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thread MARCH 2011

DIY GLITTERED KICKS

iconic

OSCAR LOOKS

SHE’S WITH THE BAND

LOOKS GRAMMYS

y n n u f

GUYS SUIT UP

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Fashion Fakes

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Iconic Oscar Looks

Grammy Style

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She’s with the Band

Suit Up

Cover photo by LIZ EMLEY

tableofcontents

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MARCH

2012

SEEING READ TH

4 8 10

Haute Online Top 5 Editor’s Note

12 16 20 22 26 32 34 36

Runway Realway Street Peeps

seams

Column Insect Jewelry Oxford Legacy Eyebrows 101 Overnight Cosmetics Party Pants

diy

40 44 46

DIY Glitter Kicks DIY Up Cycling DIY No Sew

who, what, wear

48 52 58

Role Playing Aquatic Attire Slope Swag

in good fashion

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Bare on the Bricks

110 114 119 124

Freshly Minted Fashion Dress Etiquette Men’s Essentials

back features

Rant / Rave

OUTHREADMAG.COM | 3 WWW.AMWAY.COM/NICKGAMRATH


hauteonline sf girl by bay West coast cool meets innovative interior design, art and photography in Victoria Smith’s wildly popular blog SF Girl By Bay. Smith, an experienced designer, stylist and writer, is a self-proclaimed flea market queen and expert on all things pretty and posh. Her posts feature inspirational images of impeccably styled rooms and artwork, as well as Smith’s tips on how to spruce up any room that’s lacking bohemian flair. Her eye for style and the coveted peeks into her own personal décor are enough to make readers want to raid Ikea and redesign their humble abodes.

— BROOKE BUNCE

PINTEREST TAB For an even closer look into Smith’s current artistic muses, there’s a link to her Pinterest boards. The popular virtual pin board site neatly lays out the design queen’s favorite looks of the moment, including baubles, bright lights, butterfly chairs and “geek love,” to name a few. If there’s something that tickles the fancy of a Pinterest browser, they can favorite or even re-pin one of Smith’s stunning images.

IN MY DREAMS I LIVE HERE POSTS Every so often, Smith features a dream destination and a fantasy design scheme to go with it. Accompanying delicious sets of photos from far-off, whimsical places such as Paris and Berlin, Smith also adds in a dreamy storyline of her life in a new land. And of course, she explicitly details the furnishings of her foreign accommodations.

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munrowe Up-and-coming blogger, Justin Livingston, has left quite an impression on the fashion blogosphere. Beginning in August of 2011, he has regularly updated his website, Munrowe.com, with creative sartorial suggestions for men. A typical post includes a short anecdote of inspiration followed by a few photos of the dapper blogger himself—showing us how to rock the look. But don’t feel left out, girls; Livingston would not be a true fashion star without also featuring female looks once in a while. What sets Munrowe apart from other blogs is that it is as much the journal of a stylish man as it is a style blog. Livingston’s ideas are inspiration for any person that wants to apply high fashion concepts to their everyday wardrobe. — SCOTT LAMBERT

LOOK BREAKDOWNS Livingston is great about paying attention to detail. He focuses not only on what to wear, but how to wear it and how to accessorize the look.

FEMALE LOOKS Style-seeking girls aren’t ignored. Livingston shares with readers his great eye for women’s fashion, demonstrated by his feminine interpretations of his personal style.

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le blog de betty Ooh la la! The French really do know their fashion. Betty Autier, a French fashion blogger, created leblogdebetty.com which showcases her quirky and carefree sense of style. Autier lives in Paris, France, one of the fashion capitals of the world, so it’s safe to say she knows how to dress to impress. Le Blog de Betty encourages women to be bold and try new outfits, like pairing sequined leggings with a slouchy top. Autier incorporates hot new trends with her everyday wardrobe, which makes it easy to recreate giving all women a chance to be creative and brave. All in all, Le Blog de Betty is the crème de la crème of personal style. — ALI SHULTZ

LOOKBOOK

Betty’s look book captures all of her styles, showcasing her outfits for those wanting a quick glance. A bold, yet fashionable outfit, titled “El Poncho!” includes black sequined trousers, a slouchy gray tee and a geometric-patterned poncho to complete the look.

FAIR DU SHOPPING Le Blog de Betty has many shopping opportunities, including ASOS, Topshop and Urban Outfitters. The links lead to the websites where you can buy outfits similar to Autier’s. Also, a Shopping Selection thumbnail allows users to shop for dresses or accessories without even searching the website. It is a convenient and easy way to browse for looks inspired by Betty Autier. Au revoir! n

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49 S. Court Street I Athens, Ohio I (740)594-7375

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LOUBOUTIN MANICURE

When Adele hit the red carpet last month for the Grammy Awards, she was rocking a new blonde ‘do and her signature black-on-black look, but with one notable surprise. It was a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it accessory, but the soulful songstress, who walked away with every award she was nominated for, was rocking what is now known as the Louboutin manicure. Named after Christian Louboutin’s iconic heels, the manicure is black on top (or silver, in Adele’s case) with red painted on the underside, creating a peek-a-boo effect. This new nail trend is the perfect way for college students to get a little Louboutin in our lives… without breaking the bank.

—SARAH MALOY

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AIMEE MULLINS AS A FASHION ICON

Missing fibula bones when she was born, Aimee Mullins had both legs amputated at age one. Mullins went on to attend Georgetown University, to be a competitor in the Paralympics in track and field and to serve as a fashion model. The late and great Alexander McQueen was the first to fashion Mullins a pair of hand-carved wooden legs, which she adorned on the runway when she modeled for his 1999 show. Now she has 13 pairs of prosthetic legs in varying heights, according to The Cut blog. Mullins serves a dual role as model and role model.

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—JESSIE CADLE


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LES MERVEILLEUSES DE LADURÉE

Ladurée, the Parisian pastry shop famous for its multicolored double-decker macaroons enjoyed by the likes of Kirsten Dunst in Sofia Coppola’s “Marie Antoinette,” is fashioning its pastel palette into a confectionary-colored makeup line. Les Merveilleuses de Ladurée (or The Wonders of Ladurée) collection, which was launched by Japanese cosmetics brand Albion in Japan in February, will expand to Europe, then the United States and the rest of Asia toward the end of 2012. Les Merveilleuses features 20 different blush colors in the form of cameos, foundation and lip color, according to WWD. Fashion lovers and foodies alike unite in celebratory anticipation for Ladurée’s sweet shadows. Ooh la la. —CATHERINE CALDWELL

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ONESIES ARE ZEUS

Described as “zeus” by many fashion critics (me), the Canadian menswear brand Blue Guru makes men’s fashion quick and easy. Inspired by a postmodern sense of style, Blue Guru mixes, matches and sews together a dress shirt, tie and vest. The three-layers-in-one combination, known to my fellow Threadies as a “onesie,” takes the guesswork out of dressing. These are ideal for a guy like me, who knows nothing about color and pattern coordinating, but who still wants to dress like I know how to mix-n-match. These onesies are relaxed enough to throw on with some jeans, while still being chic enough to wear in a formal setting with dress pants. Consider them a cheat code for a well-dressed man.

—TOM BUSCH

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SH*T FASHION GIRLS SAY

First it was “Sh*t Girls Say,” then it was “Sh*t Single Girls Say,” and now fashion girls are saying sh*t too. The latest installment of the parody sensation—YouTube shorts that poke fun at the lifestyles of niche social demographics—has also gone viral in the fashion world with “Sh*t Fashion Girls Say” parts one and two. Even the fiercest of fashionistas cannot help stifling a giggle at the image of herself, reflected in an eclectically-dressed bearded man in a blonde wig, dropping “totes amaze,” “I die” and “chic to the next lev” on the reg. Sh*t even hit the fan at New York Fash Fashion Week with a special edition exclusive video in collaboration with The Platform, featuring Derek Blasberg of Harper’s Bazaar. While these videos are just memes, fashion girls cannot argue that the sh*t they say isn’t anything short of eloquent. Mega chic!

—ANNA LUCZKOW

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editor’snote EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

ali mazzotta

Hi Threadies! From Bon Iver’s shabby-chic look at the Grammys, to Kelly Osborne’s hair-to-toe blue ensemble at the Golden Globes, to Angelina’s infamous right leg at the Academy Awards, this winter we’ve been inspired by red carpet fashion. The carpets of the Grammys, Golden Globes and the Oscars were more than an opportunity to appreciate the best actors and musicians—they were the be-all end-all catwalks of the season. So for our final issue of the quarter, we’re honoring old-fashioned black tie Hollywood style. This issue, check out our revamped “Runway/Realway,” featuring actors and friends Zooey Deschanel and Joseph Gordon-Levitt. Both of whom have every day style that’s just as adorable on and off the big screen. Take a trip down memory lane with our feature on the most iconic Oscar looks of the past two decades. And Thread’s “Six Looks We Like” emulates the distinct star styles of this year’s Grammy winners. To keep you looking Hollywood glamorous every day, try Thread’s tried and true overnight beauty tips in our cosmetics section or try your hand at a glitzy stiletto DIY. We also profile Ohio University’s own superstars, who raised money and donated clothes for the Athens community this February by running a nearly naked mile. 10 | THREAD

Special thanks go out to Jackie O’s Pub and Brewery, Athens Underground, The Other Place, the men of OU Improv, the OU Snowcats and the swim team. Be sure to check out Thread on Pinterest, Twitter and Facebook and let us know what you think of our issue!

