__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

thread OCTOBER 2019

Drifting Away

WADE INTO THE NEW SEASON AND EMBRACE THE CHANGING ATMOSPHERE.

Vogue Forces of Fashion A LOOK INSIDE VOGUE’S FORCES OF FASHION CONFERENCE AS TOLD BY ONE OF OUR EDITORS.

WWW.OUTHREADM


thread

Table of Contents

FALL 2017

FRONT OF BOOK

04 Haute Online 08 Top 5 12 Editor’s Letter 13 Masthead

SEAMS

22 Celeb Style 28 The Bigger the Better 32 Sock it to ‘Em 36 Not so Natural 40 Boy Beat 44 Everyone’s HypeWoman 48 On the Road Again

66 Ain’t No Claws

DIY

54 Dumpster to Duster 56 All in Knots 60 Dorm Dyed 62 Break the Cycle

2 | THREAD

18 Runway Realway


78 Rambl

WHO, WHAT, WEAR

70 Vogue Forces of Fashion 74 Kismet

84 Styling Secondhand

MIDDLE OF BOOK

182 Scrolling Through Eras

98 Gym Class Heroes 112 Body of Art 124 Drifting Away 138 6 Looks: Coast to Cost

CAMPUS CASUAL

148 Horoscopes 150 Quiz: What Pumpkin Carving are you? 152 Tablet to Table

BACK OF THE CLOSET 158 162 170 176 188 192

Socially Upcycling Changing the Conversation Fast Fashion: Friend or Foe? Punk Posers Blame it on the Juice Rant/Rave: Mullets

Click to view the story in motion with a video WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 3


HAUTE ONLINE Looking for some new blogs to add to your radar? Whether scrolling for outfit inspo or needing a quick recipe, we’ve got you covered virtually. A BEAUTIFUL MESS Sisters Elsie Larson and Emma Chapman began working together on their lifestyle blog in 2010, creating new and exciting ways to make their lives better through DIYs and trying new things. After almost a decade, Elsie and Emma have collected over 6,000 blog posts specializing in crafting, home décor, recipes, and advice. They love creating new content for their audience and even stretched out to having a small staff who helps with their projects. Over the years, both Elsie and Emma have renovated their houses themselves, learning a ton along the way and, in turn, teaching their readers. Their blog is all about self-empowerment: “Cheers to doin’-it-yourself, always learning, trying, failing, dreaming big, enjoying the small stuff, and above all else … embracing imperfection.” – EMILY BARBUS

4 | THREAD


haute online

CANNELLE ET VANILLE Aran Goyoaga, better known by her blog title and Instagram handle Cannelle et Vanille, is a Seattle-based food photographer. She’s not just a food photographer, though, Goyoaga is also a chef, and her blog features an array of recipes. They’re split by courses (appetizer, breakfast, dinner, etc.), seasons, and ingredients to make it easier for those looking for a specific recipe to fit a certain occasion. Like most recent food bloggers, Goyoaga includes an anecdote about the recipe and how it has played a part in her life at the beginning of each post. Luckily, the recipes themselves are outlined in a box and can be found at the end of each post. From vegan and vegetarian lunches to a hearty meat-and-potatoes dinner, Goyoaga offers a wide selection of options to meet every diet and dietary restriction. Her Instagram features highlights of her best recipes, but her work can also be found in Bon Appetit, Vogue, and Town and Country UK. Goyoaga also offers workshops and events to teach aspiring food photographers the basics or more advanced techniques of her line of work.

– HANNAH PRIDEMORE WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 5


LET ME WEAR THAT In the age of the “Instagram influencer,” it is hard to stay relevant and maintain an engaged following. However, being just as engaged with your audience as they are with you definitely helps. Stephanie Weizman is a Bay Area native and legal advisor who also manages to be an Instagram powerhouse and blogger. She is the definition of a “girl boss” and “hustler,” growing a significant following with her aesthetically pleasing #OOTDs, recipes, workouts, and her day-to-day posts on her stories. Weizman’s blog, “Let Me Wear That,” incorporates style, beauty, and lifestyle tips. She also has a Youtube channel consisting of vlogs and what she wears typically throughout her week. She targets the everyday guy or gal figuring out what to wear to a wedding, different ways to wear a hair scarf, how to take a skirt from a day to night look, and any other tips regarding how to keep up with the latest trends. While Weizman could pass for a supermodel, she is an everyday gal managing her work, life, marriage and sharing her tips along the way on how to look fabulous while balancing it all. – MADDY FINK

6 | THREAD

CLICK TO VIEW THE WEBSITE!


