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DECEMBER 2015

ON THE

RUN A PRIVATE, STYLISH GETAWAY

HOLIDAY HOROSCOPE Will a new year mean a new you?

BLANK SPACE PLAYING WITH NEGATIVE NAIL ART

HAUTE HISTORY

The past, present and future of couture

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Table of Contents WINTER 2015

FRONT OF BOOK

04 Haute Online 08 Top 5 12 Editor’s Letter 13 Masthead

SEAMS

16 Runway Realway 20 Celeb Style 24 Peace & Hair Grease 26 Bee’s Knees 32 Parkas & Rec 36 Pinning on Point 42 Blank Space 52 High Collar

46 THAT’S A WRAP

DIY

58 Oh My Ombre 60 Scented Brew 64 No Strings Attached 70 Well Rounded 72 Carb Loading 2 | THREAD

74 BERRY BUBBLY


78 OPEN HOUSE

WHO, WHAT, WEAR

84 Supporting Sounds 90 Turning Heads

MIDDLE OF BOOK

154 6 LOOKS: SEX AND THE CITY

94 Spark in the Dark 108 Crystallized 122 On the Run 140 Les Filles Apprécié

CAMPUS CASUAL 166 168 170 172

Ask an Intern #TBT Holiday Horoscope NYE in NYC

BACK OF THE CLOSET 176 184 192 196 206 212

Haute History Real Representation Unflitered Crazy Hair Colors Roaming Revolution Rant/Rave: Septum Piercings

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HAUTE ONLINE Looking for some new blogs to add to your radar? Whether scrolling for meal inspo or needing a quick DIY gift, we’ve got you virtually covered. LITTLE LIGHTS OF MINE From food recipes to fitness regimens, wife of Golden State basketball player Stephen Curry, Ayesha Curry, has plenty of awesome content on her lifestyle blog, Little Lights of Mine. Curry is a mother of two beautiful daughters, so she loves sharing stories about her family and what it’s like to be a mother and a wife, while still maintaining her own independence. She operates Little Lights of Mine to share her love for cooking. She posts videos of herself cooking her own recipes at home, that way her fans can recreate her exquisite dishes as well. Her videos personalize the cooking experience by inviting fans into her home, where she showcases her love for food. With dishes like greek yogurt and sundried tomato paninis, it’s easy to find all of her delicious recipes on the site. Curry even sells her own products on her blog, including items like extra virgin olive oil and an apron she designed herself. She’s only 26, and although she is a basketball wife, that’s not the only thing she is. She’s a mother, a fitness coach, and most of all, a chef. Be sure to check out her awesome blog. – TIFFANY BEY 4 | THREAD


CLICK TO VIEW THE WEBSITE!

GAL MEETS GLAM It’s never too late to pursue a dream. As a junior in college, Julia Engel wrote her first blog post on Gal Meets Glam. She never anticipated it would become a full-time career. Engel wanted to create something that would inspire people by giving them a little bit of glamour in their daily lives. Her blog is characterized by her feminine and classic style that is shown through her appearance and travels. One of the largest sections of Gal Meets Glam, Fashion, is covered in pictures of Engel in her different ensembles. This section focuses more on showing — not telling. Her sweet style is shown through printed dresses, neutrals, and classic pieces from places such as Nordstrom, Kate Spade, Neiman Marcus, and ASOS. Another important section of her blog, Travel, opens up to a large map marked with places she has visited. She includes hotels she has stayed in during her travels to places such as Paris, Rome, and St. Lucia. The photography throughout this section is exquisite and gives life to the places she has traveled. Lastly, Engel’s Beauty section is what separates her from other fashion bloggers. Her posts can vary from how to find the perfect holiday lipstick to her everyday facial routine. Engel favors high-end makeup brands such as Laura Geller, Butter London, and Burberry. She keeps her looks simple, yet always finds a way to add a touch of elegance. – MADISON CLEVELAND WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 5


FOR MORE FASHION INSPO FROM KELVIN FOLLOW HIM ON INSTAGRAM @NOTORIOUSLY DAPPER

NOTORIOUSLY DAPPER When you think of a man being dapper that means that he has a great sense of style. If you’re notorious, everyone has their eye on you. The best way to stand out and to be notoriously dapper is to have a unique look that everyone will be talking about. Kelvin Davis, who runs the blog, is a fashionforward husband and father. Outside of his blog, Davis works as an art educator and teaches his students the importance of art through creativity and expression. His artistic background influences the way he adapts his personal style. “Your body is the blank canvas and your clothes are the medium,” he said on his blog. Davis’ style as a whole is sharp and classy. He can be seen dressed in a timeless three-piece suit, or in brightly colored pants finished with a fedora. Wherever he goes, he definitely turns heads. Whether it’s a night out on the town or a work meeting, he feels stylish and means business. As a plus-size man, Davis doesn’t let body image issues stop him from feeling confident and dressing the way that he wants. So, take the same risks as Davis and dare to be dapper. – BRI GIORDANO 6 | THREAD


haute online

SF GIRL BY BAY Victoria Smith, the editor and blogger behind SF Girl By Bay, is one of the West Coast’s leading interior designers. Smith gives product reviews, shopping tips, art, photography, design resources, and home entertaining tips, while providing the reader insight on life. Smith is just one of the many writers who contributes to her blog, which gives multiple perspectives under each category she offers. Readers have the opportunity to explore a variety of things, such as accessories and homewares, DIYs, and a section exploring San Francisco. Accessories and Homeware offer the everyday reader the opportunity to expand their horizons when it comes to decorating. Smith uses different looks from various interior designers, allowing the readers to make their visions come to life. Homemade DIY is filled with a variety of projects that many readers may be reluctant to try at first, but Smith can offer guidance on just about everything. Posts cover topics like how to make a pale shade of white work in the winter, or how you can redecorate your patio in a couple of quick steps. Each of the makeovers is filled with tips on making a creation come to life in the home. Smith is a San Francisco girl at heart but she currently lives in Los Angeles. She can easily persuade the reader on why one should visit San Francisco. The page goes into detail on where to live and must-see sites while visiting. Smith also released a book earlier this year, “See San Francisco,” which talks more about her love for the city. – SARAH NEWSAD WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 7


5 TOP

Find out the top five things that our exec board is inspired by right now.

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GIGI GORGEOUS Gigi Lazzarato

has a signature send off for every YouTube video on her channel. “Remember, stay gorgeous,” Lazzarato, better known as Gigi Gorgeous, says with an air kiss. Lazzarato’s channel is filled with videos on makeup, stories of her life, adorable interactions with her dog, and her many adventures, but to label her a YouTuber doesn’t quite do her justice. She also has been featured in campaigns for Crest, Too Faced, and Miley Cyrus’ Happy Hippie Foundation. Lazzarato is an activist for the transgender community, to whom she proudly belongs. Whether using her voice in speeches at LGBT events or in “Monthly Favorites” videos, Lazzarato leads by example, staying gorgeous not just in what she looks like but also in who she is.   – LOUIS BARAGONA 8 | THREAD


2

CAPE COATS As the

weather starts to change, bundling up in a coat becomes an unavoidable chore to stay warm. Never one to want to cover up my outfit with a bulky and unflattering layer, I’m enthralled by the effortless polish of the cape coat. Far from traditional, the statement-making, billowy silhouette has taken over the street style scene and the runways, but won’t overtake over your outfit. The cape coat pairs flawlessly with jeans, boots, and any simple top. Nab one for your wardrobe at stores like Zara or Forever 21. Save the day—and your outfit—in a cape even more trendy than most superheroes. – MICHELLE FRANTZ

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SMOKEY EYE Whether I am headed to classes or enjoying a night out, I am often sporting a dramatic smoky eye. The look isn’t for the faint-hearted, as this eye makeup draws attention. I like to blend BareMinerals loose-pigment shadows for a seamless appearance. With my brown eyes, using purple with the gray and black shadows creates a variation that makes my eyes pop. With thick winged liner and heavy mascara, I dominate every day with a fierce and fun attitude. – PAIGE BENNETT WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 9


CUSTOM BANDANAS ARE AVAILABLE ON ETSY

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BANDANAS One of my

most vivid childhood memories is of rummaging through my mother’s top dresser drawer to find all of her silk neck scarves. I loved dressing up in them and enjoyed their silky comfort as well as their simple chicness. As I noticed the trend coming back on runway looks and while scrolling on my Instagram feed, I was completely on board. Whether it was on fashion bloggers’ websites or a feature in Coach’s Fall 2015 show (Runway Realway PG. 16) some of fashion’s greatest authorities are utilizing the bandana. The best part about this comeback is that it is totally affordable, with bandanas easy to find and worth every penny. Swap out a statement necklace or even pair one together with the scarf. This comfy,  affordable look is perfect for chilly sweater weather, making it easy to stay comfy and trendy.  – LINDSEY SMECKER 10 | THREAD


top 5

5

GAP TEETH Georgia May

Jagger, Lindsey Wixson and Leila Goldkuhl. What do all these models have in common? The gap in their teeth. I, having gap teeth myself, will never get enough of this beauty feature (that’s right, it’s not just a trend) that people over the past few years have been dying to see. Quirky, fun, and slightly intoxicating, the gapped tooth is adored by some and noticed by all. With the fashion industry’s push for raw individualism, gap teeth were at the forefront of the battle, fighting for imperfection in smiles all across the industry. With teeth being arguably the first thing you notice about a person, it’s important to feel confident in your smile and in your presentation. So go on! ‘Don’t mind the gap’ and smile on that Tinder date; at least you’ll know he’s got all eyes on you. – ROYLE MAST

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Editor’s Note HAPPY HOLIDAYS, THREADIES!

The season of indulgence has arrived. Winter is the perfect time to treat yo’self. My personal favorite indulgences are chocolate, a faux fur throw blanket, and ugly, wool socks that tend to illicit concerned cries of “WHAT ARE THOSE!?” ‘Tis the season for kicking back, snuggling under a blanket, stuffing your face, and remember for whom and what we’re thankful for. Though not made for the bedroom, the blanket scarf (“That’s a Wrap” P. 46) is the perfect accessory for avoiding getting chilly while still looking cool. A comfy turtleneck (“High Collar” P. 52) is also a great way to warm up, fireplace optional. Layering on a parka (“Parkas & Rec” P. 32) will also ensure that one travels well, whether through the tundra or just through College Green. For some, sweet indulgence comes in the form of a perfect nightcap, with one being our recipe for a yummy blackberry sparkler (“Berry Bubbly” P. 74). Pair your own favorite drink with our hearty recipe for baked potato soup (“Carb Loaded” P. 72) and warm up with every bite. Stay guilt-free after consumption by working

it out on an exercise ball (“Well Rounded” P. 68). My ultimate TV indulgence is Sex & the City, of which I’ve seen every episode, and needless to say I’m thrilled with our latest Six Looks We Like (P. 154), inspired by the styles of New York’s four most iconic best friends and two of the men in their lives. Whether you’re a Charlotte, a Samantha, a Miranda, or a Carrie (I swear I’m not just saying this but I am a Carrie) I think you’ll love it too. So, Threadies, it’s time to enjoy your break, giving yourself time off to pamper yourself without worry. Winter has arrived, and with our new issue, there has never been a better time to indulge.

