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IN THIS ISSUE

costume

COUTURE

and

barber

SHOP

thread JUNE 2011

plus

COAST

TO

COAST

e g a teen nd a l e t s a w

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all american bbq

teenage wasteland

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swim wear

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coast to coast

one dress

Cover photo by CONNOR LAMB

tableofcontents


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Haute Online Top 5 Editor’s Note Thread Buzz

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Runway Realway Column: Bro Cake

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DIY Embellished Headbands DIY Tie Tricks DIY Good Housekeeping

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Street Peeps His & Hers Shoes Luscious Lips Barber Shop Color Solidrity

diy

op t f o o r e c n a rom who, what, wear

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Sneaks That Shine International Street Fair Festival Fashion Costume Couture

in good fashion

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Relay for Life

back features

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Workout Wonderful Ceremonial Standards 70s Style Rant / Rave

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hauteonline atlantic-pacific Atlantic-Pacific features the diverse and immense wardrobe collection of West Coast fashionista Blair Eadie. This blog captures some of Blair’s favorite looks. Each post features several angles of the outfit as well as where readers can find the major pieces showcased. Atlantic-Pacific does a flawless job of transitioning between classic prep and boho chic without missing a beat. -HOLLY SCHNICKE

EADIE’S LOOK Noted for her bold ballerina bun, Eadie demonstrates ways in which fellow fashionmongers can wear pieces more than once to create a different look. Recently, Eadie included a DIY link instructing readers how to reconstruct one of her favorite American Apparel bags, which appears in several posts. Other Eadie favorites include David Yurman bangles and a gold monogrammed necklace from Max&Chloe, both of which she is rarely seen without.

SOCIAL NETWORKING On the side of her page, Eadie displays her social media links, and under the Features and Press section, there are links to other blogs and websites that have spotlighted her looks. From Glamour to Nylon Korea, it is clear that Blair Eadie’s blog is a force to be reckoned with.

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solestruck

Specializing in fashionable footwear for men and women, Solestruck is a fashion blog determined to rid the world of ugly shoes. This blog is an extension of a footwear retailer website that allows users to purchase the items shown. Many of the women’s shoes have been stripped straight from the runway. The men’s shoes are favored designs pulled from popular footwear lines created by numerous designers. Under the men’s side of the blog there are both classic styles and more modern styles of footwear. -KRISTA COLE

GENDER OPTION The main feature of Solestruck is the option to choose whether the user wants to view women’s items or men’s items. The women’s side of the blog is user-friendly with many categories to choose from such as archives and recent posts. The men’s side of the blog is set up differently with categories placed in a block formation.

SHOPPING VARIETIES Another feature of Solestruck is the link to the website that sells the items pictured on the blog. Users can choose to shop by designers or by shoe style. All of the shoes for sale are name brands, such as Jeffrey Campbell and Timberland, and do not come cheap. Although fashionable shoes like these are worth the cost.

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oh joy! When browsing the web and procrastinating homework, people want media to be updated as regularly as possible. Blogs with outdated posts and old styles could be a damper on anyone’s day. Joy Deangdeelert Cho, founder of Oh Joy!, makes sure her blog is updated at least two to three times a day, ensuring her readers always have the freshest news about her favorite things: design, fashion and food. -CARLY WIITA

The site is simple and elegant, focusing mainly on pictures with a snippet explaining why Cho and her staff love the highlighted items. Highlighted by pastels, the site emphasizes featured items by giving them a pop of color against the site’s light background. When focusing on food, Oh Joy! offers ways to switch up classics such as mini cupcake sandwiches, links to get a better feel for items she promotes and even ways to decorate the table for a special occasion.

THIS & THAT The fashion section has ideas such as “This & That…” which features a dress, top, purse or other article of clothing and matches it with a collaborative decoration that complements the piece.

CLOSET & CASA One of the most interesting things Cho highlights is “Closet & Casa,” which features a prominent woman in the fashion or design industry, takes a favorite from her closet and an item from the home that matches. When I need a little pick-me-up during the day, Oh Joy! is a site that effortlessly features just enough of everything to bring some joy to anyone’s day.

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BRONEY’S Alumni Grill

7 W. Carpenter Street, Athens, Ohio 45701 www.broneys.com

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Thread leaders highlight the top trends & news in the style world. Here’s what is happening outside of our Athens fashion bubble.

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Transgender Models Move over Gisele, Agyness and Coco. There are new faces on the fashion scene! Two names that have been stealing the spotlight are Lea T and Andrej Pejic. Not only do these models have amazing faces, but their stories also make them fashions’ top picks. Lea T is the muse for Riccardo Tisci for Givenchy and represents the transgendered community having gone under a full body transformation herself. Andrej Pejic makes androgyny hot! This male model is in Next Liberation magazine rocking women’s wear. These are two names and two faces who challenge gender roles and fashion rules. -Laleh Honar

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Pantone Weddings

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Attention color-obsessed brides: Worry no more! Dessy.com/PANTONE can help you coordinate with your florist, planner, bridesmaids and maid of honor (who better know the difference between mandarin and tangerine at your tangerine and coral wedding). Not only will it help everyone involved with your wedding stay on the right color-path, it will provide you with a preview of everything of your color-coded wedding dreams. Dessy makes it easy to build mood boards. Because once you choose your color combo, Dessy will show you outfit styles and accessories in coordinating colors. After that you can upload images of your venue, centerpiece, shoes, cake and invitations to help complete the design of your style board. Just another reason to love Pantones! -Ali Morris


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Two-tone Pants

This spring, it’s all about the bright colored pants. But this fall, be prepared for a new trend to try out on the town: Two-tone pants! After a recent visit to Style.com, I learned that Chloé, Celine, Derek Lam and Philip Lim are giving us another reason to break away from skirts. Their fall collections all showcase trousers with two different colors on each pant leg - usually a darker color on the inside of the thigh. As an avid dress and skirt wearer usually bored with jeans, I’m intrigued to try out a new pants look and have a feeling H&M and Forever21 will be making a dent in my budget. -Andrea Teggart

CFDA Nominees

The CFDA (Council of Fashion Designers for America) has released its annual journal of all of the nominees. This council not only announces the nominees and preps them for a photo shoots, saying, “Hey, I am talented, and I am sexy.” This year Prabal Gurung shows off his biceps and the Olsen twins (try to) create an individual look, awaiting the awards on June 6. Among other reasons, I will be following the event to see how the host, Anderson Cooper, stacks up to all the male models. - Jamie Ratermann

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I may be a bit jealous, but I keep seeing Solange Knowles, little sista of the Diva herself, Beyoncé, in every magazine, fashion website and blog. WhoWhatWear.com proclaimed her as “Girl of the Month” for her truly unique and creative ensembles. Option for bohemian pieces with urban flair, Solange intertwines her distinctive style with her talented voice, quickly becoming the fashion industry’s newest “it girl.” Better watch out before your sister steals your thunder, Beyoncé. -Aimee Rancer

magiccube77

Solange Knowles


editor’snote jamie ratermann EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Hi Threadies, I am so pleased to present with you Thread’s June issue. This issue signifies the last product from the founding executives and my last as Editor-in-chief. It is amazing to me how Thread has progressed in a year through the hard work and creativity of journalism, visual communication, film and business students. Eight issues of Thread have celebrated everything from the diverse style of Athens international students to the local metal heroes Skeletonwitch and the designs of their drummer Derrick Nau. However, the transition of our freshman writers to dedicated Threadies has been just as rewarding. For me, the photo shoots have made the most noticeable transformation, not only by the magnitude but also by the inspiration behind the photos. In terms of nudity, the first issue where the photo chief and I had to coax our male model to “appear” half nude on the cover seems a few and far between in comparison to our Boxcar Burlesque photo feature. Above all, the Collegiate shoot from our October issue holds a close place in my heart because of our depiction of the scenery and the style that defines Athens campus.

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While this June issue is bittersweet, we are leaving our fashion manifesto to a group of innovative and fashion-obsessed Threadies who can carry on our message : Fashion is everywhere in every shape and culture. While I know all of my staffers will continue the hard work, I would like to dedicate this last magazine to the graduating Threadies who have stuck with us from the beginning. Please be sure to give us your feedback via Facebook and Twitter. Also, if you would like to own a piece of Thread history, our first coffee table book is on sale! And, for the last time, stay fierce, Jamie Ratermann


thread

JUNE 2011

Editor-in-Chief Jamie Ratermann

Managing Editor seams editor

Jordan Valinsky

Aimee Rancer

design & web editor Ali Morris

who what wear editor

photo chief

diy editor

picture editor

copy chief

creative director

public relations chief

advertising executive

Courtney Baldasare

Holly Fisher

Lauren Huefner Lauren Mikolay Andi Teggart

Annie Scheltens Sam Fink

Laleh Honar

WRITERS

Brooke Bunce, Catherine Caldwell, Sydney Cologie, Libby Cunningham, Shane Darrow, Maria Fabiano, Sophie Frederickson, Rosie Haney, Jourdyn Heilinger, Kaylyn Hlavlaty, Emily Koenig, Anna Luczkow, Bridget Mallon, Sarah Maloy, Ali Mazzotta, Olivia Ohlin, Bradley Parks, Kathryn Potraz, Holly Schnicke, Laura Straub, Bentley Wiesel, Carly Wiita

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ginnie Adams, Emmy Baker, Sarah Balser, Heather Beaver, Lisa Beggs, Brooke Bunce, Mackenzie Cottingham, Sarah Cowden, Levi Finley, Holly Fisher, Mary Hautman, Kate Irby, Michelle Kappeler, Audrey Kelly, Conor Lamb, Michael Maurer, Emily Mueller, Emily Newman, Deanna Sakal, Phil Sam, Sara Spiegel

DESIGNERS

Jessica Buse, Annie Cercone, Lindsay Cherry, Elyse Freeman, Sarah Harris, Megan Hillman, Jennifer Johnson, Rachel Keaveny, Chelsea Leasure, Mikaela Longo, Danielle Magary, Linley Meyers, Alyson Morris, Danielle Morris, Marcie Richardson, Kaitlyn Richert, Riley Yuhas, Danielle Zeisler

STYLISTS

assistants Justin Brown, Ali Mazzotta Kaylyn Hlavaty, Lexi Lang, Nicole Mainwaring, Jazmine Reed

COPY EDITORS

Holly Coletta, Kate Irby, Sarah Maloy, Holly Schnicke, Rachel Swalin, Carly Wiita

PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM assistants Rebecca Goodburn

Sydney Cologie, Anna-Marie Frantz, Scott Lambert, Megan Marcum, Nicole Ranieri, Hannah Rose, Kyla Schmalenberger, Kellie Snyder, Kylie Whittaker

MODELS

Abdulmajeed Alogbani, Ski Bailey, Jordan Bresler, Kevin Briggs, Stephanie Cesar, Nicole Christie, Rachel Colletta, Steph Doan, Chris Dobstaff, Lindsay Feran, Shelby Gilgoff, Aja Goare, Sarah Hider, Hannah Hinkle, Eric Horton, Michael Joseph, Jason Karakas, Trenton Kline, Rebecca Koch, Nicole Mainwaring, Julie Maynard, Andy Meyer, Jesse Neader, Rachel Orr, Chelsea Palma, Cheri Southall, Hannah Stanton-Gockel, David Wilson, Rachel Yikes, Andrew Zucker

PR TEAM

Jordan Anders, Sydney Cologie, Anna-Marie Frantz, Scott Lambert, Megan Marcum, Nicole Ranieri, Jazmine Reed, Kyla Schmalenberger, Kellie Snyder, Kylie Whittaker

VIDEO TEAM

Margaret Babington, Tim Jackson, Jacob Nemeth

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d a e r th

Z U B LINDSEY DISTLER Really enjoyed this issue. Keeps getting better and better!

MEGAN WORKMAN I love that the magazine isn’t afraid to convey different and unique styles throughout. Love it!

LEXI_SWEET LEXI SWEET

JORDAN327

Love the new @threadmag issue! Great way to pass my time @OU_ GolfTennis! Wish i could wear hats...

The May issue of @threadmag is OUT! Click my link if you like pretty things...

SNACKFACE KAILEY HARLESS

EMOREHART EMMA MOREHART

Everyone check out the May issue of @ threadmag: LOVE the hardware/wear bracelet how-to on pgs. 56-57!

Had so much work to do this morning, but then the new issue of @threadmag came out... goodbye productivity.

MADDIE GAITHER MADDIE GAITHER

KELLIE_SNYDER KELLIE SNYDER

Enjoying the latest issue of @threadmag --> it’s FANTASTIC! Wooohoo!

IIT’S HERE! Check out the latest issue of @ threadmag @ohiou @scrippsjschool

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JORDAN V


Z Z

in good fashion

> > > S WU

O

FOLL

MAG D A E R H M/T O MAG C . D R A E E T R T I H T W T OM/ C . K O O FACEB

campus fashion twitter chat with

@NYCPRgirls

@THREADMAG » @NYCPRGIRLS WHAT KINDS

@THREADMAG » @NYCPRGIRLS WHAT

OF THINGS CAN STUDENTS DO TO PREPARE

INTERVIEW TIPS DO YOU HAVE?

