreneurial acumen. He brought the Columbus diner out local guy through and through. It’s been a while since I’ve run into Cameron Mitchell, and well, He doesn’t parade around in an of his shell, convinced him it was I guess I was surprised to learn ill-fitting suit like so many well- OK to stray from meat and potahe’s still living here. After all his heeled Cbus business types push- toes, and in so doing, he’s ing 50 with their pleated khakis greatly responsible for cultivatsuccess, I figured he probably didn’t spend much time in Colum- and boxy blue blazers. Rather, he ing our current independent bus anymore. nattily dresses down in high-end restaurant culture. denim and a Facconable shirt. (The shirt is deceptively casual, You might say he made the city But I was wrong. but I notice those kinds of finer, safe for the Lizzes and the Mikeys of Columbus. He may be on top of the restau- sartorial details.) rant world here (M, Marcella’s, Johnny DiLoretto: So, first Ocean Club, etc.), but he’s still a I was eager to reconcile

A Pearl of a

Restaurateur

things first – how’ve you been? Cameron Mitchell: Good. I’ll be 50 next year…

school in the country.

I’m a classic example — the poster boy if you will — for the JD: I don’t believe it… dish room to the boardroom. I started at $2.65 an hour washCM: Yeah, I’m a little tired but ing dishes 32 years ago as a junother than that good… The body’s not holding up like it used ior in high school and found my way in the restaurant business. I to. didn’t go off to college right JD: Is that right? So looking at away, didn’t know what I wanted 50 what kinds of things are you to do, struggled with school, you know. I had the can-do. I didn’t thinking about these days? have the will-do. CM: Well naturally I’m starting to think about what’s gonna hapThe hospitality business — I fell pen at the end. I have no plans whatsoever to retire, but by the in love with it, and I decided I same token I don’t want to con- wanted to be president of a tinue at 100 mph. So I’m starting restaurant company. So I went to culinary school for that and to think about transitioning. it’s provided me with unbelievable opportunities in life to do Companywide, our executive team has been together so long. and see things that would never We’ve been together probably an have been made available to me. average of 14, 15 years. The company celebrates its 20th anniver- With our business, we’re able to impact peoples lives. We have sary this year, but we’ve been together a long time and so we’re about 3,000 employees. We have all right around 50, and at some lots of folks who are building their careers with our company. point in time, we won’t be here We’ve had dozens of CMR maranymore but we want the comriages and babies and seeing peopany to be here. We want the company to grow — in perpetuity ple buying houses. You know, the American dream. We’ve donated — for years. millions and millions of dollars to charity over the years since our JD: So you’re thinking about inception. And impacted our comyour legacy. munity. And so we just want to CM: Yep. Starting to. I wanna further that legacy down the move to being a steward of the road and be a teaching organizacompany vs. running the comtion and continue to grow and pany. build the company and provide opportunities for people and the JD: Let’s fast-forward to the time when you are gone – not to betterment of our community. dwell on negative things – but JD: What’s the concept of The what is the Cameron Mitchell Pearl? legacy? CM: It’s a gastro pub, which is CM: Well my big, hairy, audahard to explain to folks. A gastro cious goal would be to work with pub is, in its essence, a pub, a tavOhio State and create a school of ern if you will, that has a very hospitality management there. high level of gastronomy to it. So They already have a school our pub food is not chicken wings, there, but I mean really take it nachos and burgers. We have a up to a whole new facility like burger on the menu, but that burger is a far cry from what they do with the Fisher College you’re going to get at the Press of Business and make it a topGrill. It’s a different animal. five hospitality management


LLC_31_LLC-editorial_layout 1/25/13 7:37 PM Page 1

The easiest way we’ve found to explain it is, it’s like when our chefs take over the tavern. It’s what they want to eat, where they want to go. We have chicken wings on the menu, but they’re made confit style, they’re cooked down. You get a chicken wing at our place, instead of bleu cheese dressing, there are bleu cheese crumbles on them. Instead of celery we have chopped celery leaves tossed in a little vinaigrette. The chicken wing itself pulls right off the bone, it’s so unbelievably tender, there’s no ripping and rip-

ping and chomping. It’s just beautiful. It’s that level of gastronomy that’s there. To put it another way, the same culinary level that’s used at M is used at The Pearl.

Pressed for time, our conversation trailed off into some fruitless corners, especially when trying to pin him down on some of his travels, his most memorable dining experiences, his favorite out-of-town foods. Cameron’s not a details guy when it comes to those kinds of particulars.

He’s just instinctive. The way he puts it, “I just know what’s great and what’s not great.” Now, that’s the kind of remark people will remember when they talk about Cameron Mitchell’s legacy – or at the very least the kind of remark they’ll carve into the facade on a new OSU school of hospitality management. Johnny DiLoretto writes regularly for Live Local! Columbus. You can follow him on Twitter at @JohnnyDiLoretto.


LLC_32 1/25/13 7:41 PM Page 1

2013-02-01 Live Local! Columbus  
2013-02-01 Live Local! Columbus  

Vol 2, Issue 1 • Your Goofy Grassroots Guidebook to Columbus

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