XO,

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thread EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LOUIS BARAGONA

W RITERS

MANAGING EDITOR ALICIA MACDONALD

Tiffany Bey, Erin Fausel, Maria Fischer, Bri Giordano, Abby Grisez, Natalie Helton, Dottie Kramer, Rachel McClure, Sarah Newsad, Travis Nienberg, Rachel O’Morrow, Katherine Pinter, Katie Pittman, Jaida Sterling, LynAnne Vucovich, Alex Warner, Sarah Weingarten

CREATIVE DIRECTOR LINDSEY SMECKER

Kayla Blanton, Erin Fausel, Abigail Grisez, Rachel O’Morrow, Sarah Parker, Darian Randolph, Lynanne Vucovich, Alex Warner

COPY EDITORS

FEATURES EDITOR MICHELLE FRANTZ SEAMS EDITOR DEVEN MIDDLETON W H O, W H AT, W E A R E D I T O R MEGAN FAIR DIY EDITOR PAIGE BENNETT COPY CHIEF COURTNEY MIHOCIK DESIGN DIRECTOR KAYLA BREEDEN PHOTO CHIEF ROYLE MAST PHOTO EDITOR ERICA BRECHTELSBAUER VIDEO CHIEF HANNAH SQUEGLIA PUBLIC RELATIONS CHIEF MORGAN BORER

PHOTOGRA P HERS

Kinsey Ball, Kelly Bondra, Isaac Gibson, Maia Hamilton, Kaitlyn Hatton, Liz Moughan, Lindsey Lemons, Kate Stone, Bre Thomas, Melina Triffon, Anna Ventre, Jenna Wallace

DES IGN ERS

Sarah Blankenship, Kelly Bondra, Abby Gordon, Evelyn Gustwiller, Samantha Güt, Katie Hoderlein, Ashley Morman, Allison Paxton, Kirsten Pribula, Becca Ryan, Kate Stone, Audra Swan

STY L ISTS

ASSISTANT - Taylor McCarthy Alex Bertolini, Mishalaina Coles, Kaitlin Janes, Adriana Mazzotta,Noah Morris, Stacey Neal, Travis Nienberg, Kendall Yorio

PU BLIC REL ATION S TEA M Julia Phillips, Devin Potoczak

B LOGGERS

Tiffany Bey, Morgan Brenner, Bridget Gibson, Sarah Parker, Nicole Tsangeos, Rachel Wagner

M ODEL S

Louis Baragona, Brad Burgess, Emily Brunner, Isaac Bush, Rylee Crimmel, Alora Contant, Briana Craig, Elizabeth Daugherty, Maria Delgndo, Ashley Falencki, Hannah Gilmore, Avery Kerns, Katie Klinefeiter, Anna Loss, Reagan Main, Royle Mast, Ben Martina, Lindsey Mathews, Taylor McCarthy, Breanna Rose Morri, Courtney Moser, Travis Nrenberg, Rachel O’Morrow, May Parell, Erin Radigan, Erin Reece, Zulfa Rizquia, Alessa Rosa, Michelle Sebastian, Madeleine Toerne, Alex Warner

BUSINESS MANAGER HANNAH HASEMAN

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SEAMS CELEB STYLE - DRAKE PG 20


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RUNWAY REALWAY BY DOTTIE KRAMER PHOTOS BY KELLY BONDRA

Coach is widely known as a classic brand with little variation from year to year, which is why their fall 2015 show was such a surprise. Coach switched up its normal preppy style with a darker, edgier vibe. Coach’s change can be attributed to its new creative director, Stuart Vevers, who was hired in June of 2013 to help

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upgrade the brand. “I guess for me what I found appealing when I was first contacted was this absolute desire for change,” Vevers said in an interview with businessoffashion. com. “My role... is about rethinking it and bringing on all the things that we feel are good about the brand — changing things and not being afraid to.” Vevers did just that. Nothing was body-hugging or form-fitting in the 2015 fall line, save a few pairs of leather leggings. A lot of layers were shown, proving that warmth is the most important thing in fashion and that it can still be fun. Cozy and classy, Coach paired many oversized, loosely shaped sweaters with black leather leggings and sturdy boots, warm enough for the snow. A cute, campus-appropriate look to steal from the show: Fur vests. Oversized fur vests were a clear favorite for Coach this year, and it’s easy to see why. The most surprising thing about Coach’s collection were the colors. Dark tans, blacks, and blues gave the collection a serious tone that doesn’t always accompany Coach. To recreate these looks, be sure to add heavy fabrics, dark colors, and loose silhouettes to your wardrobe. Don’t be afraid to switch it up with the fabrics; faux fur costs less and is just as fun.


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COACH Shirt: Uniqlo, Skirt: Akira, Skirt: Vera Wang, Leather Jacket: Thrifted, Shoes: Steve Madden, Bandana: Anywhere, Bucket Bag: H&M

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Y-3

Y-3 Coat: Abercrombie, Green Joggers: J. Crew, T-shirt: Vans, Boots: Thrifted

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seams BY HAADIZA OGWUDE PHOTOS BY BRAEDEN MCCLAIN

The 12-year collaboration between designer Yohji Yamamoto and Adidas has proven to be influential in the progression of athletic wear. The transition from sportswear to high fashion could not have been possible without the avant-garde aesthetic and traditional Japanese tailoring of Yamamoto and the sports expertise of Adidas. The Y, in Y-3 stands for Yohji Yamamoto. The three represents the Adidas three signature stripes and the dash signifies the bond between the two. Y-3 is known for its edgy take on athletic wear, incorporating basic tank tops, warm-up jackets, and sweatpants and reinventing them with the use of new fabric technology, pockets, new proportions and colors. “Ten years ago we created something that did not exist before and completely projected the future. My desire was and is to make sportswear elegant and chic,” Yamamoto said in a 2011 interview with dazeddigital.com. The Y-3 Fall/Winter 2015 collection, titled, “Royal Air Force,” is inspired by some of the classic designs of military clothing. Yamamoto’s influence for this collection comes from air force uniforms. The collection includes United States Air Force- and Royal Air Force-inspired blue-grey coats, flight suits, track pants with emphasized back pockets, Soviet

border officer jackets, and of course, the essential Y-3 sneakers. The military-inspired look is evident in the color scheme of this collection. Incorporating black with varying hues of grey, blue and green, with the occasional pop of red, Yamamoto was able achieve the edgy martial style he desired. The key to this collection is minimalism. Keeping your style simple is important to remember when trying to emulate this line. A utility jacket is a must when trying to achieve the style present. Dark colors, simple sneakers, joggers, trench coats and fur-lined jackets are also some of the ways one can accomplish this uniform aesthetic. The Y-3 Fall/Winter 2015 collection is undeniably chic in its fusion of classic air force and military designs with that of Adidas’ signature sportswear style.

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DRAKE

Coat: Express, T-Shirt: OVO Shop, Boots: Polo, Jeans: Levi, Watch: Invicta 20 | THREAD


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CELEB STYLE BY OLIVIA COOPER PHOTOS BY OLIVER HAMLIN

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rake honey, you are our everything and you are all we ever wanted. People can make fun of Drake’s sensitivity all day long with their memes and Vines, but no one can deny Aubrey Graham’s style. As fall fades to winter, Instagram’s @champagnepapi kills the game in boots, straightleg jeans, and parkas. Boots like Doc Martens and Timberlands are stealing the show this season by being stylishly tucked into straightleg jeans or joggers, giving them less of a “work boot” look. Drake pairs the pants and boots with fitted tops and oversized jackets, another huge trend this season. The oversized coats are often neutral colors and help break up the outfit. Drake’s style has many genderneutral aspects. Drake’s look is versatile and can be worn by any gender identity. Fashion-savvy penny pinchers can shop for budget-friendly parkas at Forever 21 or H&M with their large selection of outerwear. While boots tend to run more expensive, Timberlands have come out with shades of classic beige, olive green, and black. One of the less important pieces of the look, the top, can be found

at stores like The Gap, a carrier of simple tees both plain and printed. Drake’s style embodies the perfect amount of fit and flare, with the oversized jacket being leveled out by a tighter pant leg. Drake, if you’re reading this don’t change a thing — we love your winter style. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 21


BY EMMA JENKINS PHOTOS BY ANNA VENTRE

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nown for her waist-length cornrows and bold, grunge clothing, Zoë Kravitz is bring her discernible style to the forefront of the music, film and fashion worlds. Born to Lenny Kravitz and Lisa Bonet, it’s no surprise this 27-year-old singer and actress inherited such a notable presence on all platforms. Kravitz began her film career in 2007, and has since starred in many well-known films including Divergent and X-Men: First Class. She also currently fronts the R&B/ electropop band, Lolawolf, which featured collaborations with Miley Cyrus and A$AP Rocky as well as acclamation from Drake. Much credit has been given to Kravitz’s parents, whose notoriety helped contribute to her upbringing. Still, she embraces her success in every way possible. “I can make all the art I want and get

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paid to do it — it’s f--king crazy. I’m thankful for it,” she said in an interview with Complex magazine. Her distinct art form is also shown through her choice of attire. From her monochromatic mesh dress and knee-length sleeveless blazer that she wore at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival to her plaid romper and black platforms at this year’s Coachella, Kravitz knows how to make a statement. One of her most recognizable accessories is her septum piercing, which she continues to rock with every outfit. To achieve Kravitz’s unconventional street style, pair a black mesh tank with a long flannel and boxy jacket over top, with light-wash boyfriend jeans and lace-up boots. For accessories, add a brown suede baseball hat, thick chain necklace, and bold eyeliner. Just remember, authenticity is the key to mastering this look. No matter what she’s wearing or where she’s performing, Kravitz stays true to herself.


slug Hat: Steve Madden, Forever 21: Plaid, Ripped Denim Jacket: LF, Mesh Top: Thirfted, Light Wash Boyfriend Jeans: Topshop, Heels: Charlotte Russe

ZOĂ‹ KRAVITZ

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BLOGGER OF THE MONTH

PEACE & HAIR GREASE

THE ENDLESS SUPPORT IS WHAT MOTIVATES ME TO CONTINUE WRITING AND BEING A POSITIVE INFLUENCE. 24 | THREAD


seams BLOG & STORY BY TIFFANY BEY

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riting is something that many people dread, but for me, it has always been a form of meditation. It helps my mind to slow down when the stress of school and work build up. I’ve always known that I’ve had a passion for writing, but it really began when I joined Thread Magazine my sophomore year of college. Writing for this publication has given me the foundation to grow as a writer and create a voice within my writing. Why a lifestyle blog you may ask? Well, many of my friends and family have come to me asking for advice or for my opinion on certain topics, which got me thinking, “Hmm, how about I just start my own lifestyle blog?” I love the feeling of helping people out through my writing. Whether it’s something as small as songs to help you out on a bad day or promoting independence and individuality; It’s my way of being a counselor, just behind a computer screen. I’ve found so much inspiration from other lifestyle blogs that I follow, and as an avid reader of those sites, I have a better understanding and feel for what readers want. This then lends a hand to my creative process, making it more fun for me. Many people have been asking me where I came up with the title “Peace & Hair Grease.” Well, to be completely honest, there really isn’t a deep meaning behind it

at all. Peace & Hair Grease is a phrase that my Mom always used as another way to say goodbye. In addition to that, peace is something I wish for everyone that visits my blog and hair grease is always essential. It’s almost a metaphor in a way. Your scalp gets really dry without grease and your soul gets dry, or empty without peace. Call me corny, but it’s what I live by. Two absolutely essential things that I need to live my life. When my readers, friends, family, and even strangers tell me that they visited my blog, it makes me feel like I’m helping the greater good! The endless support is what motivates me to continue writing and being a positive influence. My hope with Peace & Hair Grease is that it will give my readers some insight on who I am, but more importantly promote readers to learn something new everyday and try new things. Having the ability to speak to such a large audience through the Thread Magazine platform has been such an incredible experience for me. My readers mean the world to me. I want them to come to me with new ideas, or advice on how I can grow as a blogger. I want this to be as interactive of an experience as it can be, not just for me but for the audience as well. I enjoy writing my blog and I hope that everyone continues to cruise through this journey with me. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 25


RUNWAY REALWAY

Bee’s Knees

You know what they always say: the higher the boot the closer to God. Knee high boots are the perfectly chic solution to the transition from fall to winter.

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slug Wide Heel: Forever 21

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BY COURTNEY MIHOCIK PHOTOS BY BRE THOMAS

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n the 1910s, hemlines across the nation began to rise from floor-length to kneelength. In the 1960s, the everpresent fashion boot joined the hem at knee level. Before the knee-high style became popular, ankle- and calf-height were widely used, especially the calf-height “Russian boot” style. The tough boot was needed for stability and protection during times of unpaved, rugged roads. But once the car came into play, the need for those boots disappeared and they fell out of favor. The introduction of a leisurely lifestyle paved the way for the rise in height and popularity of fashion boots. In 1957, Herbert Levine, a New York-based luxury shoe designer, released a collection centered entirely around the knee-high shoes. But it wasn’t until a decade later when designers like Yves Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, and Roger Vivier began introducing boots into their lines. Throughout the years since its true fashion industry inception, different styles have emerged. Go-go boots with zip-up sides, platform boots, lace-up boots with high heels, and the popular English riding boot made their way into the staple accessories of their respective decades. Today, it’s easy to see the frequency of the more simple 28 | THREAD

style of fashion boot on college campuses. Low-heeled, zip-up boots have made their marks on the mid-2010 fall and winter fashion industry. They usually come in neutral colors such as tan, black and grey, are made from materials like suede and leather, and can be worn with day-to-day outfits. Black leggings or pants with a muted or dark-colored top, peacoat and a pattern scarf pair well with this style of fashion boot for a cozy winter look. For those brisk late-fall and early-winter nights when venturing out doesn’t mean bundling up for an arctic evening, boots become more adventurous accessories. High-heeled slouched-style boots in a dark, blackberry purple or midnight blue will complement with anyone’s overcoat and nightclub outfit. Those same colors and that heel height, in a straight-legged and leather variety will add more sophisticated undertones to the entire outfit. Retail stores like Nordstrom offer all styles of the trendy fashion boot from designers like Jimmy Choo, Michael Kors and Tory Burch. For boots that are easy on the wallet, Forever 21 or H&M provide footwear in simple styles and cuts for a fraction of the high-fashion designer price. The fashion boots’ history begets its’ future and as styles and trends change, it’ll be no surprise if the boot stays with society and continues to rise in popularity.


