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thread OCTOBER 2011

new!

AFTER CLASS TO

AFTER HOURS

FAB

fragrances

KILLER FASHION FOR FALL

d e h s u H

S E N TO

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killer fashion

jacked on black

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breaking the glass

mad about the ‘60s

industrial glam

Cover photo by MARY HAUTMAN

tableofcontents


OCT

2011

4 8 10

Haute Online Top 5 Editor’s Note

14 18 20 25 28 32 36

Runway Realway Column: Kelly is That Girl

seams

Street Peeps Fashionably Pierced Essential Earware Fabulous Fragrances Hushed Tones

diy

43 46 50

DIY Ruffled Rampage DIY Crayon Crazed DIY Chalk Hair Dye

who, what, wear

54 60 66

Nautical Nonsense Knitting Niche Empowered Expression

in good fashion

124 132

Cardboard City Crafting Futures

130 132 139 144

New Vibes Freshmen Style Guide Afternoon to After Hours Rant / Rave

back features

OUTHREADMAG.COM | 3 WWW.AMWAY.COM/NICKGAMRATH


hauteonline honestly...wtf Honestly…WTF is a fashion and art-inspired blog created by designer Erica Chan Coffmann and fashion stylist Lauren Kolodny. It consists of colorful creations and ideas — displayed through photographs, designs, fashions and collectibles. Fans of Tumblr will be drawn to this site’s simple layout and continuous posting. Exhilarating flowers, dramatic prints and daring patterns are scattered throughout the blog to convey new styles and mix them with designer inspiration. Ultimately, the blog will blow your mind and make you ask: Honestly…WTF? –KAITLYN RICHERT

DIY TAB This section highlights the creations of current trends from glittery sneakers to wrap bracelets and pom pom necklaces. The reader will be trendy and fabulous with only a few steps!

TRAVEL TAB The travel category puts a unique spin on the blog by showcasing the compelling elements of style and home decor from locations like Bali and Africa.

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triple max tons Kristen Powell Stoddard is not the typical fashion blogger. She balances a full-time job in fashion marketing while also writing Triple Max Tons, a blog that does not focus solely on trends but also infuses the latest fads in make-up, food, interior design and other pop culture items. She features artsy, mainstream pieces in the “Inspiration” and “Home Decor” sections, advertising local shops and independent designers. – NADIA KURTZ

ETSY FINDS Triple Max Tons inspires readers with stellar interior design ideas. In her blog, Stoddard features a section called “Etsy Finds” where she scopes out artsy treasures, including vintage furniture and ceramic bowls. She further advises how and where to use them.

FOOD+RECIPES Another feature of Stoddard’s blog is her focus on food. She not only suggests eccentric ingredients like kale and quinoa, but she also gives instructions like “making ice cream with one ingredient” and “the different ways to use avocados.” This section is effective and informative, tingling the reader’s taste buds! OUTHREADMAG.COM | 5


dapperlou For DapperLou, or Ludget Delcy, the name of his blog really says it all. He is dapper personified—as his main photo suggests. The man can rock a bow tie and bright blue oxfords like none other. Delcy, born and raised in Brooklyn, started the blog to capture the chic male style that floods the streets of New York. The blog is a creative outlet, featuring his favorite trends, products and brands in menswear. He demonstrates that, contrary to popular belief, men can manipulate their look in myriad ways from socks to hats to ties. – JESSIE CADLE

STREET GENTS While many blogs feature diverse female styles, Delcy focuses on eclectic mens looks. He captures famous male bloggers, art directors and random strangers who look like debonair gentlemen. These men sport looks ranging from neon green socks to cheetah print tops to classy suits. Each “Street Gent” post has a theme—and he even snuck in a “Street Gent” post after the Ralph Lauren Spring/Summer 2012 show. (Shhh…)

DAPPERLOU HIMSELF The DapperLou section shows the man behind the blog and what he’s wearing each week. He provides direction on where to buy various pieces and he breaks down high-fashion male trends in accessible ways. Not to mention posing in gorgeous parks throughout NYC or against dappled graffiti walls, which help show the man in his natural habitat. 6 | THREAD


49 S. Court Street I Athens, Ohio I (740)594-7375

& Coffee House

NCASC

National Communication Association Student Club

We encourage all Communication Studies majors and minors to join, as well as anyone who is interested in the exciting field of Communication. We give students the opportunity to explore their academic and professional goals through networking trips, community service, fund raising, event planning, internship showcases, guest speakers from Ohio University and beyond, and more!

MEETINGS MONDAY AT 7:00PM BENTLEY 015 OUTHREADMAG.COM | 7


P O T

5

1

GOSSIP-WORTHY TRENDS

Just about every girl in America wants to be either Serena van der Woodsen or Blair Waldorf. While that’s never going to happen, we can at least finally raid their wardrobes—on a budget. A Gossip Girl clothing line will be debuting in the next few months and the ladies of Thread are overjoyed! The clothes will be sold at Kitson, Neiman Marcus and Saks, for $80 to $200. Judging by the pieces, it’s less a Gossip Girl line than a Blake Lively line, but everything looks fabulous so I’m definitely not complaining! -- SARAH MALOY

2

TYING THE KNOT

THREAD LEADERS HIGHLIGHT THE TOP TRENDS & NEWS IN THE STYLE WORLD. HERE’S WHAT IS HAPPENING OUTSIDE OF OUR ATHENS FASHION BUBBLE.

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The “Wedding of the Century” was still fresh in our minds when another English wedding nabbed the attention of rockstars and fashionistas alike. Kate Moss and Jamie Hince, guitarist for the Kills, tied the knot under the summer sun on July 1 in Gloucestershire. Flower girls and bridesmaids, heads adorned with flowery crowns, set the dreamy, whimsical tone in white petticoat dresses. Sparkling paillettes speckled Moss’ Jazz Age-inspired chiffon dress, also delicately embroidered with plumes and flowers. How very kind of her to let Vogue attend, sharing the ethereal spreads with us anxious admirers. --HALLIE RYBKA


SUCCESSFUL TARGET LINES

Although I fell in love with the Missoni for Target capsule collection, I was stunned by the success it had. Within the first few hours of the limited edition collection’s release, stores around the country were sold out and Target.com had crashed. Even more impressive is the sale of Missoni for Target on the black market — items from the collection have sold for thousands of dollars on eBay. With the success that this collection had, I can’t help but wonder if Target will be a repeat (success) offender with it’s upcoming Jason Wu for Target line. -- ALI MAZZOTTA

3

GRANGER BE GONE

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Emma Watson transformed from nerd-chic Hermoine Granger to sophisticated Burberry model to high-fashion cover girl of British Elle. I won’t lie readers, I became a Watson-fanatic due to my insatiable desire to be Hermoine Granger and eventually marry Ronald Weasley, but I continue to follow her career because of her admirable sense of self. While many thought she would be trapped in the iconic Harry Potter role she garnered at age 13, she chopped off her hair, changed her look and successfully separated Hermoine from Emma. Not only is she my personal fashion icon—have you seen how the girl can rock a runway?—but she sets an example for all women that confidence is classy. -- JESSIE CADLE

PRETTY IN PINK

5

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month, and to show support, many product lines are pledging pink to help Susan G. Komen find a cure. From pinkthemed events and food items to fashion lines, pink fever is building awareness, as well as advocacy. You can even turn your a.m. bagel and coffee run into a charitable custom: This month, Panera will be serving up “pink ribbon bagels,” and Caribou Coffee will be roasting Amy’s blend to support the cause. Sponsored walks and 5K races are happening nationally, so check local listings for a schedule of events. And to stay, as Thread would say, “in good fashion,” The Council of Fashion Designers of America heads a charitable initiative to unite designers, models and celebrities to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer. Brands participating under CFDA include: Intermix, Nine West, Carlos Miele, Jurlique, Henri Bendel and QVC. For more information on how to become passionately pink for the cure, visit ww5.komen.org. --CATHERINE CALDWELL OUTHREADMAG.COM | 9


editor’snote EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

ali mazzotta Hi Threadies! After a long summer hiatus, Thread is back with fresh fashions and a brand new staff. Welcome to our first issue! Fall is one of the most exhilarating seasons to be in Athens, and we tried to capture that excitement with our October issue. In this issue, we’re in love with the rich hues of jewel tones and our “Dazzling Dots” editorial has us seeing spots. The football team has us seeing black but bleeding green in “Jacked on Black.” Another feature we’re excited to share is “Breaking the Glass,” a story about the female members of the College of Business Sales Centre and their motivating style. On behalf of the entire Thread staff, I would like to thank our previous trailblazing staff and our fearless founder Jamie Ratermann for starting this magazine in the first place. And a special thanks to our current hardworking Threadies. We’d also like to thank A Stitch in Athens, Betty’s Vintage Finds, the Ohio University football team and staff, the OU Sailing team, the Sales Centre and the Habibti Rakkasah Belly Dance Club. Additionally, I would personally like to thank Britton Spark for being

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Thread’s personal web guru. As always, we would also like to give a big thank you to Athens Underground and The Other Place. Let us know what you think of our latest issue by posting on our Facebook wall or tweeting us @threadmag! Dress Sassily Athens, Ali Mazzotta


thread

OCTOBER 2011

Editor-in-Chief Ali Mazzotta

Managing Editor Catherine Caldwell

seams editor

design & web editor

who what wear editor

photo chief

diy editor

picture editor

copy chief

creative director

public relations chief

advertising executive

Anna Luczkow Jesse Cadle

Hallie Rybka

Sarah Maloy

Becca Goodburn

Riley Yuhas

Sarah Balser

Becky Williams Justin Brown Tom Busch

WRITERS

Lindsey Brenkus, Meghan Brickner, Marley Brison, Brooke Bunce, Jessie Cadle, Casey Compernolle, Giovanna Delgarbino, Alexis Evans, Taylor Evans, Adrienne Green, Anna Grueser, Sarah Hider, Colleen Kratofil, Nadia Kurtz, Scott Lambert, Kate Lienesch, Bridget Mallon, Lo Martinez, Olivia Ohlin, Bradley Parks, Emily Pifer, Kathryn Potraz, Kaitlyn Richert, Rachel Sayers, Laura Straub, Becky Wagner, Bentley Weisel, Carly Wiita