Cheers, Ali Mazzotta


thread

MARCH 2012

Editor-in-Chief Ali Mazzotta Managing Editor Catherine Caldwell

seams editor

design & web editor

who what wear editor

photo chief

diy editor

picture editor

copy chief

creative director

public relations chief

advertising executive

Anna Luczkow

Riley Yuhas

Jessie Cadle

Sarah Balser

Hallie Rybka

Sarah Maloy

Becca Goodburn

Becky Williams Jazmine Reed Tom Busch

WRITERS

Abel Araya, Brooke Bunce, Morgan Etheridge, Kaitlin Flaherty, Maddie Gaither, Amanda Hefflinger, Sarah Hider, Kaylyn Hlavaty, Nadia Kurtz, Scott Lambert, Bridget Mallon, Michael Maurer, Olivia Ohlin, Rachel Sayers, Ali Shultz, Kate Sierzputowski, Laura Straub, Becky Wagner, Bentley Weisel, Kylie Whittaker

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Sarah Balser, Kasey Brooks, Elizabeth Emley, Levi Finley, Mary Hautman, Michelle Kappeler, Audrey Kelly, Michael Maurer, Sarah Miller, Jordan Petsy, Bethany Puterbaugh, Deanna Sakal, Meghan Shamblen, Becky Williams, Leah Woodruff

DESIGNERS I DESIGN ASSISTANT: Mikaela Longo Lauren Capponi, Emily Gardner, Alexa Hayes, Megan Hillman, Hannah Hitchcock, Chloe Hoeg, Rachel Keaveny, Tia Kropko, Linley Meyers, Danielle Morris, Allison Paglialunga, Dorrian Pulsinelli, Gina Ranalli, Marcie Richardson, Kellie Sedgwick, Kathy Smidansky, Julie Wheeler STYLISTS I CO-CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Henry Kessler

Megan Carter, Courtney Cohen, Gretchen Greenlee, Lexi Lang, Nai Maith, Katie O' Connor

COPY EDITORS

Brooke Bunce, Kate Irby

PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM

Jordan Anders, Sara Andrews, Marley Brison, Jocelyn Chiu, Ben Clos, Sydney Cologie, Kelly Hayes, Jenny Joseph, Hilary Johnson, Scott Lambert, Hannah May, Tina Mirabelli, Emily Pifer, Rachel Portik, Nicole Ranieri, Megan Scalf, Kyla Schmalenberger, Kellie Snyder, Anastasia Souris, Jerika Struewing, Megan Tyler, Christina Uehlein, Riana Upton, Megan Valentine, Brienna Weibel, Kylie Whittaker

MODELS

Jordan Anders, Sam Bartlett, Brooke Bunce, Allyson Craddock, Casey Eek, Virg Flowers, Caleb Fullen, Anthony Hawkins, Hilary Johnson, Travis Koury, Joe Lalonde, Lexi Lang, Nai Maith, Matthew Mikita, Olivia Ohlin, Jered Raines, Jessica Singer, Sam Stefanik, Michael Stover

BLOGGERS I

MANAGING ASSISTANT: Scott Lambert Jonathan Adkins, Courtney Cohen, Sierra Holt, Colleen Kratofil, Bridget Mallon, Rachel Reilly, Kylie Whittaker, Seth Williams

VIDEO TEAM

Maddie Gaither, Allie Levin, Lo Martinez, Jordan Pelligrini

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Zooey has (500) days of flirty, feminine dresses. To get the look, try sweet fabrics with a flowy fit. Don’t shy away from floral, bows and quirky acces12 | THREAD sories. Polka dots are also a must.


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runwayrealway Zooey Deschanel By SARAH HIDER Photos by MICHAEL MAURER

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ho knew polka dots could be so sexy? “New Girl” star Zooey Deschanel makes cute and modest look super stylish with her unique style and quirky flair. A shy smile paired with curious eyes peeping through blunt bangs creates a look that girls strive to emulate and that makes the guys drool. Whether working the red carpet in a green beaded Prada gown or romping around the city in vintage finds, this style icon never abandons a playful approach to fashion. Mixing retro accessories with modern trends, Zooey’s style is timeless; her ensembles are often an eclectic blend of ’60s mod and psychedelic ’70s, exemplified by her collection of flirty frocks in funky patterns. Innocent as her demure dresses may be, Zooey edges up her sweet style with vixen makeup and loud nail lacquers. Her infamous bangs perfectly frame her peepers, often lined in liquid black or dusted with a modern green shimmery shadow. The Rimmel cover girl never seems to leave home without a cherry bright lip and popping lashes, patenting each outfit with her vivacious personality. Have fun with your wardrobe like Zooey. Make an A-line dress the centerpiece of your outfit and work around it with solid black tights, patent pumps and statement belts. Flirt with bows, pleated skirts and cat-eye frames for some extra Zooey-inspired flair. If bangs aren’t for you, you can still channel the Deschanel coiffure by playing with slinky curls and tucking a bright flower behind your ear.

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Joseph Gordon-Levitt By KYLIE WHITTAKER Photos by MICHAEL MAURER

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oth in and out of the spotlight, this child actorturned-independent film star has rightfully earned his place as a style icon. On the red carpet, Joseph Gordon-Levitt prefers single-breasted, one-button tuxedos or slim-fitting, two-button suits in shades of grey, navy or black. At less formal affairs, he is often spotted sporting fitted casual dress shirts or sweaters over chino slacks. Although a perfectly put together gentleman for the camera, Gordon-Levitt’s street style varies drastically from his Hollywood tabloid image. For everyday occasions he keeps his style simple by pairing graphic t-shirts with dark-wash jeans or cargo shorts and completes his look with canvas sneakers. He adapts his relaxed style to colder temperatures by adding a colorfully patterned scarf and a dark, three quarter-length coat. Gordon-Levitt’s laid back approach to dress wear and everyday apparel makes it easy to adopt his style. For a smart casual look, match grey or black slacks with a basic button-down shirt, a solidcolored sport coat and brogue ankle boots. For Gordon-Levitt-inspired street wear, stay minimalistic with a T-shirt or sweater, dark jeans and sneakers or leather boots. Although Gordon-Levitt’s carefree day-to-day appearance is on the opposite end of the style spectrum from his refined red carpet image, he dons both looks with effortless ease, exemplifying his limitless personal style. n

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JGL has mastered the trendy minimalist look. To mimic his signature style, try pairing tailored pants and OUTHREADMAG.COM | 15 crisp oxfords in deep hues.


STREET PE wonderfully warm winter Photos By MEGHAN SHAMBLEN

ABBY WOODS// Freshman

REBECCA CIPRUS// Sophomore

What is your go-to item? These boots, or any boots. Is any of your clothing thrifted? Most of them are, but currently no. Are you ready for spring apparel? I’m ready for spring, but I love sweaters. What’s a current trend that you love/hate? Love: Velvet. Hate: North Face and Uggs. Where do you shop in Athens? Athens Underground is awesome. If I had a million dollars, I would buy everything there.

What is your go-to item? These boots. I wear them quite often. Is any of your clothing thrifted? This skirt came from Betty’s Vintage Finds, but I reconstructed it into a mini skirt. Are you ready for spring apparel? I like winter apparel and playing with layers and tights! What’s a current trend that you love/hate? Love: 1960s-inspired fashion. Hate: Cropped tops worn with non high-waisted bottoms. Where do you shop in Athens? Banana Road Costume Shop and Betty’s Vintage Finds

// Photojournalism

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// Commercial Photography


EEPS

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PAUL DIAMOND// Junior // Art

NATALIA RADIC//Freshman//Journalism

What is your go-to item? My cardigan or velvet jacket. Is any of your clothing thrifted? All of it. What’s a current trend that you love/hate? Love: When people wear what they want to wear. Hate: Name brands for the sake of name brands. Where do you shop in Athens? Athens Underground, Betty’s Vintage Finds and Goodwill.

What is your go-to item? Leggings and combat boots. Is any of your clothing thrifted? Currently no. Are you ready for spring apparel? Definitely ready for spring. I can’t wait to wear colors. What’s a current trend that you love/hate? Love: Big slouchy blouses. Hate: Leggings as pants with a shirt that doesn’t cover the bum. Where do you shop in Athens? Artifacts, but mostly I shop online.

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JONATHAN NORRIS// Sophomore

//Engineering Technology & Management

What is your go-to item? Dark jeans and a quarter button thermal. Is any of your clothing thrifted? I’m sure some of it is. What’s a current trend that you love/hate? Love: Form fitting clothing. Hate: Baggy clothing. Where do you shop in Athens? Anywhere and everywhere. Have you read Thread Magazine? I’ve heard of it, but I haven’t read it.

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STEPHANIE ORR// Junior // Art

What is your go-to item? Skinny jeans and flats or boots. Is any of your clothing thrifted? Almost everything. My earrings and rings are from the Paw-Paw Festival, and my necklace is from a garage sale. What’s a current trend that you love/hate? Love: Comfy sweatshirts. Hate: Leggings as pants. Where do you shop in Athens? Athens Underground or Artifacts. Have you read Thread Magazine? Yes, my sister was in it a couple of times. n


HUSTLE & FLIP

MIXED TAPE COMING SOON!

Twitter: @colziemusic // Facebook: www.facebookcom/colzieworld

Stop in for jewelry, accessories, home & garden decor, leather items, and much more! Store Hours:

Sunday 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

visit our website:

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blogger of the month

dance like everyone is watching By RACHEL REILLY Photos by SARAH BALSER

CELEBRATE STYLE. FLIRT WITH FASHION.

Personal style embodies more than just the fabrics we fling over our bodies in the morning. It has a particular attitude: a persona; a feeling that transcends through the way we carry ourselves and through the clothes we wear. Style can be tempted, teased and allured. The beauty of personal style is that we choose to wear clothes the way we want to each and every day. No offense to William Purkey who said, “Dance like no one is watching,” but trend lovers, embrace your individual style, and rock it out for everyone to see.

PLAY WITH YOUR CLOTHES

I created a blog focused on having fun, standing out, feeling great and overall, making it work. Dance Like Everyone is Watching aims to foster confidence in readers who rule the runway of crimson-bricked Court Street. My blog encourages readers to play with patterns and tease with textures, enticing heads to turn. I desire to inspire women to try new, exciting looks and activities through items easily accessed or already owned. I tailor clothes to different sizes and implement its alternative uses. A sweater is not just a sweater. I wish to fashion my style experimentation into a new, quirky, basic, and yes, dance-worthy, flirtatious affair. Show off your looks. Play with your clothes.