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Thin Heel: Thirfted WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 29


Wide Heel: Forever 21 30 | THREAD


slug Wide Heel: Forever 21

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PARKAS & REC BY SOPHIA CIANCONE PHOTOS BY RYNE BROWNELL

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s the fall chill turns to bitter cold and the bricks of Athens, Ohio are lightly frosted each morning, students bundle up properly for the morning haul to class. Yes, winter is unbelievably beautiful and the untouched snow is mystical, but when the only mode of transportation is your feet, the cold gets old pretty fast. Cue the long parka; a staple in the closet of many young adults. Although this can be a pricey item, but with the right length, proper lining, and a warm hood, a long parka could be the best investment of the season. For those that face unbearable cold for months at a time, The North Face, notoriously recognized for its outerwear, carries multiple styles of incredibly insulated parkas with the purpose of keeping the wearer as warm as possible, without being too bulky. Styles include parkas with furry hoods and a puffy look while others have

basic hoods and a slimming fit. Michael Kors, Topshop, and Calvin Klein all carry cozy, warm long parkas, each brand bringing a different look to the table. Michael Kors carries a warm monochromatic down parka with accent zippers, buttons and sometimes belts in gold. Topshop brings the green cargo jacket to the forefront but adds a bit of insulation and a black and brown fur hood to carry the favorite coat into the winter months. Calvin Klein shakes up the game with a polychromatic quilted parka with black faux-leather sleeves, a dark green body, and a black fur hood. The winter months make it difficult to carry out a personal style because a coat can completely ruin a look. But these long parkas can insulate and keep you up to par even on the coldest days of the year. Pair the parka with a highsock-boot-combo and a big, warm blanket scarf and the cold won’t stand a chance. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 33


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HER: Grey Coat: Nordstrom, Other Coat: Thirfted, Jeans: LF HIM: Green Coat: H&M, Burnt Orange Coat: Forever 21 WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 35


PINNING on POINT BY SARAH WEINGARTEN PHOTOS BY MELINA TRIFFON

B

uying trendy clothes is an expensive hobby, but making sure your hair is stylish is an easy way to vamp up any look while keeping money in your pocket. Bobby pins might seem like a mundane hair accessory, but with some creativity, the simple bobby pin can heighten anyone’s hair game. Bobby pins are supposed to be hidden, which is why they come in brown, black, blond and red. But having exposed bobby pins is rebellious and refreshing because it turns a simple hair

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accessory into a statement. It’s what gave Rihanna’s Met Gala after-party look an edge. Her transparent, fur-trimmed babydoll top was too sweet for bad gal Riri. She and her stylist knew that framing her face with exposed chrome bobby pins would do the trick. The great thing about the exposed bobby pin trend is that it can be simple or avant-garde. A simple way to try out this hair trend is to take face-framing hair and pin it back with three to five stacked bobby pins.


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SEE NEXT PAGES FOR MORE GREAT STYLES LIKE THIS!

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This trend is easy to take from zero to 100. Wear the simple stacked bobby pin to class, then change the pins to a chevron pattern before hitting up Court Street. Another style is to space out the stacked bobby pins so they frame the face. For a bolder look, use bobby pins with a color that packs a lot of contrast. Blondes, go for a dark colored pin, and redheads use silver pins. For people with dark hair, use white bobby pins. If your hair is not a natural color, like pink or green, go to the color wheel and to find the contrasting color. The simple color clash will elevate any look even if the bobby pin count is low. The easiest way to max out this trend is to use contrasting colored bobby pins and to use a lot of them. Make a bobby pin headband. For a half-up hairstyle, take the hair that would normally be secured with an elastic or barrette and line it with bobby pins. There’s a lot of creative space with exposed bobby pins. From the patterns to the color of the bobby pin, the possibilities and looks are endless. Break the mold and don’t hide bobby pins anymore. Use them as a hair statement that is rebellious and fun. There are so many different looks that bobby pins will never be known as boring again.

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BLANK SPACE BY ABBY GRISEZ PHOTOS BY ROYLE MAST

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ail art is oftentimes synonymous with flashy, bright, heavily detailed claws. But the latest in nail trends is an absence of polish. Negative space nails involves painting only a portion of the nail, leaving the rest unpainted. It’s a simple, effortless and incredibly versatile look. This trend perfectly marries the natural look with the feeling of refinement that comes with having painted nails. It’s a juxtaposition between having nothing and something. Negative nail art uses the empty space as an accent itself. What is normally dull, boring and unfinished is now an integral part of the look. But don’t be led astray; this is not your cliché French manicure. 42 | THREAD

It’s so much trendier than that. Instead of white stripes on the tip of each nail, use other colors to draw dots, stripes, or halfmoons, leaving the rest blank. Don’t forget to finish with a top coat for shine and longer wear. Most of these looks are fairly simple and painless to achieve, with varying levels of difficulty, just like any other nail art. Any colors work with this look. But for the winter season, black and jewel tones fit the dark vibes of the colder months. Because the art is so simple, even multiple colors can be painted, as long as there is a sense of cohesion with the hues. There are many ways to achieve this trend. Ulta carries a nail art tool kit by Butter London, complete with an ultra-thin brush


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“IT’S A SIMPLE, EFFORTLESS AND INCREDIBLY VERSATILE LOOK FOR ANYONE.” 44 | THREAD


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and a dotting tool. The Colour Hardware Nail Art Tool Kit can be purchased for $30. CVS sells a set of three thin nail polishes by Kiss for $7.49, and Sally Hansen nail art pens for $5.99. Another more wallet-friendly option would be using normal nail polish, dipping in the end of a bobby pin, and using that as a dotting tool. Varying sizes of tape can be used to create that negative space as well. Not only is this look easy, but it’s ultra-trendy as well. Negative space nails were seen all over the runway during Fall 2015 New York Fashion Week. Jenny Packham, Tibi, and Rebecca Minkoff all featured some form of negative nail art. So whether an outfit is as on fleek as can be or consists of the comfiest sweats, the fingers will always be on top notch. The thing that should be stressed the most here is simply how this look is for absolutely everyone. Again and again nail art is known as a girl’s game, but who says that others can’t play too? The amount of creativity to be unleashed is too great to be exclusive. Everyone can throw caution (or fully polished nails) to the wind and leave a blank space, baby. Groomed, simple nails span all genders. So grab your tools, polish, and topcoat. Buckle up and prepare for blast off. We’re flying into negative space. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 45


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BY ALEX WARNER PHOTOS BY ISAAC GIBSON

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ne of this winter’s hottest accessories is making bundling up against the cold more fashionable. Blanket scarves are taking the drab look out of winter layering. These cozy knits can double as a scarf or a throw blanket. Its “cozy-chic,” multi-purpose design will surely transform a winter wardrobe. The variety of ways to wear this bulky neck wrap will add style to any outfit while still providing warmth To make a simple wrap, hang one end of the scarf down the front of the body and throw the other end backward. Bring that end around the other shoulder and toss it back over the shoulder where it began. Be sure to keep

White Striped Large Wrap: Nordstrom

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the scarf bulky and lower around the shoulders to emulate the shoulder wrap. Turn an oversized knit into a neck bandana for a long, hanging scarf that can easily be tucked under a winter jacket. Begin by bringing together the opposite corners of the scarf to make a triangle. Drape the middle point of the triangle over the front of oneself and throw the ends backward. Next, pull the tail ends over each opposite shoulder and hide them under the rest of the scarf. Fluff and adjust to get the scarf to form a downward triangle shape. Try creating a belted poncho, for a lighter jacket that will also insulate and keep in warmth. Simply fold the opposite corners


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Cream Hat, Stripe Blocked Wrap: Steve Madden 50 | THREAD


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together and hang the triangle around the back. Bring the ends of the scarf over the front of the shoulders. Add a thin leather belt to make large sleeves. It is also possible to leave the scarf hanging loose around the shoulders to add a new element to any ensemble. With one diverse scarf and numerous ways to wear it, anyone can mix and match styles to assemble new outfits. This cozy trend is growing among many celebrities like Emma Roberts and Kendall Jenner, who are wearing them in their own unique ways. Thisknit wrap can be found in a myriad of patterns and colors at stores like Forever 21, Urban Outfitters, and Nordstrom for just under $25. The thickness of the scarf fabric

can vary. Buy a thinner fabric scarf to wear on those slightly breezy days or a thick, wool scarf for the worst of the winter. Pair a thinner knit scarf with a neutral blazer, skinny jeans, and booties to pull together a very polished look. For a bit of a warmer look, wear a light sweater and wrap the scarf around one’s shoulders and add a thin leather belt to make create the belted poncho wrap. Wear skinny jeans and pair of riding boots to complete this look. Layer this thick scarf under a heavy winter coat for some extra warmth. Whether it’s worn around the neck as a bold statement or slung around the shoulders as a wrap, this multi-purpose piece is a staple in anyone’s wardrobe for the cold days of winter. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 51


BY MARIA FISCHER PHOTOS BY KINSEY BALL

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urtlenecks are truly the comeback kids of the fashion world. Whether you consider yourself a Steve Jobs type or a Drake, it’s time to make space for a turtleneck in your wardrobe. While the sweater’s origins are difficult to pinpoint, historians believe turtlenecks first came into the fashion forefront between the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries. Medieval warriors wore high-collared garments as a way to protect their skin from harsh metal armor and breastplates. Although turtlenecks were quickly traded in for petticoats and ruffled shirts during the colonial area, these sweaters came back once again in the late ’50s as the uniform of artists and nonconformists. The turtleneck’s popularity continued well into the ’70s before it slowly became stuck in the time vault of fashion’s past. But the turtleneck is back full force. No longer the frumpy pieces of clothing found in the back of your granddad’s closet, today’s turtlenecks have taken on a fresh, sleek look. The key to finding the perfect modern turtleneck is the fit. If styled correctly, turtlenecks (or rollneck jumpers, as they say across 52 | THREAD


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HIGH COLLAR

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TURTLENECKS ARE TRULY THE COMEBACK KIDS OF THE FASHION WORLD. the pond) flatter nearly every figure because they extend to the neck. These sweaters seamlessly elongate the torso and smooth over any problem areas. From Balmain to J. Crew to H&M, there are many brands and designers that cater to the fashionable turtleneck-wearing man. Luckily for the hesitant, turtlenecks are incredibly versatile and made for layering. A fitted turtleneck paired with black pants and a jacket is a great choice for men experimenting with this throwback staple. For a man trying to appear innovative and soulfully deep, a simple black turtleneck exudes a sense of creativity. Retailers like ASOS provide a wide range of options for something that’s as simple as a black turtleneck. For those with a closet full of streetwear, a Hotline Bling cream turtleneck matched with classic Converses or Timberland boots is easily hip-hop’s latest look. The sweater is also a hit with the artsy crowd, who can easily incorporate boxy turtlenecks and beanies into their everyday style. On a fancier night out, consider donning a turtleneck in a neutral

shade under a dark sports coat as an alternative to a shirt and tie. Ralph Lauren offers a selection of high quality turtlenecks that are perfect for any formal event. Tight turtlenecks also look incredibly sophisticated when paired with structured blazers and tailored pants. Whether it’s dressed up or dressed down, perhaps the turtleneck’s single best quality is warmth. As the days become colder, a cashmere turtleneck is a smart investment. It’s worth shelling out the money now for a quality turtleneck, as you will happily spend the rest of winter sans scarf. Every style-savvy man will be wearing a turtleneck this season. Go ahead and unleash that inner Drake. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 55


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DIY BERRY BUBBLY PG 74

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OH MY

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BY JAIDA STERLING PHOTOS BY EVAN LEONARD

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ake a plain button down shirt from the back of your closet and give it a refreshing, artsy vibe. Using any color you please, you can create a vibrant ombre on the shirt. The finished product provides a top that can be dressed up or down. You only need a few materials, and the steps are so easy, you’re going to want to ombre everything else in your home. MATERIALS Light-colored button down shirt, bucket of warm water, dye, salt STEPS • Pour the dye and the salt into the bucket of warm water and stir. • Lower the shirt into the dye until the dye reaches the point where you’d like the ombre to end and let it sit for 10 minutes. Be sure to move the shirt back and forth in the dye to avoid sharp lines (unless you want sharp lines). • After the time is

up, lift some of the shirt out of the dye and let the rest of the shirt sit for another 10 minutes. Repeat this process until you reach the bottom of the shirt. (Take out small sections of the shirt at a time for a more gradient effect.) • After dyeing the shirt, let it dry overnight.

PA IR IT Style the ombre button down with ripped jeans, a chunky statement necklace, and boots for an edgy look. Tuck this top into dress pants and wear classic heels for a fun twist on the work uniform. Try leaving this shirt unbuttoned over a little black dress for a cute and casual outfit. Layer under a knit sweater and pair with skinny jeans and loafers for warmth and sophistication. For a sweet and feminine style, wear the ombre button down with a midi skirt and heeled sandals. Stay warm by layering the top under a cozy vest.

• Rinse the dye out of the shirt with hot water and allow the shirt to dry.

Dark denim pants tucked into tall boots will complete the outfit.

• Enjoy your new button down shirt, and ombre everything else you can get your hands on.