FOR A FASHION CAREER WHILE STILL IN COLLEGE?

Meg Make this YOUR interview. I’ve been on too many interviews where I let them run the interview out of nerves/

Meg Study the space and know it like the back of your hand. Know every publication, know the vernacular, know the leaders.

fear.

Adrianna Impress your interviewer with well thought out questions. Check out our blog post for details!

Adrianna Beyond landing an internship, build your social networks, start a blog or Tumblr account to display your interests.

@THREADMAG » @NYCPRGIRLS HOW IS PR IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY DIFFERENT FROM OTHER TYPES OF PR? WHAT EXTRA SKILLS ARE NEEDED?

Meg You need to have endurance - be prepared for crisis control every single day. And of course the fab shoes.

@THREADMAG » @NYCPRGIRLS WHAT SHOULDN’T YOU DO IN AN INTERVIEW?

Meg Don’t stay quiet. Don’t forget copies of your resume. Don’t forget to put on makeup/shower/swallow your gum. Seen it all.

Adrianna Don’t ever say you don’t have any questions - it makes you seem uninterested and like you didn’t pay attention.

WANT TO GET IN ON THE BUZZ? PARTICIPATE IN #CAMPUSFASHION CHATS WITH @THREADMAG EVERY OTHER MONDAY NIGHT! OUTHREADMAG.COM | 13


runwayrealway By LAURA STRAUB and EMILY KOENIG I Photos by KATE IRBY

BELT

Adding a vibrant belt to an outfit instantly spices up the overall look.

SHOES

Adding a pop of color with shoe wear makes walking in heels look much more bearable.

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he Alice and Olivia Spring 2011 Ready-to-Wear collection puts a new spin on traditional springtime fashion. The line is dominated by black, white and tan neutrals livened by bright and daring red or blue hues. These bursts of color continue all the way down to the toes, with brightly colored or patterned peep-toe platform heels. The clothing in the line is light and airy with a few structured pieces like a trench coat or skirt to bring the looks together. The 14 | THREAD

line makes use of textural detailing on the sheer fabrics, with scalloping, feathers and, of course, lace. When not playing with the texture of the garments, the clothes feature bold patterns like polka dots, stripes and geometric shapes. Making Alice and Olivia’s look work for you is easy. Simply pick your favorite textured, neutral staple and add a bright belt or platform heels. Be sure to add a structured piece to bring the look together.


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Clothes provided by The Other Place

Alice & Olivia

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Perry Ellis

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s colors make their way back into the trees and flowers, they’re also finding their way into this season’s menswear. The dark hues of winter are easily forgotten with the introduction of salmon, mint and pastel blue sweaters and soft gray, blush and white shorts flaunted in the Perry Ellis Spring 2011 menswear collection. Blazers with hard edges and soft colors, clam bake-worthy plaid and crisp khaki shorts are all simple staples that make Perry Ellis’s collection stand out. It’s a prep school look with a splash of color that isn’t meant to be paraded only on the east coast, but all the miles in between.

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SHORTS

SHOES

A soft-colored pair of shorts with a vibrant sweater is an easy way to tone down the sweater’s statement & coordinate the outfit.

Incorporating shoes without a polished finish can help to make this look an everyday staple.

ROLLED-UP SLEEVES

TIE

Rolled-up sleeves that expose a white shirt underneath a bright sweater are a good way to relax an outfit without losing the style.

For layering that adds sophistication, donning a sleek tie under a bright sweater exemplifies the Perry Ellis persona.


blogger of the month

flow: the icing on the brocake

W

By SHANE DARROW Photo by SARAH BALSER

hen it comes to bro fashion, one of the most crucial elements to put everything together is not a piece of clothing, but the ability to pull off an incredible head of hair. Us bros do not grow old fearing death or being alone; we fear balding. The thought that one day old age could strip us of our flow sends goosebumps down our spines. Many of us have a yearly, and sometimes longer, hair care schedule that we stick to in order to make sure our flow always stays healthy: the three-month trim, the devotion to a certain brand of conditioner, the multiple empty bottles of Biotin that pile up on our dressers or the relationship between a bro and his hairdresser. There is only one person in the Milky Way Galaxy that I will ever allow to trim my hair; her name is Rebecca and she is a goddess. Another reason why us bros care so much about our hair is that a lot of us are, or were at one point, athletes. Many of us play club sports in college, but to quote Brantford Winstonworth, the subject of “Ultimate Lax Bro,” a YouTube viral video, “We still try really hard.” My main point is this: Having long hair run out of the back of a lacrosse or hockey helmet looks absolutely amazing, and if this can be complemented by a respectable mus-

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tache, well, then you are just on another level completely. You know the saying — “Look good, feel good, play good.” And who says that us bros do not have fashion sense when it comes to color coordinating? Find me a bro who loves his flow that doesn’t have at least five different “flow bands” to match his outfit and I’ll find you a guy that just doesn’t go that hard in the paint. In the long run, us bros are always going to be givers. Every bro knows the length before he can cut his lovely locks and donate them to a better cause — 10 inches of a pony tail to Locks of Love for all you bro haters out there — and we take pride in knowing that after a long run, sometimes it just has to get cut. Whether it is for work or for your parents threatening to cut off your finances, that day will sadly come. The last time I got my hair buzzed it was literally like I was having my self-esteem surgically removed from my system. I remember watching my hair float to the floor and reminiscing on all the memories we had. So I end this post by telling all bros out there to let the flow rage to its longest ability, because college is the one place where we can get away with having it before the real world hits us and we all turn back into buzz cut kids. Bro hard, OU.


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streetpeeps

Illustrations by LINLEY MEYERS

By BROOKE BUNCE

“I was able to slip this dress on over a bikini because I’m going to a beach party and I knew it was going to be really hot during the fest.”

JUSTINE PRICE FRESHMAN, UNDECIDED MAJOR

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“Sean Kemp is my favorite player, and of course I had to rock the jersey for an Athens fest.” DANNY GUBANC, RECENT GRADUATE OF TWINSBURG HIGH SCHOOL


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“I found these shorts in my dad’s drawer with the tags still on. They’re Tommy Hilfiger from I think ’96 or ’97. I wore them because I knew it’d be hot today.”

“I wore this dress because it’s really flowy and comfortable.” TAYLOR CLAY, FRESHMAN SPEECH PATHOLOGY MAJOR

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“We knew it would be really warm so we really tried to look cute but still be comfortable!” CATHERINE RIECK, SOPHOMORE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS, MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT MAJOR BETSY SHELLHAAS, SOPHOMORE, FINE ARTS MAJOR

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KATY HARRIS, SOPHOMORE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR

“We tried to look really festive and colorful and wanted to coordinate our outfits.” MATT HORNER JUNIOR MARKETING MAJOR BECCA MERRITT SOPHOMORE MIS MAJOR


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& shoes

HIS HERS by KAYLYN HLAVATY | photos by SARAH BALSER

THERE IS USUALLY AN ACCESSORY THAT A PERSON LOVES AND FOCUSES ON WHEN PICKING OUT HIS OR HER WARDROBE. SHOES ARE NO EXCEPTION, BECAUSE SHOES ARE A WAY TO CHANGE THE LOOK OF AN OUTFIT AND CREATE A PERSONALIZED STATEMENT. WHETHER IT IS SNEAKERS AND LOAFERS FOR A GUY OR SKY HIGH STILETTOS AND STRAPPY SANDALS FOR A GIRL; SHOES ARE MOBILE WORKS OF ART THAT ARE CONSTANTLY BEING SHOWN OFF. THEY RANGE IN STYLES AND COLORS AND EACH SEASON A NEW DESIGN IS DISPLAYED FOR US TO GAWK OVER. THESE ARE ACCESSORIES THAT CAN SHOW FUN, SOPHISTICATION AND STYLE ALL IN ONE. WHEN WEARING A PAIR OF SHOES, FLAUNT THEM BECAUSE IT IS YOUR INTERPRETATION OF ART. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 23


SPERRY’S

As you may notice walking around campus, these Sperry Top-Sider boat shoes are a necessity for some students like Manolo’s are for a shoe lover. They come in a variety of patterns and colors that provide a casual yet preppy touch to a look that may otherwise be boring with just flip flops. For men, these are the go-to shoe because you they are comfortable and dress up most kinds of outfits. 24 | THREAD


HIS

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TENNIS

More often than not, tennis shoes are not the first choice of shoe to pair with an outfit. Many think of them for one purpose, and that is for physical activity. However, tennis shoes have been revamped and have graced the runway in bright neon colors and high-top styles. These high-top Nikes can be worn by men and women, with variations in style to fit each gender. By wearing high-top sneakers, they show off an urban and ’80s inspired look. If you’re uneasy about wearing these styles, pair them with a simple pair of jeans and a basic top to achieve an urban chic look.

OXFORDS

Normally associated with formal wear, oxfords and loafers are appearing off the runway and into the streets as casual wear while still maintaining sophistication. Men and women alike are showing these off in hues such as brown, black and blue with khakis and trouser shorts that give an allAmerican vibe.

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GLADIATORS

Gladiators are still a musthave for any summer wardrobe. They can take you from last season’s look to now with striking hints of metallic and extra straps that elongate legs, which provide a bold statement. They elevate an outfit from plain to attention-grabbing. These are a creative way to still achieve the look of a sandal, but incorporate a style of a culture from Roman or Greek background.

ESPADRILLES

The emergence of strappy wedges on the runways gives us a key sign to ditch our overworn stilettos and pumps, and opt for effortless espadrilles and wedges. These are the new heel for summer because they are versatile with numerous outfits. Wedges come in a variety of hues and patterns that allow them to be worn from day to night while still maintaining the effortless style of summer and surviving the hot weather.

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FLATFORMS

Shoe fanatics are always looking for the new “it shoes” and anticipating the switch of the season to bring out old and new favorites. Instead of settling for plain flip flops, change them up with studded, floral or strappy flatform sandals. For the fashion-forward women, flatform sandals, like the one’s seen in Prada, are edgy and expand an element of rocker chic to an assemble. Sandals are only temporary for seasons, so be daring and excited to try out the many styles out there.

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sultryshadows OUTHREADMAG.COM | 29


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colorful eyes

Illustrations by ALYSON MORRIS

By SYDNEY COLOGIE | Photos by DEANNA SAKAL and EMILY MUELLER

Believe it or not, eye shadow has been around for centuries. The Egyptians used kohl to accentuate the eyes, and it was even thought to be beneficial for preventing eye infections. In the 21st century, eye shadow has become a thing that most women can’t live without, whether it is a daily swipe of shimmer or spending hours in front of the mirror Friday night trying to get the perfect blend. Whatever role eye shadow plays in everyday life, there is no doubting that it’s important to know how to apply it and how to make the spring look of aqua blues and hot pinks work for everyday life. Most of us are familiar with powder eye shadows, but there are also matte, liquid and cream shadows. They all have their benefits and their disadvantages; it’s all about finding what works best for you. Powders are the most popular because they are easy to apply and come in many different colors. The next is matte eye shadow because it works well at keeping colors bright and long-lasting, which is great for spring. Cream eye shadow is similar to matte, but it adds some shimmer. Lastly, there are liquid eye shadows. These are rare and color choices are limited, but that shouldn’t keep you from testing it out on the basics. The question at this point would be how to rock the neon look. The real answer is confidence. There is more than one way to play up bright colors. As seen on many of the runways, including the spring 2011 collections of Oscar de la Renta and Jason Wu, intense shadows were paired with muted clothing to bring attention to the eyes. If feeling bold, another way to approach this trend is to combine the colorful eye with prints and bright clothing, as seen in Peter Som and Christian Dior’s spring 2011 collections. Neon shadows are not only on the runways; celebrities such as Fergie and Rachel McAdams have also given this year’s spring obsession a try. One last tip — keep eyes nude and have fun with just the eye shadows. Avoid going over the top with this look, steer clear of heavy eyeliner and keep the mascara light. Don’t be shy this season! Adding brights into the every day can attract some new attention. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 31


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barbershop

Source: Milady’s Standard Textbook of Professional Barber-Styling: Revised Edition (1999)

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HELPFUL HINT*

Draw beard and mustache shapes on with eyebrow pencil to be used as a guideline while shaving.

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By ALI MAZZOTTA Photos by DEANNA SAKAL

SHAVING IS IN DANGER

of becoming a lost art, according to one Court Street barber’s textbook. But looking at the facial hair on guys walking around Athens, it seems that the art of shaving is long lost. To be honest, some men’s facial hair is all too similar to Joaquin Phoenix during his stint as a rap artist (I’m Still Here, anyone?). But before any guys break out the hacksaws to trim their beards and mustachios, there are some things to remember. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 35


SHAVING 101 First — prep that face! Wash away dirt and debris with cleanser. Student (and Thread facial hair extraordinaire) Trenton Kline swears by one all-natural soap. “I use, religiously, Bronner’s soap. It’s legit — all organic, no fragrances, its gentler but also really active.” The next step in face preparation is steaming. This can easily be done by placing a hot damp towel over the face or simply by taking a hot shower. Steaming the face helps to soften the outer layer of facial hair, making it easier to shave. However, if you have dry or sensitive skin, you should skip this step, as it will just further irritate the skin. Now it’s time to put on shaving cream if you are using a hand-held razor. Rub your favorite

shaving cream over your face in a circular motion, so it makes a nice lather. If using an electric razor, a pre-shave treatment like Lectric Shave makes facial hair stand up, so a closer and smoother shave can be achieved. Next, grab a razor! If using an electric razor, make sure the head is not dull and if using a hand-held razor, be sure that the blades are sharp. This will help to achieve a close shave and will prevent having to re-shave, which leads to skin irritation and ingrown hairs. While shaving, be cautious near the lower lip and the adam’s apple as these areas are most sensitive. And remember to shave with the hair and not against the grain. Now that the shaving process is over, don’t forget to apply after-shave or a nonoily lotion to soothe the face.