REMIX YOUR CLOSET

Girls always want more new clothes. What

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we don’t realize is that the fabrics hanging unwarily inside our closets have more potential than meets the eye. We wear clothing according to its purpose; shirts as shirts, skirts as skirts and dresses as dresses. What would happen if we remixed our wardrobes? Clothes would multiply, and our look becomes brilliantly creative. Take out old sweaters and long sleeved shirts that are never worn and have been cramming in the back of your closet. Cut the sleeves off and wear them over leggings and jeans as leg warmers. The longer your sleeves, the higher you can wear your DIY warmers on your leg. Scrunch them down for more volume and pair with a favorite pair of boots. T-shirt hoarding is something females engage in habitually. For some reason, we develop odd emotional attachments to old tees. I mean, high school track was awesome and all, but why do we still have our shirt? For those moments when we become smugly scissor happy, that’s why. Re-use your old Tshirt by cutting the bottom into small strips to create a fun, fringe belly top. Using these examples, I challenge readers to take a second glance at their closets the next time they suggest they have no clothes. Try wearing an article of clothing for a completely different purpose. Applaud your personal style. Test its boundaries a little bit. Every street is a runway. Every platform is a stage. We deserve to look good and feel great by daring to be different. Try new functions for fashion. Radiate individuality and confidence. Dress for everyone to see. Dance like everyone is watching. n


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insectjewlery By NADIA KURTZ Photos by DEANNA SAKAL

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N

ature-inspired insect jewelry is now making its way down the runway and into the most fashionable ensembles of the season. Top jewelry designers are adorning accessories with detailed birds, cats and elephants. Even Tiffany & Co. is adding insect pendants, earrings and charms to its collection. While the thought of accessorizing an outfit with critters may seem creepy, insectinspired jewelry is a surefire way to jazz up an ensemble. Flaunting crawlers is a trend that is sure to attract attention, but it’s not just the latest fad; most insects are symbols of ancient cultures with a story to tell.

BUTTERFLIES

These vibrant yet delicate creatures have inspired an array of necklaces, earrings and pins. Butterfly jewelry adds an air of elegance and gives a bland look character. Often considered a symbol of free spirit, butterflies bring a playful mood to any look. Known for their grace and ease of flight, butterfly-inspired jewels, like a simple Pandora bracelet

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seams Beetle Earrings, $8. The Other Place

charm or a winged brooch, give the wearer sophisticated poise.

LADYBUGS

Give an outfit a punch of color with the bright red hue of ladybug jewels. Cute and harmless, these little bugs can be worn on an everyday basis and with any outfit, especially when in need of some superstitious luck. Ladybugs are regarded as a good omen; in ancient Greek mythology, they represent the pairing of the soul with the god of love. Give your outfit a magical vibe with a little ladybug luck.

SPIDERS

Most people would squeal at the sight of this insect, but not in the world of accessories. Spider rings are more than just a Halloween look; when paired with the right amount of sparkle, spiders give an outfit edge. In ancient Native American culture, spiders were drawn on people’s backs as a symbol of protection. Now, the creatures are worn around necks as pendants to give the wearer a feeling of safety and security. n

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oxfordlegacy By RACHEL SAYERS Photos by MARY HAUTMAN

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hough they’ve given us the Burberry trench and Alexa Chung, Great Britain’s greatest contribution to the fashion scene to date is the oxford shoe. Sweeten up these classic leather lace-ups for spring with floral frocks or exhibit them in their timeless fashion under trousers. No matter what the pairing, the ubiquitous oxford has the versatility and class to appease even the most anomalous of tastes.

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classic For those who prefer traditional, or perhaps slightly androgynous clothing, the classic brogue style is recommended. Modeled after the original dress shoes worn by the gentlemen of Oxford University circa 1800, the classic oxford belongs in the closet of book lovers and professors alike. Burberry’s fall 2012 ready-to-wear collection is full of menswear staples and muted colors reminiscent of this customary style. To produce a rather stately effect, take inspiration from this line and add in accessories, such as bow ties and suspenders. To feminize, go for the occasional ruffle or pink piece. To channel this schoolboy charm without blowing the budget, look no further than the online clothing store Asos, a major supplier of the trend across the pond.

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saddle shoe If flowers and sundresses are your style, the naïve charm of the saddle shoe will call to you. This two-toned low-leather oxford bestows an air of sweet innocence, most notably when paired with frocks and a ribbon or bow. For Louis Vuitton’s spring 2012 ready-towear collection, the design house used a soft assortment of pale colors and delicate lace to compliment the virginal allure of the black/ white contrast saddle-style, producing a refreshingly youthful effect. To authentically achieve the look, peek in your grandmother’s closet or local vintage boutique. If thrifting isn’t your thing, visit ModCloth.com or Delia’s for even sweeter alternatives.


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contemporary If your fashion sense is more shock-and-awe than sweet compliance, the contemporary style is sure to suit your fancy. Designers have given the traditional oxford a noticeable edge with the addition of abstract prints, neon shades and metallic embellishments. The unique footwear is sure to add style and anomalous flair to any outfit, but if you need some more oxford inspiration, allow yourself to be amazed by Christian Louboutin’s leopard print look or KG by Kurt Geiger’s sparkling brogues sold at House of Fraser.

platform To give your blazer-and-bow tie uniform an instant boost, heighten your fashion with the latest edition of the oxford design: the feminine heel. Far from the shoes of your father, these platforms evoke a sense of captivating boldness, adding elegance and poise to any prep school ensemble. Pair with pencil skirts, power suits or figure-hugging dresses; platform oxfords are a statement all their own, whether worn to work or for a night out. Take notes from Jenny Packham’s fall 2012 ready-to-wear collection, which was full of bold dresses and classic silhouettes that perfectly compliment this shoe’s effortless grace and enduring class. For the slightly conservative, Chinese Laundry and J. Crew currently sell the traditional style, while Casadei offers a slightly more provocative take on the trend. n OUTHREADMAG.COM | 29


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eyebrows101 how to groom your man By MADDIE GAITHER Photos by SARAH MILLER

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irlfriends, we’re all familiar with this routine: the ineffective and useless battle of persuading your man to keep his facial hair in check. While beards and mustaches seem only to plague the relationship during No Shave November, another area seems to threaten his appearance year-round. Yes, that would be his eyebrows. No one wants to be dating Groucho Marx or Oscar the Grouch, so here are some quick tips for keeping your guy’s fuzzy caterpillars contained.

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BEFORE PLAN OF ATTACK

If going after a few stray hairs, use tweezers. While this might be a turnoff to your BF, explain to him that shaving will only irritate the area while a razor clips hair at the skin’s surface, meaning that you’ll have to help him more often. Tweezing removes the entire piece of hair from its shaft, so grooming sessions are less frequent. If your guy has a very low pain tolerance, a depilatory cream works well because it uses chemicals to soften and dissolve the hair from its follicle. Simply apply, let sit and wipe away. Note: A razor or scissors are for his beard or for your legs – not for swiping down between his eyes. While unibrows may be bad, razor burn is far worse.

SET THE SCENE

The best time to confront those buggers is right after your man gets out of the shower – the hotter the better. The steam from the shower will soften and relax the hair follicle so it will be less painful to remove. You can also numb the eye area with an ice cube for a minute or two. Be careful: icing for too long will shrink the follicles and make it more difficult to see the hairs, especially if he’s a blondie.

TAMING OF THE BEAST

Once you’ve armed yourself with tweezers, inform him before you pull each hair out so he’s not painfully surprised. He should get used to the sensation after a few hairs come out. If cream is your weapon of choice, test a small amount on his hand to see how his skin reacts before applying to the eye area. Allow it to sit for the amount of time indicated on the packaging and then wipe away with a warm washcloth. Dab some of your moisturizer on the area afterwards to soothe the skin.

BATTLE TIPS

Only remove as much hair as he’s comfortable with. Stick to his natural shape. Only remove hairs below the brow line. The top should serve as a template, providing the eyebrow’s natural shape and arch. If your man is the stubborn type, remind him that you’re helping him achieve his hunk-like status. Taking care of his facial hair does not make him a diva; it makes him a well-groomed, responsible member of the male species. Be sure to remind him that you shave your legs on the regular; he can handle ridding himself of a few stray hairs. n

AFTER CREAMS: Sally Hanson or Revitol

TWEEZERS: Tweezerpro or Tweezerman slant OUTHREADMAG.COM | 33


overnightcosmetics By MORGAN ETHERIDGE Photos by MICHELLE KAPPELER

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s busy college students, many of us tend to put beauty treatments on the back burner as we focus on homework, labs, classes and extracurriculars. Not only is the winter season detrimental to our skin, hair and hands, a lack of sleep and vitamins plagues college students in the forms of baggy eyes and lackluster locks, while expensive price

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tags on top beauty products keep many students at bay. But by knowing the essential ingredients to look for in products, repairing winter’s havoc is easy enough to be done in our sleep. Here are some products that work while snoozing to give you the appearance that you’ve gotten the beauty sleep you’ve always dreamed about.


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Skin

When searching for the perfect overnight facial cream, look for antioxidants to guard the skin against damage and one that contains jojoba oil, which aids in natural moisturizing. Try Origins Drink Up Intensive Overnight Mask for a hydrating mask that penetrates skin overnight, leaving the face baby soft and kissable. For a natural (and less costly) overnight moisturizer, try spreading a thin layer of extra virgin olive oil over your face before bed to wake up with a deliciously rich and velvety complexion.

Hands

Hands often take a harsh beating in the cold winter months. Look for products that contain biotin, a form of vitamin B that strengthens nails and keeps skin youthful and elastic. Another key ingredient is vitamin F, which protects skin from outdoor elements as it soothes scaly, dry hands. Try Boots Botanics Overnight Hand and Nail Treatment to boost skin’s vitality and gently remove any dryness. Make an overnight hand treatment at home by mixing half a cup of coconut oil, half a cup of sugar and the juice of one lemon in a bowl. After massaging into hands, put on an old pair of cotton gloves and hit the hay. The heat from the gloves allows the oil to absorb into skin faster, leaving hands rejuvenated and satiny in the morning.