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SCENTED BREW

Gather round for tea time. These simple and unique teacup candles will have you toasting to the impending winter season. BY NATALIE HELTON PHOTOS BY LINDSEY LEMONS

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he holidays are approaching quickly which leaves many people grasping for gift ideas. Surprise loved ones with a special handcrafted present that is sure to please. These teacup candles are unique presents that make beautiful decorations to place around the house. You can use vintage teacups that you already have at home, or you can buy some from the local craft store. In little time, you can create these delicate candles and impress everyone on your holiday list.

MATERIALS NEEDED Teacups - vintage or new Candle wicks Candle wax flakes Chopsticks, wooden skewers, or pencils Stove Saucepan Glass container (Pyrex or an old sauce jar) Tape Scissors OPTIONAL MATERIALS Fragrance oil scents, for scented candles Candle color blocks, to create colorful candles

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STEP 1

Clean teacups using regular dish soap to get rid of any dirt or dust. Dry thoroughly until no water remains in the teacup before you add the wax.

STEP 2

Measure the necessary amount of candle wax. Use two teacups full of flakes for each candle.

STEP 3

Lay the candle wicks flat against the bottom of the teacup using chopsticks, skewers, or pencils to hold them up. Tape the ends of the candle wicks to keep them in place.

STEP 4

Fill a saucepan halfway full with water. Place the measured amount of wax flakes in the glass container. Then place the glass container in the saucepan. Turn stove onto a medium-high temperature. The flakes should start to turn clear as they melt.

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STEP 5

Once all of the wax flakes have melted, carefully remove glass container from the saucepan. Add coloring and scents to wax, if desired.

STEP 6

Carefully pour the wax into the tea cups and fill until they are about half an inch from the top.

STEP 7

Let the wax cool and set for a few hours. It is best to keep at room temperature to prevent any cracking from cooling too quickly.

STEP 8

Once candles are set, trim wicks to about 1 cm long.

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NO SEW FAUX FUR PILLOWS

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BAG OF POLYESTER FIBERFILL FABRIC

GLUE

BY MADISON DECHELLIS PHOTOS BY COLBY CALDWELL

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ince the cold weather is coming sooner than we would like, it is important to start bundling up now. Whether it’s a favorite fur vest, boots, or blanket, faux fur is a necessity for the wintry months. Pillows are one of the most essential pieces for those snowy cold days. Fur pillows are cozy and cute, whether they are placed on your couch or bed. These pillows can be purchased almost anywhere, but it is more fun and budget-friendly to create and personalize your own. These pillows also make great holiday gifts. With just a few simple steps, this home accessory will be yours.

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HOW TO Decide whether you want a small or large pillow and depending on the chosen size, cut your fabric accordingly. Turn and fold the fabric and fold a seam across the long end. Apply a straight line of glue along seam and let dry. Once the seam is folded, place a book or other object on top to keep the two pieces together as they dry. Allow to dry overnight. When the seam dries, run a glue bead along the fur part of the seam and the back of the larger fabric piece, and then glue together. Then let dry again overnight. Fill your pillow tube with polyester fiberfill and then bring the short sides together with glue. Place this pillow on your couch to make a warm and welcoming statement. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 67


WORK IT!

WELL ROUNDED

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BY RACHEL O’MORROW PHOTOS BY HALEE SMITH

Over time, a repetitive workout becomes dull and loses its effectiveness. Working out at home or in the gym should never feel like a drag, especially during wintertime. An unexpected tool to spice up a trip to the gym is the exercise ball. This simple piece of equipment is fit to target any muscle group. In addition, the exercise ball will help increase balance and core strength. If you are looking to tone muscle and build enthusiasm toward your workout, grab an exercise ball and try this fun routine.

STABILITY BALL PIKE Get into a push-up

position. Be sure your hands are directly beneath your shoulders and place both feet on top of the ball. Squeeze your abdominal muscles as you raise your hips up, making an upside down V. Repeat 2–3 sets of 10 to 15 reps.

LEG CURLS Begin with your

feet propped up on the ball and your back on the floor. Place hands at your sides or on hips. Inhale and squeeze your hamstrings and glutes to raise your lower back and hips off the floor, keeping your shoulders and head pressed on the ground. Hold position for two seconds, exhale and return to starting position.

LEGS ON EXERCISE BALL CRUNCH A

more effective crunch to engage the core. Lie flat on your back and rest your feet on top of the ball, creating a 90-degree angle. Place your hands lightly on the sides of your head. Roll your shoulders off the floor and push down hard on your lower back while breathing out. Be sure movement is controlled. Repeat 2–3 sets of 10 to 20 reps. Advanced move: Hold a weighted plate in your hands.

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PUSH-UP WITH FEET ON EXERCISE BALL Lie face-down on the floor. Place your

toes on top on the exercise ball to elevate your body. Lower your upper body until your chest almost touches the floor. Push back up using your chest. Pause for a second, then lower your body again. Repeat 2–3 sets of 10 to15 reps.

THE BALL LUNGE Start by facing opposite of the ball and gently place one foot on top of the ball. Be sure hips are level and place your hands on hips or at your sides. While contracting your abdominal muscles for balance, begin to lower yourself until your thigh is horizontal. Slowly pop back up into the starting position. Remember to not let the weight-bearing knee pass your big toe. Repeat 2–3 sets of 10 on each leg. Advanced move: Hold dumbbells in your hands while lunging.

SQUATS WITH THE BALL Stand with the

ball between your lower back and wall. Be sure to press slightly on the ball. Hand placement is up to you. You can place hands on your hips or extend your arms in front of your body. Feet should be shoulder-width apart. Keep the ball in contact with your back as you squat down. Repeat 3 sets of 8–15 reps. Advanced move: Lift one foot up to 2 inches off the floor and perform this squat one leg at a time.

PRONE FLYS

Lie face-down with chest on the ball. Your feet should be wider than shoulder-width apart for proper balance. With dumbbells in hand, partially bend your elbows and face them toward the ceiling. Raise dumbbells to shoulder height and squeeze your shoulder blades together. Return to start position. Repeat 3 sets of 10 reps.

WALK-OUTS

Rest your stomach on the ball with hands and toes on the floor. Walk your hands out into a plank position. The ball should now be under your ankles. To finish one rep , walk your hands back to the starting position. Be sure to keep the ball under your body at all times. Repeat 2–3 sets of 8 to 12 reps.

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CARB LOADING

BY PAIGE BENNETT PHOTOS BY KELLY BONDRA

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fter a long day of battling the brutal weather, it is enjoyable to come home to coziness. You put on your flannel pants, light a candle, and snuggle up in a fluffy blanket. But in the middle of your movie marathon, the growling starts. A monstrous rumble rises from the pits of your stomach … you’re hungry. With this simple bread bowl and hearty potato soup, you can stay cozy. Minimal effort is required — just knead the soft dough or stir the creamy soup between shows.

BRE A D BO W L 1 ½ Cups warm water 2 Tablespoons instant yeast 1 Tablespoon white sugar 3 ½ Cups all-purpose flour 2 Teaspoons of salt

POTATO SO U P 5 Tablespoons butter ¼ Cup all-purpose flour 3 ½ Cups milk (more, if needed) 3 Russet potatoes 2 or 3 Green onions 1 Cup shredded cheese (an extra pinch for garnish) ½ Cup sour cream Pinch of salt and pepper 72 | THREAD

Pour the warm water in a mixing bowl. Dissolve the instant yeast and sugar in the water. Let sit for 10 minutes — the mixture will be bubbly. Pour in 3 cups of the flour and the salt. Mix well into the water mixture. Slowly add the remaining flour to the dough until it pulls away from the sides of the mixing bowl. Knead for 10 minutes. Lightly grease a new bowl. Place the dough here and cover with a damp towel. Allow to rise for 30 minutes. While dough rises, chop potatoes into cubed pieces. Peel the skins first, if desired. Chop two to three green


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onions. Set both ingredients aside. In a stock pot, melt butter for the soup. Mix in the 1/4 cup of flour until browned. Pour the milk in slowly and stir until thickened. Add potatoes and green onions to the soup. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low. Let soup simmer for 20 to 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 500 F. Divide your risen dough into four pieces. Shape each piece into a ball. Place dough balls on a lightly greased baking sheet. Sprinkle tops with salt. Let rise for 15 more minutes. Place dough balls in oven for 16-20

minutes until light to golden brown. When potatoes in soup are tender, stir in sour cream and cheese. Add more milk if the consistency is too thick. Carefully cut a small circular chunk from each bread bowl. Scoop out the innards and place the top bread piece on the side of a plate for dipping in soup. (Also, eating the scooped out bread is a great alternative to throwing it away.) Slowly pour the hearty soup into the warm bread bowl. Garnish with shredded cheese, pepper, and chopped green onions. Grab a spoon and enjoy. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 73


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Berry Bubbly BY DARIAN RANDOLPH PHOTOS BY LINDSEY LEMONS

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he holidays are a time for celebration and warm feelings of home. Families and friends gather together in these times to reflect on years of memories. These celebrations often consist of an abundance of food and drink to make the most out of the time people have together. Blackberry sparklers are a wonderful holiday beverage to toast blessings and good vibes to fellow loved ones. Not only does the aesthetic of the drink fit the traditions of the holidays, but it’s available to be made alcoholic or nonalcoholic as well. Impress your friends with this cheerful and refreshing holiday sparkler.

H O L I D AY B L A C K B E R R Y S PA R K L E R 1 Cup of fresh blackberries 1 Cup of sugar 1 Cup of water 4 Sprigs of fresh rosemary 1 Bottle of champagne or sparkling cider

In a small pan, mix blackberries, sugar, and water together. Set the stove on high boil and allow it to simmer. Cook for 12–15 minutes. Red syrup will begin to appear from the blackberries. After it’s done cooking, drain the blackberries out and keep the syrup to allow cooling. Once syrup is cooled, scoop the syrup out in tablespoons to put into the bottom of champagne glasses. Top the glasses with champagne or sparkling cider. Toast to season’s greetings. Cheers. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 75


WHO, WHAT, WEAR SUPPORTING SOUNDS PG 84 76 | THREAD


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Open House BY SARAH WEINGARTEN PHOTOS BY LIZ MOUGHON

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anukkah is the Jewish holiday that happens near the end of the year. Like all other Jewish holidays, the festival of lights is scheduled based on the lunar calendar. This year, eight nights of Hanukkah happens to fall during Ohio University finals week. Hillel, the campus facilitator for Jewish life, will host Hanukkah celebrations that may serve as a way for students to unwind and get their minds out of their textbooks. Lauren Goldberg, Hillel’s Assistant Director, has at least eight nights of planning ahead. “We’ve had programming that varies each year depending on what our student intern team feels is the most exciting for the students that year,” Goldberg said. Previous Hanukkah celebrations have included parties at Jackie O’s and weeklong competitions such as crafting a menorah and lighting candles in Baker Center. The lighting of the menorah is the constant throughout Hillel’s eight nights of Hanukkah. This year Hillel is encouraging students to bring their own menorah to light. “It’s actually a mitzvah to light your own menorah rather than a random one that we have,” 78 | THREAD

Goldberg said. Lighting the menorah is not the same as lighting any candle. There is meaning behind the number of candles, how the menorah is lit, the type of candles used, the prayer beforehand, where the menorah is supposed to be—and that’s just scraping the surface of the rituals of Hanukkah. Hillel does its part by making their menorahs visible. “We like to put them in the windows, as we are encouraged to do, to let everyone see them who is passing by. People can share in the light,” Goldberg said, “We are told to do that to put the menorah someplace visible so that even if somebody doesn’t light the candles themselves they can see them.” When asked about finals week and Hanukkah being at the same time Goldberg is assured attendance won’t waiver. “I think that Jewish students really like to set aside [Hanukkah] as a special time,” Goldberg said. “When it’s so dark during the winter it’s just a beautiful way to gather around the candlelight and take a few minutes out of your normal day to recognize it’s a special time of the year.”