HELPFUL HINT

Follow the directional arrows with your razor for the least irrataion to your skin.

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Illustrations by ALYSON MORRIS

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THE RIGHT STYLE FOR YOU Certain types of facial hair look good only when your facial features match said hair. For example, beards or a 5 o’clock shadow look good on almost anyone, but some types of facial hair can only be worn on a certain face. For example, the thickened side-burn “mutton-chop” look does not work for everyone. This look works best for those with short hair and no other facial hair. The goatee look is something I’m certain that only Brad Pitt is capable of wearing. However, if you’re determined to try this look (which can actually help elongate the look of a round face), it needs to be well-manicured and even. A full-grown beard looks best when the neckline is clear and present and the hair is fully grown. Kline says that patchy facial hair is simply not cool. “You cannot do a neck beard and if it’s patchy — you just can’t do it.”

As far as mustaches go, few people can pull them off without looking like they’ve time traveled from the ’70s. But there are some guidelines to follow: a long and more narrow face works best with a narrow to medium mustache, a round face looks best with a semi-square mustache and a square face looks best with a heavy linear ’stache.

A HAIRY SITUATION While extensively grooming beards and mustaches, many men forget to service one very important facial hair feature and end up looking like Groucho Marx, or worse, Frida Kahlo. Eyebrows, guys, eyebrows! It is a common misconception among men that eyebrow maintenance is metrosexual. Yet Kline says tweezing that unibrow is nothing to be ashamed of. “I don’t think its metro at all, taking care of yourself. You shouldn’t be demure about it — go for it.” OUTHREADMAG.COM | 37


colorsolidarity

W

By SOPHIE FREDERICKSEN Photos by MICHAEL MAURER

e are often wary of being too “matchy-matchy,” but in the world of fashion, rules are meant to be broken. This season, designers are filling the runways with single-colored outfits, making the monochromatic trend the next big thing. When you break it down, the monochromatic trend is really quite simple: “Mono” meaning one and “chromo,” which is the root of color. This isn’t the first time the monochromatic look has made its appearance on the runway. The idea of minimalist fashion emerged in the 1960s when fashion was made functional. The monochromatic look blossomed with the production of colored hosiery, which allowed women to create a look that was one color from head to toe. From there, designers like

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Calvin Klein and Giorgio Armani paved the way for the monochromatic trend by creating lines that consisted of the classics done in a monochromatic palette. Monochrome fashion is streamlined and universally flattering, which is why the look appears season after season on the biggest designers’ runways. This season, the monochromatic trend is being reinvented by putting color into what is commonly a neutral look. Designer Donna Karan showcased basic monochromatic outfits in orange and blue on the runway this season while designer Jason Wu added flare to the trend by adding patterns into his single-color ensembles. The designers stayed true to the one-color theme while adding in additional color and texture. Designers aren’t the only ones cooing


in good fashion seams

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Clothes provided by Athens Underground

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seams

over monochrome; style bloggers, such as Christine Cameron of mystylepill.com, are also fawning over this simplistic trend. “Sometimes a girl just needs to wear all black. It’s easy — no muss, no fuss,” Cameron wrote on her personal style blog. Fred Butler, a set and accessory designer based in London, was not afraid to dive into monochromatic fashion. Butler was photographed in a collection of ensembles reminiscent of a rainbow for a feature by Digital Daze. Butler was shown dressed head to toe in wardrobes of all purple, yellow, orange, pink, silver, white, green and red. But how can you get Butler’s one-color looks without looking like a giant crayon? The key is to mix hues, textures and patterns. If you’re going to wear yellow, pair a bright yellow skirt with a light yellow striped shirt and yellow-orange accessories. You want an outfit that looks streamlined without looking

like a uniform. Students on campus are a little apprehensive about this one-color trend. “There’s no life in a single shade,” said sophomore Andrew Shrock. “Different shades can work but the same color is too much.” Freshman Madison Brown isn’t ready to dive fully into a one-color outfit but says she would work it into her wardrobe. “I would wear at least one thing that isn’t the same color,” said Brown. “For example, if you’re wearing a white shirt and skirt, have your blazer be gray.” Don’t be afraid of wearing one color. This trend is sleek and surprisingly sophisticated. Once you try it, you’ll be amazed at how easy it is to master. Going monochrome will challenge you to look at your closet in a different light — one that’s exclusively singular. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 41


Student Alumni Board

The Student Alumni Board is a student organization that connects students with alumni. We also do a lot of philanthropy work. We put on events such as: • Get the Scoop • Bare on the Bricks • OUr Day • Paint the Town Green • And so much more!! Follow us on Twitter: @OhioUSAB Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/StudentAlumni-Board-SAB/308059404434

*Accepting new members in the Fall and Spring!

Full Service Salon We specialize in hair color, weaves, manicures, pedicures and facials

HOURS

Monday - Friday: 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Saturday: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday : Closed

* 10 Tanning Beds Airbrush Tanning * Walk-ins Welcomed! *

19 North Court Street, Athens, Ohio 42 | THREAD

attractionshairandtanning.com


diy

embellishedheadbands By BRIDGET MALLON Photos by EMILY NEWMAN

A

fter spending hours drying, straightening, crimping or curling, nothing is worse than having the hairstyle you worked so hard at ruined the second you step out into the humid weather. Wind and rain are constant frizzy threats to formerly smooth, shiny hair. Other days there just is not enough time to cultivate a presentable hairstyle. To hide bad hair days and to add aesthetic appeal, headbands have long been the go-to accessory. Piles of plain cloth headbands and unadorned plastic styles

fill the closets of many girls, but with a few quick updates, those headbands can become works of art. While plenty of pre-adorned headbands are available for purchase, creating one of your own is cost effective — the materials themselves cost less than most embellished headbands — and lets you create an accessory that no one else will have. Rhinestones, feathers, studs and zippers can all be used to transform a plain headband into a stylish accessory that will become a wardrobe staple, not just a last-minute hair fix.

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Studs give a hard-edged style when added to headbands, which are usually seen as a girly accessory. The tough look can be paired with other masculine-influenced pieces to create a strong, powerful style, or added to feminine styles like flowers and lace to create a hard-soft style dichotomy. STEP ONE Remove the textured plastic backing from the studs and position them on the headband with the clear plastic side up. The clear plastic should stick to the headband. STEP TWO Turn the headband inside out and press the iron down on the studded area for 15 seconds, then use a circular motion to iron the whole area for another 10 seconds. STEP THREE Allow the headband to cool for at least three minutes. Turn the headband right side out and carefully remove the plastic sheet. If the plastic is still warm let it sit for a few more minutes. If the studs are still loose, use the iron again with the headband inside out.

iron-on stud headband YOU WILL NEED • 1 package of iron-on studs (available at craft stores and Walmart) • cloth headband • iron

TIP: Make sure not to iron directly onto the studs, and keeping the headband inside out is essential. The plastic covering on the studs will melt if the iron touches it. 44 | THREAD


Bohemian and carefree, feather headbands add a funky element to any outfit. Whether throwing it on before heading to class or planning a going-out style around it, a feather headband punches up an outfit’s aesthetic interest. STEP ONE Cut the feathers into the preferred size and shape. Circles, rectangles and asymmetrical shapes all work, depending on the type of feather you use and the desired look. STEP TWO Cut out a small piece of felt that will be used to hold the feathers together. Make sure to keep the piece of felt smaller than the feathers. Circular pieces work well, but any small shape is acceptable as long as the felt is completely covered by the feathers. STEP THREE Arrange the feathers on the felt. STEP FOUR Glue the feathers down one at a time; make sure to hold the feathers in place for at least three seconds. STEP FIVE Let the feather piece sit for an hour to ensure that the feathers will not fall off once they are glued to the headband. STEP SIX Use fabric glue to secure the feather piece onto the plastic headband and let the glue set overnight.

diy

feather piece headband YOU WILL NEED • feathers • plastic headband • felt • fabric glue

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zipper flower headband

YOU WILL NEED • hot glue gun • one 20 to 26 inch zipper (zippers can be bought at fabric stores or zipperstop.com) • hard plastic headband scissors • felt 46 | THREAD

Take time to wrap the zipper slowly, going too fast may mess up the shape and leave the flower asymmetrical and messy looking. · Keep the second half of the zipper handy in case you need to start over.


diy Zipper flowers are a cute creation that can be added to necklaces, bracelets, barrettes and brooches, in addition to headbands. By forming something as mundane as zippers into a stylish flower, a new, versatile accessory can easily be created. The hard, shiny look of the zipper teeth and the soft, feminine look of the flower ensure that the headband can be paired with any look, casual or dressy, with exceptional results. STEP ONE Unzip zipper completely and cut the end off. Split it into two pieces down the middle,

each side with its own set of zipper teeth. Only use one piece per flower. STEP TWO Cut off any excess fabric at the top of the zipper. STEP THREE Place a small dab of glue near the edge of the zipper tape (the fabric part of the zipper) and fold the tape over to form the base of the zipper bud, holding it in place for a few seconds to secure the glue. STEP FOUR Place another dab of glue onto the zipper tape, rolling the zipper around tightly to form the flower bud. Do this two or three times, making sure to spiral the zipper down, so the teeth are visible at each layer. STEP FIVE Wrap the zipper around the

bud two more times, slightly looser, securing it with glue each time. STEP SIX After the bud is formed, make a larger loop with the zipper, using glue to secure it onto the bottom of the bud. Then, make a figure eight with the first petal to make another one directly across from the first petal. Continue making petals until the flower is as big as desired, or until no more petals are possible. STEP SEVEN Hot glue gun the completed flower onto a small piece of felt, and let it sit overnight. STEP EIGHT Once the flower is completely dry, apply glue to the back of the felt piece and secure it onto the headband.

EXTRA TIPS: Take time to wrap the zipper slowly. Going too fast may mess up the shape and leave the flower asymmetrical and messy looking. Also, keep the second half of the zipper handy in case you need to start over. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 47


This sparkly style instantly adds an air of glamour to weekend outfits. Paired with a plain cotton dress, a rhinestone headband is an easy way to add flair.

STEP ONE Lay out the rhinestones on the headband in a pattern. Play around with the rhinestones to get the pattern right before gluing them down in case they need to be moved. STEP TWO One by one, glue down the rhinestones, holding them in place for three seconds each. STEP THREE Let the headband dry overnight on a flat surface and resist the urge to wear it out before it is completely dry.

EXTRA TIPS: Play around with different patterns before gluing down the rhinestones or ironing down the studs. Don’t commit to a less-thansatisfactory style. Also, don’t try on the rhinestone headband until you are sure it is dry. The gems fall off easily if the glue is still wet.

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rhinestone headband YOU WILL NEED • cloth headband • flat back rhinestones • fabric glue


diy

WATCH THE VIDEO FOR A STEP–BY–STEP DIY TIE


tietricks By BRADLEY PARKS Photos by MICHELLE KAPPELER Step-by-step guide by ASHLEY CAPPELLAZZI

Be ‘that guy,’ put on a tie.

H

ow to tie a tie is a mystery that plagues males from early boyhood and on through awkward middle school dances. All of the twisting and contorting that goes into giving birth to the perfect knot can escape the minds of gentlemen well into their college years if they aren’t careful. Not only the mechanics of knotting a tie, but the proper time and place to wear a tie is sometimes unbeknownst to men. When and where can ties be worn? How many ways can a tie be worn? What shirt can the tie be worn with? The tie itself has become an enigma of sorts. When seen outside of an office, it raises the “too formal” flag for many men. However, a tie is one of the easiest ways to class up an outfit and will have others taking a page out of your book of fashion.

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THE FOUR-IN-HAND KNOT

diy

This is one of the easiest and quickest knots to execute, but it takes some work to get it looking just right. If you’re dressing up for an important event, use the four-in-hand only if you’re in a rush. But if you’re looking for a more disheveled look, use this knot. Leave the top button of the shirt undone and keep the tie loose.

Set the tie with the broad tip (otherwise known as the wider end) on your left and the narrow side on your right. Set the broad tip of the tie even with your fly, give or take an inch or two. This serves as a good measure to get the length of the tie right.

4

Grab the broad side near the cross and wrap it all the way around to the front and pinch at the cross.

2

broad tip

1

Cross the broad side of the tie over the narrow side and pinch at the cross.

3 Bring the broad side through the neck in the back.

1-2 inches

5

Bring the broad side through the neck in the back again and through the loop. Pull it tight making sure you don’t pull the knot out.