Hair

A season full of cold air and windy days leaves hair dull and damaged. Revitalize lifeless locks by combing a quarter-sized portion of mayonnaise through dry hair, covering the head with a nightcap or plastic wrap and getting that beauty sleep on. In the morning, rinse and shampoo as usual, blow-dry and style those luscious locks. Not too keen on condiments in your tresses? Try Avlon Keracare Overnight Moisturizing Treatment. The overnight serum leaves hair shiny and silky in the morning without the tediousness and time commitment of a deep conditioning treatment. When browsing for overnight hair products, avoid mineral oil and sulfate as they leave strands feeling dry and brittle. Keep an eye out for glycerin and collagen to help restore moisture balance while you sleep. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 35


partypants spring prints in winter weather By KAYLYN HLAVATY Photos by BECKY WILLIAMS

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inter days often welcome an array of neutral shades and monotone sweaters. While it may be tempting to throw on a North Face and Pink sweatpants amidst the chilly forecast that overtakes the streets of Athens this time of year, for those begging to break winter barriers, a brighter option exists. That option is the plethora of vibrant patterned and animal print pants and leggings popping up on the runways this season. Everyone has a favorite piece, whether it be a structured black blazer or dark-wash skinny jeans that serve as the focal piece to an outfit. Trousers are no exception; they come in a variety of colors, styles and fabrics that offer something for every outfit. For spring 2012’s runway collections and retail lines, animal, floral and kaleidoscope prints have made slacks a statement, lightening up the winter wardrobes of fashionistas and celebrities alike. This trend has been spotted on Rachael Bilson, who rocked the red leopard print trouser, and Rachel Roy, who was photographed in silky, floral hareminspired pants during fashion week. Alice + Olivia’s pre-fall 2012 collection showcases the basics of winter, but the signs of spring are evident in the floral flared and skinny chinos that made their way down the runway. The collection featured eye-catching whimsical trousers paired with oversized sweaters or parkas, warming up the look for the winter season. Turning to menswear, the interpretation of this trend is expressed

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through a monotone and sophisticated color palette. J. Crew’s fall 2012 ready-to-wear collection was filled with tangerine, deep ocean blue, sand and aqua tones. Colored chinos were cuffed and complemented with sweaters and sport jackets, adapting the appearance for the winter winds. Patterned pants are an easy and innovative way to fashionably make the transition from winter to spring. Trousers provide the necessary warmth during the cold winter months, while patterns liven up a rather dull and repeated seasonal outfit. For some, printed pants may seem a little daring, but there are numerous ways to achieve comfort in winter, while adding a spring to your step. Try a solid top or one with a subtle print to balance the look of a busy bottom. While walking to class, printed trousers can be matched with a neutral V-neck or sweater depending on the temperature outside. Contrast animals prints like leopard and cheetah with a jewel tone top in sapphire or ruby shades to really make pants pop. To transition bottoms from day to night, a black or a bright shaded pump or ankle bootie will not only elongate the legs, but also give the pant an upgrade for a night on Court Street. A leather jacket adds edge while a blazer contributes a masculine but sophisticated touch to pink or more feminine print pants. For men out in their colored khakis, high-top sneakers and combat boots work well with this trend by neutralizing the look with a rock-inspired edge or grunge-urban flair.


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glitterkicks By Bridget Mallon | Photos by MACKENSIE COTTINGHAM

T

he shimmering substance we all fell in love with in preschool is having a major moment right now, with starring roles on countless runways, red carpets and even the streets of Athens. Adding a little glitter into everyday life can make any moment a special occasion, and seeing the sun reflect off a beautifully iridescent speck of sparkle is impossible to resist. Why walk into a meeting, a party or even a classroom with a boring pair of shoes, when with just a few steps you can transform regular old footwear into something eye-catching and impossible to ignore? These instructions can be used to add glitter to the heel of basic pumps, the back of a pair of boots or even the entirety of a ballet flat. The options are almost endless, so avoid pitching your old shoes and give them a sparkly makeover instead.

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supplies

Glue Shoes

Masking Tape

Paintbrush

1

Sandpaper Loose Glitter

3

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step BYstep ONE

Tape off the part of the shoe you don’t want to glitter. Doing this ensures that the shimmer stays in place and doesn’t travel to other parts of the shoe.

1

TWO

4

Rub sandpaper over the part of the shoe where the glitter will be applied. This helps the glitter stick to the shoe once it is dry.

THREE

Mix together the glitter and the glue until it is a paste-like consistency. Consider mixing several colors of glitter together to customize the shoes even more.

FOUR

Apply one coat of glitter-glue to the shoe and let it dry.

FIVE

After the first coat is dry, apply a second coat of glitter-glue. Before the second coat dries, pour loose glitter on the area to fill in any empty spots.

SIX

7

Remove the tape and touch up any spots that need more glitter with the glitterglue mixture.

SEVEN

Let the shoes dry completely before stepping out and stepping up your style game with the new sparkly stunners. n

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upcycling cleaning up coats By MICHAEL MAURER Photos by MICHAEL MAURER

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ish you could do something with that beloved— maybe not so stylish anymore— coat you are just too stubborn to give away? When it comes to restyling old clothing, there are many techniques. Whether you donate items to a local charity, or simply give them away to friends, refashioning and re-wearing old clothing is preferred to letting items collect dust in the back of your closet. With a quick change of prefix, instead of recycling, upcycle old clothing. Upcycling is a way to bring life and flair back into old clothing, making it useful once again. Follow these steps to spruce up your favorite fashion treasures. 44 | THREAD


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STEP 1:

Select the jacket you want to revamp.

STEP 2:

Decide what materials you think will best bring your jacket back to life. We chose embroidering string and red vintage buttons from Athens Underground.

STEP 3:

After choosing buttons for the middle of the coat and marking where you want to place them, begin by sewing them into place.

STEP 4:

This jacket fortunately had hidden clasps that keep the coat together, so the buttons here are more for show than functionality. If you want buttons to connect with the other side of the coat, create holes and hem accordingly to ensure the coat could be buttoned up.

STEP 5:

After sewing on buttons, embroidering is a good way to give the coat some detail. We added red stitching to the collar of the coat to give it a new bright pop. Stitching can also be done around the cuffs or around the bottom of the jacket for a flair of fashion.

STEP 6:

Sewing additional buttons on the cuffs is another trick to bring your jacket back into style. n OUTHREADMAG.COM | 45


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By AMANDA HEFFLINGER Photos by KASEY BROOKS

e’ve all been there: an outfit planned down to the accessories and matching nail color, but the jeans you want to wear are too long; they bunch up at the bottom, laying awkwardly atop flats. Don’t fret. There’s a way to shorten pants without a sewing machine or even a needle and thread. 46 | THREAD


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you will need:

• • • •

PANTS TO HEM IRON AND IRONING BOARD FABRIC TAPE SCISSORS (IF PANTS ARE EXCESSIVELY LONG) • RULER • PENCIL/PEN

STEP ONE

While wearing the pants you wish to shorten, fold the bottom of one pant leg up until it is your desired length. Mark this fold with a pen or pencil both inside and outside the seams.

STEP TWO

Take off the pants and measure the length to be removed. Match this length on the other pant leg and mark with a pen or pencil. If the excess is long, trim off a few inches with your scissors. Leave about an inch of excess fabric to work with.

STEP THREE

One pant leg at a time, flip the pant leg inside of itself. Place a few pieces of fabric tape just below the marks you’ve made on the leg of the pants.

STEP FOUR

Iron the pants to adhere to the fabric tape. Make sure you have applied enough heat for the tape to stick, but not too much - you don’t want to burn your pants. Keep in mind some fabric tapes are different; be sure to follow the directions that come with the product.

STEP FIVE

Slip back in to your newly hemmed pants and slide on your sexy flats. Your new look is fitted and complete! n

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roleplaying By RACHEL SAYERS Photos by SARAH BALSER

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ith the change of an outfit or the alteration of the temperance of speech, the Ohio University actors succeed in transporting the audience away from reality and into the fantastical world of theater. Few audience members, however, take the time to contemplate how the performance affects not only those watching the production, but the actors and actresses who are making the magic happen. “The first time I get into costume, I take a moment to really look at myself in the mirror,” said Laura Ornella, a senior theater major. “I notice how it changes me, how it transforms me. I think it’s really important to realize who I’ve become, because it certainly isn’t who I was before I put [the costume] on.” OU’s School of Theater teaches young performers the ins-and-outs of the diverse, and often challenging, world of acting. It is a dynamic life, one full of erratic rehearsals and dramatic peers, which is why it’s often difficult to explicate what life is like on the other side of Diderot’s infamous fourth wall. “Everyone has a reason for getting involved in theater,” said senior Jessica Link with a twinkle in her eye. Link is seated in the back room of a nearby coffee shop with a few of her fellow theater majors. The three actors are eagerly devouring their packed lunches. With a busy course load and late evening rehearsals and

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performances, the only time they could meet to chat was on a fleeting food break. “I became interested [in theater] because it gave me a chance to be funny, but now I just can’t seem to get away from it,” Link jokingly admitted while savoring warm soup. Link’s humorous approach to acting, however, is not far from the stage’s original methodology. The Ancient Greeks emphasized exaggerations and over-the-top emotions, often employing the use of dramatic makeup and masks to accomplish this task. Even now, the style of acting necessitates that performers develop another persona entirely, one which belongs exclusively to their on-stage character. It is a task Sonja Mata, a senior theater major, knows well. “I’m involved in the play A Servant of Two Masters, which is a physical comedy whose style centers mostly on the actors’ use of masks,” said Mata, adopting a more serious tone than that of her friend. “ [Actors] literally spend hours alone with their mask. They study its face, learn what it looks like from above, from below. How it changes in the light. They have to know their face, even before they ever put it on. It becomes a part of you.”

A PRACTICAL APPROACH

This sort of devotion is not uncommon for the actors. Their commitment to theater has eaten away at their time, concentration, and yes, even fashion, in the pursuit of spotlight.


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“My day begins bright and early and doesn’t end until late at night,” Mata said. “My wardrobe has to be extremely versatile for the sort of lifestyle I live.” The girls all nod in mutual agreement. “I don’t want to look like a scrub-bag all day long,” Link said, her eyes coming to life with a fiery passion. “I work, you know. I start out the day working at Shively. After that, I have classes, then movement class at five, followed by dinner and rehearsal at seven. And then, if I want to go to the bars afterward, and I want to look cute, I damn-well better make sure my outfit can keep up.” Planning an ensemble is a careful exercise in practicality, functionality and personal preference that took the ladies years to perfect. “My approach is a bit less utilitarian,” Ornella said. “But if I want to take the extra 20 minutes to make sure I look nice, well, I’m going to do it. I think it’s silly to say that fashion is frivolous. If it’s going make my day better, then I don’t think it’s shallow to care about what I’m wearing.”