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“THIS IS SOMETHING WHERE WE LIKE TO GATHER AS MANY PEOPLE AS POSSIBLE TOGETHER TO SHARE THE LIGHT.” LAUREN GOLDBERG

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Even though Hanukkah falls during a stressful time for students, Hillel is ready to celebrate. “Sadly, there have been years where we haven’t had any Hanukkah at all with the students because it hasn’t even fallen during the year when students are around. Sometimes it’s in the center of winter break,” Goldberg said. Goldberg and the rest of Hillel are happy to celebrate with students this year, no matter the circumstances. Students who aren’t Jewish

may also attend Hillel’s Hanukkah events. “This is something where we like to gather as many people as possible together to share the light,” Goldberg said. Perhaps the darkness of finals week will encourage all students to participate in the festival of lights. Though the events vary from year to year, “the traditional trappings of Hanukkah” are always celebrated at Hillel. From gelt and dreidel to authentic latkes, one can take in all the charm Hanukah offers. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 83


Supporting Sounds

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BY KAYLA BLANTON PHOTOS BY ERICA BRECHTELSBAUER

At 3:30 p.m. every Monday, ARTS/West on West State Street is elatedly greeted by the contagious energy of nine young girls with a passion for music and female empowerment. They are a part of Athens Rock Camp for Girls, an after-school program that provides girls between the ages of 10 and 18 with a safe environment to learn and grow in music while encouraging social change and a positive self-image. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM OUTHREADMAG.COM | 85


“The idea is to empower girls and young women to play music, in more of a rock ‘n’ roll kind of way … to not be afraid to make noise and experiment,”Tessa Evanosky, one of the directors and founders of the Athens Girls Rock After School Program, said. The Athens chapter is a part of a national organization, the Girls Rock Summer Camp and AfterSchool Program, which started on the West Coast in the late ’90s. Evanosky runs the Athens after-school program with codirector Sarah Fick. They felt as if the mission aligned well with their personal goals for the young female generation, and they have been empowering young girls through music since 2010. “I’ve been a musician since I was 11,” Evanosky said, “so it felt really important to share my skills.” Many of the girls who meet every Monday first participated in the Girls Rock Summer Camp, which also takes place at ARTS/ West. During one week of camp, the girls split up into bands and produced a completely original song. At the end of the week, they put on a concert to show off their hard work. “It’s totally awesome,” Evanosky said. Girls Rock Summer Camp also offers workshops in self-defense, non-violent communication, sound, stage presence, and empowerment, all of which are important and representative of 86 | THREAD

the program’s mission. The after-school program gives the girls more time to make music and bond with fellow rockers. They are given free reign with the instruments provided by the program — they use the time to either practice in their established bands or partake in independent music lessons with a director or long-time camp member. Girls Rock isn’t solely focused on making music perfectly, but encouraging girls to take their music in whatever direction by which they feel inspired. Emersynn McGuire has been involved in Athens Rock Camp for Girls and the after-school program since she was 12. Now at 16-years-old, she feels as though the program allowed her to open up and be herself. “I felt like I was weird because I liked punk rock and I just didn’t really like myself … but then I came here and everyone was like me,” the Athens High School student said. As an established member of the program, McGuire feels obligated to encourage and inspire the younger girls just as the older members did when she first joined. “Now I feel like it’s my turn,” she said. As practice commenced, amps were electrified and guitar strings tuned among the continued conversation about the school day. All musicians took their places: a drummer, bassist, guitarist, pianist, and vocalist


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prepared to tackle their set list for an upcoming fundraiser while reflecting on what this program means to them. “You can kind of just be who you are here,” 13-year-old pianist, Allyriane Huq said as she looked up from the ivory keys. “We have a rule, ‘no body talk,’ where you should favor actions over looks …” Huq said, “… You should feel valued for who you are, not what 88 | THREAD

you look like.” Lauren Chase, bassist and eighth grader at Athens Middle School, gives Girls Rock credit for her newfound happiness. “My family has noticed a drastic change in my mood,” she said. Chase has also grown to love the thrill of performing. “I put a big chunk into making this something that people enjoy listening to, that’s really important to me.”


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Vocalist Jade Pettey finds that band practice allows her to experiment more with her voice outside of a choral setting. “I like having an opportunity to put the work I’ve put into my voice into something,” she said. Girls Rock gives a group of striving musicians and powerful young women a platform to express themselves and empower other girls their age, while offering

a safe place to share their daily lives with each other. All the girls agree that this experience is one that they wish to carry into their futures. Her fellow band members nodded in agreement when Pettey said, “Sometimes the lights are so bright that you can’t even see the audience and it’s all [about] showing what you’ve done … You put a lot of work into it and it’s very rewarding.” WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 89


TURNING HEADS BY KATHERINE PINTER

PHOTOS BY KARA GUYTON

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s Madeleine Toerne steps in front of the microphone, her audience of 20-somethings takes some notice and move slightly toward the singer. She adjusts the strap on her guitar and quietly introduces herself while a few extraneous conversations continue to rumble throughout the crowd. The talking soon comes to a grinding halt as Toerne begins to sing her opening tune “Ordinary People.” The once disinterested group slowly shuffles closer, hanging on the sweetly sung and bitingly candid lyrics about Toerne’s disdain for conformity, all composed by Toerne herself. One by one, the front of the crowd lowers themselves to the floor, until half the room is sitting, soaking up Toerne’s folkinspired ballads. In person, Toerne is noticeably as charming as her engaging on-stage presence. As she spoke about Joni Mitchell and Joan Baez, two major musical influences, Toerne’s face lit up and her wide grin stayed put as 90 | THREAD

she further explained their impact on her. “That’s what means the most to me. When I listen to those women talk about their identities and finding themselves, which sounds cheesy, but, I’m like ‘[Heck] yeah!’ I can connect to that,” Toerne said. It may come as a surprise that Toerne’s musical endeavors only began quite recently. “My parents got me a guitar when I was 10, but I didn’t start seriously playing until last May,” Toerne said. “So I practiced two summers ago. And then, probably last winter break, I started writing some music. At first, what I did was I took some poems I had written and added parts of them and formed them into a song.” Since her first performance at the Bat Lounge, Toerne has quickly become a regular presence among the Athens DIY music scene. Her calm, floaty vocals easily enrapture the crowds as her simple, but powerful acoustic melodies are


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who, what, wear

plucked out confidently on her it’s so tumultuous that they can’t guitar. While folk music may take it anymore and they go into be the most distinguishable a body of water,” Toerne said. “I reference, Toerne seems to take kind of use [The Awakening] as the inspiration from all sources. background of the song. I wanna Within one sentence alone, be drowning in my clothes.” she cited legendary country Toerne’s thoughtfulness is singer Patsy Cline and current reflected in all the songs she indie songstress Angel Olsen pens, and that may stem from as influences, admiring both her writing process. “It’s kind of women’s beautiful vocal abilities. funny because people that are As a junior at Ohio University, poets and musicians, they say, ‘I Toerne’s major keep those two of choice, things separate.’ ” Integrated But that’s how I IT’S KIND OF FUNNY Language Arts, started writing BECAUSE PEOPLE THAT ARE songs, by just has influenced her work as well. POETS AND MUSICIANS, using my poetry It seems only as a kind of THEY SAY ‘I KEEP THOSE rough outline,” appropriate that the aspiring high TWO THINGS SEPARATE.’ Toerne said. school English Though simply BUT, THAT’S HOW I STARTED expressing teacher would be compelled WRITING SONGS, BY JUST herself is one to write a song reason for inspired by one USING MY POETRY AS A KIND performing, of her favorite Toerne finds that OF ROUGH OUTLINE. novels, The simply being ” Awakening by asked to play Kate Chopin. has been the MADELEINE TOERNE Discussing her best motivator yet-to-be titled track, Toerne during the school year. continually referred to the song “In a way, I guess, people by the reoccurring line in the booking shows is that push I need song, “Drowning in my clothes.” during the school year to do this She elaborated on the imagery. for myself and play out,” she said. “Edna Pontellier, the female As Toerne finishes the final protagonist, eventually drowns chords on her closing song, “Girl herself. And Virginia Woolf Mentor,” she looks at the crowd drowned herself. It’s like this with a soft smile. Immediately, reoccurring way, in terms of suicide, the audience, now packed into for females who like to rebel every inch of standing room at the against the system. Eventually, venue, bursts into applause. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 93


SPARK DARK in the

The luminous rebirth of ‘70s glam will sparkle in the dreariest of winter nights. PHOTOS BY KAITLIN HATTON


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CRYSTALLIZED SHARP AND ICY STATEMENT JEWELS BRING OUT FIERCE AND UNBREAKABLE CONFIDENCE. PHOTOS BY KATE STONE

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ON THE

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HEADLINES, DEKS & BYLINES

LES FILLES APPRÉCIÉ Bringing the romance of the City of Lights to the bricks of Athens can be as simple pairing feminine details and surreal silhouettes. Say bonjour to classic Parisian style.

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Bienvenue à paris

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Acclamations à la mode

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ask an

INTERN One former BET and Harper’s Bazaar intern dishes the details on working and living in NYC. BY MORGAN PETERSON

HOW DID YOU GO ABOUT SEARCHING FOR INTERNSHIPS? DID YOU USE A SPECIFIC WEBSITE? For my past two internships, I had the advantage of personally knowing someone who worked for the company. But when I began my internship search last fall, I had no connections. I was really determined to intern in New York again but I wanted to work within the fashion industry. I started by making a list of companies that I would love to work for, then from there I researched their internship opportunities and narrowed the list down. I did most of my research on the different companies’ respective websites, but I also used Indeed and LinkedIn. It also helps to get in contact with people who work within human resources. 166 | THREAD

HOW DID YOU PREPARE BEFORE INTERVIEWS? All of my internship interviews have been over the phone, but to get prepared I read as much as I could about the company beforehand. I would research recent news articles, their mission statement, clients, reviews of the company, etc. Since my mom used to work in human resources, I usually have her ask me common interview questions and we would go over my answers. Lastly I read my resume over to make sure I was selling myself effectively.

ANY ADVICE ON LEAVING A GOOD IMPRESSION WHEN YOU LEAVE YOUR INTERNSHIP? Within my last three weeks at Harper’s BAZAAR, I began scheduling meetings

with all of the editors just to gain feedback from them about my progress at the company. It was also an opportunity to ask them for career advice and how they made it to where they are in the industry. On the last day of my internship, I wrote thank you cards to the editors I worked for. There’s something special about a handwritten note that helps you leave your mark. Lastly, make sure you finish ALL of your projects. There’s nothing worse than finishing an internship and realizing you didn’t finish all of the tasks you were assigned.

ANY ADVICE ON HOW TO EASE YOUR NERVES ON THE FIRST DAY OF AN INTERNSHIP? My first day at [Harper’s] BAZAAR was a little haphazard. I woke up to a rainy day


campus casual THINKING OF INTERNING IN THE CITY? FOLLOW THESE TIPS BELOW!

and I took the wrong subway, so then I had to take a cab the rest of the way. But it was all worth it once I walked into the beautiful Hearst Tower. My calm nature definitely came from talking to my mom the night before. She’s one of my biggest supporters; so having her build me up helped get me ready for the day ahead. It’s all about the preparation. The more you do to calm your nerves before the actual big day, the more comfortable you’ll feel. Your confidence will only grow with everything you do at your internship.

WHAT WAS ONE OF THE MOST USEFUL THINGS YOU LEARNED WHILE LIVING AND INTERNING IN NEW YORK? The number one thing to remember before embarking on your journey to New York is that you are NOT on Sex and the City or Gossip Girl. Your life will not be as glamorous, your feet will blister because you don’t conveniently have a car service, or money for an Uber, and everything you thought

ESSENTIALS TO MASTERING NYC you knew about style is probably wrong. In light of all that, living there is definitely an adventure because every time you walk out of the door, you really don’t know what your day will entail. There’s always a new restaurant to try, a new art exhibit to see or a new park to visit

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE EXPERIENCE THUS FAR AT EITHER OF YOUR INTERNSHIPS? One of my favorite experiences while interning at [Harper’s] BAZAAR was seeing my name published on the website for the first time. It was a small article, but having my work published for such a renowned publication was really exciting. After I was published for the first time, it got me inspired to pitch more ideas at meetings and a lot of those ideas were actually used! I’ve never been completely confident in my writing, but knowing that people cared about what I wrote was a huge accomplishment for me.

• Have a great subway app (I preferred Hop Stop) • Always make sure your phone is charged because you will be using the GPS app all the time. • Have a cute pair of flats for your subway ride or morning walk. • Keep a pair of headphones on you, it helps with keeping out the crazy. • FaceTime with your loved ones at home and keep them updated with your life. The city gets lonely sometimes. • On those nights you don’t want to go get food, get the GrubHub app, they make ordering food EASY. • Try not to walk alone too much at night, it’s still New York City. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 167


#TBT

We suprised Thread Exec members with embarrassing pictures from their past and documented their hilarious reactions. VIDEO BY HANNAH SQUEGLIA

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CHECK OUT THE

THREAD BLOGGERS BRIDGET GIBSON

SNEAKERS AND SUNNIES

sneakersandsunniesblog.wordpress.com

MORGAN BRENNER & NICOLE TSANGEOS

LOVE IN MY TUMMY

amoreinmytummy.wordpress.com

RACHEL WAGNER

THE REVOLUTION OF JAY rachelewagner.wordpress.com

SARAH PARKER

THE BEAUTY BREAKDOWN http://thebeautybreakdown.tumblr.com

TIFFANY BEY

PEACE & HAIR GREASE

http://tiff13bey.wix.com/peaceandhairgrease.com WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 169


HOLIDAY HOROSCOPES CAPRICORN 12.22 – 01.19

You are such a responsible adult, Capricorn. After meticulously creating hundreds of flashcards and several study guides, you will breathe a sigh of relief when finals are over. This holiday season, remember you don’t have to play the parent. You are allowed to have fun and let loose. Live a little! 2016 RESOLUTION: Be less cautious.