6

Adjust the neck by grabbing the knot in one hand and the narrow side in the other. Pull gently down on the narrow side and gently up on the knot until it rests at your neck.

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THE HALF-WINDSOR KNOT The Half-Windsor is the go-to knot. It’s easy to tie and makes a beautiful triangular knot every time if you do it right. This knot is perfect for any tie-wearing occasion. The crispness of its shape makes it easy to pull off with almost any formal look.

1

2

broad tip

Set the tie the same way you would for a four-in-hand knot.

Cross the broad side over the narrow side and pinch at the cross.

1-2 inches

4

5

Bring the broad side through the neck in the back and pull it through the loop.

Bring the broad side through the neck in the front.

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Wrap the broad side all the way around to the front and pinch at the cross.

3

Wrap the broad side across the front by pulling it to the opposite side and pull the narrow side to the opposite side as well. Pinch at the cross.

6 Adjust the neck the same way as the four-in-hand being careful not to pull the knot out.


THE BOW TIE

diy

The bow tie is the most difficult of these knots and perhaps the most difficult of all tie knots. When tying the bow tie, you must be patient. The first bow won’t be perfect and the same can be said for the second and the third as well. Just keep working to perfect your technique and it will be worth it in the end. Why a bow tie? It provides a quirky way to mix it up. Necktie after necktie can get boring and lose personality. A bow tie says, “Look at me, I’m different.”

1

Set the tie with one side hanging approximately two inches longer than the other.

4

Fold the short side to construct half of the bow and pinch at the center.

TIE TIP

2

Cross the long side over the short side and pinch at the cross.

5

Wrap the long side around the center of the bow and pinch to hold the bow together.

3

Bring the long side through the neck in the back and gently pull it tight — as you would your shoelaces — draping the long side over your shoulder.

6

A loop is created in the back of the neck. Pull the long side through the loop by its center to construct the other half of the bow and gently pull it tight.

The right knot can be the missing piece to a flawlessly executed outfit. A tie paired with the right shirt, sweater or blazer makes you stand out from the hoodie-clad crowd in a good way. With a few good ties in your closet, you’ll add multiple outfits to your wardrobe. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 53


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diy

goodhousekeeping By ROSIE HANEY Photos by MACKENZIE COTTINGHAM

W

hen life deals you lemons, redecorate. Or at least reorganize. Life has a funny way of dumping change on you all at once, and my progression of change to a new room happened in an amusingly predictable sequence.

Illustrations by SARAH HARRIS

Step 1: Change It’s the hinge of sanity. When life turns stale, change inspires gusto, and when life changes too fast, change can be the last push from instability to the tumultuous crash. For me it was the latter. This quarter served up bellyache, after headache, after heartbreak; over and over in unrelenting spite. On the very first day of the quarter, I lost my RA job and was given five days to move out. I had no money and no place to go. I lost friends with that job too. There were 30 freshmen I

would hang out with when I got home, lame as it is, and I missed them. Coworkers I spent hours with now shared scarcely more than a wave. Then there was him. We’ve all had those relationships — the painful split, followed by “friendship,” followed by frustration, followed by fighting, followed by an ending. I lost the remaining friends there. I was lonely and falling behind in school, and I continued to fall behind while I dealt with the persisting disarray. I felt like everything was a mess.

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Step 2:Adjust Oh, the slow and painstaking process of adjusting. When changes are constantly evolving, there seems to be an indefinable goal, but a girl can try. You need to adjust your routine to accommodate and adjust your frame of mind to cope. It’s much easier said than done, and some people never do it. But I’m not one to be defeated. In this particular case, it was finding my brother’s friend who had a spare

room. It was an ugly spare room, for sure. The walls were bare wood-panel and the only source of natural light in the basement room was one tiny window. The austerity could rival even the most dismal of un-renovated dorm rooms. But I was broke and completely down on my luck, and when kindness is extended your way, you can feel like all the luck in the world is yours. I was going to make it.

Step 3:Accept While bestowed kindness was a godsend, it took a lot of getting used to. Breakups — platonic and romantic — were still hard to come to terms with. All my touchstones of stability were gone, from living arrangements to my job, grades, friends and romance. I’d be lying if I didn’t admit to being disheartened. But I had that moment. I had that rock-bottom moment when I laid in my bed and watered the threads of my pillow. Breathing got heavy, hands started shaking like fee-

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ble branches in a thunderstorm and my heart kept sinking. Eventually I calmed down. The rain stopped pouring out of my eyes. I sat up and looked at my face in the mirror that was propped against the wall. I saw my bloodshot hollowed eyes reflected and in that moment decided: No. I’m not sure if it’s an acceptance of change or the refusal to indulge the sorrowful coldness, but just like the earth after spring’s first rain, the ground took the water, verdant and thriving.


diy

Step 4: Rebuild For many, the most unsettling aspect of change comes from realizing the faint grasp of control we really have. We may be the master of our own fates, or whatever that poem says, but the fact is, sometimes stuff happens. People deal in different ways — some not entirely healthy. But for me, rearranging my room is the right remedy. I moved my posters because I knew they’d look better on the other side of the room. I nailed milk crates to the wall to make shelves and save precious floor space. My favorite spring dresses became wall hangings to brighten things up and to hide some of the wood paneling. I took my guitar out of its case and

set it out for display. I found that an old screen makes an interesting earring rack, and I made a patchwork wall mosaic from patterned flyer paper left over from my RA job. When I was going through my stuff, I found pictures I had taken in a darkroom photography class in high school and put those on my wall too. I even found my fourth-grade nameplate (with my first name, “Meredith”) and slapped that on the wall. Almost instantly, the cold, wood-paneled bedroom started to look … comforting. For a final touch, I put some flowers in a glass mug and suddenly, spring, in every manifest of the word, was in me.

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in good fashion diy

sneaksthatshine By BRADLEY PARKS I Photos By AUDREY KELLY

I

t’s time for people to put away boots and galoshes and break out sandals and flip-flops. But along with the flip-flops and flats, we must not forget our old pal: the tennis shoe. Brightly colored sneakers are often stowed away in closets for the sludgy winter months and patiently await warmth and sunshine to be back in action. But even with nicer weather,

it’s easy to go bonkers trying to keep those new shoes looking their best and brightest. Midsoles fade from white to yellow or brown from natural wear and tear. Leather toes get filled with creases, and creases get filled with dirt. All of a sudden, your sneaks may not seem as hip as they once were. To avoid having this happen to you and your beloved shoes, a few precautions must be taken.

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DECREASE THE CREASE:

Leather sneakers and basketball shoes in particular have one downside: when you walk, creases attack the toes like ugly on an ape. A recently purchased pair of sneakers could begin to look worn out in the first few steps, and creases are dirt magnets that are nearly impossible to clean. Here is how to avoid those cursed creases.

MATERIALS:

Gel heel orthotics, two careful hands

1 2 3

Unlace the sneakers and remove the insoles right out of the box. Take one gel heel orthotic and slide it down into the toe until it is snug against the tip. Slide the insole carefully back into the sneaker on top of the orthotic.

When you walk, instead of having your toes bend the entire front end of the sneaker, the placement of the orthotic will allow your foot to roll as you walk. This will drastically decrease the crease in the toes of your shoes and keep them looking new into the later stage of their career.

BONUS TIP:

Keep the cardboard or plastic molds found in the sneakers at purchase. When you aren’t wearing them, put the molds in to help your shoes hold their true shape. If you don’t have molds, keep the paper wads. If you tossed the paper wads, this earth has an abundance of paper around. Take some old newspapers or paper bags and make your own stuffing.

KEEP WHITES WHITE AND COLORS BRIGHT:

As you continue to wear your sneakers, dirt begins to build up around the midsole and the stains are sometimes difficult to get off with just a quick spit shine. Think of midsoles as teeth: all it takes is regular brushing to keep them looking their best. Here’s how...

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diy

MATERIALSO:

One small bowl, dish soap, a toothbrush and paper towels Here are some more helpful tips putting the soul back in your soles:

1 2 3 4 5

Squirt a dime-sized bit of soap into the bowl. Add warm water until the bowl is nearly full. Stir. Dip the toothbrush in the soap. Just like with your teeth, firmly scrub the midsole with the toothbrush in little circles. Wipe away the soap and water from the midsole with a paper towel.

The key to making this technique work is patience — not even the best brushing will get out every scar from your midsoles. However, a good solid brushing will remove most of the unsightly rubbish from the midsoles. Give the sneakers a nice scrubbing and follow up with another round of light brushing and your midsoles will be looking like new again.

to

1

Use saddle soap (a mild soap made for leather) and a soft sponge to clean spots off of leather sneakers. If you’re really feeling thrifty, a multi-purpose cleaner (such as Windex) and a paper towel will work as well.

2

If you have suede, find yourself a suede cleaning brick. They look like erasers and often come with a brush. That will help clean up and soften old, hardened suede.

3

Canvas sneakers can be thrown in the wash! If your canvas sneaks are looking tired, put them in a delicates bag and wash them with like colors. Stain-fighters will work for trouble spots as well. Your shoes will come out looking like new.

4

Also, put your laces in the wash. If they’re a different color than your shoes, be sure to remove the laces and wash them with like colors. Oftentimes, jeans will bleed, leaving ugly spots on laces. Throwing them in the wash with stain-fighters will clean them up.

5

The most important tip: Be careful out there! Don’t abuse your poor sneakers because they may not forgive you later.

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who, what, wear

By CARLY WIITA Photos by MACKENZIE COTTINGHAM

international

street fair

A

ny student who’s been in Athens long enough knows of its small town reputation. To show the diverse cultures brought here by international students and residents, Ohio University hosts International Week each year in May. The week is full of activities, from the introduction of traditional food at Baker University Center to international craft night. The International Street Fair serves as the grand finale of International Week. This year the fair took over Court Street from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 21. While the blocks of booths may seem daunting to first-timers, the best way to take it all in is to traipse slowly up and down the line of multi-colored stations. Sometimes curiosity is all that’s needed to understand the various cultures — asking questions is the best way to learn about the different clothes, jewelry and foods.

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1

Lourdes Gómez

Latin America — International Studies Mayan Women’s cooperative, state of Chiapas (Mexico) Proceeds fund community development in Latin America-region, Southern Mexico and Mayan women

Thread: How does the culture play into the fashion? Especially the scarves and bracelets? Gómez: Actually, it’s interesting you ask because different aspects of the Mayan cosmic vision are woven into the pieces of work. You see the diamonds in some of the stuff, and this is very common. They represent the four corners of the universe. A lot of times you see stuff … which represents maize, the corn, which is integral to Mayan culture. Some stuff has little frogs on it — the frogs were the chorus of the gods in Mayan mythology. It is very culture-specific.

Thread: What do the colors mean?

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Gómez: In Mayan cosmic vision, you have the four corners of the earth, which are represented by four different colors of corn. And so you have the red corn, which represents Native Americans all over the world, the darker corn represents African nations, the whiter corn, which is significant to European countries and the yellow corn, which is significant to Asia.


who, what, wear

2

Essam Mikhail Fair Trade 20 different countries

Thread: Are the clothing and bags here handmade? Mikhail: Yes. These (shirts and skirts) are from India. They are organic cotton. The bags are from Egypt, and they are made by the garbage collectors.

Thread: Do any of the colors mean anything particular? Mikhail: No, they make whole different designs every year, and I just update them to get something new. People request certain colors and designs. I try to accommodate people with different colors.

Thread: Do you have any accessories that people here in the U.S. don’t typically see? Mikhail: The bags are very unique here. It is carpet material woven by young women in the mountains around Cairo. There is a community of about half a million people ‌ about 60,000 of them collect the garbage by going door-to-door. They get separated by the young women in the village in the mountain, and they recycle some. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 65


3

Qiannan Chen China

Thread: Do the bright colors of the masks and jewelry mean anything? Chen: Bright colors are most prominent. Red and yellow are used a lot, because you know, in China, they signify happiness and are cheerful.

Thread : Is all the jewelry handmade? Chen: Nothing was handmade. It is a collection my friend had started and wanted others to enjoy it … All of the masks and jewelry.

Thread: Do you have anything here that is considered unusual in the U.S.? Chen: That red box over there. Do you see all the smaller boxes inside it? It is considered a marriage box. Not typically seen in the U.S., but it’s common in China.

Thread: Does your culture play into the fashion — like anything you wear? Chen: We have a lot of traditional clothing we would normally wear, but not here. We like to follow the trends of fashion.

4

Ani Nurhasni and Megan Snow Southeast Asian Student Association Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia

Thread: Do you know how the culture of these countries would play into the fashion, especially the accessories? Nurhasni: Batik is a traditional Indonesian method of clothing making in Bali. The key rings are models of an ethnic group’s temple in Indonesian in western Sumatra.

Thread: Do you have any accessories that aren’t typically seen in the U.S.?

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Snow: The scarves are from Thailand and Malaysia. The Sarong comes from Southeast Asia. It’s worn pretty much everywhere in Southeast Asia. Many of these pictures were taken by students, and the colors represent the culture of Southeast Asia.