DISCOVERING SELF

The ability to transport the mind, of both the audience and the actors, outside the normalcy of day-to-day life is but one of the theater’s many distinct features. The stage also affords actors and actresses a chance to discover what lies in their innermost self. “Whenever I dress myself, the image comes from a picture I have in my mind,” Ornella said with a whimsical note in her voice. “There’s a color or a feel that I have and it just seems ‘right’.” The theater, for all its emphasis on observation, has bestowed the young actresses with a self-awareness far beyond their ages. “We show up to auditions like a blank canvas,” Mata said. “We can be anything –become anyone—but at the end of the day

it’s me that’s left and theater’s helped me realize that.” Ornella, too, spoke on the self-actualization that comes with theater. “I can literally visualize what I’m feeling inside,” Ornella said. “It’s helped me understand not only myself, but all those around me, so much better.” The theater majors certainly march to their own beat and choose to express themselves exactly as they see fit. Their confidence and easy humor emulate the sort of assuredness that seems to befall most stars of the stage; a characteristic that sets them apart from the majority of their peers. From their anomalous fashion choices to their dramatic personalities, these girls make sure to stay true to themselves, no matter what the rest of the world is doing. “It’s the same sort of art that everyone’s been doing,” Ornella said, her hand sweeping over her body. “I just have my own personal expression of it, and I’m okay with that.”

“The first time I get into

costume, I take a moment to really look at myself in the mirror. I notice how it changes me. how it transforms me. I think it’s really important to realize who I’ve become, because it certainly isn’t who I was before I put [the costume] on.” — LAURA ORNELLA

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By BENTLEY WEISEL Photos by LEAH WOODRUFF

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hile effortlessly jumping rope and performing push-ups like pros on the tiled floor of the Ohio University Aquatic Center, the OU women’s varsity swimming team maintained their athletic composure and swimmer style. Upon entering the aquatic center, one is bombarded with a hefty wave of humid chlorine and the sight of dozens of fluorescent lights illuminating a completely empty pool awaiting domination by its swimmers. As the team dove through the clear sheen of water and shot down the narrow lanes, their green suits gleamed through the waves for the second practice of the day. The team’s first two-hour workout occurs in the weight room at 5:30 a.m. and their day ends with a two-hour practice in the pool at 5:30 p.m. With such a busy practice schedule, finding the time to put together a

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fashion-forward ensemble is not at the top of the girls’ priorities. In fact, it doesn’t even make the list. However, these swim girls find their personal style by incorporating swim accessories into their everyday outfits, working towards “sweat-pant-chic” and utilizing time off. Though the team doesn’t have to match everyday, they often choose to even in a practice setting. They are each bedecked in a one-piece Speedo suit featuring a tie-dyed green pattern brandishing a Bobcat logo; their individuality comes through with their choice of brightly colored goggles, caps and jewelry. “Everyone has their own things they do that set them apart from the team on the exterior,” said sophomore Morgan Sprosty. “I personally always have a lot of bracelets on when I practice.” Junior Kristyn Repke chimed in, adding that you will never see her without nail polish and brightly-colored


who, what, wear

Speedo Vanquisher goggles. For most on the team, the Vanquisher goggles were the goggle of choice. “It’s hard to distinguish ourselves on a daily basis in the water, and even more so at meets when we have to match completely and wear no jewelry,” explained Repke. Sophomore Molly Slattery contributed that, “When we match it eliminates individuality, but it enforces the sense of team and unity that makes us such a strong group.” As far as practice suits go, the choice belongs to each swimmer on most days. The top pick practice suit by the team was the Speedo Endurance with a spider back and smooth, flexible straps, because it is more comfortable for long practices in the water. For dual meets, which is when one team competes against another head-to-head, the OU swimmers must maintain their matching mentality with caps and suits.

For championship meets or invitationals, however, the swimmers compete on an individual basis, so they are not obligated to wear matching suits. The top racing suit is composed of an ultra lightweight pulse fabric that is quick to dry with low skin friction and low drag, according to Speedo’s website – almost like wearing another layer of ski “Some people prefer Speedo and others like Nike for their suit choice, but most people go for Speedo LZR suits when we have a big meet,” said Slattery and Repke; Sprosty agreed. Silicone is the top choice of cap-wear due to its stretchy nature and thick, soft texture that does not pull hair out like latex. The form-fitting material shapes snuggly to the head, while making it easier for swimmers to slide up and down the lanes during practices. This type of cap comes in a wide variety of colors and patterns for personalizing. The girls of the swim team are not only

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awake before most college students, they are already working out in the weight room. Some try to sneak in style while others compose themselves with a nonchalant mentality. “In the weight room we all have to wear our matching T-shirts and shorts, but I usually bring another outfit to change into 56 | THREAD

for class,” Sprosty said. “It typically is yoga pants and a V-neck: my go-to ensemble.” While Slattery added that she typically does not take into account anything beyond warmth and comfort for what she wears to and from practice, she mentioned that she treats her days without practice differently.


who, what, wear

“On days we don’t have practice, which is very rare, we usually straighten our hair and wear jeans instead of sweats,” Slattery said and all three girls agreed. They proceeded to elaborate on their weekend style that consists of skirts, dresses and cute tops that attest to each of their individual senses of fashion.

“If I ever go out and look nice people from my classes don’t even recognize me because I’m not in sweats and a messy bun,” Repke said. “I just wish people in my classes wouldn’t judge me for how I look when I go to lectures because they don’t realize our routine influences our daily wardrobe.” n OUTHREADMAG.COM | 57


slopeswag

By ABEL ARAYA Photos by XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

By ABEL ARAYA Photos by ELIZABETH EMLEY 58 | THREAD


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he powerful gusts of the soaring winds transmit the mood from one of fear and panic to one of calm and serene tranquility. The Ohio University Snowcats, as they move swiftly and effortlessly through treacherous paths and near-vertical trails, have a high threshold for fear; they move and slice past the trees in diagonal and perpendicular pathways with both style and a sense of easiness—or as they would call it in the extreme sports vernacular, “steezy.” OU Snowcats, a skiing and snowboarding club, strives to recruit ambitious students who love extreme and adrenaline-filled winter sports. These sports affect what they wear on the slopes and are a defining aspect of their lifestyle. Junior officer Ryan Burgess discovered his love for skiing when he was just three-yearsold and went with his parents, his aunt and his uncle to Seven Springs Resort in Pennsylvania. He continued his passion for skiing through high school and eventually college, joining OU Snowcats immediately when he came to campus. “I joined Snowcats during freshman year talking to Michael and Danny Messmer (president and vice president of the club) at the FreshFest in Baker with all the clubs and organizations that the University had to offer,” Burgess explained. “They told me about the club and what the Snowcats did, but what made our friendship grow was not our love for skiing, but that they simply needed players for the intramural soccer league and all of us had soccer in common.” Despite the fact that there are no places on campus where the group can actually practice and showcase their skills, they have a resilient base of over 200 active members. In addition to their weekly meetings in Morton and socials throughout the quarters, they also take trips to ski resorts out West every winter break to shred down the moun-

tains. This past winter, OU Snowcats traveled to Park City, Utah with 180 of its members. Their numbers represent the tight-knit community of individuals that love to ride.

SNOWCAT STYLE

“The colors

have to match to the personality I provide for it. In this case, wearing big and bright colors definitely brings the individuality I have for the love of this sport.”

— DANIELMESSMER

Although the club does not have official uniforms, they develop similar styles when it comes to skiing and snowboarding, said senior Daniel Messmer, vice president of the club. “A lot of us wear Northface or 686-jackets because it not only makes you

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feel comfortable but it bundles you up, especially if you’re going down a slope at 20 to 30 mph,” he said. They also focus on specific colors. For the majority of this club, including Messmer, wearing vivid colors is a must. “Whenever I ride, I always have an XL snow jacket and 2XL snow pants, and the colors have to match to the personality I provide for it. In this case, wearing big and bright colors definitely brings the individuality I have for the love of this sport,” Messmer said. The colors are also practical in capturing moves on camera. “If you’re getting your picture taken or you’re being filmed, you want to be able to have people see you on camera, so it’d be a really good idea to wear a color that people can visibly see,” he said. Senior Benjamin Palko, marketing and public relations officer, added that the annual ESPN X-Games and the looks the professionals wear influence how young skiers and snowboarders style their outfits. “A lot of the pros … they’re wearing bright clothes so you can see them as they’re shredding down these gigantic mountains,” he said.

ACCESSORIES

For the Snowcats, accessories like headphones, goggles and gloves play a large factor in their performance and in their look. Many of them listen to music with Skullcandy headphones when they ride. “I ride with a Skullcandy backpack with the speakers on the sides, so when I ride, I wouldn’t have to worry about putting headphones on because I could hear the music perfectly, which is always a plus,” Messmer said. In terms of other accessories, Grenade gloves, a type of glove with heavy grip, are a must-have in order to increase the ability to hold onto the ski handles or snowboards. As for headgear, Oakley goggles, the lead-

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ing goggle manufacturer in the world, are a necessity for having perfect vision of downward pathways and preventing snow or loose branches from being caught in eyes. As for snowboards and skis, many people have different techniques on how they accessorize them; some people put graphic art on their boards and others add stickers. Whenever Burgess skis, he wears multiple stickers from major skiing and snowboarding companies such as Oakley, Backcountry. com, Evo.com, GoPro and Dakine. “I always feel proud to wear these stickers, because these are the stickers that I believe in,” Burgess said. Secretary of OU Snowcats Matthew Simmons, a junior, has been collecting something quite different. Instead of collecting stickers for his board, he collects patches at every location he’s been to with the group. “I was thinking of sewing them all to a blanket or something when I get enough,” Simmons said. While collections and other forms of styling accessories may be different, each individual has the same love for their sport and especially their board. “I take pride in my board. It is my tool that allows me to fuel my passion,” Simmons said.

COMMUNITY

The group strives to make everyone in OU Snowcats feel like part of a community united by a common passion. To Simmons, the sports are so much more than just an activity. “Skiing isn’t just a hobby or a sport; it’s a way of life,” Simmons said. “It’s something very unique [because] it is about your decisions, your line you take and the attitude you carry into every day of skiing. The intangibles of skiing are that it puts a smile on my face every day and removes all worries and stresses about ordinary life.” n


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BUNDLED and

BRIGHT I

Photos by BETHANY PUTERBAUGH

n a season of plums, blacks and heather grays, neon colors emerge to brighten your closet and spirits. A nice substitute to camels and a great option between pastels, neon can make a bold statement or an easy compliment. Through not for the faint of heart, neons can be introduced into your wardrobe by accessories or jewelry. Neons can add life and excite to an assemble, a far cry from the neutral hues that are typically encouraged. But like a diet or live tweeting, moderation is key. A pop with a shoe or a splash with a choker necklace is the perfect addition to any winter outfit.