AQUARIUS

The end of the semester calls for egregious coffee trips, hundreds of notecards, and celebration! There is no essay too long or test too hard to stop the endless fun that is winter break. Will you get the holiday feels and make a resolution you’ll keep? THIS MONTH’S SIGN:

SAGITTARIUS

Sagittarius, you are the human embodiment of a lucky charm. You’ll ace your finals and be ready to start winter break. Your energetic charisma makes it impossible for you not to have fun the entire holiday season. You could catch the eye of a hometown cutie, but your inability to commit could burn that flame quickly. Don’t forget, life isn’t a nonstop party! 2016 RESOLUTION: Slow down, life isn’t a race.

11.22 – 12.21

PISCES

ARIES

01.20 – 02.18

02.19 – 03.20

03.21 – 04.19

You’re a wise one, Aquarius. There is no doubt in your mind that you will kick butt on all of your finals. It’s what you’ll get everyone for the holiday that is tripping you up. Your unconventional and individual nature will make you the gem of many gatherings this break. Don’t be afraid to chat up cute strangers because they will dig your quirky aura. 2016 RESOLUTION: Be creative and devote time to being artistic.

Don’t let the holidays get you jumbled up, Pisces. You are much too selfless and that will be your downfall. Your devotion to friends makes this an extremely difficult time for you. There is no gift perfect enough in your eyes to give to your friends. Don’t let the little things get to you. If presented with the opportunity, do something out of the ordinary! 2016 RESOLUTION: Be less of a daydreamer and go out there and live out your dreams.

There is only one thing anyone can tell you by the end of the semester — slow down! Everyone knows you have an adventurous spirit, but that is no reason to lose sight of your finals. Also, don’t let your short temper get the best of you this holiday season. You wouldn’t want to spend the last days of the semester mending relationships when you could be celebrating! 2016 RESOLUTION: Take a spontanteous trip and be less self-oriented.

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TAURUS

04.20 – 05.20 Taurus, finals week is not the time for laziness! Don’t let your emotions get the best of you. Study, and then deal with romance. Your loyal yet possessive nature could lead to some very personal feelings coming out during winter break. Don’t let this upset you for too long. You’ll feel better than ever after you find the perfect gifts for all your besties. 2016 RESOLUTION: Be more outgoing and upfront about your feelings.

GEMINI

05.21 – 06.20 What finals? That is what you’ll ask yourself during the last weeks of the semester. Your quick wit and adaptable nature will leave you ready to face whatever your professors throw at you. Although your energetic nature means you’ll probably be spending all of break partying, remember that some of your closest buddies aren’t so lucky. Try taking a breather 2016 RESOLUTION: Try to be less superficial.

LEO

07.23 – 09.22 Leo, you are so ambitious but you can be so lazy! Don’t let that be your downfall during finals week. You love the spotlight and have a warm energy, which is great for attracting study buddies at the end of the term. Winter break is no time to deal with friendship squabbles. This holiday season, you’ll be the center of countless parties. 2016 RESOLUTION: Learn to admire yourself rather than relying on others.

SCORPIO

VIRGO

08.23 – 08.22 We get it Virgo, you’re a perfectionist. In some cases this is your greatest strength. You’ll do just as you expect on all of your exams after weeks of preparation. The quest for perfection doesn’t end there, as you’ll spend hours trying to find the perfect gift for every friend and family member. Remember, have fun! 2016 RESOLUTION: Think more with your heart than your brain for a change.

CANCER

06.21 – 07.22 Contradictions, Cancer, you are full of contradictions! Your love of stability and need for comfort has you dying to go home to see family and friends this winter break. This winter break, don’t let clinginess get the best of you. Now is not the time to buy an extravagant gift for a hometown flame. 2016 RESOLUTION: Don’t let people take advantage of your kind soul.

LIBRA

09.23 – 10.22 Finally what you’ve been waiting for: winter break. You crave adventure this break. You’d be delighted if one of your friends called you up and invited you on a weeklong backpacking adventure. When friends turn to you about family drama or the stress of finals, you’ll listen with a helpful ear. You need some time for you. 2016 RESOLUTION: Go on an outrageous shopping spree and spice up your look.

You’ll have nothing to worry about this finals week. Don’t spend

10.23 – 11.21 all break brooding and being mysterious. It is not very aligned

with the holiday spirit. This holiday season, hang out with some old friends as well as new ones. It may be time to assume the best of everyone rather than the worst. That doesn’t mean you should let your love of debate get you into any trouble. 2016 RESOLUTION: Hold less grudges. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 171


NYE in NYC Think celebrating New Year’s Eve in Manhattan is nothing but classy drinks and bright city lights? Think again. One Cosmopolitan intern shares her crazy, cringe-worthy NYE in NYC. BY MARIA FISCHER ILLUSTRATIONS BY KAYLA BREEDEN

Starry-eyed fashionistas have this deeply rooted idea that New Year’s Eve in New York City is nothing short of glamorous. And that’s what I thought, too — until I actually spent a NYE in Manhattan. Last winter I was hired as a web, beauty and style intern at Cosmopolitan magazine. My first few weeks in the office were full of holiday excitement as it was announced on social media that Cosmopolitan was hosting the New Year’s Eve party in Time’s Square. Champagne. Music. Celebrities! As I made my way in and out of the beauty closet, all I could hear was a chorus of elated “I seriously can’t wait!” and “What are you wearing?” because the entire Cosmopolitan staff was invited. Everyone except the interns, that is. Womp, womp. No invite to the Time’s Square 172 | THREAD

bash was a bummer, but I was determined to have a night equally as glam as my Cosmo counterparts. My best friend, Katherine, and I decided that we would spend New Year’s Eve sipping champagne in a posh lounge a few blocks from my subleased Union Square apartment. But as the night approached, our big plans suddenly came to a screeching halt: we had nothing to wear. ENSEMBLE SEARCHING It was a true Manhattan emergency. Neither of us could find an outfit that screamed “New Years Eve in the City.” The illfitting blue dress I had purchased a few weeks earlier now seemed more silly than sleek. I kept digging deeper into our clothing stash when I discovered a lacy, all-black ensemble that was perfect for a Manhattan NYE — and it looked exactly like the dress Katherine had just pulled from the pile. A few bubbly drinks convinced


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us that it wasn’t completely weird to step out as two 21-yearolds wearing matching dresses. Nothing says city chic quite like twinning in your twenties, right? “PUT IT ON MY TAB!” We finally made it to the lounge about ten minutes before the clock struck midnight. After showing my ID to the bouncer, I hurried to the bar and quickly ordered a round of the cheapest champagne for Katherine and few other friends right as it hit midnight. After a few “Happy New Year,” kisses, I returned to close my tab. I looked at my bill and my heart nearly stopped: I had failed to notice that each “cheap” champagne flute cost $20 a pop. Inflated NYC prices had struck again. In a matter of a few minutes, my tab was already over $100. I had more than surpassed my spending limit, preventing me from buying any more drinks for the rest of the night. As Katherine and I sadly sat at the bar sipping water, two men overheard our situation. “Don’t worry,” one reassured me.

“We’re trying to save money, too.” He slyly opened his jacket to show us a cheap bottle of vodka they had snuck into the fancy lounge. Katherine and I exchanged looks. We knew it was a little sketchy but we were desperate to keep our night going. We agreed to go outside with them to hang out and pass around the bottle. A SIDEWALK VENUE While my Cosmo editors were living it up at the biggest party of the year, my “glamorous” Manhattan New Year’s Eve was spent sitting on a dirty curb, sipping cheap vodka out of the bottle with strangers, rocking an embarrassingly identical dress with my best friend. It may not have been an elegant evening by any standard of the word. But looking back one year later on my crazy New Year’s Eve, my night was definitely worth every overpriced champagne flute in the city. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 173


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back of the closet BY KATIE PITTMAN PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

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n the world of fashion, nothing speaks rich and unique better than “couture.” The art of couture fashion has, and continues to be, revered in countries all over the world. It is extravagant and hard to replicate, and couture pieces are handmade and must be custom ordered. Some argue that couture fashion is impractical and unnecessary in today’s ready-to-wear world of fashion; however, couture fashion still plays a large role in setting trends, preserving the art of fashion, and promoting creativity. Ready-to-wear collections are becoming more and more elaborate, reflecting the influence couture has on them. The main difference between couture and ready-towear is styling. Many couture pieces are designed to create a single, seamless look. Ready-to-wear pieces are made to mix and match. In fact, many designers want those who buy their pieces to create a look unique to the wearer.“My mom grew up in the ’80s. She wanted to have a total look. I try to explain a different type of beauty. I try to enforce the idea that you can change, by yourself, every single piece,” Alessandro Michele, Creative Director for Gucci, stated in an interview with The New York Times. But, many designers also take inspiration from aspects of couture fashion. Heavy detailing, which is usually seen in couture collections, is also becoming popular in ready-to-wear collections. Dramatic silhouettes and fabrics are also becoming more frequent in these ready-to-wear collections. However, in order to understand the importance of couture fashion, one must first understand its history. The first self-proclaimed fashion designer, Charles Frederick Worth, began dressmaking in the mid-1800s. According to Eluxe Magazine, women dominated the WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 179


field of dressmaking, and many said that it was unusual for Worth to be sewing and designing instead of simply working in a textile shop. Within a few years, Worth set up his own haute couture house, or atelier, and designed dresses for the elite upper-class women of Paris. In the years to follow, organizations were made in order to define what was, and wasn’t, couture fashion. According to Harper’s Bazaar UK, Le Chambre

“[COUTURE] DEFINES THE CREATIVE VISION OF THE HOUSE AND ADDS TO THE OVERALL BRANDING OF THE LABEL.” VOGUE AUSTRALIA

Syndicale de la Haute Couture was the first organization created to “safeguard high fashion.” Members of this fashion group determined who could earn the right to have a couture house, depending on whether or not a designer had the qualifications needed in order to own one. Eluxe Magazine states that in order to have a couture house, a designer must have clothes that are “custom-made to fit the wearer, handmade by expert 180 | THREAD

artisans (specialized in one area, such as embroidery), be of the highest quality fabrics and materials, and have an exclusive design and fit for each client.” In 1908, the Chambre Syndicale coined the phrase “haute couture,” which directly translates to “high sewing.” As the popularity of haute couture grew, many began to recreate the work of couture designers to produce more affordable copies of couture designs. The copying of other designer’s work prompted the French Press to create L’Association de Protection des Industries Artistiques Saisonnieres, in order to help designers copyright their work. Eluxe Magazine states that each original couture design was photographed from all angles to serve as evidence in case any designs were copied. According to Harper’s Bazaar UK, the rules of haute couture became increasingly strict in 1945. In order to own a couture house, a designer must create made-to-order pieces for clients, hold multiple fittings for the client, have at least 20 staff members in their atelier, make at least 35 daytime and eveningwear pieces for each season, and present all collections to the Paris Press. These strict guidelines made it harder for designers to keep their couture houses, and the number of ateliers dropped from 106 in 1946 to 19 in 1970. Many designers were forced to shut


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down their ateliers due to the high production costs, and today only 11 designers have official couture houses. These designers include names like Chanel, Christian Dior, and Givenchy. Four designers have been named correspondent, or foreign, members of the Chambre Syndicale. These four designers are Elie Saab, Giorgio Armani, Valentino, and Versace. But how does couture fashion influence fashion today? Some argue that haute couture is becoming relatively obsolete in today’s world of fashion, but couture still has a large influence over the trends shown in readyto-wear collections. According to Vogue Australia, “Not only does [couture] allow the designer to show-off his technical prowess, but it also defines the creative vision of the house and adds to the overall branding of the label.” Not only does couture show off a designer’s skill, but it also allows them to flash their financial stability. Some designers are unable to continue designing couture due to the high cost, so those who can are proud of the fact. Many couture designers also create ready-to-wear collections. So, not only do they construct one-of-a-kind pieces, but they also design for the masses. The Wall Street Journal argues that ready-to-wear fashion has become the new haute couture. Ready-to-wear pieces have become more elaborate, and some are even starting to call these

detailed pieces “semi-couture.” Elaborate ready-to-wear pieces are custom-made, but can be ordered online without any fittings. These pieces share the craftsmanship of haute couture pieces, but at a fraction of the cost. However, according to The Guardian, couture sales have been on the rise. In 2014, Chanel’s couture sales increased by 20 percent and Valentino’s rose by 30–35 percent. The Guardian also reports that the average age of the couture customer, once 30 to 40 years old, has decreased. Dior attributes this change to the rise of young and rich customers in Europe and Asia. These customers are buying more and more couture, aiming for an elevated level of glamour in their wardrobes. Although some say haute couture is becoming obsolete, recent trends in ready-to-wear collections prove otherwise. More detailed, elaborate clothing is seen in today’s ready-to-wear collections, reflecting the strong influence couture has on fashion today. Although it is still difficult for a designer to have his or her own couture houses, the art of high fashion is still respected and desired in the realm of modern fashion. Without the influence of couture fashion, ready-to-wear collections would be less ornate and crafted differently. Couture is an art, and designers will produce one-of-a-kind pieces for many years to come, following in the footsteps of the Father of Couture, Charles Frederick Worth. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 183


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REPRESENTATION BY KENYETTA WHITFIELD PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

In a sea of thin women with high cheekbones and slim waists, there exists the perfect magazine man — chiseled abs attached to fit legs, with coiffed hair and a seductive grimace, donning pearly white Calvin Klein underwear. This is the man who graces the pages of glossy fashion magazines and mystical Paris runways. He is tragically handsome and devilishly fit, but most of all, he is, for all intents and purposes, perfect.