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ginnie Adams, Heather Beaver, Emmy Baker, Sarah Balser, Rebecca Ciprus, Mackensie Cottingham, Levi Finley, Mary Hautman, Lauren Holle, Kate Irby, Michelle Kappeler, Audrey Kelly, Christine Lentz, Michael Maurer, Sarah Miller, Emily Mueller, Emily Newman, Jordan Petsy, Bethany Puterbaugh, Deanna Sakal, Becky Williams, Leah Woodruff

DESIGNERS

Arielle Busch, Alison Guitar, Alexa Hayes, Megan Hillman, Chloe Hoeg, Rachel Keaveny, Mikaela Longo, Danielle Magary, Linley Meyers, Danielle Morris, Allison Paglialunga, Gina Ranalli, Kaitlyn Richert, Margaret Riedel, Kellie Sedgwick, Katherine Smidansky, Riley Thenrer, Courtney True, Jessica Vogel

STYLISTS

Sophia Borghese, Megan Carter, Aly Fossett, Kaylyn Hlavaty, Lexi Lang, Nicole Mainwaring, Meg Makzec, Charleen Modzelewski, Katie O’Connor, Kelly Phillips, Jazmine Reed

COPY EDITORS

Olivia Arbogast, Brooke Bunce, Holly Coletta, Taylor Evans, Holly Schnicke, Rachel Swalin, Carly Wiita

PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM

Jordan Anders, Ben Clos, Jocelyn Chiu, Sydney Cologie, John Dean, Jasmine Garcia, Kelly Hayes, Jenny Joseph, Scott Lambert, Hannah May, Abigail Millar, Rachel Portik, Nicole Ranieri, Kyla Schmalenberger, Kellie Snyder, Anastasia Souris, Megan Valentine, Brienna Weibel, Kylie Whittaker

MODELS

Devin Albert, Alexandra Arko, Emily Bauer, Lowell Berg, Jocelyn Chiu, Ben Clos, Nick Creme, Alexis Fisher, Sarah Grothjan, Anthony Hawkins, Katie Hawkins, Kelly Hayes, Logan Hayes, Neil Huitson, Jessica Huizenga, Patrick Johns, Martina Johnston, Chelsea Kovak, Jim Kovell, Rachel Lantz, Josh Leeson, Danielle Lewondowski, Cissy Li, Eudora Peterson, Kelly Phillips, Rachel Portik, Jazmine Reed, Nick Rees, Sabrina Reola, Olivia Reasoner, Noah Sacksteder, Kate Selander, Meghan Shamblen, Brianna Simmons, Anastasia Souris, Amy Stafford, Taco (Meredith Woods’s cat)

BLOGGERS

Kelly Ginsburg, Anna Grueser, Abigail Millar, Nick Rees, Leah Smith, Patrick White

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managing editor Catherine Caldwell

photo chief Sarah Balser

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seams editor Anna Luczko

advertising executive Tom Bush

copy chief Sarah Maloy

photo editor Becky Williams


diy editor Hallie Rybka

pr chief

Becca Goodburn

design & web editor Riley Yuhas

NEW thread creative director Justin Brown

execs OUTHREADMAG.COM | 13


runwayrealway dkny fall 2011 By COLLEEN Photos by

D

KRATOFIL MICHAEL MAURER

KNY’s fall 2011 collection showcased streamlined looks for effortlessly cool street style by incorporating structured pieces with bold pops of color. Tailored menswear pieces were toughened up with leather motorcycle jackets and porkpie hats, which oozed a coolness reminiscent of that spotted on the Sartorialist. Sharp, tailored pieces were contrasted with pretty, feminine looks, such as short black lace dresses with Peter Pan collars and long, loose color-blocked dresses. Stripes and houndstooth patterns punched up comfy sweaters and suits, while vibrant reds and pinks brought in pops of color to the neutral fall tones. Tan or black outfits were enhanced with a single brightly-colored sweater, shirt, jacket or pant. By switching out a traditional earth tone piece for one of intense color any outfit will embody the DKNY-esque vibe for fall.

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DIY

seams

Recreate an urban-cool look worthy of Donna Karan herself by pairing bold shades. Red pants cast a flame on this season’s runway, so be daring and don this haute hue with a cool jewel tone for an eye-catching contrast. Overlay black pieces and top the look off with a wide|black OUTHREADMAG.COM 15 hat for added sophistication.


Embrace autumn wrapped in regal plaid scarves and neutral outerwear. Balmain’s fall line transitions to campus with ease in wearable pieces: patterned scarves, cuffed jeans, knit sweaters and boots. A gray coat topped with double-layered scarves adds fresh feel to a classic 16 |a THREAD look (coat, The Other Place).


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balmain fall 2011 By LAURA STRAUB Photos by

MICHAEL MAURER

B

almain Homme embraces brisk autumn with its Fall 2011 ready-to-wear collection. Layers are key in this menswear line; each look features lightweight sweaters and structured pea coats often worn under a fur vest or military style jacket. The designer drapes bulky scarves over almost every piece, whether in traditional muffler fashion around the neck or cinched around the model’s waist for a belted effect. The collection flows with rich, dramatic colors: deep blues, golden beiges, smoky grays and mustard yellows. The designer utilizes plaid and striped patterns for scarves and shirts. Cuffed dark-wash jeans, scrunched khakis and dark chinos, paired with chunky leather boots and heavy knit socks, complete the look. Fashioned for brisk fall walks, this look is adaptable to the bricks of Athens as the layers are practical for Ohio’s unpredictable weather. Match a comfy collared shirt or soft sweater with a classic pea coat or utility jacket, thrown on some hiking boots and dark cuffed jeans, and head out the door into the autumn air in a style to rival the runway.

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blogger of the month

kelly is that girl... By KELLY GINSBURG Photos by SARAH BALSER

M

y name is Kelly Ginsburg, and I write an objective blog focused on trends for the upcoming season. I write about what styles to be on the look out for, why they are popular and where to get the look for less. I understand that we are all thrifty college students who need to find the best price, while still keeping up to date on fashion. My fashion fascination started this summer. Naturally, I wanted to look good when I went back to school, but couldn’t decide what to try to squeeze into my little sorority house closet. Questions were racing through my mind: Should I bring my leather jacket from winter 2010? Are Ugg boots still acceptable? Is a tight, black skirt still the only going out must-have for the weekend? I decided to do a little research to see what I needed. I didn’t want to be “that girl” who thought I still looked cool when I actually didn’t. So, I went to Google (don’t judge!) and searched “Fall trends for 2011,” which brought up funky Rodarte, William Rast and couture Chanel clothes, paired with kneehigh Yetti shoes. What am I suppose to do with that? The more I searched, the more disappointed I became. I couldn’t fathom the thought of walking into a party with tall fluffy boots or a kimono on. Then I saw the link “Fall 2011’s Most Wearable Trends,” I thought, “Finally! Tell me the must haves!” But pictures of crazy bright red and blue plaid get-ups and

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obnoxiously patterned pants only made me more confused. Wait, what? That is the most wearable? That couldn’t be right. Why couldn’t someone just tell me what was going to be “in”? Why did everything media-related to fashion and trends have to be so monstrous and manrepelling? I just wanted to know what to get before I went to school! Then, it hit me. The more I looked at high fashion trends, the more I realized there was a pattern that lead to everyday outfits: a rippling effect where high fashion clothes are broken down to basics, eventually becoming what we wear on campus. These pictures aren’t just hideous obnoxious jackets. These are professional jackets. These are jackets going for the “business” look. These are jackets designed to be tight around the rib cage and flow out toward the bottom. These are jackets made to make you look slimmer. These are blazers. Light bulb! One just needs to know how to look at runway trends as inspiration for what to be on the look out for in stores seasons away. This is where my blog comes into play. I look for a fashion pattern and relay it back to you. I want to know why people wear what they wear. I am a “trends-lator.” Hopefully my blog will give you a better idea of who I am and why I write what I write. Stay Trendy.


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streetpeeps back to school bags Photos By SARAH BALSER

LAUREN DREW

SOPHOMORE Did you choose it for style or function? Style Did you change bookbags for seasons? No

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TAYLOR SEE

JUNIOR Did you choose it for style or function? Function Did you change bookbags for seasons? No


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AMRIT SAINI

JUNIOR Did you choose it for style or function? Both, but mostly style Did you change bookbags for seasons? No How long have you had it? Since freshman year fall quarter

TERRI LINK

SENIOR Did you choose it for style or function? Both Did you change bookbags for seasons? No

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ALEX WECHSLER

SENIOR Did you choose it for style or function? Style Did you change bookbags for seasons? No How long have you had it? 6 months

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NICK SANDERS

SOPHOMORE Did you choose it for style or function? Function Did you change bookbags for seasons? No How long have you had your bookbag? 6-7 years


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CHI OMEGA WELCOMES Its New Fall Pledge Class!

N I JO

NITIES

AL ORTU SSION D PR OPP E F O E AN - PR KING S - DESIGN S WELCOM R O W R D AJO - NET FRIEN ALL M NNING AKE NEW A L P T EVEN PMENT - M LO E DEV

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GEN

S G N I T Y MEE er 242

D Bak O n i m B p 7 ERAL esday at u Every T


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fashionablypierced By MEGHAN BRICKNER Photos by MICHELLE KAPPELER

N

o longer just reserved for the uniform of a rebellious teenager, piercings have shed their image of extreme aesthetic. Studs, hoops and bars have made their mark in the style world, as fashion’s most fearless embrace this metal mayhem. While it may appear everything from the ear on down is now fair game for body décor, here are some of the trendiest territories for today’s most popular piercings.

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TRAGUS

A twist on the conventional hole-in-thelobe, the tragus piercing punctures a small piece of cartilage near the ear canal. Once considered edgy, this ear piercing hit the mainstream in 2005 and continues to have celebrity and college followings. Depending on how much flair you want to give your ear, choose among rings, bars or twisted barbells. For those looking to stand out among other earring wearers, this is the ideal option.

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LIP

Bolder than the brightest shade of lipstick, a lip ring is the most shocking way to accentuate this facial feature. Top or bottom lip, metallic ring or silver stud—this piercing holds a heavy-metal vibe while giving the wearer a little extra pucker. Even though its initial ’90s popularity might have faded, fans of this fad have revived its rockstar vibe with “snake bites,”—two piercings on both sides of the bottom lip.