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Perfecting the “mix and match� is key with this look. Too much neon can take things too far. Try different textures and fabrics, and use the neon accessories as accents, not statement pieces.

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Pairing neon colors with more subtle tones helps to draw attention to your flashy piece. Glamorize the traditional LBD with showstopping colors.


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Neon colors are more popular than ever before, don’t be afraid to experiment with this trend. To warm up with this style, try bold and chunky acces| 69 sories toOUTHREADMAG.COM brighten up your look!


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SUIT


UP

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I

Photos by ELIZABETH EMLEY

f you adhere to the belief that laughter is the best medicine, then these men should be licensed doctors. The four gentlemen pictured here are members of OU Improv, an improvisational comedy group on campus. Have you heard of Whose Line is It Anyway? It’s like that, only they present longer scenes. In improv, everything is made-up on the spot, and the cast doesn’t know what is going to happen any more than the audience does. The group, comprised of two mixed-gender troupes, performs free shows every Thursday at 9 p.m. for audiences of upwards of 200 students. This shoot in itself is a work of improv comedy. The pictures present the viewer with a paradox: the juxtaposition of their sophisticated outfits posited against their absurd facial expressions. Their look highlights that even the classiest of outfits could use a dash of humor and a sprinkle of light-hearted fun. Based off of a GQ photo-shoot featuring Justin Timberlake and Jimmy Fallon, the following pictures hope to add a little laughter to your diet.

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SHE’S WIT THE BAND The life and fashion of musicians on the road. Photos by JORDAN PETSY

Musicians are, in some respects, the ultimate storytellers. Their lyrics are autobiographical and the melodies are strings pulled from their hearts. Whether a cotton candy-crazed pop star or a Christian folk band, musicians want to bring something raw and great, and leave an even greater impression and legacy. When they go on the road, they leave their families, friends and venture off with their instruments, their clothing and their stories.

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A fur vest helps a rocker go from grunge to glam instantly. However, the slouchy boot keeps an edgy masculinity to an otherwise diva-esque ensemble.

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Large brim hats demand that a fashionable musician be taken seriously. Having a leather jacket in chocolate rather than black makes a timeless piece more modern.

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Zippers are the ultimate detail for any edgy look. The white jacket is performance-ready with details and black denim. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 91


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Grammy

six LOOKS we like

style By BRIDGET MALLON | Photos by AUDREY KELLY

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A D ELE

URE S IG N AT R HER O S F 0 N ‘6 KNOW S AND FA B R IC IS T H E BLACK LE E D A , P ND MAKEU OF CLASS A E IS T IC A M H O P IT O P S E D . M U T E S T IN S O L ID E C A R G BE E OMES T IO N C A N D F E M IN IN G IN S R O L H L IG H T E D CO IG H . IN G DR D E TA IL W IT H A B O L S FUL T H E L IP O R A P O W E R IM E F T M A K E S N T, B U T IN A E S TAT E M N E R . AN LESS M

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X E L L I R SK

US R E B E LL IO W IT H H IS EN T G T A N O LO A SN G O IN G LE X PAY O R FA S H E , S K R IL TRENDS OR AT T IT U D F N N IO H W S O FA KN T IO N T O S , IR O N IC A LLY EAD. IC H AV E D H IO N C R IT S A N D H A LF -S S S E OUTHREADMAG.COM | 95 H IS G LA


TAYL O R SW I FT

GS ED SON E R P E N N T Y LE IS H G IN H S M AT C W IF T ’S E F U L. LO V E , S N D TA S T ABOUT F LI R T Y A RY T L, N A U IC O S HER C W H IM TS, TRUE TO IN B O O S TAY IN G E C A N B E S E E N R E V O H LE S B ROOTS, M F O R TA FOR CO O P T IN G AT E R IA L. M G IN M R CONFO

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& Z Y A J T S E W E KA NY HION. FOR FAS SFT SPOT UNGLAS O S S IR A E E H V T A R . PPERS H OWN FO SSORIES N E K C E C R A EVEN RA A ND JAY-Z ATHLETIC KANYE A R JACKETS AND HE T A LE , S E

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C IVI L WA RS

T ONY NO L HARM IS T O TA T A LS O W IT H IN IR PA T H IS ES BU E IR V O IC P LE M E N T IN G O N LY T H S AND S. COM LE Y T S H TONE T H E IR IN E A R T S H IG H R IT E H H T O O U O N E A N T S T Y LE , T H E D . S N LI IO M IN IM A E IR FA S H 98 | THREAD W IT H T H NOTES


BON I V ER

C IT Y E S IM P LI G TO TH LE N D S S P E A K IN IC , B O N IV E R B S LA N U F M D IS AN IN H KE TEES LI IC S R S B IC S C LA S F O R T FA U R O Y. IT H C O M ORD C D N E LS W N A S WOOL SUCH A

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Iconic

Oscar By OLIVIA OHLIN I Illustrations By VIRGINIA ADAMS

1997 - Nicole Kidman

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1999 - Celine Dion


Looks

2001 - Bjork

2001 - Julia Roberts

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2002 - Halle Barry

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hen it comes to the Oscars, “The Academy Award goes to…” and “Who are you wearing?” are considered statements of virtually equal importance. Each award show serves a different purpose and theme, but one aspect remains consistent: the focus on fashion. The Oscars is arguably the most anticipated, glamorous event of the season. It produces some of the most iconic red carpet looks in history, and Thread is recapping the past 15 years’ most memorable fashion moments. The list of noteworthy beauties begins with the statuesque Nicole Kidman. Alongside her then-husband Tom Cruise, she looked 1997 glam in John Galliano for Dior. The floral embroidered satin chartreuse gown coupled with a bold red lip added a

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2003 - Jennifer Lopez pop of color to the runway. Kidman snagged an Oscar for Best Actress that evening for her role as Virginia Woolf in The Hours. Two years later at the 1999 awards, designer John Galliano was associated less with grace and elegance, and instead with disaster and confusion. Celine Dion pulled a 180 with her menswear by wearing what looked like a suit jacket backwards. It is iconic in its own way, deemed as one of the most unforgettably bad looks the Oscars have ever seen. More awesomely horrendous looks swarmed the red carpet in 2001. Bjork, an Icelandic singer-songwriter wore what might be the most identifiable version of Oscar train-wreck fashion. Or road kill. Bjork’s outrageous swan dress was the creation of Macedonian designer Marjan Pejoski. The


2005 - Hilary Swank white-feathered garment featured a swan neck draped around her own with its head slumped lifelessly on her chest. The bizarre dress was a hot topic for weeks after the award show. Thanks to Julia Roberts, the 2001 Oscars still maintained their reputation of stunning fashion. Roberts channeled Hollywood glamour in a vintage black Valentino gown with vertical white accents. She won Best Actress for her portrayal of Erin Brockovich that year, adding another beautiful accessory to her iconic look: her signature elastic smile. Saying it was a win-win night for Roberts is an understatement. The next year, Halle Barry looked gorgeous in Elie Saab. Her gown, a sheer embroidered top with a statement maroon skirt, became synonymous with Oscar

2008 - Heidi Klum fashion. The night became more memorable when she was awarded the title of Best Actress for her role of Leticia in Monster Ball; she was the first African American to ever win Best Actress. In 2003, viewers ooh-ed and ahh-ed over the it-couple formerly known as Bennifer. Jennifer Lopez looked radiant in a mint green one-shoulder Marchesa gown. The genetically gifted pair may have looked great, but this Oscar night unfortunately was the inception of rumors that their relationship was rocky when pictures were snapped of Ben Affleck giving his wife a particularly insincere smooch. Three years later in 2006, Hilary Swank blew Hollywood away in a sexy backless navy blue Guy Laroche number. This dramatic gown fit her like a glove and was appropriOUTHREADMAG.COM | 103


2009 - Beyonce´ ately contrasted with a low, slicked-back bun and soft natural make-up. Swank accepted her Best Actress statue in this elegant look for her physically demanding role as boxer Margaret “Maggie” Fitzgerald in Million Dollar Baby. Supermodel Heidi Klum also brought the runway to the red carpet in 2006 by making a bold statement in her fire engine red, custom Dior gown. The dramatic collar and creative back details made this gown unlike any other red dress. She wore a high full bun and accessorized with Stuart Weitzman jewels that she designed from her own jewelry line. The iconic dress was later auctioned off for The Heart Truth, a campaign that raises awareness about women and heart disease. The next year, the trend continued with celebrities showcasing their own fashion business ventures when Beyoncé arrived 104 | THREAD

2010 - Rachel McAdams in a dress from her clothing line, House of Derion. The black and gold floral mermaid gown hugged every one of Beyoncé’s famous curves and generated a love-hate reaction from critics. Despite any negativity associated with her look, Beyoncé’s Oscar performance was well-received. The most recent notable Oscar look is Rachel McAdams’ Elie Saab Haute Couture gown from 2010. The whimsical multicolored gown made it look as though the actress floated down the red carpet. The pastel strapless dress was paired with Lorraine Schwartz multi-colored earrings and a diamond ring. With 83 years of fabulous and shocking fashion under its belt, this year’s Oscar looks should be anything but disappointing. n


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IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY AN EDITORIAL ON THE EFFECTS OF BUYING COUNTERFEIT By KAYLYN HLAVATY Photos by SARAH MILLER

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magine shoppers stepping off a subway, walking through busy streets and searching through purses in small, dark and cramped stores that aren’t much bigger than jail cells. The walls are mounted with fake designer products that cover the room like pieces of art. Here, the customer negotiates already low prices with persistent (and often frightening) vendors just to score a “designer” piece at a bargain price. This chaotic place filled with bargain-hungry consumers and rows of little shops is called

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Chinatown. It’s located in New York City, and the goods being sold are counterfeit. Although scoring a good deal on a designer handbag may be thrilling, there are hidden costs in purchasing a counterfeit bag. Every time consumers purchase faux items, they are directly contributing to forms of terrorism, child labor and drug cartels. By far the most horrific consequence of counterfeit production is child labor. The following facts come from a 2007 article in Harper’s Bazaar. Many manufacturers of fake