5

Inas Nazzal

who, what, wear

Muslim Society Association

Thread: How does fashion play into the culture, especially the scarves? Nazzal: Oh, everybody’s following fashion now. All the girls, everybody. You look at, you don’t know what country they’re coming from. Are they European? Are they Chinese? You know? Everybody loves different colors, different shapes, different things, so the scarves are following the trends.

Thread: Do the colors of the scarves mean anything specific? Nazzal: No, just you know, girls like pink. Can you imagine, now, people can wear pink and orange together? It used to be very odd 10 years ago or so, but now everything is nice and fun.

Thread: Did you make all of these items? Nazzal: The beads, the earrings, the necklaces, the bell set are all handmade, crocheted with a wire. It’s all handmade, of course. The scarves are not. But they are done so a lady can come in and put her touch. Some are left undone at the end so you can come in and put any color at the end, if you want. I like them plain.

Thread: Is there anything worn differently?

Illustrations by CHELSEA LEASURE

Nazzal: Of course. Look at her hijab. (Another woman at the booth with her scarf wrapped around twice) My scarf is different. It is culturally different and fashionwise, girls like to wear different things (depending on their face shape). Some of the (scarves) are thin so you have to make more than one circle around. You could wear a necklace or something.

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who, what, wear

festivalfashion By BROOKE BUNCE Photos by AUDREY KELLY

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s the crowd patiently waits for the next performance just outside Hocking College, anticipation buzzes as the air itself becomes heavy and wet. The ominously dark clouds looming above begin to release small droplets of rain onto the backs, shoulders and necks of the awaiting listeners, clad in an array of flowing floral sundresses, straw hats of all varieties, bohemian-inspired tanks and homemade jorts. As the throng of participants starts to grow damp and the ground begins to sink beneath them, the moment the crowd has been waiting for finally presents itself. The musicians arrive on stage in all their grandeur, and the soaking fans cannot contain

themselves any longer. Springtime in Athens signifies one thing: fests. But this festival is not the typical street bash full of house parties and kegs. The annual Nelsonville Music Festival, sponsored by Stewart’s Opera House, brings to town some of the most popular acts in indie, folk and alternative music. Stewart’s sold more than 3,000 pre-sale tickets, and an estimated 5,000 people attended the festival overall. This year’s lineup was as diverse as those who attended, ranging from popular names like The Flaming Lips, Yo La Tengo and The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger (fronted by Beatles baby Sean Lennon) to established country classics like George Jones and Wanda Jackson, to pulsing Columbian techno from OUTHREADMAG.COM | 69


Bomba Estereo, to eclectic 30-member Mucca Pazz, outfitted in mismatched marching band attire. Local acts included Southeast Engine, She Bears, Whale Zombie, Duke Junior & The Smokey Boots and Scubadog. Hannah Cook, a sophomore studying journalism at Ohio University, attended the Nelsonville Music Festival last year and noticed themes in typical attire. “Since it’s a festival, I think most people are mostly worried about being comfortable and being dressed appropriately for the weather. But it’s not hard to implement your own personal style into that,” she said, adding, “Nelsonville Music Festival can also be kind of ‘hippy-dippy,’ you know. So there’s 70 | THREAD

lots of rugged clothing, layers, et cetra.” The carefree, unconventional vibe was apparent in the sartorial choices of many fest-goers, despite constant rain and layers of mud. Spirits were anything but dampened as skirts grazed both calves and ankles, and maxi dresses were in full force. Flannel shirts peeked out beneath denim overall cutoffs, while hefty combat boots squished through swamp-like mud puddles. Attendees balanced these tough ensembles with delicate feather earrings and hair accessories, jewel-toned rings and silky head scarves. Natural inspiration was also prevalent — headbands featuring flowers and leaves wrapped the heads of countless


who, what, wear female attendees. Even fanny packs were made trendy at this outdoor jubilee. Slung low on fest-goers’ waists in earthy leather tones, these once fashion faux-pas were effortlessly updated while functioning as a practical place to keep essentials. The guys attending this year’s fest were just as in-tune with their style as the ladies. Countless pairs of cuffed trousers were held up by suspenders in an assortment of neutral, muted tones. Paired with classic oxfords and patterned shirts, the men of the Nelsonville Music Festival looked fit to be displayed in the latest folk-inspired fashion spread. A select few of those performing at the festival brought a personal style to the stage that reflects their creativity as much as their musical expression. Cook recalled watching Loretta Lynn at the fest last year. “She wore a bright pink sparkly gown. And ‘Honus Honus’ from Man Man wore an all-white, weird jumper, outfit sort of thing.” This year, Chicago-based band Mucca Pazza showcased their horn-inspired, percussion-based music through get-ups that included authentic marching band jackets, pants and hats. Local bands also showcased their style. Chris Lute, drummer of Athensbased ensemble Whale Zombie, described his band’s look as humorous and satirical. “We typically like to wear either comically-cliché psychedelic clothing (or) comicallycliché rock ‘n’ roll outfits,” Lute said. “Sometimes we decide we’re all going to wear the same colors.” Beyond the clothes, Lute commented on the festival atmosphere. “I’m really into the community and social aspect of shows, so I always end up really digging festivals,” he said. The Nelsonville Music Festival allows attendees to camp out for the three-day event,

which can sometimes hinder outfit choices as attendees may have to sacrifice style for functionality. Jacob Szybka, a 2010 graduate of Ohio University, opted for shorts and a T-shirt. He didn’t plan to change his outfit much over the weekend, he said, mentioning his excitement to camp out with his best friends for a weekend full of music. Josh Miller, a senior at OU majoring in video production, was just as eager as Szybka to camp the entire weekend. As a one-year veteran of the festival, his expected plans changed slightly after only one night in Nelsonville. “I wasn’t planning on staying all three days, but after having so much fun already I think I’m just going to stay the entire weekend,” Miller said. Having seen The Flaming Lips three times before, he anticipated this year’s performance. “It’s like the craziest party in the world. It’s like your birthday, Christmas and New Year’s wrapped into one. … You know you’re going to be covered in confetti and hugs and sweat.” Miller prepared for the festival by sporting DIY jorts with paint splatters and a bandana in his hair to keep both sweat and rain at bay. Ultimately, what brings both Szybka and Miller back to Nelsonville Music Festival year after year is the shared sense of community with bands as well as audience members. “Appalachia is my favorite part of Ohio, and friends and Appalachia is a great combination,” Szybka said enthusiastically. Miller added, “It’s a local festival, but at the same time, they have national bands. It’s like I know a quarter of the people here. So it’s like coming here and seeing so many faces I know and being like, ‘Hey man, give me a hug. Let’s go watch a cool band.’ You go to larger music festivals and you don’t know anyone except the people you came with. Here it’s just like a community.” OUTHREADMAG.COM | 71


costumecouture

T

By JOURDYN HEILINGER Photos by EMMY BAKER

he stage is dark. The audience silently waits for the show to start. As the crackling static of a radio echos through the speakers, a single spotlight illuminates the dancer on stage. Then the music begins to play. In her white lace dress, she effortlessly moves across the stage to the muted beat. The loose sleeves hang from her arms as she lifts them above her head. With each move she makes, dance senior Keri Noble’s dress twirls along after her, following her smooth, graceful movements like a shadow. Noble is one of 12 seniors whose work was showcased in the Senior Dance Concert this spring. Each year the seniors of the Ohio University School of Dance choreograph and perform in senior concerts in the fall and spring. In the fall, half of the dancers choreograph a group routine while the other half execute solo performances, but

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in the spring, they switch roles. These talented students execute every aspect of the performances from the choreography and the music to the lighting and the costumes. “(Costuming) is based on our personal and individual style, so there is not one set method that we use when choosing a costume,” said senior Madeline Schrock.

NUDITY (WELL, ALMOST) A video clip of Eric Hill dancing in a New York subway station came to life on the screen behind him. Hill sat in a chair with his head down. He anxiously tapped his feet as his hands jittered nervously. Then he began removing his clothing. He unzipped his hooded sweatshirt and pulled his cotton T-shirt over his head. He kicked off his boots and peeled off his socks. His khaki shorts fell to the ground as he loosened his belt. As he stood center stage, illuminated by the


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spotlight he grasped the elastic waistband of his miniature briefs and let them fall to his feet. “I take my clothes off for two reasons: It goes along with this idea of shedding the past and moving on,” he explained. “I am working with the idea that whenever you start a new chapter in life, like graduating college, a 74 | THREAD

part of you has to die. And (nudity) makes people uncomfortable. When people are uncomfortable, they pay attention and listen.” Not wanting to completely distract and offend his audience, Hill wore a small, fleshcolored dance belt, similar to a thong. The neutral tone of the thong, when combined


with the lighting, one of Hill’s favorite technicalities to play with, created specific tone and ambiance for his piece.

ALL THE COLORS OF THE WIND Dancing in complete silence, Madeline Schrock needed a strong costume that reflected her movements on stage. Schrock’s movements were wide, soft and dynamic. She danced across the stage with wide arms and long, smooth strides. Her light color scheme of peaches and yellows enhanced the gentleness of her number. She paired a light orange scoop neck tank with delicate yellow pants. The loose, flowing pants made even her strongest movements demure. “I liked the pants because they are not very tight and they flowed along with my movements,” explained Schrock. Many of the dancers, like Shrock, employed color schemes to enhance and accent their numbers. A piece with softer movements will often have lighter color schemes in costuming. In contrast, a piece with strong movements calls for a bolder color scheme.

WORKING WITH MOTION For Keri Noble, however, the most important factors in choosing her costume are comfort and maneuverability. “It can be difficult to find clothes that you can dance in without restricting your movement,” she said. Noble drew inspiration from the 1960’s. Her piece, entitled “Where is the Microphone?,” was inspired by the popular television show American Bandstand. Noble wanted to pay tribute to the fact that the show was broadcast in black and white, so she found a simple ’60s-inspired white lace dress with loose sleeves. Whitney Joseph also chose a simplistic, comfortable look for her senior piece. She choreographed her entire routine before deciding what she would wear. Joseph asked a group of her peers to evaluate her piece and give her some input and ideas for a costume.

who, what, wear

“Her movement evoked images of pueblos and the Grand Canyon. I pictured her dancing on rich clay in a warm, dry climate,” recalled Schrock. Joseph’s brown leggings were embroidered with small feathers, and her gray, orange and brown top evoked an earthy feel. The soft neutral colors embraced the beauty of nature as well as the grace of her dancing.

EVOKING AN ERA Pat Peoples ended the show by choreographing a ’40s-inspired group dance. Her costumes reflected the time frame in which her piece was set and gave each dancer a defined role in the overall number. “I knew what I wanted each character to look like beforehand,” Peoples said. The piece featured seven different dancers. The two men leapt across the stage as war soldiers wearing black pants, white shirts and suspenders. The two women, playing stereotypical 1940’s housewives, wore modest floral print dresses. As pin-up girls, two of the dancers seduced the audience from the stage in white corsets and black spandex shorts. As the star of the number, the iconic Rosie the Riveter took strong steps that were accented with a red plaid button-up shirt and shorts. Joseph, who choreographed a group piece in the fall, explained that when costuming for a group it is important to keep in mind the relationship between the dancers. “If the dancers don’t have a personal identity, then they might wear the same exact outfit. Sometimes they will share a similar design or color scheme. Yet other times people might have each person wear something completely different,” she said. Whether one is a dancer, an actor or just an ordinary student, costuming is an essential part of day-to-day life. Every day, every person costumes themselves whether on or off the stage. Clothing choice reflects personal identity the same way that a costume expresses the vision and personal style of the choreographer. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 75


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E G A TEEN D N E L E WAST OURTNEY

Styling by C OR LAMB I

N Photos by CO

BALDASARE

NK and SAM FI

WITH THE COMING OF WARM WEATHER ALSO COMES THE EMERGENCE OF ALL THINGS FORMERLY COOPED UP BY NASTY WINTERS. WILD, RABBLE-ROUSING INDIVIDUALS BURST INTO THE OUTDOORS. A NATURAL AND FREE SPIRIT IS EMBODIED IN THE SHENANIGANS OF THESE INCENDIARY AMERICAN YOUTH. INSPIRED BY GRUNGY LOOK OF THE AMERICANA LIFESTYLE,THREAD DEPICTS OUTFITS AND SCENARIOS CLASSIC TO THE THEME. DIY CUTOFFS, SHREDDED TOPS AND BANDANAS RUN AS RAMPANT AS THE UNFETTERED PEOPLE WEARING THEM OUTHREADMAG.COM | 79


A sleek, neutral maxi dress paired with chunky combat boots makes for a look that is equal parts girly and grunge. 80 | THREAD


A patriotically colored flannel over a cotton tank is a cool and casual male ensemble, topped off by an unkempt ponytail.

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Fringed tops and destroyed denim combined make classically free-spirited DIY outfits. Hand-painting for guys and beading for girls add an easy and more creative handmade aspect to the clothing. 82 | THREAD


EBIS VOLUPTIUM et, qui omnimpo reculpa rcidell itatiusantur alis aut quam endel intem andendisqui OUTHREADMAG.COM | 83


Channel the true Americana spirit by incorporating an American flag print into an outfit. Add a bandana as a staple grunge piece to finish off the look.

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Boys will be boys in washed-out button-ups, slim-fitting bottoms and badass boots

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Crocheted pieces and band T-shirts — especially those of the ‘90s grunge rock era — are fitting for a wild and free ensemble.