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EYEBROW

Ideal for emphasizing the expressiveness of the eye, an eyebrow piercing draws more attention to peepers than any mascara. Eyebrow embellishments come in neon, studded or bejeweled—or, for those with an even funkier style, stamped with symbols like skulls, stars and flowers. For a more modest look, wear a subtle clear bar. This piercing heals within 48 hours, so you’ll be ready to rock your new stud by the end of the week.

NAPE

For piercing pundits, the nape is currently the hottest spot to test out a trend. A compliment to the modern-day bob or chic bun, the nape piercing is a way to show off the back of the neck. Unlike many facial piercings, this one can be hidden with just a flip of your hair. This piercing carries the ultimate edgy vibe, but it takes more care, requiring a special bar much heavier than traditional facial gems.

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Earrings provided by The Other Place

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essentialearware By ADRIENNE GREEN Photos by MICHELLE KAPPELER

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HOOPS

Hoop earrings are a timeless adornment that have always made an appearance in fashion. Making their most popular debut in the ‘90s, the endlessness of this classic lobe dĂŠcor lives on in wardrobes season after season. Chic and simple, these earrings are a sleek addition to any outfit. Sophisticate this style with gold or silver for a big event, or make it funky with rhinestones, elongated shapes and shimmering diamonds for a trip uptown. Hoop earrings compliment any face shape and will flatter any style.

GAUGES

Gauges are making their way from band scenes into the mainstream. This specialized

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method of piercing enlarges your lobes so they can be filled with different sized plugs, giving an edgy vibe to any look. You can start with a subtler gauge, or go for a more outspoken style. If the thought of stretching your lobes sounds too permanent, you can achieve the same look with faux plugs for a still spunky appearance.

STUDS

Studs are small dazzlers that are a big finish in your wardrobe. Light enough to be worn to the gym, yet sleek enough for a special event, studs can play up the classic diamond-styled earring with sparkle, energetic colors, and unique designs. These little ear candies have made their mark as a major accent accessory.

FEATHERS

Feathers are a fun accessory for this fall. These ear embellishments have made a huge appearance this year, on celebrities and fall collections, from Michelle Roy and Mary Jane. Feathers accent using bright colors or pure shades. Whether paired with all bohemian looks, evening glam wear, or vibrant ensembles with lots of glam, feather earrings can add a touch of frill, and come in styles long and short to spice up any outfit.


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1

2

3 One shoulder banana dress, $39.99, The Other Place.

Long stone vest, $39, The Other Place

fabulousfragrances By ALEXIS EVANS and RACHEL SAYERS Photos by DEANNA SAKAL

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for women

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VERA WANG LOVESTRUCK

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TOM FORD JASMIN ROUGE

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DSQUARED² SHE WOOD VELVET FOREST WOOD

Vera Wang’s latest fragrance is filled with promises of love and adoration. Based upon the tragic story of Romeo and Juliet, Lovestruck is set to induce a sense of passion. Top notes of pink guava and angelica blossom reveal a headier core of sheer musk and woodsy notes set to enchant men. If you keep a diary filled with adoring prose, set your romantic sights on Lovestruck and prepare to meet the love of your life.

Reminiscent of red lacquered lips and dark smoky eyes, Tom Ford’s Jasmin Rouge promises to become your elixir of choice. Sweet notes of mandarin, cinnamon and cardamom give way to a spicy center filled with pepper, ginger and sage, while deep notes of Mexican vanilla and leather keep an atmosphere of inscrutability that matches your fiery attitude. Marilyn Rouge is the ideal fragrance for a sizzling night filled with martinis, memories and men.

Notes of pine, violet leaf and green leaves sweep you into the enthralling scent of She Wood. The aroma evokes a sense of natural beauty reminiscent of the late 1960s, making it the ideal fall fragrance for the free spirit. In tune with the alluring elements of nature, She Wood brings to mind an enchanted northern forest, perfected by a mystical base of vetiver, patchouli and musk. This scent’s captivating base and woody top notes render it an essential for Autumn’s colorful hikes and sun-filled picnics.

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for men

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GIORGIO ARMANI ACQUA DI GIO

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CALVIN KLEIN CK ONE

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RALPH LAUREN POLO SPORT

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It’s date night and you want to excite your girl’s senses. A little Acqua di Gio before you leave your pad is sure to spruce things up a bit. This fragrance enhances your already dashing appearance and demeanor with its combination of fresh, warm and rich notes. When she catches a whiff of your sexy aroma as you hold open the door, rest assured it will be a magical evening.

The guy who rocks CK One will most likely be taking his sweetie to see a local band or out for a steaming cup of coffee. This cologne has strategically combined fruity, fresh and floral scents. But don’t let the word “fruity” deter you — this classic scent is just subtle just enough to excite the senses of a girl who loves a man in thick-rimmed glasses.

For those dudes desiring a clean, aquatic daytime scent, Polo Sport is for you. Ideal for the athlete who enjoys a break from the weight room for a date out with his honey, this fragrance will take you from sweat-laden to sweetly fresh. Whether accompanying you on a date to the Friday football game or just to the sports bar to catch some hockey, Polo Sport promises a clean, crisp scent that won’t leave your girl wondering if you’ve been working out.


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Bewitch in rich plums. A hue fit for royalty, amethyst pieces paired with classic blacks jazz up classic business attire. Burgundy blouse, $5, Athens Underground.

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hushedtones Dressed for a winter wonderland By SARAH HIDER Photos by MARY HAUTMAN

D

iamonds may be a girl’s best friend, but this season prepare to fall in love with jewels. Stepping out of summer’s neon brights and into winter’s rich and sultry hues is a sure way to keep things hot when the snow starts falling. Sapphire, ruby and emerald shades dripped off the runways of Donna Karan, Zac Posen and almost every designer’s ready-to-wear collections this fall, and they will be seen in every aspect of fashion this season. The jewel-tone color palette plays off the look of luxury. Plush fabrics in rich prints and solid shades in head-to-toe ensembles are ideal for luxuriously prancing through a winter wonderland. Sequined dresses and blouses as well as tailored trousers and structured outerwear embody last year’s monochromatic style, but with a surprising sheen. Layered and mixed textures add dimension to an otherwise flat look. Sticking with satin is playing it safe, but mix it up by layering fun furs on sensual chiffon — as seen in both Gucci and Diane von Furstenberg’s interpretations of this trend. Is fear of fabric play and color splash holding you back from embracing these elegant

ensembles? For the tame at heart, embellished accessories and shimmery cosmetics pair well with black and nude shades. Vamp up your little black dress with ornate earrings, a statement ring or a ruby or plumshaded pout. If you want to ease into this trend, select black velvet garments with gemstone sheen, similar to those seen in Ralph Lauren’s fall collection. For a sophisticated spin on summer’s funky shades, dip your tips in shimmery hues. Polish colors like lustrous golds, silvers, rubies and emeralds enhance an already regal look. Add some sparkle by swiping jewel-toned shimmer on your eyelids. Metallic gold eye shadow, like that used in Roksanda Ilincic’s collection, adds an angelic glow that’s complementary to every skin tone. For a more sultry look, use “darkly divine” colors like those found in MAC Cosmetic’s Evil Eye shadow palette, which includes rich plum and glistening charcoal. This season, don’t be shy! Make new friends with treasured tones. Old pals like black, nude and tan will be waiting in your closet for autumns to come. Let the look of luxury guide you as you sparkle along the jewel-paved path to winter. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 37


Dazzle in magenta. Deep pink hues add allure to traditional A-line cuts, like this pink satin dress, $35, Athens Underground.

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Spark intrigue in deep hues and lighter shades of sapphire this season. Luxurious fabrics in solid shades add glamour without looking ostentatious. Blue satin blouse, $8, Athens Underground.

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Charm in deep emeralds and blues. Pair these looks with silver or gold accessories for a standout look that sparkles. Pleated blue skirt, $10; green velvet dress, $55, both Athens Underground.

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seams

Thread’s

favorite

jewel tones RUBY

CHARCOAL

GOLD

EMERALD

PLUM

SILVER

SAPPHIRE

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diy

ruffledrampage By LINDSEY BRENKUS Photos By LAUREN HOLLE

T

he ancient lampshade that has been looming next to your bed for four years somehow made it to college with you, but you just can’t bare to trash it? Save your meager college budget and instantly spice up that old lamp with this Anthropology-inspired project. A burst of light will give your room a fresh look and the ruffled shade lets you show off your crafty side. So roll up your sleeves, because all you need are four inexpensive items to boost your thriftiness—and your room—to a whole new level.

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YOU WILL NEED

Lamp and shade 1.5 yards of burlap Hot glue gun Scissors

step one: Cover your lampshade in a layer of burlap, leaving an extra inch hanging over on the top and bottom. That extra inch allows you to glue on the inside of the shade, without the glue oozing through. Fold that extra inch over to the inside, pulling taut as you go, and glue.

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tips

A sporadic pattern makes the ruffles look more interesting. Achieve that by twisting the burlap in different directions for each strip instead of parallel curls. That will create gaps that you can fill in with more material later.


step two:

step three:

Cut the burlap into strips twice the width you want your ruffles to be and about 1.5 times the length of your shade. Fold the strips lengthwise and iron the crease.

Apply glue to the outside fold of the strips, but only an inch or two at a time, because the hot glue dries fast. Quickly place the glued strip on the shade, forming a squiggly line from top to bottom. After the glue dries, it is time to combine lamp and shade. Then flip the switch and never look back! Burlap ruffles are way hotter than dust and drab. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 45


crayoncrazed By KATHRYN POTRAZ | Photos by AUDREY KELLY

I

N SEVENTH GRADE, I WAS A LITTLE BIT TOO ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT MELTING CRAYONS. RE-PURPOSING MY EASY BAKE OVEN AS A CRAYON MAKER, I MELTED DIFFERENT COLORS TOGETHER TO CREATE GEMS SUCH AS “BASEMENT” AND “UGLY FLOWER.” MY LOVE FOR CRAYONS HAS NOT ABATED — DESPITE THE FACT THAT I STOPPED MELTING THEM WHEN I WAS 13 YEARS OLD — SO CRAYON DRIP ART SEEMED LIKE A PERFECT PROJECT FOR ME TO TRY! IT WAS EASY TO MAKE AND THE FINAL PRODUCT IS A PERFECT TOUCH FOR AN APARTMENT.