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COUNTERFEITS CAUSE

U.S. JOBS LOST ANNUALLY

goods reportedly exploit children for labor. Much of this illegal labor allegedly takes place in the city of Guangzhou, China. Although the legal working age in China is 16, factory owners seeking to maximize profits turn a blind eye to the underage children who apply. The factories are rumored to be overheated buildings with employees on anything but a 9-5 work schedule. Instead of playing with Barbie dolls and Tonka trucks, girls and boys are playing with unsafe machines and are working 10-plus hours with sleep deprivation and less than minimum wage pay. The factories usually produce legitimate, legal goods during the day and counterfeit items at night. Reports indicated that the workrooms are as big as a football field, with workers standing at long tables sewing, painting or gluing the next item on the assembly line. These conditions, if witnessed, would be condemned by labor laws in countries such as the United States. The production of counterfeit violates human rights abroad, and is detrimental to the state of the economy at home. There are roughly 750,000 jobs lost annually due to intellectual property theft in the United States. American companies are also feeling the effects of counterfeit production. There is an estimated $20 billion in revenue lost to American companies from underground companies illegally producing fake goods. This money lost can be going into the pockets of hardworking Americans producing the clothes and handbags that consumers wear and use daily. Dr. Sky Cone, an associate professor of retail merchandising at Ohio University, gave one example of hijacking ensembles. “Counterfeit is stealing and I think there is a market for it especially with the Internet. For example, af108 | THREAD

ter Kate Middleton was married, there were knockoffs of her dress. I think because the way the economy is and the way people are, most people cannot afford haute couture and so the only way we can have that stuff is diluted versions which are knockoffs,” she said. Michelle Price, assistant professor of retail and merchandising at Ohio University, also shared her insight on how the U.S. is cracking down on counterfeit imports. “The U.S. does have border guards that track these counterfeit items. It was a story on NPR and it was the person’s job to figure out the component of the shoes being imported into the country because each material is taxed differently,” she explained. “This person’s job is to get a saw and randomly take the products and dissect them to see if someone was trying to get a cheaper tax rate. When there is a will there is a way.” But there is a point at which interpreting fashion goes beyond good-natured copying and becomes an illegal act, Price explained. “The result of counterfeit goods stray the consumer away from supporting and buying from the designer. The weird thing about the fashion industry is that you are allowed to copy garment designs because they are not copyrighted, but the knockoffs where it’s the counterfeit actually happens when they try to pass it off as something else such as Hermes or Louis Vuitton and it’s the fake labeling that does a lot of damage,”she said. Over the course of three years, there have been 50 lawsuits filed against retailer Forever 21 by the likes of Diane Von Furstenberg, Anna Sui and retailer Anthropologie for infringement on the replication of designs, buttons and fabric patterns, according to a report filed with the U.S. Copyright office. The ability for goods to be sold on websites has added fuel to an already-growing problem


REVENUE LOST TO AMERICAN COMPANIES

of illegal counterfeit items. Less than a year ago, in June 2011, U.S.-based fashion designer Tory Burch made headlines in the fashion industry and a step toward change when the company was awarded $164 million in damages as a result of 41 online websites selling counterfeit items, reported Lexis Nexis. Price explains that design processes are the same across brands but there is a fine line between similar designs and illegal designs. “All designers influence other designers. When I worked at American Greetings, we designed almost the exact identical gift bag as Hallmark did. We are all being inspired by the same trends and it just happens. Once that label goes into the product, that is when it becomes illegal,” she said. Harper’s Bazaar is a leader in the fight against counterfeit fashion items and created the “Fakes are Never in Fashion” initiative in 2007. The campaign is dedicated to bringing awareness to the effects and criminal activities that result from the sale of luxury goods. The campaign appears yearly in the January issue of the magazine. According to the magazine, it is estimated that $1 billion is lost annually in New York City as a result of counterfeit sales. The loss of tax revenue can be linked to consumer purchasing of fake goods, and the individuals who are selling and manufacturing this merchandise. The latest bags, sunglasses, clutches, shoes and jewelry of designers are sought-after accessories because of their luxury and brand appeal. Fashion merchandise is not the only counterfeited item making its way into consumer hands. DVDs, music, perfume and pharmaceuticals are counterfeited as well. With the Internet and use of new technologies, it is easier to recreate what appears to be the real product while secretly merely mim-

icking a company’s designs. In recent years, Internet sites that sell counterfeit goods have increased due to their ability to produce quality websites that deceive consumers. In addition to magazine initiatives such as “Fakes are Never in Fashion,” there are organizations addressing the issue and finding solutions to fix it. One such organization is the Teacher of Ten Thousand Generations Foundation, a Hong Kong-based charity that rescues children out of factories and pays for their education and housing costs. UNICEF is another organization that designed a program to protect and assist child laborers. In 2009, the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) proposed the Design Piracy Prohibition Act to Congress, which would give designers three months from the time their designs are first made public to copyright their garment. Counterfeiting flourishes for two main reasons: counterfeiters can earn high returns with profits in the millions and those who are busted rarely do jail time. It is organizations’ actions and official laws that will help to alleviate the counterfeit problem. The production of counterfeit goods is a bargain for the consumer who can’t afford the real deal. Bags may appear pretty and desirable, especially with a slashed price tag. “For me, counterfeit items are stealing someone’s intellectual property and even the childhood of a young boy or girl,” said Cone. Despite the great bargain and the resemblance of a real designer good, there are real consequences to buying these cheap and fake goods. It can mean the difference between a child going to school or a child working 10 hours a day. n

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freshlymintedfashion freshlyminted freshly mintedfashion fashion

F

By BRIDGET MALLON PHOTOS FROM Photos from STYLEMINT.COM, SHOEMINT.COM, JEWELMINT.COM

or years, subscriptions have ensured that the daily news arrives on countless lawns before the sun rises and that monthly magazines reach their destinations promptly. But when subscriptions are employed to keep the fashion flowing, the style scene takes notice. A new series of websites offer users the chance to get a fresh piece of fashion delivered straight to their door every month with a simple monthly payment. StyleMint, JewelMint and ShoeMint are leading the way in style subscription services with their com-

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bination of customer involvement, celebrity spokesperson appeal and personalized suggestions. StyleMint offers a twist on the classic tee, JewelMint sells a line of statement jewelry and ShoeMint gives users the chance to get the newest foot couture. Each member website of the Mint family pairs a sartorial-minded celebrity with a professional stylist/designer to create each piece that appears on the website. Every piece on StyleMint is designed through collaboration between the impeccably outfitted Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, who are both


designers and celebrities in their own right. JewelMint pairs actress Kate Bosworth with celebrity stylist Cher Coulter. Ever-present in street style feature, Rachel Bilson now takes the reigns of ShoeMint with stylist Nicole Chavez. Upon creating an account with any of the Mint websites, users have access to all three with the same username and password. First-time visitors to all of the sites take a style quiz which helps determine what pieces are presented to them in their personal showroom. After answering a series of questions about personal style, best-loved magazines and dream pieces, each visitor is shown a small selection of the sites wares that best fit their style DNA. The websites choices are not permanent however, as users are more than welcome to purchase pieces outside of their showrooms. The websites work with membership credits, which are used to purchase each site’s specific wares. Members have one credit per month. After the first purchase is made, each subsequent month’s credit is automatically charged to the user’s card. For StyleMint and JewelMint credits worth $29.99 are charged monthly and for ShoeMint’s credits ratchet up to $79.99 per month. No charges are incurred until the first purchase is made, each subsequent month’s credit is automatically charged

to the user’s card. For StyleMint and JewelMint credits worth $29.99 are charged monthly and for ShoeMint’s credits ratchet up to $79.99 per month. No charges are incurred until the first purchase is made, however, and all of the sites offer new member deals — sometimes up to 60 percent off the original price. People who are unable to commit to making a purchase every month need not shy away from this family of websites though; during the first five days of each month, users have the option to opt out of making a purchase that month. The idea of subscription fashion is really taking off in the style world; both bloggers and celebrities have taken notice of the StyleMint, ShoeMint and JewelMint wares. Personal fashion bloggers Brooklyn Blonde, Sterling Style and Cheetah is the New Black have all posted photos of themselves wearing StyleMint tees. I Spy DIY featured a ShoeMint inspired project and giveaway, and JewelMint pieces have been spotted on Gweneth Paltrow and Sienna Miller. Though these three websites are less than a year old, they have been gaining momentum and a strong following of fans, both fashionably famous and not – a sign that subscribing to style is an idea with staying power. n

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FACESMODELING HTTP://WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/FACESMODELINGOU HTTP://WWW. WIX.COM/OUFACESMODELING/FACES 112 | THREAD

PHOTO BY ASHLEY WHITE


thread join

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WRITERS COPY EDITORS PHOTOGRAPHERS DESIGNERS STYLISTS MODELS PUBLIC RELATIONS ADVERTISING

MEETINGS: WEDNESDAY NIGHTS at 9pm SCRIppS 111

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dressetiquette thenvs.now are we still playing by the rules? By KATIE FLAHERTY Photos by LEAH WOODRUFF

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f in doubt, wear the plainer dress.” In an era of more-is-more fashion, this advice may be a hard pill to swallow, but this was once the credo for women’s attire. The magazine Etiquette “The Complete Modern Guide For Day-ToDay Living the Correct Way,” was published in 1956. Its flimsy grey cover barely protects the stained taupe pages that leave a crumbly residue after each touch. Similar to titles for an episode of Mad Men, some of the chapters include, “Business Particulars for Women,” and subheads “Try to be impersonal” and “For you, the secretary.” Etiquette’s bold and demeaning language begs the question, why would any woman go to this book for guidance? In the section on “Women’s Clothes” searching for evidence of fashion repeats proved useless as the expected pillbox hates, taffetas and petticoats were nowhere to be found. Instead each page is a testament to a woman’s narrow world over a half a century ago, capturing the last few years of control before the outbreak of social progression. “Unlike fashion, style doesn’t change,” read the opening to chapter ten. In disbelief while reading through “General Pointers for Small Women.” Number two“Watch out for Heavy Fabrics- Long haired furs are not good.” Notorious offenders of the oversized fur jackets, Mary-Kate and Ashley must be unaware of these rules.