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Ditch the shirt in the spirit of Americana by keeping the look simple with monochromatic jeans and boots.

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Keep it cozy with a versatile, long-sleeved top. The pocket and heathered gray texture contrasts with some basic jeans for a comfy look that still rocks.

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ALL

AMERICAN

BBQ by KAYLIN HLAVATY | photos by XXX SOMEONE

EACH YEAR, THE EMERGENCE OF SUMMER IS SYNONYMOUS WITH FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION AND THE SMELL OF THE GRILL. WHILE THE OVERARCHING IMAGES OF COOKOUTS AND PARADES NORMALLY SHOW THE PERFECT ALL-AMERICAN FAMILY, THREAD WANTED TO USE THIS USA STANDARD TO EMPHASIZE SELF-EXPRESSION. PERSONAL STYLE IS AN EXTENSION OF TRUE SELF — FROM SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND ETHNICITY TO LETTING THE FREAK FLAG FLY IN ALL OF THEIR INTERESTS. OUR ALLAMERICAN BARBECUE SHOOT SHOWCASES THE CONSEQUENCES OF IGNORING SELFEXPRESSION AND THE REBELLION AGAINST PORTRAYING A PERFECT IMAGE.

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Bring large floral print back into your wardrobe for a pattern that outshines others. Add a pair of heeled espadrilles to finish off the look.

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Effortlessly achieve the man of the house role with a well-tailored suit and a patterned tie.

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Pull inspiration from the Stepford wives’ look of the ’50s with a bright pencil skirt and a strand of pearls. Add a modern touch with a dark red lip.

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Channel Wally Cleaver with a primp button-up and cardigan, but add Sperrys and long shorts for a modern take.

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Embrace the inner bad boy with a great dark wash jean, an olive jacket and an eyecatching hairstyle. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 101


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A classic angelic look is easily achieved with a simple checkered, mid-thigh length dress and a musthave pair of Mary Jane flats.

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Without barriers, self-expression leads to a better understanding of each other. Rock your sophisticated, edgy, untamed or playful look with confidence.

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Illustrations by DANIELLE MORRIS

Photos by HOLLY FISHER and PHIL SAM I by LAUREN HUEFNER


Details

Unexpected touches brighten up basic bathing suits. For women, think bold patterns and ruffles. Guys can step away from standard trunks with patterns in bright colors OUTHREADMAG.COM or shorter lengths.| 107


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Retro

This summer’s vintage-style maillots are a godsend for curvy ladies. Structured tops actually give support to bustier girls. Solids like white and red keep the look simple and summery.

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Clothes provided by Athens Underground

One-piece

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If baring it all in a bikini isn’t your style, try a one piece that’s cut low on the legs with a runched bust. Finish the vintage beach-babe look with big sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat.


UV bright

Be as bright as the sun as you’re baking under in a day-glo suit. For this look, guys should keep an eye out for solid trunks in traffic-stopping yellow, orange or pink.

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Mix ‘n’ match

Girls can go crazy with mix and match neon solids and tribal-patterned tops and bottoms. Don’t forget to wear sunscreen — especially if the sun is as hot as you look in these colors.


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one the girl in

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1 365 dress,

days

A LITTLE BLACK DRESS FOR A REALLY BIG CAUSE

By LIBBY CUNNINGHAM Photos by HEATHER BEAVER

E

lizabeth Held owns almost 30 dresses, but for the next year she’s only going to wear one. Her little black dress, with a semi-fitted top cinched together with a zipper, is always on her body when in public. However, she can choose how to wear it, whether it be in scarf or skirt form. Helm wants to shine a light for those living in Rahab’s Hideaway, a safe haven located in Columbus, Ohio for women and men who have been victims of the sex trade. The rules of Held’s resolution are simple: 1 dress, 365 days and no repeat outfits. Held is making more than just a fashion statement. Hopefully this will yield about $1,000 in

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donations for Rahab’s and raise awareness about the human slavery occurring in our own backyards, Held said. Rahab’s Hideaway took its first resident in October 2008. Founded by Marlene Carson, a trafficking survivor, the non-profit organization’s mission is to help victims of sex trafficking turn survival skills into things that are more productive. Initially, Rahab’s only housed female survivors, but now there is a location for men as well, Held said. “Everyone I know, that I’ve talked to, thinks that sex trafficking is just a third world country problem,” Held said. “But it’s definitely not. Right now, it’s the number one


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largest illegal trade in the world.” Fighting for her cause with fashion was not something Held had ever thought of until she attended a Campus Crusade for Christ conference in Indianapolis. During one of the speeches, Held noticed that the woman speaking was wearing an apron. The speaker then mentioned that she was going to wear one dress, every day, to raise money for a cause. “She was explaining how she was wearing an apron, and it wasn’t until probably the end of her talk until that she was like, ‘I am sure you are wondering why I am wearing this apron. I’m doing this project,’” Held said. “She wore it (every) day for six months.” Held felt inspired in January and by the middle of April she was ready. So she too decided to raise money and awareness for sex trafficking and to do it with the help of a dress. She researched different blogs to get an idea of how she was going to pull it off and looked at websites such as The Uniform

Project to see how it could be done. The Uniform Project was founded in 2009 by Sheena Matheiken to pay homage to sustainable fashion. Matheiken then decided to pay it forward and turn her project into a fundraiser to send children who live in Indian slums to school. Since her project started, she has been able to send 287 kids to school and raised $103,000 for the Akanskha Foundation, according to her blog. Dresses like the A-line that Matheiken wore are available for sale on her website in various styles. Although Matheiken’s was one-piece, Held chose a two-piece style. She paid $160 for the dress, and a portion of that will go toward The Uniform Project itself, Held said. Held wanted to make sure that her outfits were creative, comfortable and different every single day. Each day, she tries to photograph her outfits and put them online to show that wearing one dress every day can be done. “When a woman wears a little black dress, they feel confident. … They feel that self-

When a woman wears a little black dress, they feel confident.They feel that self-worth and that beauty and wearing a dress represents women."

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ELIZABETH HELD


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worth and that beauty and wearing a dress represents women,” she explained. “And using my body, it’s a constant reminder for me and a constant reminder for the people who are looking at me.” The dress, which is versatile, must be on her body at all times when she’s in public, Held said. But that doesn’t mean she can’t get creative. If she’s wearing jeans, Held will turn the skirt into a scarf and the top into a coverup or short-sleeved jacket. She’s hoping to figure out a way to pin both pieces together to fashion a jacket for the fall. Sometimes she will put the pieces on under something she is already wearing, like a different dress. “Every day I want to try and make a new outfit — another concept of this project is conservation,” she explained. “Project conservation in clothes: my own items, my friends items or thrifted items. And I love thrifting and that’s how I get all of my clothes anyway.” When people talk about her project, they tend to ask one question more than anything else, she said. “Everyone’s first question is, ‘How are you going to wash it? What do you wear when you wash it?’” she said. “I wear other clothes when I’m indoors. When I’m in public, that’s when I want to represent Rahab’s. When I’m in my dorm, I can be in PJs.” Before becoming a photojournalism major, Held considered dabbling in fashion. Having a closet lined with cardigans, shoes and tights has aided her in her own personal one dress project. “I guess I always knew (sex trafficking) exists, but it really hit me that it was a problem (in Ohio,) and that’s when my social justice interest really kicked in,” she said. “I knew I wanted to get involved somehow and (the woman at the conference) talked about

the dress. (I thought,) ‘That’s it. That’s my way. That’s my little tiny contribution I could do that’s not just a car wash.’” Held said the dress is a constant reminder of what she is believes in, and although some college students may not understand sex trafficking, being around her could get them thinking. “I can’t just hold a sign or have it tattooed on my arm,” she said. “It’s like I have a dress and that’s a physical reminder. I don’t have to necessarily verbalize it. People don’t need to be like ‘Oh, Liz, are you still doing your campaign?’ They can physically see it.” This summer, Held and her little black dress will be working at Rahab’s Hideaway. “I’m really excited to get involved with them over the summer. I visited one of the houses once and only two of the women were there at the time, so I got to explain the project to them,” she said. Wearing the dress while working will hopefully let the residents of the house know that they have someone supporting them. “I get to know the women (who) want to be involved with Rahab’s. Once I’m home, I want the dress to be for them a reminder that I’m supporting them and that I’m spreading their word and their story,” she said. To raise money, Held is updating her blog to let people know of her progress. She also plans to stuff envelopes and mailboxes with letters, asking for donations and explaining what she is doing. Held said she hopes these tools will spread her message about why she’s doing this project. “Here, being in school, people are just like, ‘Oh yeah that’s so cool that you’re just like wearing one dress,’” she said. “But I don’t know if the message of the sex trafficking part has come through yet. But I’m getting a lot of a lot of people talking about it casually.” OUTHREADMAG.COM | 121


one dress, unlimited style Elizabeth’s dress has a semi-fitted top cinched together with a zipper. She can choose to wear it however she wants, but she has a rule that she can’t repeat outfits. Here are just a few of the options of what she can do with her little black dress.

Hang the shirt as a scarf around the neck.

Style it up with a fun jacket and a belt.

Wear it under a completely different dress. 122 | THREAD

Make it dressy with a cardigan and tights.

Illustration By LINLEY MEYERS

Use the skirt and shirt as accessories for a different dress.


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oast coastto

By SARAH MALOY Photos by SARA SPIEGEL

The East Coast, West Coast and the Midwest have different accents, various cultural influences, thousands of miles between them and completely diverse styles.

and atmosphere of each area, causing styles across the country to be as varied as possible. With that in mind, the Midwest has acquired its own look but not without the influence of the East and West.

Dark, tough East Coast and free-spirited West Coast fashions meet in the Midwest to create the custom-blended style that walks the streets of Athens every day. “There are so many different factors (that influence style), such as the culture you're surrounded by and grow around, the natural environment which determines what type of clothes could be worn for which seasons, the geographical landscape of your area, whether you live in the city, suburban or country setting and even your race,” said Ninh Nguyen, an aspiring men’s fashion designer in New York City. All of those factors depend on the culture

Fashion along the West Coast is all about freedom and ease, with light, flowing materials and fun colors. In Los Angeles, wavy, undone hair and barely any makeup can still look fabulous. “Growing up on the West Coast taught me a lot about comfortable fashion,” said California native Kathy Miranda, a public relations professional in the fashion industry, reminiscing about a pair of green cowboy boots that she used to wear every day. “Surfinspired grunge rock was pretty much a go-to in high school and early college. When I fell in love with the no-bullshit attitude of the East Coast in college, my fashion sense grew

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up, so to speak.” The West Coast style is one part mentality, one part weather, explained Nikki Scoggins, a California resident who has lived and worked for clothing companies on both coasts. “When I moved (to LA), I got rid of my 765,000 coats because you just don’t need that here. … It’s mellow here and it definitely reflects in the clothes,” Scoggins said. “You tend to have a lot more loose, light layers versus on the East Coast, where it might be 30 degrees in the morning, then 70, and back to 50 at night and you’re gone the whole day. It’s just practical. You have to dress rad and you have to dress for where you live.” The Pennsylvania-born and East Coasteducated fashionista had quite the surprise when she originally ventured to the West Coast. “When I first moved here, I was at an Oakley party and immediately the first person I talked to was like, ‘You’re from the East Coast.’ I asked how he knew and he said, ‘Look at what you’re wearing.’ I had on a blazer, a little skirt and heels,” Scoggins said. While structured blazers and heels may be the norm in New York City, cross the country and you’re more likely to see women sporting colorful sneakers, flip flops, vivid platforms, or the occasional pair of espadrilles. “West Coast fashion calls for comfort and ease. This is not to say everyone is always in sandals and chinos. The style out here is more of a lifestyle — surf-inspired silhouettes, tailored with a bit of vintage montages,” explained Miranda, who said that her own style often resembles that of the ’50s pin-up girls. “Think bohemian pin-up, if there ever was a thing.” LA style has recently drawn inspiration from Native Americans, incorporating feathers and dream catchers into just about everything. Another trend that has caught on in 126 | THREAD

Cali is “cat-eye sunglasses — they’re everywhere,” Miranda exclaimed. “That and highwaisted everything — this is what I mean about the bohemian pin-up. We want those curvy shapes, but we also want loose-fitting skirts and macramé ponchos.” But there’s one trend comfort-loving Miranda says will never catch on out West. “The strong geometric shapes that are more conducive to modern art than they are clothes. Asymmetrical and androgynous style is very much an East Coast phenomenon. Too many beautiful long-haired blondes out in California to understand it.” Standing next to those beach blonde women are their male counterparts, often pictured in surfer shorts or polos. Yet 25-year-old designer Nguyen said guys are more likely to be found sporting skater shoes and graphic tees. “West Coast fashion is all about surferskater culture with bad-ass attitude,” said Nguyen. “I love the graphic art but sometimes it's just too much when you look like walking graffiti.” Whether it’s caused by the lifestyle, mentality or weather, it’s no question that West Coast fashion is beach-inspired, relaxed and colorful, while the East Coast is tougher and darker.