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diy

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Hair Dryer

Two 64-Packs of Crayons

Hot glue gun

materials

Canvas or Foam Poster Board

Newspaper Drip Sheet (not pictured)

Select your color palette. If you use all the colors in the box, consider removing the browns, which are downers when it comes to the vibrancy of a Crayola 64-pack. You can also opt to try a colorspecific scheme, like all neutrals or all pinks. Lay a newspaper or plastic drip sheet on your working surface to catch runaway drips before they ruin the oh-so-beautiful gray carpet in your apartment (oops!). Plug in your hot glue gun and wait for it to heat up. While you’re waiting, compulsively arrange your crayons in the order you want to place them. 48 | THREAD

3

4


diy

When the glue gun is ready, squeeze a thin strip of glue onto the crayon.

7

Quickly set the crayon (point side down) along the top of the canvas, lining the bottom of the crayon up with the edge of the canvas so it lays straight. Repeat until you run out of crayons or canvas.

8

Turn on your blow dryer and start heating up the crayons. It takes 5-10 minutes for the crayons to start dripping, but once they start it’s easy (and fun!) It helps to angle the dryer downward so the crayons drip down. Heating the crayons evenly ensures they drip the same distance.

When your dripping crayons reach about halfway down the canvas, call it quits and turn off the dryer. The crayons harden within a minute or two, so you can hang it up almost immediately. Enjoy the new, fabulous pop of color in your apartment!

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diy

chalkhairdye By ANNA GRUESER Photos By GINNIE ADAMS

an easy, temporary shade for

E

your luscious locks

veryone seems to have something adorning their hair these days, from feather extensions and strands of beads to the oldschool hair wraps many of us had when we were 6 years old. Even celebrities are sporting the trend: Lady Gaga has rocked green, lavender and yellow strands, while Katy Perry, Joss Stone, Avril Lavigne have toyed with colored locks. The Spring 2012 runway showcased rainbow-colored hair, featured in the Thakoon, Mara Hoffman, Peter Som, and Narciso Rodriguez shows. But there is one we have not seen too much of on campus: pastel highlights made from chalk. I’m not shy when it comes to doing permanent things to my hair. I’ll chop it, grow it, dye it, highlight it — you name it, I’ve done it! My theory is that it always grows back, right? However, cotton-candy streaks are one thing I have not dabbled in. What if the color wouldn’t match my chic threads? Would my boss freak out? Of course she would. Then this opportunity fell in my lap: create temporary hair dye with sidewalk chalk. Done! Our patio is often embellished with chalk art, so I already had half the ingredients. The other ingredient is water, and by last count, my utility bills were up-to-date. I anxiously selected my color, but my locks curled to the high heavens after applying the wet dye. I alternately decided to

chalk-up my temporary extensions, allowing more control over the exact placement of the dye, rather than slathering it blindly and awkwardly on my own head. There are two ways to do the chalk dye. Here’s how to accomplish both: If you’re going for an all-over color, or you are not worried about exact placement of the dye, try this:

1

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supplies - CHALK - SPRAY BOTTLE - WATER

2

STEP 1

Get a spray bottle (available in the travel toiletries section at Wal-Mart or CVS). Fill it about three-quarters full with warm water.

STEP 2

3

Grab some Crayola chalk. (I used the thin, colored chalkboard kind, not the sidewalk kind.) Smash it into smaller pieces, then add it to the water. For dark or black hair, consider using a lot of chalk for a brighter color.

3

STEP 3

With hair extensions, lay them out on a towel, separating inch-long sections to spray. Smooth the color out lightly with your finger if the color is splotchy. Take a hair dryer to them to set the color so it does not run. The extensions I used are human hair, so this will work on your natural hair too. The other method is to wet both the hair and the chalk, and then rub the chalk on a selected strand of hair. This can also be done with the top layer of your natural hair to blend it in with extensions. Dyeing smaller, thinner sections with this method help to blend it all together. But be sure to check the weather report before spicing up your locks! You certainly do not want all your hard work to run in the rain, ruining your gorgeous garments.

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STYLEBOOK

$15.00 GET

YOURS TODAY!

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Nautical NONSENSE By BECKY WAGNER I Photos By EMMY BAKER

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who what wear

T

he lake is shimmering and the wind is at an ideal 10 knots with small white caps topping the waves. Madeline Beck, a member of the Ohio University Sailing Team, is out on the water in a white, single-hulled sailboat, taking on the waves with relative ease. Decked head-to-toe in a waterproof bodysuit to combat the elements, she grips the rigging with matching waterproof gloves. As she leans back on the hull to steady her boat, her nylon mainsail catches the wind and billows

out, white and full. She switches to the other side to avoid tipping over and lets out a whoop of joy. “This is one of the most exhilarating sports there is,” said Beck, a junior studying interior architecture, when she is safely back on land, adjusting her waterproof Patagonia jacket. “We sail on the weekends, and it’s a great way to let off steam from classes when the weather is nice.”

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Though nautical is all the rage on the runway, for the sailing team, fashion ties in with function. The gear has to stand up to the elements of sailing: water, wind and sun. “A common misconception is that we go out sailing in … striped shirts and such,” she said. “We actually have to fit lifejackets under our shirts and stay warm; there isn’t much room for style.” In terms of functionality, the team has a bone to pick with Sperry’s shoes, which are stereotypically considered sailing shoes. “Probably only around five percent of people around here wear them for function,” said Evan Graves, a member of the team. “You’d wear them on bigger boats, like catamarans, because they don’t mark up the boat.” Although the shoe would be practical for larger boats, they’re a fairly bad idea for sailing on the boats that OU sailing uses: the FJ’s, or Flying Juniors. “We have hollow boats that water can come up in, so we need a good waterproof shoe,” Beck said. Though both Beck and Graves don’t wear them on the boats, they are big Sperry fans when it comes to everyday wear. “I grew up boating. My dad always wore Sperry’s when I was a little girl, and I wore them all though my high school years,” Beck said. Graves, a junior studying health service administration, has been sailing for 12 years. “It doesn’t matter to me that [Sperrys] are more popular … I still wear them constantly,” he said. Both Graves and Beck grew up sailing, but neither claims to be especially nautically influenced in their personal style. “The main stereotype around campus is that we dress nautical all the time and only wear Sperry’s,” Graves said. Nautical-inspired fashion is nothing new. From as early as the 1850s, sailors in the Navy set the nautical trend and this season it’s back in full swing. From classic Breton stripes to brass buttons, sea-inspired wear is trending. But for sailors, it’s all about what is best on the boat. “I don’t think [the nautical trend] really affects what people wear when they’re sailing at all,” Beck said. “On the East Coast, Yacht Club style is much stricter – khakis, 56 | THREAD


who what wear

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“It’s all about staying dry and warm.” -MADELINE BECK, MEMBER OF THE OU SAILING TEAM

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who what wear button-downs, Sperry’s. But here, we’re much more casual. Our style is more board shorts. I’ll wear boat shoes, but not to make a fashion statement.” During competition,

team members usually wear all-waterproof outfits: overall pants with suspenders, a spray top that wraps fully around the neck, sunglasses, gloves and a lifejacket topped off with

an OU pinny. “It’s all about staying dry and warm,” Beck said. “We have to move around a lot on the dinghy’s, so we need clothes that can weather the elements.”

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A

stereotypical knitter is a silver-crowned grandmother sitting serenely in her rocker, working hard on a new pair of soft socks or a cozy quilt for a grandchild. However, knitting and crochet aren’t exclusive to the elderly—a new brand of knitters are defying age expectations and crafting chic pieces that add a hip homemade spin to their usual garb. As recently as fall 2011, Thakoon’s ready-to-wear collection featured strands of yarn braided and twisted into each model’s coiffure, showcasing just how versatile and fresh the art of knitting can be. Not only is knit a trend that appears endlessly on the runway, this intricate and practical skill is being put to good use by A Stitch in Athens, OU’s first club devoted entirely to knitting and crochet. “It’s so much fun to create something and it’s a nice creative outlet … anybody can knit if they want to,” Liz Miller, the group’s founder, said. Miller, a junior studying restaurant, hotel and tourism, started the group last winter quarter. It seemed that OU was lacking a means of creative expression for those who do their best work with a pair of needles. “I wanted something where you could bond with people over a certain interest, and I went straight to knitting…I also wanted to incorporate giving to the community or a charity, and it just all fell into one,” Miller explained. Her hands gracefully dance to a harmonious tune created by the click of her needles as she works on her current project. Seated in the cozy Baker

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Knitting By BROOKE BUNCE I Photos by REBECCA CIPRUS


who what wear DIY

“Anybody can knit if they want to.” – LIZ MILLER, A STITCH IN ATHENS FOUNDER

Niche OUTHREADMAG.COM | 61


“I wanted something where you could bond over a certain interest and I went straight to knitting...” – LIZ MILLER, A STITCH IN ATHENS FOUNDER

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who what wear 1804 lounge, group members casually converse with one another, chatting about their current work-in-progresses and their lives. Their hands have a life of their own as they work, swiftly lifting loops of fabric off one needle and transferring them to the other, creating row after row of textured art. The effortless movements are second nature to these veteran crafters. To the side, beginning knitters gather in circles learning the basics of knit and crochet. A Stitch in Athens doesn’t just create for themselves – they create for those in need. The group’s main focus is to make and donate blankets to Project Linus, a volunteer organization that collects blankets and then gives them to children who are seriously ill, traumatized or in need of something warm and comforting. Last year, A Stitch in Athens donated five blankets to Project Linus. “Blankets are a really easy thing to get started on. They’re a big project, but they can be really simple or more intensive if you’re a really advanced knitter,” Miller said. Of course, the members don’t exclusively craft for charity. They also knit and crochet for the sake of adding a handmade touch to their everyday attire. “There’s probably not a single craft that I don’t do or have not tried,” said Stephanie Mussard, president of A Stitch in Athens, and a junior studying advertising and marketing. Mussard taught herself how to knit in middle school and hasn’t stopped since. The slouchy, salmon-colored beanie that balances on the crown of OUTHREADMAG.COM | 63


her head is one of many clothing items she’s crafted herself. With its intricate cable patterns, Mussard’s cap looks like it could have come straight from the shelves of any major retail store. “After you get really good, it’s exciting what you can make. You can make shirts, cardigans, hats, socks… and then just weird stuff like little animals,” she said as she pulls a small, knitted koala bear from her bag, which she explains is a work-in-progress for a cousin. Mussard’s current project is a handmade cardigan, a process that has proven to be both time consuming and detail-oriented. “There’s a lot of math involved. When you’re making a garment you have to measure yourself, measure the stitches, figure out your gauge … and you can’t just knit a few rows, leave it, and come back to it,” she said. Secretary Andrea Hewitt, a junior studying English and marketing, also sports a self-knit beanie in a deep violet shade as she works on a pair of slatecolored knee-high socks, nimbly intertwining thin yarn around four needles. “It’s a stress reliever. I think knitted things are beautiful, and I love being able to make them myself,” Hewitt said. “People always get really excited when you make your own clothes. They think it’s the coolest thing ever.” In the end, A Stitch in Athens demonstrates that anyone can knit -- no oversized wire-frame glasses or cat fetishes required. “Because it doesn’t involve technology … it kind of seems like an old lady thing, but it’s just as much fun for college-age kids,” Miller said.