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n the laundry list of social movements that have taken the 21st century by storm, the Body Positivity movement could easily top the list. According to bodypositivity.com, the movement “explores taking up occupancy inside your own skin, rather than living above the chin until you’re thin. It is a set of ideas that may help you find greater well-being in the body you have.” Through the movement, the term fat-shaming has become increasingly mainstream and controversial. What the body positivity and anti-fat-shaming movement haven’t been noted for is a focus on male bodies. Eating Disorder Hope states that eating disorders affect about one million American males every year. Though this is true, there have been virtually no pushes for more discussion of male body image, or varied representation of male bodies in the fashion industry and media as a whole. For the past two decades, the media, especially fashion magazines, has been criticized for its portrayal of unattainable images of women. However, the realities of men’s body shaming have never gained the visibility that the women’s movement has. Much of this could be attributed to the fact that the body positivity movement has feminist roots, possibly making it scary territory for the hyper-masculine man. It

could also have to do with the history of more visible and rigid physical standards put on women. Lack of mainstream advocacy for male body positivity hasn’t stopped plus-size men from diversifying the fashion industry through their online presence. Kelvin Davis is a husband, father and fashion aficionado located in Columbia, South Carolina. He is also the proud force behind the fashion blog, Notoriously Dapper. The self-described perfectionist has been running his blog for just under a year and is already a force within the bodypositive movement. In addition to running his blog, Davis is also the male voice of model Tess Holiday’s movement EffYourBeautyStandards. Middle school art teacher by day and blogger by night, Davis treats fashion as any other art form and he got his start with fashion as a boy. “My mom would buy me clothes in the husky department … and all the stuff was just so bland,” Davis said. And so his fashion journey began. Notoriously Dapper got its start after Davis was unable to get a jacket from Express in the biggest size they offered. “What I interpreted that as, is that they [Express] didn’t want bigger guys wearing their jacket,” Davis said. After this shopping mishap, Davis took to Instagram to tell his story and was approached by Holiday to represent EffYourBeautyStandards. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 187


Davis isn’t the only plus-size man making strides for the men’s body positivity movement online. Chubstr, a site dedicated to the plus-size man and his fashion needs, acts as a community for the bigger guy who want to feel comfortable in his clothing, as well as gather style inspiration. Bruce Strugell started Chubstr after he, like Davis, became frustrated with the lack of clothing options available to him in his local mall. Like many people, Strugell harnessed his frustration and “took to the internet to vent,” he says. Strugell’s venting turned into a Tumblr blog, which eventually became Chubstr. “For me, advocacy and positivity can be as simple as featuring photos of a person of size wearing clothing that makes them feel good about themselves,” Strugell said. The founding editor is doing just that on his site. This also encompasses much of what the online body positive movement does for people. By featuring people of different non-idealized body types being happy in clothes, it shows others that they can be excited about their bodies as well. Body positivity is important for men and it can be a wonderful thing for many. “I’ve been on this body positivity thing for more than a year now, and I think it’s awesome that people are starting to realize — men care about how they look,” Davis said. Though there continues to be 188 | THREAD

more plus-size male bloggers within the blogosphere, there is still a lack of trans representation. Trans-men face a different type of body dysmorphia than cis-gendered men. Not only is fat-shaming prevalent in their lives, there is also the need to present themselves in societal norms of masculinity. In an article for Ravishly, “I’m Transgender and I Need Body Positivity Too,” Sam Flynn explains that he does not dislike his body, yet he faces body dysmorphia. “It’s the mixed messages and the mis-gendering that come with having a

”CONTEMPORARY MASCULINITY DOES NOT PERMIT A MAN TO ADMIT HIS PHYSIQUE IS LESS THAN IDEAL.” TYLER KINGKADE

“feminine” body but a masculine gender identity. It’s about how invisible my body makes me feel — the way it tricks others into seeing me as something that I’m not,” Flynn says. Fashion in itself operates along a rigid binary for gender. Feeding into what is masculine and what is feminine with little in between. Masculinity and male culture in America are an extreme driving force in body image. Tyler Kingkade, a senior editor


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at the Huffington Post, wrote, “Contemporary masculinity does not permit a man to admit his physique is less than ideal. But if men could be more open about their own insecurities, without fear of violating the unspoken rules of masculinity, we’d do better at accepting our flaws in our bodies,” proving the point that concerns with body image are constantly deemed effeminate. The declaration of poor body image as feminine contributes back to trans-men as well as plus-size men and men with “nonideal” body types. “I think that many men are raised to think that body image shouldn’t matter if you’re a “manly” man,” Sturgell said. Body positivity movements have not gained the same traction with or been replicated by male models and internet personalities, which could be attributed to the idea of “manliness” rather than exclusion. This leaves little representation for men other than in film and television. Whether it’s widespread or not, this idea of opening up about body image and being a man is not non-existent. “I feel like it’s slowly changing. We’re seeing roles open up, and we’re seeing that it’s okay to feel good about yourself at any size. You don’t have to be the funny fat guy if you don’t want to be,” Sturgell said. However, even if men begin to open up more about their body issues and embrace body positivity, it is unclear whether fashion designers will take notice.

Body positivity and the call to humanize the image of fat bodies has led to more plus-size women on runways and in magazines. It would be easy to assume that the same could happen with men’s fashion, but at the moment it seems unlikely. It’s hard to know why fashion designers reject the idea of plus-size male bodies. “Honestly I think they are scared,” Davis admitted. “If everybody can get to it, then it’s no longer this unattainable thing.” The issue with fashion designer’s apprehension toward plus-size male representation is that these men are, in fact, interested in fashion. Davis draws inspiration from Pharrell Williams who is noted for his impeccable taste. Strugell, on the other hand, gathers much of his inspiration from photo submissions to Chubstr. There isn’t a lack of interest. So what is it? Ultimately, fashion’s ignorance towards plus-size men could truly be the industry’s own downfall. “It may be slowmoving, but body positivity is picking up among men and they are celebrating it. There are amazing people out there at every size, and I want to celebrate this group that doesn’t get a lot of focus in the mainstream,” Strugell said. If the fashion industry doesn’t want to represent them, blogs like Notoriously Dapper and sites like Chubstr will continue to provide varied representation for men everywhere. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 191


UNFILTERED BY SYDNEY OTTO PHOTOS BY DANI BARTLEY

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hen beauty is defined by popular culture, women and men are often left with Barbie and Ken standards. Magazines feature models with slim bodies and unblemished faces. Jeans hug 24-inch waists like they were sewn specifically for them. Broad, muscular shoulders sport shirts that look painted on. Bodies are often altered to reflect the beauty ideal in the eyes of a nation where false advertising has become the norm. Recently, however, the beauty ideal is retouched than the models rendering it. With more BY SYDNEY OTTO and more models, brands, and PHOTOS BY DANI BARTLEY celebrities speaking on behalf of untouched beauty, the fashion industry has been undergoing an overhaul of its editing ethics. Celebrity supermodel Tyra Banks has posted photos of herself looking #RawAndReal. “I decided to give you a taste of the really real me,” she proclaimed alongside a photo showing dark circles under her eyes and uneven skin. Banks doesn’t try to claim that this is beauty, she claims that this is real. The beauty ideal that society has today cannot be upheld by models, and it cannot be upheld by regular people. Along with posting a 192 | THREAD

#RawAndReal photo, Banks also posted another photo of herself with makeup and Photoshop effects, proving that how models are shown to the consumer world is unrealistic. Banks regularly speaks out about how all body types are beautiful. On her show, “America’s Next Top Model,” she changed the rules that apply to contestant qualification. Over the past few cycles “ANTM” began accepting models of all shapes, sizes, and sexes. Most recently, Banks got rid of the height limitations, accepting contestants as short as 5-foot-3. “The answers aren’t always black and white,” said Bill Schneider, an Ohio University photography professor. Think of this: As consumers, we rarely expect to receive the pictureperfect Big Mac portrayed in McDonald’s advertisements; however, many strive to achieve perfection when comparing themselves to fashion or beauty ads. Why is this? Makeup plays an invisible role in the controversy of photo retouching and editing. Many imperfections are covered by professional makeup artists before a photo shoot even starts. Just because a photo has not been digitally retouched doesn’t mean a model has not been perfectly made up to closely resemble the


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beauty ideal. It’s impossible to conform to a digitally altered image, but additionally, most people don’t have a professional makeup artist in their homes every day. Professor Larry Lambert asks his students to realize the intent of the photograph they are editing. “If it’s a photojournalism student: minimal retouching, but if it’s a commercial photography student I usually tell them to make the image look as good as possible,” he said. This is where his students are challenged to look at what they are “selling” in the photo. “The end goal is to try to be honest while still allowing the product to shine.” “When the body shape of the model is changed, that’s crossing the line.”Gary Kirksey, another Visual Communications professor, said. Both makeup and Photoshop soften skin and clear blemishes, changes that are considerably less misleading than changing a model’s figure. The movement has even reached Seventeen magazine who have vowed to keep their publication transparent. A“Body Peace Treaty,” was featured in a 2012 issue.“We vow to never change girls’ body or face shapes,” the treaty states. The magazine allows its readers to view the behind the scenes of photoshoots and editing sessions, a transparency that has yet to be seen in many other magazines. The initial photo shoot heavily impacts all production changes. Eustasio Humphrey from Ozy Media said, “Kudos to the photographer who can create a beautiful photograph preproduction.” The better the original image, the fewer changes have to be made in the editing process. “There is more pride in making a photo great before post-production.” In the spring of 2014, Aerie, a lingerie

”THE BODY TYPE PORTRAYED IN ADVERTISING AS THE IDEAL IS POSSESSED NATURALLY BY ONLY 5 PERCENT OF AMERICAN FEMALES”

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brand by American Eagle, started an advertising campaign,Aerie Real, which features untouched models. Aerie said that their ads are “challenging supermodel standards by featuring unretouched models in their latest collection of bras, undies and apparel.” ModCloth, an e-retailer, has been an advocate for unedited advertising on their site. In fall of 2014, fashion brand Bongo, launched their clothing line featuring Vanessa Hudgens “unretouched and unfiltered.” The body type portrayed in advertising as the ideal is

possessed naturally by only 5 percent of American females. The truth of advertisings’ effect on young girls’ and boys’ selfesteems is what has driven the Photoshop-free movement. According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, 69 percent of girls between fifth and 12th grade said magazine pictures influenced their idea of a perfect body. Celebrities, brands, and magazines are creating change in the fashion industry, but it is a gradual change. It is slowly reflecting real beauty, not simply what will sell. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 195


playing with

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BY MILAN LAVENDER PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

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t was the summer of 1978 when Grease’s beloved beauty school student, Frenchy, became a dropout for mistakenly dying her hair a bright bubblegum pink. Unbeknownst to much of the world, Frenchy’s mishap would later become a common sight for our time almost 40 years later. In 2013, pink hair dye sales increased 243 percent. Since then, ROYGBIV has found itself in locations other than the sky; from the young to youthful at heart, misuses to men, the masses to the minorities — pale pinks or bright blues are the new craze. Influential celebrities such as Katy Perry, Kesha, and Rihanna have made music that speaks to innumerable audiences. However, their hair color has spoken words that their lyrics cannot. The fiery reds, lavender locks, and electric blues have become a symbol of strength, independence, rebellion, and inspiration for many. With the influence and praise celebrities have received for their loud locks, dyed hair has become an outlet for those whose voice has failed to properly express their individuality on too many occasions. Despite quiet and conservative personalities, hair

color has become the canvas on which many people crave to paint, so that their artwork can be carried alongside them and seen by everyone. Just as Frenchy suffered under her idea of immense beauty school failure in 1978, it is easy to question when such wild hair colors transformed from abnormal to accepted. Celebrity colorist Daniel Moon, recognized for Nicole Richie’s lavish lavender look, told MTV news that much of this sudden desire for dyed hair can be contributed to the influx of images of celebrities and runway models on social media outlets, stages, and magazines. “I think unnatural hair colors became the new norm when model Charlotte Free stepped into the picture with pink hair; model Chloe Norgaard walked the runway for Rodarte; Nicole Richie shot the cover for Paper magazine with lavender locks; and when Katy Perry kept being Katy Perry wearing every color Pantone could imagine,” Moon said. “A color explosion has happened and now is being molded to our lifestyle — as normal as they can be.” Dirty looks and whispered insults may have ensued after a simple glimpse of an audacious WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 197


head of orange hair. Although such things continue today, the popularity of unnaturally colored hair has made it far less common for people to express such disapproval. The only significant problem now is the methods needed to obtain such vibrantly-colored hair without the professional cost. For all the brunettes and blondes heading to the salon, reach for the bleach. Unfortunately, only platinum blondes can get away with dyeing their hair alternative colors without the help of oxidizing the melanin in the hair, therefore removing the color pigmentation in hair. As eager as some may be to suddenly transform from dark brown to bright blues, it is essential to research the effects some artificial colors may have over time. Red hues are notorious for fading quickly, while greens often overstay its welcome. The color care world offers countless options to help amateur dyers get started on painting their personal canvas. Among professional hair stylists, products such as Crazy Color and Directions top the hair care charts with their variations of 27 and 34 shades, respectively, made to fit each and every desired look. After purchasing the hair color, a mixing bowl, tint brush, conditioner/hair treatment, and shower cap are all that remain to transform 198 | THREAD