EAST COAST A three-day drive and 2,794 miles east of the relaxed West Coast is Los Angeles’s stern and structured counterpart, New York City. Known for their dark colors, layers and professionalism, New Yorkers are always on the go, a mentality that is reflected in their style. “East Coast style is ballsy, always out to make a statement,” Miranda explained. “Whether you’re a Manhattan debutante, Ivy League prep or starving musician pleading to the subway masses, your style is always saying something. Where California


“Growing up on the West Coast taught me a lot about comfortable fashion... Surf-inspired grunge rock was pretty much a go-to in high school and early college.“ KATHY MIRANDA

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“New York City is one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. It’s a true melting pot. So the style in NYC is eternal.” NINH NGUYEN There’s just a melting pot of a lot of different cultures and a lot of different styles,” Tuason said. “I hang around downtown in New York, which people would classify as more the hipster scene. Here it is all about customization — it’s trying all new things and reinventing yourself every few weeks.” And with all that reinvention comes new trends — a few of which seem to be influenced by the comfortable, colorful styles of the West Coast. “I see people going away farther from the skinny jeans. Guys are starting to wear proper, gentlemanly trousers,” Tuason said. “It’s more relaxed and more professional. You also start to see some color blocking. I’m not the biggest fan of color, but color is big for women now. And longer skirts — definitely long skirts — maxi skirts, ankle-length skirts. Longer skirts for women feel more feminine and dramatic.” Not only is New York a melting pot of international style, but it’s also the fashion hub of the world, influencing taste and dictating trends across America.

MIDWEST Between the two coasts lies Athens, Ohio, heart of all that Midwest fashion has to offer.

Illustrations By DANIELLE ZEISLER

reigns in effortless panache, the East Coast, namely New York, makes up for it in sartorial bravado and edge.” The one thing that truly defines New York style is the color palette. Occasionally there will be pops of color or patterns, but for the most part, New Yorkers wear dark clothes — black, black and more black, according to 25-year-old NYC style blogger Izzy Tuason. “The typical New York man would have a nice black jacket, whether it be like a really good quality leather jacket or a nice black blazer,” Tuason said. “But it’s just going to be plain black with a black T-shirt, black jeans and really good hair — good facial hair, too.” Tuason said a variety of factors influence the dark color scheme that covers the East Coast. “It’s because of the weather. It’s also the pace of the city. In New York, your days are always jam-packed, so what you wear in the day should be able to work at night. That’s why people are always in black: It never gets dirty and it’s good in the dark. It’s a lifestyle thing. It’s also about wearing what you can wear on the grimy subways. The gritty streets of New York affect style.” The women and men of New York are always prepared to conquer the mean streets of NYC, donning sturdy heels and platforms, ready to withstand miles of walking and dozens of subway rides. Although there are certain trends and colors that are consistent throughout New York, there is no quintessential East Coast style. “New York City is one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. It’s a true melting pot. So the style in NYC is eternal,” said Nguyen, whose men’s fashion line NINH is for “a modern-day Renaissance man.” Tuason, originally from Manila in the Philippines, described the city in much the same way as Parisian native Nguyen. “New York style is very international.


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“Midwest fashion focuses on its local designers for trends and to support the community, meanwhile establishing its own style by combining both the East and the West Coasts for a diverse cultural experience.” NINH NGUYEN The style of the Midwest is a blend of the East and West Coasts, drawing from both cultures as much as weather and online shopping allows. “Midwest fashion focuses on its local designers for trends and to support the community, meanwhile establishing its own style by combining both the East and the West Coasts for a diverse cultural experience,” Nguyen said. The Midwest isn’t exactly known for being a fashion capital, but it weaves together the structured style of the East Coast with the effortlessly cool fashion of the West Coast to create a style that is uniquely its own. “The Midwest is not the 'pulse of the industry' like NYC and LA. So it is simply less of a fashion emphasis,” said Ann Paulins, a retail merchandising and fashion product development professor at Ohio University. “In some respects, the fashion adoption is slower be-

cause of the communication and transportation of the fashion news and merchandise. But the population in general isn't receptive to the fast-paced fashion change nor the fashion risks associated with adoption of new — and sometimes controversial — fashions.” The crossover between the styles of the coasts allows for new and interesting trends that are found only in the Midwest. A flowing, colorful outfit that might be seen only in LA could be adopted with a darker color palette in the Midwest. A blazer with sharp, New York-esque lines might make it’s way to the Midwest in color rather than black. “Midwest style is influenced (by the coasts), but is adapted much later, particularly in terms of mass fashion. And never quite as edgy or showy,” Paulins explained. “(Fashion in the Midwest is) more conservative than the coasts.” Midwest fashion tends to be much less bold than style on the coasts. The mentality is more about fitting in than making a statement. The Midwest weaves together both sides of the country and California determines celebrity and cultural impact, but New York will always be the style leader. “New York City is where fashion develops. It's the fashion capital of the world,” Nguyen said. “Although LA is ranked fifth in the top fashion capitals of the world, I don't think LA can create trends that would influence the fashion world.” But it’s all about perspective. Scoggins loves the style of both coasts and said she doesn’t have a preference either way. “I like getting to have the easy, loose stuff that LA has taught me fashion-wise. It’s taught me to loosen up a little bit, but I still completely love the hard lines and the blazers and that feel to me like the more Philly or East Coast look,” she said. “And I appreciate both.” OUTHREADMAG.COM | 131


relay for life By MARIA FABIANO Photos by SARAH COWDEN

C

ome rain or shine, students at Ohio University have been committed to attending Relay for Life. In the past few years, they have endured especially poor weather conditions, but what keeps old as well as new participants coming back is the cause. They relay for a friend, for a family member, for the survivors — they relay for

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a cure. Courtney Bailey relays for every one of those reasons. Bailey has witnessed firsthand the damage cancer can cause to a family. Both of her mother’s parents died before she was born, and her mother had cancer three times before she finally succumbed to the disease when Bailey was 12 years old.


in good fashion

She remains hopeful despite the pain she has experienced because of this disease. “I am so adamant that there is a cure that I even got it tattooed on my body,” said Bailey. Now she is co-president of the OU Relay for Life Planning Committee along with Natalie Meyers, who lost her grandmother to ovarian cancer. Every year the Relay for Life Planning Committee hosts the outdoor event, which lasts 18 hours and requires each team to have one of its members continuously walk around the track to emphasize the fact that cancer never sleeps. The Planning Committee organizes events throughout the evening, such as a corn hole tournament, an American Idol contest and other fun competitions to keep the teams motivated throughout the night. However, the events that are most memorable for the participants are the survivor lap around the track and the luminary ceremony. During the luminary ceremony, candles are lit in bags around the track to honor those that

have been affected by cancer, and the participants take a lap in silence. This past year, 52 organizations participated in OU’s Relay, raising a total of $42,000. Morgan Healy, a team member of Delta Zeta, raised nearly $1,200 individually. “I didn’t really have a special story of how I raised money,” said Healy. “It really just shows how easy it is, just sending out emails.” With so many philanthropies to choose from, Healy decided Relay for Life would be hers because of the personal connections she has had with cancer in the past few years. According to the American Cancer Society, half of all men and one-third of all women in the U.S. will develop cancer during their lifetimes. In 1985, Dr. Gordy Klatt, the father of Relay For Life, pledged to walk and run around a track for 24 hours to raise money for the American Cancer Society in his hometown of Tacoma, Wash. Now, more than 26 years later, the event continues in its hope to end cancer. Even students who have not been per-

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This past year, 52 organizations participated in OU’s Relay, raising a total of $42,000. sonally affected by cancer have been inspired to get involved with the effort to find a cure. Eric Horton is an Alpha Phi Omega co-chair who said he relays for a young girl, Ava Nichols, who was diagnosed with a brain tumor last year. “If you go outside and ask someone if they know someone who has had cancer, everyone is going to say yes,” said Meyers. “Whether that is going to be a family member or a friend or even a friend of a friend, everyone knows someone who has had cancer and that says a lot about this being an epidemic I think.” 134 | THREAD

Even though the ohio university relay for life event is over, you can still donate money until august. So go to http://www. Relayforlife.Org/ relay/ and find out how you can start raising money!


congratulations

to the 2011-2012 Executive Board Editor-in-Chief Ali Mazzotta

Managing Editor Catherine Caldwell

seams editor

design & web editor

who what wear editor

photo chief

diy editor

picture editor

copy chief

creative director

public relations chief

advertising executive

Anna Luczkow Jessie Cadle Hallie Rybka

Sarah Maloy

Becca Goodburn

Riley Yuhas

Sarah Balser

Becky Williams Justin Brown Tom Busch

COME OUT FOR RUSH! Get more information about rush at:

www.phisigmapiou.com

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workoutwonderful

W

By ANNA LUCZKOW Photos by MARY HAUTMAN

hen sweating it out on the elliptical or feeling the burn while pumping weights, appearance is the least of any true fitness fanatic’s concerns. Sweat, smells, smudged makeup — it’s what working out is all about. However, when the time comes to pack up the gym bag and head back onto campus, anxiety about looks suddenly stifles any exercise euphoria. Scheduling physical activity into a college student’s daily agenda doesn’t have to mean running around all day looking like a gym rat. If showering down after an intensive run on the treadmill or swapping sweats and sneakers for jeans and Sperrys isn’t time permitting, don’t sweat it. The physical benefits of exercise can extend into an athlete’s hygiene, grooming and wardrobe if given the proper care. This post-workout primp plan will help any gym guru leave the locker room not only looking socially acceptable but also stylishly appropriate.

FIERCELY FRESH Making the time to hit the gym between classes can be difficult, which is why hitting the showers after isn’t always an option. But this does not mean forgoing freshness. Fitness buffs should first and foremost take care of the most fundamental physical facet: the face. According to livestrong.com, exercise improves the appearance and health of skin because it increases circulation by

bringing nutrients to the surface. Using an oil-free cleanser after workout to remove excess dirt and oil from pores will help an already luminous complexion to glow. For the trainee on the go, purchasing a mini bottle of a preferred face wash or filling up a travel-sized bottle is an easy method for toting products in a backpack, while allowing plenty of room for school books. Taking precautions during physical activity is key to reducing prep time as well. Ladies, skipping out on makeup or going minimal with makeup both cut back on facewashing time and reduces the likelihood of clogged pores. During exercise, wear a thick headband to prevent the hairline from becoming soaked with sweat and continuously pat skin dry with a clean towel. Cleanliness aside, athletes have been known to wreak havoc with this side effect of physical exertion: body odor. While it still holds true that the more successful the sweat session the greater the risk of stench, this pitfall can be avoided with proper deodorizing. “Cologne and deodorant after a workout are mandatory regardless,” said Adetunji Adedipe, a forward on the Ohio University men’s basketball team. Rolling on an antiperspirant prior to hopping on the stationary bike will protect against sweat, but reapplying during cool down is the key for leaving any trace of smell behind in the locker room. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 137


According to a menshealth.com guide to the most effective deodorants, a good stick for active males is Degree V12 Absolute Protection Antiperspirant and Deodorant. Women who work out regularly should try Secret Clinical Strength Sport. For an even sweeter scent, carry along an inexpensive body spray. Rebecca Koch, a fitness instructor at OU’s Ping Recreation Center, likes Dove Go Fresh Body Spray for days when she doesn’t have time to shower after teaching fitness classes. “It’s comforting to know I smell good when I go to class,” said Koch.

PERFECTLY PRIMPED Priming one’s physique is not just about keeping clean — it’s about looking fit for the rest of the day. Hair care is a primary step in the post-workout plan. During activity, women should wear hair loosely in a bun or ponytail to make manes easier to maintain afterward. While a brush or comb is a staple accessory for any gym bag, sometimes oily locks need a little something extra. In a pinch, dry shampoo or baby powder work to absorb grease while adding volume and texture. Sculpting strands into a workable up-do with Goody Secure Fit Ponytail Holders is a simple way to secure a

What to wear... for girls...

for guys...

headband

ponytail

T-shirt towel

dri-fit athletic shirt

bright running shorts

colorful sneakers

sneakers

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Illustrations By MIKAELA LONGO

athletic shorts


chic style for the rest of the day. Keeping the day’s activities in mind, women should use products like mineralbased powder foundations or blushes when applying their morning makeup. According to GKhealth.com, these will absorb oil and are less likely to smear with sweat. Wear waterproof mascara to avoid running and black smudges. For women who engage in extreme exercise, chances are most makeups will sweat off. Carrying along a small cosmetic case with smaller items is clutch for touchups. Samples that can be obtained from department store cosmetic counters make for convenient carry-alongs. Also, a good moisturizer and Chapstick are ideal additions because sweat tends to dry out skin.