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who what wear

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EMPOWERED

Expression HABIBTI RAKKASAH BELLY DANCE CLUB By BENTLEY WEISEL I Photos by EMILY NEWMAN

R

anging in type, costume and performance, the art of belly dancing is an enticing and inspiring form of movement with a distinct fashion that translates to everyday style.

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who what wear

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Senior Danielle Echols is the founder of the Habibti Rakkasah Belly Dance Club at Ohio University, which meets every Monday. The club teaches female empowerment through dance. One way to demonstrate this selfconfidence is through clothing choice. Echols portrays her personal day-to-day style, while effortlessly alluding to her belly dancing hobby with her fashion choices.

PROFILING A PRO

The untrained eye may see bright colors, bangles and tighter clothing as a random occurrence, but Echols reveals that her personal style is closely tied to her favorite hobby. Belly dancing and dancing of all sorts have been a part of her life since her adolescence, and her fashion sense has naturally followed. “I think when you have a hobby it becomes impossible for your worlds not to cross at some point,” Echols said. “Belly dancing has not only affected the way I dress, but the way I look at the world and view how other people choose to dress.” Though performance wear, practice clothing and everyday ensembles can vary for any belly dancer, Echols finds that regardless of the circumstance, her fashion is about feeling comfortable. “Being on stage and performing or being in class on a normal weekday doesn’t change my desire to 68 | THREAD

choose clothing that feels good,” Echols said. “I love being able to feel good while walking down Court Street and while dancing on stage.”

FROM PERFORMANCE TO EVERYDAY

“When you perform on

stage as a belly dancer, you don’t want to completely strip away the image you just created for your audience after you step off stage,” Echols said. “So I usually try to wear something that allows me to still look like a dancer.” Looking like a belly dancer requires transitioning from


who what wear

the deep reds, golds and blacks of performance wear to the lighter and more blended tones of daywear. The performance ensembles typically consist of sparkling bra tops and petal skirts with beaded jewelry or tanks with gold, coin-sized medallions dangling from the hemline. These influences can be

seen during the day in belly dancers’ gravitation toward flowing peasant skirts and brightly colored scarves around the neck or hair.

BELLY DANCING ON CAMPUS

All of these fashion trends can be seen on the dancers

of the Habibti Rakkasah Belly Dance Club. Echols and friends Whitney Clayton and Gabrielle Smith founded the club at the end of 2009. The club was started based on a love of belly dancing and a hope to inspire female empowerment. “We wanted to provide a safe place for girls to feel OUTHREADMAG.COM | 69


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who what wear

comfortable dancing and expressing themselves creatively,” Echols said. “Our goal is to build self-esteem and show that anyone can do it … regardless of shape, size or background.” The club practices the art of cabaret dancing, which is essentially the American version of the traditionally Middle Eastern-style belly dancing. This American and Middle Eastern-blended style leads to more flashy performance costume choices that move with the dances and pop on stage. “Cabaret is the style I was originally taught,” Echols said.

“We typically wear jeweled bra tops and flowing petal skirts made of silk or chiffon.” The belly dancers are able to find pieces and parts of their costumes locally at Athens Underground and Banana Road Costumes. However, complete belly dancing costumes are found online at sites like moonbellydance.com or missbellydance.com. “You can easily find fancier costumes online, but we encourage our members to get the best deals they can,” Echols said. “Plus, it adds more personality and shows their style when they

put it together and create their costumes themselves.” During performances, the women wear matching or coordinating costumes. They add personal flair through their hair and makeup choices. “The makeup usually matches the color of whatever our costumes are,” Echols said. “The cabaret style has more glitter and sparkles.” The dancers of Habibti Rakkasah Belly Dance Club have a form of self-expression that reflects not only in their body movement but also in their clothing choices.

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DIY

jacked On

Black

By BRADLEY PARKS Photos by ROCCO ZAPPIA and JOEL HAWKSLEY OUTHREADMAG.COM | 73


F

ew people would expect to see college football this confusing. It seems a new investigation on rules violations is a top story each and every week on ESPN. Conference realignment has Texas A&M trying to join the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and Colorado joining the Pac-12 – “Pac” being short for “Pacific.” If young kids begin paying serious attention to college football, the United States may be stuck with a generation of geographicallyconfused children trying to explain why Notre Dame is on the Atlantic coast. College football is all topsy-turvy nowadays and even the uniforms are creating a buzz. With new technological and sartorial concepts spearheaded by Nike’s Pro Combat series, fans have not a clue what they will see their team wearing on the field each week. Some fans may enjoy the new era of football uniforms and see the University of Oregon’s bevy of uniform combinations something truly spectacular. Then there are 74 | THREAD

those that see the University of Maryland and wonder why the state flag vomited on their jerseys. Ohio University joined in on the uniformrevamping when they debuted all-black jerseys and pants on Sept. 17 against rival the Marshall Thundering Herd. Russell Athletics pulled a page out of Phil Knight’s book with the black base featuring green numbers with white piping. The Bobcats also had the script “OHIO” logo forming a brick pattern in white on the green sleeves. The black uniforms shocked the players. The equipment staff tacked on a promo video for the uniforms to the end of the pregame highlight film. Players sat and listened to Johnny Cash’s “God’s Gonna Cut You Down” as quick peeks of the uniform’s components flashed onto the screen. When the first glimpse of black mesh appeared on the screen, the Bobcats erupted with cheers powerful enough to send seismic waves across OU’s campus.


The reaction was all caught on tape and the video made a big buzz in the sports world. After Darren Rovell, sports business reporter for CNBC, caught glimpse of the video, he posted it on his Twitter feed. Showing the power of a single tweet, the video took off with a flurry of hits. That video alone garnered more hits than all of Ohio University’s other videos combined. Why all the hubbub for a new uniform? As many have seen, it brings attention to the program. “[The new uniform] is big for the kids,” said Matt Morton, Equipment Manager for the Bobcats. “Athletes love this stuff; recruits love this stuff. And, obviously, it generates exposure.” Throughout the history of Ohio football, the Bobcats have never worn a black-based uniform. OU has had one of the more traditional uniform timelines: a green or white jersey with the occasional contrast stripe or paw print thrown in for good measure. To see such an outlandish jersey on a typically-traditional team was unexpected. However, judging by the loudness of the crowd and the deafening noise of matching black thundersticks, it’s safe to say the jerseys were a hit. Seeing the Bobcats dashing around the field in these futuristic jerseys would probably shock Ohio’s football pioneers. Back in 1826 when OU student Jim Brough was kicking a football over the “Center Building” (Cutler Hall), he probably didn’t expect it to evolve into what it is today. Ohio didn’t play its first intercollegiate football game until 1894 against Marietta. The Bobcats of old weren’t donning the moisture-wicking, skintight, aerodynamic uniforms of today. The 1897 team wore striped turtleneck sweaters— turning their team photo into the easiest game of “Where’s Waldo” ever. Along with their Waldo sweaters, the Bobcats slipped into droopy, heavily padded knickers. Also a part

of the early years, they either wore leather helmets or no helmets. Fashion folk and neurologists everywhere would be beside themselves at the sight of those uniforms. (Come to think of it, many neurologists are still probably beside themselves at the very mention of football these days.) The beginning of the Ohio football uniform evolution took off with the introduction of plastic helmets in 1939. Ohio’s first “modern” helmet came in 1960 with a white helmet featuring a green stripe down the center and green player numbers on the side. The helmet featured the outline of the state of Ohio from the late 1960s and on through the late ‘70s. Then Ohio underwent arguably its most drastic change to the uniform in 1979 when a green helmet was introduced. The helmet featured a white paw print on the sides and the Bobcats carried it on through until 1990. It was 1991 when the Bobcats first introduced black into the uniforms, adding black and white stripes down the center along with a black facemask. However, that small hint of black doesn’t compare to what OU brought out against the Thundering Herd. However, according to Morton, past Bobcats wanted black uniforms just as much as the current team. Former Bobcats players, including New England Patriots’ wide receiver Taylor Price were asking Morton, “Why didn’t we get these?” “It really became a joke,” said Morton. “We’d joke with the guys telling them the black jerseys were in. It got to the point where they’d just laugh it off.” But this year, it was no joke. The jerseys

“When the first glimpse of black mesh appeared on the screen, the Bobcats erupted with cheers powerful enough to send seismic waves across OU’s campus.” OUTHREADMAG.COM | 75


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came into Athens in June and it was the job of Morton and his staff to keep them a secret. The equipment staff had to come in late at night when all the players were gone to take inventory, so that the players wouldn’t find the black uniforms. The black uniforms were huge for the team. Seeing the reaction to the jerseys followed by the stellar performance on the field against Marshall, it’s clear that the uniforms were a catalyst in motivational creation. Black was a step outside the box for Ohio and the future of the Bobcats’ uniforms is still unclear. “You never know,” said Morton. But no matter what color the Bobcats wear on the field, one thing is for certain: players, coaches, and fans all bleed green.

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“But no matter what color the Bobcats wear on the field, one thing is for certain: players, coaches and fans all bleed green.”