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Continuing down the page “General Pointers for Heavy Women” explained “if you are on the heavy side you should stick to what is known in the trade as ‘vague’ clothes.” Tips number three and four also advise dull- surfaced materials and uncluttered clothes, justifying, “Of all women, those who are stout should be most conservative about their clothes.” Besides body types, which include the wide variety of heavy, thin, tall and small Etiquette’s only other division is drawn between city and country style. To sum up, country clothes are versatile and may be jazzed up for the city, but city clothes “look conspicuously out of place in the country.” Etiquette and fashion are intrinsically tied to social norms and much like society in the fifties fashion allotted much narrower margins for women. Dress was closely aligned with rigid gender roles that were believed to be concrete at the time. Women’s and gender studies professor Susan Burgess explains, “Etiquette is always trying to maintain status quo for the privileged …the groups that aren’t privileged have to be kept in line more because they’re the outliers …so there are rules that apply to men, but they’re less stringent because that’s not the worry.” Some 40 years past the women’s liberation movement we’ve exchanged our girdles for Spanx and gone back and forth with


DIY

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our feelings on bras. But unlike Etiquette’s description of a woman’s night out, there are no longer only two kinds of evening clothes. The two designated styles including “dinner dresses” and “evening dresses” have evolved to pants, no pants- just tights, skirts, shorts and even the occasional sweat pants have been known to make an appearance at the bar. As evening wear has expanded other genres have shrunk, for instance in the ’40s and early ’50s a well-dressed woman must complete her ensemble with a hat. As Etiquette states all women were required to wear hats in most churches. Now hats 116 | THREAD

have crossed over gender lines and appear in more casual settings for women including baseball games and for more practical use in cold weather. “Once women and other groups start to be included more fully in society and approach equal rights the norms that underlie the rules of etiquette come to be seen as artificial…so once they’re revealed to be not natural, but something that someone has constructed to keep things in place that sort of busts the whole thing wide open,” Burgess said. So the progression must be noted, woman


Etiquette is always trying to maintain status quo for the privileged …the groups that aren’t privileged have to be kept in line more because they’re the outliers …so there are rules that apply to men, but they’re less stringent because that’s not the worry.” - SUSAN BURGESS

are now seen in combat boots on the runway, men can regularly wear jewelry and skinny jeans as they please and the opportunities to express a unique style seem endless, but how free and original are these choices in fashion? To take a snapshot of most college campuses, the average school day outfit now consists of an old flannel that looks like its been taken out of a box in Uncle Edgar’s basement closet. It’s then covered with a long cardigan and most say forget the pants, leggings will do when since the flannel is two sizes too big. Etiquette would never approve, this outfit has thrown femininity out the window, right? But that same relaxed look seems to be replicated by a third of the campus, so where’s everyone getting their ideas? To indulge in a girly chick flick for a moment, there may be an answer ahead. In The Devil Wears Prada, Meryl Streep plays an esteemed magazine editor who scolds her fashion faux pas intern, Anne Hathaway, for

laughing at the deliberation between two seemingly identical blue belts. “You’re trying to tell the world that you take yourself too seriously to care about what you put on your back. But what you don’t know is that that sweater is not just blue…It’s actually cerulean…in 2002, Oscar de la Renta did a collection of cerulean gowns…it’s sort of comical how you think that you’ve made a choice that exempts you from the fashion industry when, in fact, you’re wearing the sweater that was selected for you by the people in this room.” The tangible books of etiquette may have been left to decay with the housewife persona long ago, but there is still somewhat of a rule-abiding culture in fashion that is simply evolving with the times. “There is a way in which we think there’s a lot of variation, but there’s also a way in which our choice is structured for us by people who are still playing by something like this rule book,” Burgess said. n OUTHREADMAG.COM | 117


Vintage Clothing & Accessories Antiques & Ephemera, China, Books & more

Check out our fantastic selection of Vinage Vinyl!

90 N. COURT ST. / 592-6286 facebook.com/athensunderground

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men’sessentials 10 essentials in your dopp kit By KATE SIERZPUTOWSKI Photos by LEVI FINLEY

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canvas bar mitzvah, the Dopp kit is the century old tradition of telling one’s son that puberty ain’t so bad. Assuming you’re now in college, it’s time to get yourself together and take care of the products that take care of you. That zip lock bag carrying toothpaste and a wad of floss just won’t do anymore; grab a leather kit that will leave your old man proud. Whether you are jet-setting to your job interview in New York City or simply toting your masculine goods to the dorm bathroom, here are the essentials for the sophisticated male on the move.

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TOP 10 MUST-HAVES: BRONNER’S 1 DR. PEPPERMINT SOAP

This Fair Trade and organic product is the perfect multipurpose tool for keeping squeaky clean. With as many as 18 uses, this bad boy can cleanse that dirty body, get deep into your scalp and glisten those pearly whites. In a pinch it can also be used for laundry soap and washin’ veggies on the run.

2 TOOTHBRUSH AND FLOSS

Keep your gums healthy and your mouth fresh by choosing a toothbrush of the electric variety and spin ‘em extra clean.

& SHAVING 3 RAZORBLADE CREAM

Keep scruff at bay by manscaping your beard or go all out for baby Faced perfection. There is only one Chance to make a first impression, with your face.

4 DEODORANT

An obvious essential for the man on-the-go, this product should never leave your pits or kit.

5 NAIL CLIPPERS

For keeping those nails trim and professional. The male hand is the window into his heart.

6 BLISTEX

Keep the pucker soft and smooth, this miracle lip conditioner will give you angel soft lips overnight.

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BOTTLE OF 7 SMALL COLOGNE

In case you get sweaty or forget to shower. No one likes the smelly kid.

8 TYLENOL

In the morning when the lights are too bright, the sounds too loud and your head feels like a used punching bag.

ETC.

(NOT PICTURED)

CONDOMS

These always-welcome friends are simply there for your protection. If you pick the humanitarian route, Sir Richard’s Condom Company donates a pack of condoms to a developing country in need every time you buy a pack…or two. They also design an entirely new brand for each country they donate to in collaboration with local artists to ensure cultural relevance in the area. Like their motto says, “Doing good never felt better.”

$20 BILL

You never know when you might need some spare cash to get yourself out of a tricky situation, or simply purchase some snacks. n


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In Good Fashion

bareonthebricks By LAURA STRAUB Photos by ELIZABETH EMLEY

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ras, body paint and boxers were the attire on Court Street during Bare on the Bricks, Student Alumni Board’s annual philanthropic event, cosponsored by Phi Kappa Psi this year. Students stripped down despite the below-freezing temperatures to donate their clothes to a good cause.

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in good fashion

Bundled up runners arrived at College Green around noon to blaring music and free hot chocolate, compliments of Fluff Bakery & Catering on Court Street. After checking in, it was time to take it all off. All of the participant’s excess clothes, except for boxers, bras and shorts were placed in garbage bags and the race began. Each participant received a drawstring backpack, which they used to store some extra clothes, just in case they did not want to trek home from Courtside as bare as when they arrived. This year’s race was the most successful yet, thanks to Student Alumni Board Member Alyson Kado, who partnered with Phi Kappa Psi philanthropy chair Joseph Garman in coordinating the event. According to Kado, the work began last quarter with securing sponsorships. The work continued this winter with advertising for the race. Their efforts were rewarded well; about 300 runners showed up for the event. “There were 426 registered runners, but I think the cold weather scared a few people away,” Kado said. Between registration fees and sponsorships, the two organizations raised just under $2,000. This is the first year that money will not be used to cover any expenses of the event; it will all be donated to a local charity. Student Alumni Board and Phi Kappa Psi have yet to decide which one. They also have an entire room full of clothes waiting to be sorted. “We are giving everything we raised to the local Athens community,” Kado said. The children’s clothes will be donated to local elementary, middle and high schools, specifically the Athens County and Trimble schools. Adult clothes will be divided and given to regional community shelters. “This year was definitely the most successful the event has ever been,” Kado said. It was not only the highest registration number, but the highest turnout for donations as well. Donations ranged from T-shirts and shorts to hoodies and jackets. Phi Kappa Psi member and winner of the race, Ben Carter, rid his closet of everything from the past six years that no longer fit. “I had two huge

bags,” he said. This was Carter’s third year participating in the race, but the first year his organization helped plan it. For the past two years, Student Alumni Board and Alpha Epsilon Pi have sponsored Bare on the Bricks. However, this year Phi Kappa Psi was more than happy to help out. As for winning the race, it has always been a personal goal for Carter. “My goal was to win this year and I did,” Carter said. “I got to break the banner and everything.” After the race, runners warmed up in Courtside with a slice of free pizza and Fluff’s hot chocolate provided. Music blared and the organizers raffled off prizes. As she waited in line for her pizza, runner Emily Pollack enthusiastically said, “I would definitely do it again.” n

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Asymetrical Hair

RANT BY BECKY WAGNER

So, you want to shave one side of your head. Because…why not? Rihanna did it, why not you? Go right ahead! I’m sure fashionminded peers everywhere will commend your edgy and dramatic choice of style. But, what are you going to do when you want to grow it back? There are such things as jobs and internships where you probably want your boss to think of you as a fairly stable-minded individual. Feasible options in this scenario are as follows: pull a Britney and shave your entire head, rediscover hats or deal with having an awkward cabbage-sized patch of hair that flounders in the awkward inbetween stages of hair growth. Best of luck over the next six months to two years, time dependant upon your hair length of choice. Re-growth consequences in mind, it’s best to just avoid the style entirely. You want to be taken seriously in your career field. Unless you plan on forever working in a tattoo parlor or bar tending at The Union, hacking off half your head of hair won’t help you get ahead. Do you want people to casually assume you got in a fight with a drunken barber that ended with him pinning you down and forcibly shearing you like a sheep? Didn’t think so.

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RAVE BY KATE SIERZPUTOWSKI

The human body is all about symmetry; cut us down the middle, and we’re the same on both sides. We’re used to our roles as perfect emblems of natural organization. Symmetry, however, is a system created to give one the sense of safety, security and familiarity... How dull. There are two ways to deter this burden of boredom. One: going the Strange Addictions route and becoming a self-inflicted paraplegic, or two: taking the safer route and chopping off a side of your hair (preferably the one that shows off the more attractive features). Although the look may seem like Edward Scissorhands slipped a delicate razor-bladed finger whilst trimming, it does take one away from the comfort of a millennium of anatomical symmetry. Just look to La Roux; confidence is having the guts to whack off some of your hair and leave judgment only to those faint of heart. n


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DINE-IN ONLY DRINK SPECIALS // “PITCHER BEER NIGHT” DEALS ON DOMESTIC PITCHERS, IMPORT PITCHERS, & SELECT BOMBS 126 | THREAD

March 2012  
March 2012