In your bag... water bottle

chapstick

FASHIONABLY FIT Spending one’s free time at kickboxing class or shooting hoops in the gym does not have to mean spending the day in tawdry tees and shapeless high school track shorts. Workout wear should be anything but worn down, especially when it’s the day’s uniform. Regardless of one’s level of strength training, fitness should never have to be weighed against fashion. For Koch, versatility is always en vogue. “If I’m going to work out and I know I’m going to be out for the day, I want something with a dri-fit material or tighter capris. Then I can just layer stuff with it, and it looks cute,” Koch said. College campuses already condone the casual trend, so take advantage of the relaxed environment by rocking colorful sneakers and spandex paired with an oversized zip-up — only the yoga mat will give the outfit away. For a gym-to-class look, Koch recommends Nike Tempo Running Shorts, which come in bright colors and

deodorant

body spray

cologne

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patterns and are long enough to be worn by students outside the indoor track. Exercise should be enjoyable, so play up the look with fun accessories. Go for bright hairpieces like Goody Ouchless Gentle Headbands or funky patterned sports bras like the Nike Subliminated Pro Sports Bra. Koch said for her personal style, a cardinal rule is choosing one bold piece like her gray swirled Reebok compression capris. While Nike and Under Armour are the high-end designers of athletic ensembles, brands like Reebok and Champion are coming out with more affordable items, which Koch would recommend for student budgets. For guys, the rules of the game are somewhat similar. “I always wear some sort of athletic gear (to class),” said Patrick Fogt, an OU senior studying accounting. “I wear Nike and Under Armour, mainly for the comfort and the way they are designed to keep your body cool.” Fogt, who works out four times a week after class, recommends that to avoid appearing unkempt, fellow men should make more of an effort to match their clothes or opt for brand

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“If I’m going to work out and I know I’m going to be out for the day, I want something with a dri-fit material or tighter capris. Then I can just layer stuff with it, and it looks cute.” REBECCA KOCH name clothing over a sloppy white tee. However, an active lifestyle requires ditching the running shoes and cut-off tanks from time to time. “Our coach has talked to us about our public image,” said Adedipe. “On weekends I dress more professionally because I never know who I’m gonna see.” For the crazed cardio queen or bustling body-builder, outside image can fall second in line to the fitness façade. No matter how rigorous a student’s exercise regime, he or she should always take a time out for appearance. School work and work-outs may both require a lot of effort, but looking good makes any activity more fun.


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ceremonial standards By CATHERINE CALDWELL | Photos by SARAH SPIEGAL

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HINT

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WHEN TAKING A DATE TO A WEDDING, COORDINATING A COLOR SCHEME IS THE EASIEST WAY TO LOOK LIKE A COORDINATING PAIR.


THOUGH A

wedding ceremony is the time when the bride can take center stage, the guests can still have their chance for a portion of the spotlight. Forget about all those wedding myths. Before saving the date, here are a few pointers on how to dress to impress this wedding season.

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Wedding-wear can be easily sought after as retail companies like J. Crew and Anthropologie enter into the weddings and parties market. While the lines center on the wedding party, the style of the clothing gives great inspiration for personal style to shine. The original styles of J.Crew and Anthropologie is evident enough that this bridal wear doubles as guest wear. The wedding line from J. Crew this season offers simple and flattering gowns for the bridal party, while remaining fashion forward. Shorter

dress styles are becoming increasingly popular for bridal parties and J.Crew’s line caters to this trend. The bridesmaid’s dresses from J. Crew’s line are less formal, so much so that they resemble dresses from local uptown stores. Anthropologie’s wedding line, BHLDN, is more extravagant than J. Crew’s. The line plays with different shapes and styles that could make any bride say, “I do.” The collection presents an “anything goes” philosophy that allows a bride to express herself on her wedding OUTHREADMAG.COM | 147


day. BHLDN’s bridesmaids’ dresses are fun and versatile enough that a bridesmaid could wear it the next time she attends a wedding. If the invitation deems the wedding casual, finding an tasteful ensemble is easier than it seems. Sundresses can be transformed from weekend-wear to wedding-wear. Adding the right accessories, makeup and hair choice can make all the difference for an understated sundress. “A lot of people were wearing summer dresses with wedges,” said Sam Bartlett, a junior who attended her first wedding in South Carolina this spring. “The wedding was more casual with a country, southern feel.” While Barlett wasn’t sure about the most appropriate outfit, the groom made the decision clear by personally suggesting a sundress. Bartlett opted for a white, kneelength dress with black spaghetti straps and colored flowers, complemented by black heels and a Pandora necklace for her weekend wedding attire. While Barlett chose heels instead of flipflops, she saw that flats, gladiator sandals, and wedges became popular footwear alternatives. While shoes are always a significant part of accessorizing, noticeable necklaces, earrings and bracelets can accentuate a new fresh look. When taking a date to a wedding, coordinating a color scheme is the easiest way to look like a coordinating pair. For guys, they have it a little tougher when choosing the proper wedding guest outfit. This wedding season, it is acceptable for guys to wear shorts as long as they are not denim or black; opt for khaki, pastel shades or a subtle pattern like seersucker. Pairing them with an Oxford style buttonup shirt as opposed to a polo and some Sperry Topsiders can separate the good dates from the bad. The color choice, sunglasses and hat options can be left for a extra form of self148 | THREAD

expression. However, a classic option that never fails is a nice pair of dress pants and a button-up shirt. If the wedding invitation specifies the occasion as formal, clothing choices are more limited. Wearing a basic black suit, light-colored shirt and more subtle tie is the suggested attire for guys at formal wedding ceremonies, according to Martha Stewart Weddings’ Etiquette Adviser on her website. Ties should be conservative, with simple patterns. For a formal affair, monogamy doesn’t apply just to newlyweds but also to wedding dates, especially when it comes to color. Matching a tie to the color of a dress or accessory within reason looks elegant and intentional. Senior Lori Huber also attended a wedding this spring and wanted to match her date without looking like they put a lot of thought into their outfit choices. She said her dress had a black top and a zebra print bottom. She said to have a cohesive look her date wore a black suit, a white shirt and a black tie. Huber is attending another wedding later this summer. “It’s in Chicago, and I know their family is a lot more formal. It’ll be black tie, I’m sure,” Huber said. Dresses for a formal wedding should be no shorter than cocktail or knee length and patterns shouldn’t be flashy or bold. Despite these rules, there is still freedom in color. Be bright and bold, or have pops of color with trendy accessories. While wedges have become more popular this wedding season, heels add a classic touch. If the formality of the wedding ceremony has increased, attire should follow suit. Now, it is time to debunk some wedding myths. Many myths state what is acceptable to wear — and not to wear, — to a wedding. To avoid committing a wedding etiquette faux


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pas, deciphering between the truth from the wives tales is crucial. While getting dressed for the big day remember it is the bride’s day to shine. Keep your hair styled simply. Avoid up-dos, big hair or anything resembling Carrie Bradshaw’s bird’s nest on her wedding day in the 2008 film Sex and the City. So shying away from ostentatious outfits from the bachelorette party is a must when attending a wedding. According to the wedding section in Glamour, it is completely acceptable, if not encouraged, to wear black to a wedding. Black is a flattering, versatile and classy color choice at all times. In contrast, it is acceptable to wear white this wedding season (note: Pippa Middleton). As long as the outfit doesn’t resemble the bride’s or confuse the groom then wear it. Just remember it is still the bride’s day. Bartlett broke the rule banning white attire for wedding guests and chose her floral outfit for style and comfort. She also offers a few pointers to other summer wedding attendees. “I was really involved with putting together the wedding, so I recommend wearing something comfortable to sit and move around in,” Barlett said. “But most importantly, don’t wear new heels. They’ll kill your feet.” In the past brides could only wear white, but today their dress can be any color from off-white to red. Bridal gowns are even transforming from traditional to fashion forward. This theme is being shown through J. Crew and Anthropologie’s wedding lines. Whether the occasion is casual, formal or unconventional, make sure your outfit stays wedded to the style of the ceremony. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 151


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70sstyle


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154 | Clothes byTHREAD Athens Underground


“Seeing ’70s trends while walking around campus is like getting a blast from the past, from a time where people did and wore what seemed to be whatever they wanted.” KATIE O’LEARY

Illustration By RACHEL KEAVENY

By OLIVIA OHLIN Photos by LEVI FINLEY

The fashion of the ’70s evolved from the ’60s era of hippies, Twiggy, free love, Woodstock and government protests. Millions of teens donned bell-bottoms, tie-dye tees and peasant blouses on an everyday basis. Today, these trends and styles are re-emerging 40 years after their debut. According to an article from thebeautyinsiders.com, “Vintage fashion styles have always been a great source of inspiration for fashion designers. This is because vintage styles have always exuded style as well as glamour.” This vintage inspiration is spreading to clothing stores everywhere and now can be seen on students throughout campus. “Seeing ’70s trends while walking around campus is like getting a blast from the past, from a time where people did and wore what seemed to be whatever they wanted,” said Katie O’Leary, a sophomore studying advertising. The ’70s have been associated with an era of anything goes when it comes to fashion styles, along with an overall emphasis on individual expression throughout the decade. Activism in feminism, civil rights and Vietnam protests all contributed to people’s free-spirited and rebellious attitudes and were reflected through fashion. High-waisted, wide-legged trousers, hot pants, revealing crop tops and high-necked frilly tops were all among popular trends. The main styles that are being recreated on the runway are seen around Athens and in college student budget-friendly clothing stores such as The Other Place, H&M and For-

ever 21. Crop tops, hot pants and a floppy sun hat are ideal for day wear. Beat the heat with a Farrah Fawcett look by wearing short, highwaisted denim shorts paired with a floral patterned or striped cropped shirt. Top it off with a floppy sunhat to protect yourself from the rays while you’re on the streets for fests on the weekends or reading for class outside during the week. This spring, designers such as Marc Jacobs, Derek Lam, Fendi, Etro and Salvatore Ferragamo all pulled inspiration from the ’70s and have made an effort to resurface formerly popular trends and apply them to modernday fashions. “I’ve always liked the ’70s, so I’m glad they’re coming back,” said Maddie Valley, a sophomore studying studio art. “For example, I love floppy hats, and if I had any money I’d buy myself one.” Marc Jacobs’ spring line showcases bright colors, high-waisted trousers with wide legs, tighter tops, dramatic straw hats and rompers. Rompers are a casual alternative to a sundress. Fancier than shorts but more carefree than a dress, rompers are the ideal outfit to wear while eating lunch on College Green or lounging in the Scripps Amphitheater. You don’t even have to worry about breezes whirling up your flowing sundress. Derek Lam demonstrates an androgynous look with high-waisted trousers, a turtleneck and a blazer. Etro’s current spring line features a traditional ’70s palette of mustard yellows and floral patterns. Fendi and Salvatore OUTHREADMAG.COM | 155


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Ferragamo also echo the ’70s by showing crop tops and blazers. The diversity of designs came and went throughout the decade. The use of polyester, cheesecloth and various synthetic fabrics surfaced. Lycra and spandex, along with rhinestone and gem-embellished garments became widely popular, inspired by disco and movies like Saturday Night Fever with John Travolta. Rayon and leotard fabrics also contributed to the late ’70s evolution into the ’80s aerobic craze punk fashion scene filled with loud colors, acid wash and cigarette-leg jeans. Jacobs’ line in particular takes a modern twist on the fashions by using complex fabrics that were not as common 40 years ago. According to a style.com report of the show’s line, his material usage sets him apart from

the other ’70s-inspired lines. “The ’70s have been in the air for a couple of seasons now,” the article said. “You can already find long dresses and denim flares here and there on Broadway’s fast-fashion strip, but none in the materials Jacobs uses like double-face voiles, gauzes, etamines.” This proves that re-creation of old trends lends to improvement and adaptation with modern modifications. “I love looking through my mom’s old pictures, and it’s cool too see that I have similar things in my closet,” said Mollie Fitzgerald, a sophomore studying communication studies. “It’s a great decade to bring back.” Stay trendy, Athens. Always remember that mother knows best, especially when you’re rocking her fashion. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 157


Illustration By RILEY YUHAS

croptops


rant

By CATHERINE CALDWELL

N

less you’re a ’90s pop sensation or lounging on a beach with a Mai Tai in hand, baring your belly should not be a wardrobe option. While many may admire your rhinestone butterfly belly button ring, that doesn’t mean you have to expose your navel jewelry and half your torso to the world. The only way to explain showing your stomach around

campus is either: a) you want to attract negative attention by shady suitors, b) you went overkill on the cutting during your DIY project, or c) you lost a fight with a lawnmower. Walking around on a normal day looking like you left half your shirt at home is simply not attractive. Save the belly shirts for the beach, Britney and Christina, and you won’t rub anyone the wrong way.

rave

By KATHRYN POTRAZ

I

have fond memories of the ’90s and my midriff-envy days. Posh Spice’s short, skin-tight T-shirts were something I longed to rock but never had the chance to as a nine year old. By the time I was old enough to squeeze into one, crop tops were as obsolete as my worn light-up shoes. Some may cringe at the thought of baring skin when it has long been hidden. Even though not all our stomachs are as flat as Blake Lively’s or Mischa Barton’s, the new crop top is more figure-friendly than the

old. Featured in Christopher Kane’s spring collection and Missoni’s fall collection in 2010, the new crop tops are loose and breezy. The length is also more forgiving — modern crop tops barely graze the navel. Avoiding an exposed stomach is easily remedied by wearing high-waisted shorts or a longer top underneath. This summer I’ll be cool in a breezy, short tee paired with high-waisted shorts. Add some gladiator sandals and a glass of lemonade, and I won’t ever want to leave my sunwarmed patio. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 159


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