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Killer Fashion LOOKS FROM THE GRAVEYARD

Photos by BECKY WILLIAMS and BETHANY PUTERBAUGH

THIS FALL, A TRIP TO SOUTHEAST OHIO BECOMES A JOURNEY INTO THE WORLD OF PARANORMAL ACTIVITY. DEEP IN THE BACKWOODS AT THE ABANDONED MOONVILLE TUNNEL, LIES A LEGEND BOLSTERED BY MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCES, UNEXPLAINED ACCIDENTS AND DEATH. IT IS SAID THAT SINCE HIS PASSING IN 1859, THE DECAPITATED GHOST OF A MARIETTA-CINCINNATI RAILROAD WORKER HAS WANDERED THE BARREN TUNNEL WITH ONLY HIS DIMLY-LIT LANTERN. NEXT, THE AIR BECOMES HEAVY WITH AN EERIE FEELING OF IMMINENT DANGER IN A VACATED CREMATORIUM IN THE BASEMENT OF A FRANKLIN STREET RESIDENCE. THREAD DIVES INTO THE UNHALLOWED WORLD OF KILLER FASHION – WHERE EVERYONE IS A VICTIM.

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ABOVE GROUND

Bring out your inner devil in a floor-length red dress with black lace and a sheer jacket or a feathered, collared frock. Red dress with black lace, $22, sheer shiny jacket, $12.50, and black dress with feather collar, $55, Athens Underground. 82 | THREAD


The uniform of the undead consists of black, red and leather. Leather vest, $25, Athens Underground. Indiana Jones hat, $25; black long sleeve sweater, $29.99, both The Other Place. Fedora, $22.50; red jacket, $18, both Athens Underground.

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This fall, channel The Raven with dramatic feathers like this haunted style. Black dress with feathered collar, $55, Athens Underground.

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These menacing looks are executed by a sinfully red blazer and contrasting white pants. Red jacket, $18; red dress with black lace, $22; sheer shiny jacket, $12.50; black dress with feather collar, $55; all Athens Underground.

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Achieve the sultry appearance of a she-demon in a sleeveless top and leather skirt, or be haunting in a distressed button up and suede vest. Black stretch top, $5; black suede vest, $10, both Athens Underground.

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UNDERGROUND

Possess killer fashion instinct in a tailored, checkered blazer and velvet lace-up dress. Black velvet dress with lace-up front, $20; checkered blazer, $20, Athens Underground.

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Play devil’s advocate in fitted snakeskin pants, combat boots and a distressed sweater. Vintage tailcoat, $110; Indiana Jones hat $25; stretch snakeskin pants, $12.50, all Athens Underground. Black short sleeve destroyed sweater, $29.99, The Other Place. 88 | THREAD


A tuxedo shirt and vintage waistcoat enforces the rules of the dank dungeon. Tuxedo shirt with black stripe collar, $18; vintage tailcoat, $110; Indiana Jones hat, $25, all Athens Underground.

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Black velvet dress with lace-up front, $20; checkered blazer, $20, both Athens Underground.

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STYLEBOOK

$15.00 GET

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glam

INDUSTRIAL Photos by JORDAN PETSY

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F

rom physical attraction to romantic chemistry, pairing opposites makes for a perfect match. Fashion follows this formula with dazzling gowns contradicted by workshop quarters. The dreariness of an imminent winter and the monotony of every day life tries to dampen the flashy look, but an artillery of fur, sequins and beading combats their assault. This sea of sequins may seem like a fantasy, but Thread showcases the embellishments in unlikely places with a sophisticated result.

Royal blue sequin dress, $25, Athens Underground.

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Avoid a melancholy mechanical wardrobe by partnering a blue sequin top, $20, with beaded pants, $35, and a fur caplet $30, all Athens Underground.

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Manufacture a siren image in a silver sequin chiffon dress, $35, Athens Underground.

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Long sequin dress, $22; cream cape, $45, both Athens Underground.

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Pink silk and rhinestone dress, $30, Athens Underground.

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Generate a unique style impossible to mass produce. Gold knit sweater, $4.50, Athens Underground. Black Sequined Skirt, $26, The Other Place.

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The magnetic force of seduction enlists the shimmer of sequins and rhinestones to blind with beauty.

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Vintage Clothing & Accessories Antiques & Ephemera, China, Books & more

Check out our fantastic selection of Vinage Vinyl!

90 N. COURT ST. / 592-6286 facebook.com/athensunderground

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6 LOOKS WE LIKE

MAD ABOUT

THE ‘60S Photos by LEVI FINLEY and SARAH MILLER

W

elcome to the 1960s, a time of revolutionary thinking and societal change. An era of evolving social norms, the ’60s shook up politics and fashion, sparking a radical shift in trends that mirrored the decade’s social movements. As mad men were running Wall Street and Audrey was having breakfast at Tiffany’s, women were striving to break out of binding gender roles to achieve something beyond the life of an apron-donning Stepford wife, lifting the “glass ceiling.” (For more on the glass ceiling, 102 | THREAD

take a look at “Breaking the Glass,” pg. 52). Depicting an era engaged in Civil and women’s rights, AMC’s Award-Winning show Man Men challenges period beliefs concerning gender roles in both the household and the office. The series not only raises societal questions, but also inspires the audience through style. Remarked for its phenomenal fashions, Banana Republic launched a Mad Men-inspired collection in August. While we may not aspire to be Betty Draper or a chainsmoking advertising exec, Thread is definitely fond of the 1960s fashion craze.


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Mad About You

“What you call love was invented by guys like me to sell nylons,” Don Draper said. Look as dapper as Draper in a two-piece suit paired with a classic print tie. A simple patterned two-tier dress wears well to meetings and exudes a subtle air of elegance. Pair with kitten heels and pearls for added ’60s flair. Move over, Jackie O. Two tier ivory tapestry dress, $25; sharkskin two-piece suit, $40, both Athens Underground.

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After Hours Appeal

You don’t have to be a CEO to look like a million bucks. A timeless neutral sweater paired with brown pants and dress shoes appears casual-yet-sophisticated for an after-work feel. Cashmere men’s sweater, $28; vintage skinny tie, $8, both Athens Underground. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 105


Top of the Network

Climb the ladder in a great outfit and a good pair of shoes. Nude sling backs and a waist-cinching tweed pencil skirt command attention and respect. A well-cut satin blouse can be dressed up or down for an array of social occasions. Topping the look with a sassy crepe hat adds personality and assures the world that you mean business. White satin blouse, $10; tweed skirt, $8; vintage tan crepe hat, $8.50, all Athens Underground. 106 | THREAD


Cooking Up Class

Recreate a traditional after-work welcome in era-inspired fashion. A maroon blazer brings eye-catching appeal to a plain dress shirt and tie. Pair with dark slacks and shoes for added wearability. A collared vintage dress cuts above the ankle, alluding to the period. This look can be modernized with funky jewelry and killer shoes. Vintage grey and black striped pleated dress $28, Athens Underground. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 107


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By BRIDGET MALLON Photos by HEATHER BEAVER

structured blazer, perfectly tailored trousers, wing-tipped oxfords and a strong leather briefcase. At first glance that may sound like the outfit of a successful businessman heading to work. But for more and more women, those pieces are becoming essential daily uniforms. Borrowing from the boys is nothing new; boyfriend jeans and grandpa cardigans are mainstays in many closets. Katherine Hepburn loved to infuse androgyny into her outfits with timeless menswear pieces, and Diane Keaton sparked a menswear trend when she premiered her signature menswear style in Annie Hall. The trend seems ever-present in the fashion world, but as American women continue to be promoted to higher-level positions, the impeccable tailoring and high quality fabrics of men’s fashion is being injected into the personal wardrobes of even more women. The menswear trend has become a signifier of the changing ways of the workplace. Women are increasingly present in the business world, holding powerful jobs. On Ohio University’s campus, the Ralph and Lucy Schey Sales Centre’s executive board is challenging the idea that in order to be successful one must be male. The Sales Centre has a top executive board of six people, this year, five of those positions are held by women. “I think it just shows that women are really motivated,” said Brianna Simmons, the VP of Communication for the Sales Centre. The glass ceiling that has kept so many women from ascending the ladder of power at their jobs is slowly but surely cracking. Many women are hopeful that it will soon completely shatter. In 2010, women held 17.7 percent of senior/corporate officer positions at the top 500 companies in America, according to Financial Post, a number up from 14.4 percent in 2004. Though men still dominate the business world in terms of holding the most powerful jobs, women are working hard to shake that up. “In the past it’s been seen as a man’s place

to be in the business world,” Simmons said. “But now, being CEOs, those are our dreams. We’re not just going to be secretaries. We want an active role in business.” Women make up 46.7 percent of the workforce, according to Catalyst.org. With nearly half of job-holding Americans today being female, it is no shock that women’s wardrobes are representing their drive for professional power. “I do and I don’t think it has gotten better for women in business,” said Carole Ivan, a junior studying marketing and management. “I’m reading a book now called Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman, and it talks about how men are still overpowering in business, but statistically wise, yeah it has gotten better.” Although there is still a division between men and women in the world of business, Ivan does not think being a woman will be a hindrance to her pursuit for employment. Women are increasingly present in work environments, though equality has not fully been reached. Men hold the vast majority of top positions at companies, but women are asserting their business prowess in their work and through what they wear. No longer do men and women have completely different choices for work wardrobes. The lines are being blurred and what was once reserved for men is now fair game for working women too. What we wear can have an unconscious effect on how people respond to us, so clothing can be a valuable way to demonstrate power in the workplace. “We had a lesson in class about how audiences respond to different colors — blue is more calming and red is more powerful, so if you want something, you should wear red,” Ivan said. Clothing’s quality can also serve as an indicator of power and importance in work environments. Because people in senior positions have the ability to purchase more expensive pieces, high-quality clothing is seen as a sign of authority in a work environment. “The higher up you are, the richer-looking clothes you wear,” Ivan said. The menswear trend for women utilizes OUTHREADMAG.COM | 111


“We had a lesson in class about how audiences respond to different colors— blue is more calming and red is more powerful, so if you want something, you should wear red.” – CAROLE IVAN 112 | THREAD