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boring blonde to pale pink. Despite the simplistic directions, it is vital to ask local hairdressers about the best ways to go when dying hair. Research the best products that work for specific colors and hair types. In a world that has been deemed “basic,” it has become increasingly difficult to set oneself apart from the rest;

whether in search of adventure or in need of some rebellion, wild colors are more than a fleeting hue. Frenchy may have failed beauty school in 1978, but today she would be paving the way for contemporary hair colors that speak volumes when words cannot. Pick up the pale purples or rebellious reds, it’s time to be a beauty school knockout. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 201


CLICK K C I CL

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BY KYLIE SOUDER PHOTOS BY MAIA HAMILTON

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undreds of selfies are taken in concession in an attempt to achieve the perfect Instagram shot to garner as many likes as possible. Many argue that the selfie culture of our generation has created the most self-obsessed, perfectionseeking people on the social media stage to date. People in the 21st century have been criticized for leading lives that don’t hold much meaning. In the past, photographs were taken to showcase special events, milestones, and family portraits. These days, many people will go so far as to take selfies with their breakfast food because they are transfixed with creating content on a constant basis. How did we get here? Unsurprisingly, much of the selfie culture can be attributed to Apple products. The introduction of the front-facing camera with the iPhone 4 in 2010 provided an effortless way to document the personal physical appearance and showcase it in a way that is the most pleasing to the user. Before, people had to rely on each other to take photographs of them, which would require minimal scrutiny. With the adaptation of the front facing camera, the user entered center stage to produce their own image to their liking. This led to a fascination and deep

understanding of every perceived physical flaw that is mirrored by a tiny lens. The real danger of selfie culture is the actual journey in achieving the perfect photo. Perfection is not something that is physically attainable, but selfie enthusiasts strive for just that. Perfection is unattainable because it’s not real. Even models must be Photoshopped before they are recognized as “perfect”. From an outsider’s perspective, selfie culture has brought such a negative connotation upon itself, reaping selfie-takers as narcissistic and attention-seeking. There is a large social stigma surrounding selfies and the people who take them. Society as a whole has issues with people who have deep senses of self-acceptance or feel confident about themselves in general. The more selfies a person takes can directly correlate to the amount of attention received on social networks. People look to be entertained by candid photos or scenic portraits rather than posed facial expressions. Regardless of physical appearance, this type of social media page only allows for a singular perspective on a person’s life. This is where self-esteem comes into play because people who are seen to post more images of themselves are often viewed as pompous and WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 203


conceited. A clear fascination of one’s physical appearance is frowned upon in our society today. Instagram users are typically not welcoming of selfiespecific accounts, unless by household names and celebrities. The most popular interfaces of selfie use comes from Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook. Snapchat has lesser effects on selfie culture simply because of the timeliness of the image; snaps only survive up to 10 seconds unless they are posted to the story for 24 hours of review. Instagram and Facebook, on the other hand, allow for permanent placement of facial imagery; this is where most of the negative commentary and unfollowing relate to selfie culture. Mobile applications have also entered the game and created infinite spaces for content creators to showcase their faces all over social media. There are also apps on mobile devices that can edit the facial features, correct blemishes, whiten teeth, and add certain filters to appear more attractive. Sometimes, these apps go so far as to make the person unrecognizable. While most selfie-taking is innocent and fun, there are times when the culture takes an extreme turn in a negative direction. The American Psychiatric Association has actually created with a term to indicate a mental illness associated with obsessively taking 204 | THREAD

selfies: Selfitis. The APA describes the illness as, “the obsessive compulsive desire to take photos of one’s self and post them on social media as a way to make up for the lack of self-esteem and to fill a gap in intimacy.” The extreme cases of selfie culture have even gone so far as to create deep depression in people who severely lack self-esteem. Selfie-taking has also increased levels of suicidal thoughts and led to the development of eating disorders in some cases. Many of the extreme cases revolve around pre-existing mental illnesses including: body dysmorphic disorder, anorexia, bulimia, anxiety, and depression. Selfies have been linked to the rise of eating disorders following the new trend in exercise and fitness. When people achieve fitness or weight-loss goals, they document it with a selfie or a body photo, but physical changes in the body might not show up on camera. This lack of perceived achievement can lead to more and more weight loss or negative self-image reaching dangerous levels. Prior to selfie-taking, this journey was documented by looking in the mirror or the scale. Selfies are not all bad. Selfies have also increased people’s self-esteem, brought a face to the forefront of people’s social media, and spurred numerous movements for body positivity.


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BY ERIN FAUSEL PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

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LUTION

ootwear today is much more than simply protecting feet from the elements. With the purchase of one pair of rain boots from Roma Boots, another pair is donated to a child in need. Ten percent of the cost of purchase is also donated directly to educational supplies. The small company out of Dallas, Texas, is a model for a footwear business with philanthropy. Enter Samuel Bistrian, CEO and founder of Roma Boots. Bistrian was raised in Benesti — a village in Romania that suffers from great poverty. At eight years old, Bistrian, his parents, and his 11 siblings moved to the United States where he received a college education, as well as experience in the fashion industry. He worked for Neiman Marcus and spent much of his free time going abroad to build schools and orphanages in countries suffering from poverty, just as people in his homeland did. In 2009, Bistrian met the founder of TOMS Shoes, Blake Mycoskie, who then sparked his idea to create Roma Boots. After living and breathing the hardships of poverty on the WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 207


streets of Romania as a child, and continuing to give his time abroad to help countries in need as an adult, Bistrian knew he had the ability to combine his love of fashion with his passion for helping greater good. He would create a rain boot company with a buy-one-give-one business model to help children in poverty across the world. The small startup business took off in 2010 and has since brought thousands of smiles to children in need of durable foot protection. “We all have something to give,” says Bistrian, “… You don’t have to be rich, just kind.” Roma is “amor” spelled backward, meaning love, and love is certainly the foundation of this incredible company. Roma 208 | THREAD

Boots has donated thousands of pairs of rain boots across five continents and a total of 25 countries, but that’s just so far. The company believes in providing the proper tools for education. In the case of poverty, sturdy and appropriate footwear like rain boots keep feet warm and allow easier accessibility for walking to school. Moreover, the Roma Boots Foundation donates 10 percent of all boot sales to supplies for educational purposes. All other donations also aid the company in gathering these materials. Inspirational quotes are found throughout the Roma Boots website, highlighting its mission and purpose in both philanthropy and fashion: “We believe that


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only through education can we truly help eradicate the cycle of poverty and help these children become catalysts for positive change in society. We are determined to facilitate this growth by helping them achieve their education goals with the supplies they need.” As if the wholesomeness of the company’s mission didn’t have one immediately logged on to its site to purchase a pair, romaboots.com has a flair for all walks of fashion. With a variety of size options, The Classic Collection features 18 different color combinations of their standard tall and short boots.

Matte, glossy, and floral styles are featured, making it easy to pick the perfect pair for any personality. The Art Collection is the go-to for customers looking for bright and colorful boots, while the Fashion Collection is perfect for those who seek a bootie fit with a lace-up or combat boot style. For those with smaller kickers, toddler and kids’ styles are available in the Kids’ Collection. The website’s newest Sadie Collection, or Live Original Collection, is a group of boots hand-picked by Sadie Robertson, TV personality from “Duck Dynasty” and “Dancing With The Stars.” Sadie is featured

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modeling the trendy footwear on the Roma Boots website and Instagram account. Speaking of Instagram, cool boots aren’t the only thing to come across on the company page. Dogs with boots, holiday decor with boots, customers, storefronts, and even the actual children served by the company appear on social media. On Roma Boots’ website, picture galleries of Boot Drops in Romania, Guatemala, and Moldova bring the precious joys of this philanthropy to life. “We have quarterly boot drops where we partner with non-

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government organizations and other nonprofits to distribute the boots,” Roma Boots blog staff said. “We conduct boot drops directly on the streets, in schools, parks, or inside specific facilities. It is a joy to see the faces of these precious children when we fit them with their new Roma Boots!” Numerous partners of this incredible cause, including World Vision, Global Aid Network, Linking the World, Red Cross, and Buckner International, help make the boot drops possible. They are also leaders in donating to the Roma For All Foundation.


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Roma Boots is growing quickly in popularity since vast national and international media corporations in magazines and on TV have covered the company. With mass popularity comes demand, and many retailers have opted to sell Roma Boots — from mom-and-popshops to department stores nationwide. Nordstrom has recently established a partnership with Roma Boots that launches this November. Countless other retailers across 36 states and the District of Columbia carry the brand in stores as well. For those who can’t find a store close to

home, online purchases are the way to go. Jump on this footwear philanthropy and go grab a pair this season; it will make a world of a difference for a child in need. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO GET INVOLVED WITH #GIVINGPOVERTYTHEBOOT, THE ROMA FOR ALL FOUNDATION, AND SO MUCH MORE, VISIT WWW.ROMABOOTS.COM OR FOLLOW THEM ON INSTAGRAM AT @ROMABOOTS

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RANT/RAVE SEPTUM PIERCINGS

RANT

BY JULIA BROWN

Excuse me. I think you have something in your nose. Oh pardon me, it’s actually just your septum piercing. I mistook your trendy piece of body jewelry for a piece of bodily debris that people normally dispose of in private. Why anyone would want a piercing that makes it look like they constantly have a booger is beyond me. And you shouldn’t be surprised if someone suddenly pulls out a red cape and starts in with chants of “Toro! Toro!” when you debut your newest piercing because quite frankly, you look like a bull from a bullfighting match. Nor should you be alarmed if someone mistakes your septum piercing for a doorknocker, and begins asking if you’d like to buy some Girl Scout cookies. But enough of the insults that sound vaguely like they may have come from a middleaged suburban father of two; the septum piercing actually does provide several very real challenges to the wearer. Of course, sneezing or blowing your nose becomes nearly impossible since any air passing through your nostrils threatens to oust the nose ring that probably came from your local Claire’s. If you want to wear foundation, low-hanging jewelry makes it impossible. If the piercing moves at all, you’ll constantly have to reapply on your nose and upper lip. Speaking of low-hanging jewelry, septum piercings can also make it hard to talk. There’s no way you’ll pass your public speaking class when you have to talk around a ring through your nose. As far as trends go, this is one you can surely turn your nose up at. 212 | THREAD


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RAVE BY LYNANNE VUCOVICH

ILLUSTRATION BY ANDIE DANESI

Expressing creativity through body art has been done throughout history, and is still one of the most common ways of expression today. This art can help improve self-esteem, and show the person’s originality. Body art can also bring out a sense of pride and those who have piercings love the way they look. More and more people have been getting body piercings, and one of the most popular has been septum piercings. Styles of septum piercings vary from complete circles, to bullrings, and to meticulously-designed rings. It’s becoming more common to see anyone wearing these rings, and looking “on point” while doing so. Anyone can pull these off, no matter their personal style, proving that the popularity of the septum piercing is definitely deserved. These piercings are edgy and can make anyone look offbeat in the best way. No matter who you are, these piercings work, especially with the amount of styles of rings, allowing any wearer to express themselves. There are even rings that are barely visible for those who can’t show their piercing all the time, which shows their versatility. Septum piercings can also look delicate with designs of thin hoops in classic colors, like gold that look fantastic on any skin tone. These piercings look badass, and the best part is that you don’t even need to actually commit to going under the needle. Fake piercings look just as great as the real ones and continue to give their wearers the alternative look they’re going for. Septum piercings are a great trend that work for anyone and add an edge to any look. Their variety is unbeatable and fake options are just as workable. This piercing seems to be making a lasting impact. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 213


THREAD’S DECEMBER ISSUE RELEASE PARTY

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WE DNES DAY, DE C E M BE R 2 at 9 : 3 0 P.M. SO L RESTAURAN T IN UPT OWN AT HENS 33 N. CO U RT STREET

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