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“We want to be taken seriously in a business setting so we make sure that our clothing is appropriate and reflective of that.” – BRIANNA SIMMONS

some of the best materials and fabrics, which gives the pieces a high-quality feel that demands respect. Women who choose to adopt the trend and make it a key component of their wardrobe need not worry about actually resembling a man. Designers have been taking cues from classic menswear styles and fabrics and reimagining them in feminine, flattering ways. Tuxedo jackets and classic blazers cinch the waist to create an hourglass figure. Wide-legged trousers lengthen and slim the legs without negating the natural curves of a woman’s hips. The oxford shoe, a staple in many a man’s wardrobe, is updated with an ultra feminine high heel. Even dresses have taken cues from the menswear trend, and stores like J.Crew are producing work appropriate frocks in tried and true menswear fabrics like tweed and pinstripe. “I definitely think it plays into how women are perceived in the workplace,” Ivan said. “It’s not the biggest factor, but it plays a part.” Many designers who started out their careers designing for men have been able to

transition into designing for women based on women’s penchant for masculine styles. Brooks Brothers, the company renowned for its preppy work wear for men, established a women’s line in 1949 after noticing that women consistently shopped for themselves at the menswear store. Contemporary designers have also made the move from menswear to women’s collections with a menswear influence. Scott Sternberg, the designer of men’s label Band of Outsiders, launched a women’s line, called Boy, in 2007. The collection is composed of men’s pieces reinterpreted for a woman’s body. “We’ll wear suits or power pumps — the higher heels — to show power,” Simmons said. “We want to be taken seriously in a business setting so we make sure that our clothing is appropriate and reflective of that.” For women in the world of business, jumping into the menswear trend and embracing the inherent power in well-tailored, classic pieces gives new meaning to the saying “dress for the job you want, not the job you have.” OUTHREADMAG.COM | 115


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dazzling dots Photos by EMILY MUELLER

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Polka dots are typically associated with pig tails, gummy bears and childhood, but this season, polka dots are bouncing down the high fashion runways. Black and white dot jacket, $15; black and white dot shirt, $12.50, both Athens Underground.

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Polka dots dotted the Ready-To-Wear Fall 2011 show in collections by Marc Jacobs, Lavin, Stella McCartney and Diane von Furstenberg. These polka dots aren’t subtle, they’re bedecking on scarves, tights and hats.

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These polka dots are popping ‌ literally. They add a layer of texture as they protrude from pieces adding a tweak of chic.

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Black and white sequin shirt, $20, Athens Underground.

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cardboardcity habitat for humanity

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By LO MARTINEZ Photos by MACKENSIE COTTINGHAM

uring a cool September night, Ohio University students stopped in their tracks as they crossed the parking lot of East Green’s Morton Hall. Light brown castles, domes, teepees and shacks filled the space, creating a temporary cardboard skyline. The asphalt stretch, normally deserted at dusk, became almost unrecognizable beneath the flimsy foundations of Habitat for Humanity’s Cardboard City. This make-shift town sparked both interest and conversation as

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awe-struck passersby attempted to process the peculiar sight. “This is exactly what we wanted to happen,” said Erin Coyle, the fundraising chair for the OU Habitat for Humanity chapter. “We want people who are walking around and going out to stop here and get curious. We want them to come over and ask, ‘What’s going on? Why are you doing this?’ If that happens, the event’s a success.” Cardboard City is an annual event hosted by the Athens County Habitat for Humanity


in good fashion in collaboration with the OU student chapter. The primary goal of the event is advocacy and foremost focus is placed on raising awareness about substandard living conditions, an issue extremely relevant in Athens, one of the poorest counties in Ohio. Besides serving as a means to kick-start dialogue among Athens community members and Ohio University students, the event is also one of the main fundraisers for the Athens County chapter of Habitat for Humanity.

“You want to wear something that you don’t mind getting a little messed up…”

– REBECCA FISCHER Cardboard City 2011 was held on Saturday, Sept. 24, marking the eighth consecutive year of the event. This year, 26 teams participated and raised approximately $8,000 to be put toward building the next Habitat for Humanity home. The 26 teams ranged from student organizations to close community groups, but as diverse as the teams were they all shared a common laid-back style. Participants chose form over fashion when selecting their apparel for the evening’s event. Most of them slept under their cardboard roofs in comfy sweatshirts with a pair of jeans. Though there was no set dress code for the Cardboard City, commemorative white Tshirts with lime green script were provided for all of the volunteers. Adorning the shirt was completely optional, but most participants chose to pull them on right away. Kenneth Oehler, Executive Director of Habitat for Humanity Athens County, said this is the norm for almost all their events. “T-shirts are build and event specific so, though it’s not mandatory, people like wearing them because it really helps form a sense of unity. You look around and feel like you’re part of a team,” Oehler said. According to Alex Smith, the Habitat for Humanity advocacy chair for the OU chapter, the rest of the typical ensemble for a build or an event is chosen based on two main objectives: to be comfortable and to be safe. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 125


“Personally, when I’m on-site, I’m a jeans-and-Doc-Martens kind of man.” – ALEX SMITH

“Personally, when I’m on-site, I’m a jeansand-Doc-Martens kind of man,” Smith said. “That’s what you’ll almost always see me wearing...They [Doc Marten shoes] are protective, sturdy, comfortable and last forever!” This is also Smith’s preferred style on campus in Athens. “Especially when winter hits,” Smith said, “Give me my Doc Martens.” OU chapter president Rebecca Fischer shared Smith’s sentiments about the importance of comfort and protection when making the choice of what to wear for Habitat service efforts. Fischer said she personally dresses down for Habitat for Humanity because of the overall practicality. “When you’re building, it’s dirty and you might be in the mud or painting. You want to wear something that you don’t mind getting

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a little messed up…” When asked about injecting fashion into a build-day ensemble, Fischer giggled and then her brow began to furrow in thought. After a few moments Fischer came up with a few practical possibilities. “Well, I’ve never seen it done, but you could wear some trendy sunglasses for eyeprotection…” Fischer said. “And maybe a leather jacket for extra arm protection!” When she is not contributing to her service organization, Fischer still dresses in a similar leisurely style, as most of the other chapter members typically do. She would describe that style as laid-back and casual. Though their clothes may be more comfy and practical than fashionable, their efforts toward such a worthy cause will always be in style.


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craftingfutures seed of hope By: TAYLOR EVANS Photos provided by Seed of Hope

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or some people, fashion is important, for others it’s necessary for survival. It is high on their list of priorities, only second to breathing. Clothes define who they are, becoming a way to project their personalities to the world. At the Seed of Hope Center in Nairobi, Kenya, fashion is not only important, it is integral to the lives of many young women. Seed of Hope’s ‘Crafted’ program allows those women to build the necessary skills to rise above poverty and become self-sufficient. Seed of Hope is a branch of Vision Africa, a UK-based charity in Kenya that aids Afri128 | THREAD

cans in the fight against poverty. The branch is, according to seedofhope.info, the ‘vocational arm of the Vision Africa Give a Child a Future.’ The program is funded by donations. Young women going through the program are sponsored for $25 a month, a contribution that sets the women up with everything they need and provides them with one meal a day. Each branch of Vision Africa does a project that also helps generate funds. Seed of Hope is a two-year program designed to educate young women in life, business and vocational skills. Eighty-two percent of the girls who graduate from the


in good fashion

“Although the women draw some of their ideas from an ancient culture, the clothing is still fresh.” program earn above minimum wage, a feat that greatly improves their quality of life. Field Director at Vision Africa, Deborah Kimathi, who has been with Crafted since its inception, told Thread: “The girls would have few opportunities otherwise. Most of them would end up doing casual labor. They’d be cleaning clothes or ironing—earning under a dollar a day. Just earning minimum wage is a huge achievement for them.” Graduates are given the opportunity to get involved in Crafted, which allows young women to apply the skills they learned in Seed of Hope to create clothing and jewelry for personal profit. Crafted then sells the clothing the girls make at the Seed of Hope center. Volunteers with Vision Africa from countries besides Kenya have brought the Crafted products abroad, displaying the items at craft fairs in their towns. Crafted hopes to expand its range of distribution and start selling the clothing online within the next couple of months. The charitable clothing is sold in three separate collections. Each line is a collaborative process inspired by Kenya, a country Kimathi says is “beautiful in terms of scenery, animals and all that’s around us.” The actual people of Kenya inspired the collection called Duara. The Maasai, a tribe indigenous to the country, became a muse for the women of Crafted, providing a template for their unique designs. Although the women draw some of their ideas from an ancient culture, the clothing is still fresh in design. Kimathi describes the collections as “contemporary African” and “very wearable.” “The average American student at a university can wear them,” she said. Finding the materials for the pieces is done by one young woman who graduated

from Seed of Hope. The organization scours markets in and around Nairobi looking for materials. Sometimes, the products are a little out of the ordinary—for example, a future collection will feature pieces made of coconut. Seed of Hope and Crafted have used fashion to give back. Kimathi agreed,“Because the girls do all of the labor, it’s their businesses that will benefit and grow.” Some women say clothing can change their lives, but for the young women in Kenya, it truly can. Seed of Hope and Crafted have provided a unique opportunity to young women striving to escape poverty, granting them a chance to learn new skills.

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newvibes Betty’s Vintage Finds Written By: OLIVIA OHLIN Photographs By: CHRISTINE LENTZ

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etween groups of wild students mingling outside of bars and grilled cheese fundraisers in front of the courthouse, Athenians are used to oddities on Court Street. But blaring oldies music and a pink mannequin decked out in a flowing dress? Now that’s weird even by Athens standards. That bizarre sight is an effective yet quirky advertising technique to let students and Athenians alike know that Betty’s Vintage Finds is open for business. Owner Mary

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White offers hundreds of vintage clothing items for men and women, along with jewelry, shoes and trinkets from the past. The store is named after the owner’s grandmother, who was known for donning extravagant hats, dramatic jewels and glamorous dresses. White thought that naming the store after her grandmother was an appropriate way to honor the woman who influenced her life in so many ways. “My store is unique because I try to have a mix of old and new,” White said. “There is something for everyone.” She


has even convinced a skeptical crowd of fraternity brothers to check out the store by jokingly betting them $100 that if they gave it a chance, they would find something they liked. In the end, every guy left with a purchase, she said. Her love of and enthusiasm for vintage clothing is something she hopes customers will share. “Nothing is new in fashion,” White said. “It’s very cyclical. You can always wear something vintage and have it be fashionable today. It all just depends on what fashion says what is in now.” The Betty’s owner is a graduate of Ohio University with three degrees. She worked as a mental health and chemical dependency counselor and was also employed by the Department of Defense. Despite having two careers unrelated to fashion, vintage clothing was always on her mind. “I have always been an entrepreneur,” White said. “I would open up my trunk that was filled with clothes and my coworkers would shop during lunch break. My friends would always be like, ‘Let’s go see what Mary has for us today!’” White had an early passion for vintage clothes and she grew up wearing them with the intention of one day opening a store. She handpicked all of the items for Betty’s Vintage Finds from vintage stores, estate sales and auctions in New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago and Paris. The antique treasures are sold for reasonable prices that students can afford. “It was serendipitous that the day

I looked at buildings in Athens was the day the old yoga studio’s space was published to be sold,” White said. “Starting my own business was a scary venture, but (it was) worth it.” Betty’s Vintage Finds was not White’s first business. She had another vintage store by the same name in Lancaster, OH. The new store’s contents are always evolving. White filled her Court Street store with goodies from her basement, and there are still undiscovered gems left in h house. “I’d rather turn over my sale than have it sitting in the store for six months,” White said. “It makes me really happy to see someone find something that fits them well and they love it.” Since the store’s opening in July, White said she is pleased with the success. Students are also responding well. “Betty’s Vintage Finds is a unique store,” said Sarah Hamid, a senior criminology major. “I don’t own many vintage clothes, but this store made me realize I may have to change that.” Colleen Coyne, a junior communication studies major, appreciates Betty’s Vintage Finds as an addition to the other great stores in town. “I am really impressed by Athens’ vintage scene. It was awesome enough with Athens Underground here, so to be adding yet anther vintage store in such a small area is great. “The staff is super friendly, and I think that this method will work,” Coyne continued. “After all, that’s how small boutique clothing stores are supposed to be.”

store info Open Six Days a Week Monday – Thursday 12-5 pm Friday 12-8 pm Saturdays 11-8 pm

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DIY

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living campus life fashionably By EMILY PIFER, MARLEY BRISON, GIOVANNA DELGARBINO and CASEY COMPERNOLLE Photos by KATE IRBY

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ach fall, a new freshman class appears on campus. They travel in packs, often spotted decked out in Bobcat attire, sporting lanyards as necklaces and wearing stilettos at night. Although making the transition from high school to college is tough, especially wardrobe-wise, starting college is an exciting opportunity to make a fresh start and experiment with style. So pledge to start your college career off right, get good grades, make new friends — and avoid heinous freshman faux pas. It is Monday morning and you have a busy day ahead. While it may seem tempting to roll out of bed and throw on one of your old hoodies from high school, it’s easy to put together a cute look for a busy day of first impressions, lectures and yoga classes at Ping. Start off with a pair of your favorite jeans or leggings and choose a neutral top, accessorized with a sweater or scarf for a personal touch. Walking around campus in comfortable shoes is a collegiate must, but there are a variety of stylish options to choose from this fall. Whether you covet riding boots, moccasins, loafers or boat shoes, finding comfy footwear to compliment your outfit is simple. Take one last look in the mirror before you leave and make sure that your outfit reflects your personality! Love flowers? Put one in your hair. Need a little bling? Layer on your favorite necklaces. Take advantage of your new-found wardrobe freedom to step out the door with confidence and a cute style that’s all your own. Freshman year is the time to get involved and begin building your resume, networking and getting your feet in the right doors. This means joining organizations, which may lead to interviews for jobs, internships and other school-sponsored programs. Dress-

ing for weekly meetings can be tricky, but choosing a few basic elements is the way to ensure you will be prepared. Crisp, tailored pieces look professional and can be dressed up or down. A blazer and button-up blouse, for example, can be worn with a skirt, dark denim or trousers, depending on the occasion. Tempted to go for comfort? Remember that it is possible to be comfortable while still looking professional and put together.

“Teams, clubs and organizations also hold weekend activities that require you to step up your garment-game and work a more elegant ensemble.” Save warm, cozy boots and chunky sweaters for class. An interview or meeting is an opportunity to say something smart about yourself through style. Once the long week is over, study dates are replaced with socials, hanging out with friends and exploring Court Street. The weekend presents another opportunity to get creative with your wardrobe. If your weekend is more laid-back and casual, we suggest a pair of jeans with a crop top, blouse, flannel or cozy knit sweater. Complete the look with your favorite pair of flats: metallic and floral prints are popular this fall. If your evening is more on the dressy side, transition a casual look from day to night by throwing on a pair of comfortable heels. A dress or skirt can also OUTHREADMAG.COM | 135


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be paired with flats or boots for an effortless evening look. No matter where the weekend takes you, keep essentials handy in a cute cross-body bag or wristlet. There are many stylish options that will keep your phone, cash, keys and lip gloss in their proper place. As always, be sure to incorporate your own unique style in to your evening outfits. This will allow you get noticed in a good way, not because you were that girl who got her heel

stuck in the bricks. Teams, clubs and organizations also hold weekend activities that require you to step up your garment-game and work a more elegant ensemble. Whether you are attending a special ceremony or formal, it is important to look chic and classy. A black, high-waisted skirt is the perfect starting piece for a business casual dress code. A floral blouse and a pair of your favorite bright-colored heels will make this style staple more fun. Add a cardigan or cropped sweater to stay warm under chilly conditions, and for the winter months, sheer or opaque tights will complete the look and keep you cozy. Another formal option is a sophisticated cocktail dress. Choosing a plain black dress allows you to personalize your outfit with dangling earrings, chunky bracelets and dazzling necklaces. Formal occasions are an invitation to define style and add glam. Fall quarter of freshman year is a great time to start trading high school gym shirts and pleated skirts for long-lasting personal pieces. Use this basic style guide as the foundation for your own, unique wardrobe — and stay far away from those freshman stereotypes. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 137


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Class To Going Out

afternoon

TO after hours Double your closet with our quick fixes By CAMISHA VIGIL, CARLY WIITA and SHANNON FULTON Photos by LEAH WOODRUFF

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et’s face it, going out in Athens isn’t exactly a formal affair. But every Threadie knows that dressing up and feeling stylish from the classroom to Court Street can give a girl the boost of confidence to score an A on that dreaded midterm or the courage to finally talk to that cute neighbor she’s been eyeing. With busy class schedules, jobs, organizations and a full social life on top of it all—who has the time, the energy or the wardrobe to pick out two completely different outfits to go from day to night? The ever-so-versatile denim vest—for-

merly reserved for bikers and that bedazzling project you did in fifth grade—is now a (hotly debated) trendy fall piece that can take you from day to night in no time. For daytime, we paired an oversized motorcycle vest with an embellished burnout tank, zipper leggings and a basic pair of flats. Leggings are a good way to avoid the juit if you’re not feeling daring enough to jump headfirst into the denim trend. The monochromatic scheme and minimal accessories keep this trendy outfit comfy and casual enough to strut to your Monday morning 8 a.m. class. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 139


look chic without wasting any time

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The moment of deciding what to do with one’s night could take all day or just a split second. If a friend calls up and says to get ready as soon as possible, there may not be time to get all glammed up, but with a little quick thinking, you can keep wearing that comfy denim button-down and still look put-together. Pair your button-down with a black sequin skirt and a elegant top and add bold, statement jewelry for a bit of pizazz — with-

out looking like you’re ready for the prom. Bold, dark eyeliner and blush are musthaves for dressing up this simple outfit. Keep consistent with one color throughout so your button-down can pop against the monochromatic theme. The denim takes the edginess out of an outfit and gives the wearer a more laid-back feel, while still looking chic without wasting any time. The days are getting shorter and the cold

BOLD JEWEL ERY ADDS PIZAZ Z

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THIS CASUAL JACKET EASILY TRANSITIONS FROM DAY TO NIGHT

breezes have hit. Jackets are being worn more often, and the traditional NorthFace and sport jackets are seen everywhere throughout the streets. Why not change it up? Be a little different, be unique and stand out from the crowd. From day to night, a few changes can take this jacket from class-ready to a night on the town. The leather gives this jacket a tougher vibe, keeping you sexy yet masculine. It also goes with absolutely everything, from a basic tee to a dress shirt, so it’s

convenient and versatile. Whether you are out with the guys or out on a date, why not dress to impress? Nights are chilly, and grabbing a leather jacket is a quick way to complete an outfit, adding individuality without a lot of fuss. With some dark-wash denim and a V-neck, this outfit has a dressed up yet handsome look. When pressed for time and on the go, it’s as simple as slipping on a leather jacket to look confident and prepared for anything life throws at you.


denim-on-denim

RAVE By SCOTT LAMBERT

As the ’90s came to an end, many fashionistas waved a friendly goodbye to the Canadian tuxedo: denim-on-denim. But it is my distinct pleasure to announce that the trend is back! And it is bolder and better than ever. In the Spring/ Summer 2010 collections we saw many designers like Chloé and Ralph Lauren rock the look with a brand new twist: incorporating the various washes of the 2000’s into a sort of pre-color blocking “denim-wash block.” As the Spring/Summer 2012 collections were introduced in September, the jean trend was still going long and strong. The secret to the jean-jean extreme is a light wash top and a dark wash skinny pant. Accessorizing you ask? It’s all about brown leather: belt it, bag it. Say goodbye to the tux from our Northern brothers and work it with your denim-on-denim luxe.

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RANT By KATE LIENESCH

When I look back and see old pictures, I cringe with disappointment at some of the trends, fabrics and accessories I’ve worn. However, there are some styles and fads that will always be fashionably unacceptable—no matter what. One of those looks is the horrific denim-on-denim. When worn by itself, a chic denim jacket or a trendy denim dress can be compliment-worthy, but in almost every other situation, trying to rock the denim-on-denim look is a big mistake. Jeans with a jean jacket wasn’t even an acceptable ensemble back in the ’90s, so why do people try to make it work in 2011? Newsflash: you can’t! Sorry Bieber, the monochromatic color scheme just isn’t working. No matter what any “fashion expert” may say, leave that denim behind.


ILLUSTRATIONS BY DANIELLE MORRIS

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October 2011  
October 2011