haute online

THE SKINNY CONFIDENTIAL Lauryn Evarts Bosstick knows how to keep it real. At least, that was her goal when she started “The Skinny Confidential” in 2010 as a student at San Diego State. Since then, the blog has become a brand, a book, a Youtube channel, and a podcast. Bosstick now runs the company with her husband, Michael. She was bartending and teaching fitness classes full time when she created the blog, but that didn’t stop her from pursuing her dreams. TSC ranges from niche topics like face rolling, organic tampons, and her nutritionist- and trainer-approved workouts and meal plans. Bosstick also interviews entrepreneurs and partners with various companies that align with her brand. The blogger utilizes social media, from a bright pink themed Instagram with almost 1 million followers, to Snapchat, where the content creator shares beauty tips and tricks. From blog to brand to baby, Bosstick recently revealed that she is expecting her first child and plans to include more maternity posts on her site. Lauryn Evarts Bosstick is a girl boss among us, serving as a chic inspiration to us all on how to turn a passion project into a fabulous empire. – SHAINA DUBINKSY

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 7


5 TOP

Find out the top five things that our exec board is inspired by right now.

8 | THREAD

1

BINGING WITH BABISH I’ve

always been a fan of cooking and baking shows, so it’s no surprise to me that over this past summer I became obsessed with watching this genre of videos on YouTube. My favorite channel that I’ve stumbled across is Binging with Babish. Babish, or Andrew Rea, is a chef best known for recreating iconic dishes from popular TV shows and movies. From Lars’ ube roll in Steven Universe to spaghetti tacos from iCarly, Babish recreates the dishes and usually tries to find a way to improve them. He also has a “Basics with Babish” series teaching basic recipes and skills that every home cook can learn. – HANNAH PRIDEMORE


top 5

2

MINT Since I moved off campus this year, I have found that spending money is a whole lot easier than when I lived in the dorms. Living on campus meant that I had a meal plan and Bobcat Cash to rely on, plus no car to take me out shopping to spend the extra money. But, now I have a house that is lacking cute fall decorations, a fridge that does not stock itself, and a car to help me satisfy both of those needs. And it’s about to get a lot worse now that Marshalls announced they are opening in a week! But, I found an app called Mint, a helpful app that lets you set budgets for specific things each month like groceries, gas, restaurants, and just about anything else you can think of. It is a tool to help you be more conscious of how much you make and where all of that money goes. You can also connect multiple accounts to it like your credit card, debit card, investments, and loans to see an overview of all your financials at once instead of logging in to each individually. That is one of the features I like most about the app. Overall, I think it is a great tool to start using in college to begin to set budgets and saving goals that will help you out in the long run. – LEANNA SIUPINYS WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 9


3

POST MALONE Post Malone is

an icon in the music world today. He has his own twist on hip-hop that takes influence from rock and indie music, and he has bent the genre to make it more “accessible” to people who may generally stay away from it. Of course, by now I’m sure you’ve heard one of his many hits such as “Rockstar,” “White Iverson,” “Sunflower,” or one of his many other songs making waves in the music community. With his recent release of “Hollywood’s Bleeding,” he sends another tracklist full of hits into the masses. This time around, I feel like he has really begun to develop his own sound. With a lineup of features from artists like DaBaby, Future, Halsey, and even Ozzy Osbourne, without even listening to it you can tell he is doing his own thing and bringing all of the genres that influence him into one big melting pot of music. My hope is that he continues to dive into how he can do his own thing in his music and create songs for times when we are partying, chilling out or even those instances when we are feeling down and just need a voice in our headphones to relate to. – MATTHEW JONES 10 | THREAD


5

4

TINY MEAT GANG

It is hard to navigate the internet without seeing a meme of Cody Ko and Noel Miller. These two YouTubers have gone viral multiple times for their amusing and, at times, outrageous content. I have been a fan of their YouTube videos and their self-proclaimed “meme rapping” for a while now, but I only recently decided to listen to their podcast, Tiny Meat Gang. This podcast has all of the humor from their viral videos stretched out to nearly an hour in length. They keep the content to casual conversations that can span from everything, including how their weeks have been to news and, of course, occasionally to Love Island. The Tiny Meat Gang podcast is incredibly entertaining when walking across campus or pushing yourself through a workout.

BROAD CITY “Broad

City” is a TV series on Hulu, and it has to be one of my all-time favorite shows. Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson produce the show and are the main characters, portraying themselves. The show is about their real life as best friends trying to make a living in New York City. It is a show I can throw on at any time and know it’ll make me laugh. Each episode is only about 20 minutes each, so they are very easy to watch. These plotlines range from stories of Abbi and Ilana’s friend anniversary to Abbi getting her wisdom teeth removed. Sadly there were only five seasons created and they don’t plan on renewing a sixth season. However, I do highly recommend this show to literally everyone, you regret it! –ERIN LESKO

– CHLOE RUFFNENACH

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 11


Editor’s Note It’s official, our first issue of Thread for the 2019-2020 school year is here! Welcome back to all of the dedicated readers, and hello to all of the new Threadies. I’m Hannah Pridemore, the new Editor-in-Chief of Thread, so you will be hearing from me now in the Editor’s Note. I’m currently a junior majoring in journalism strategic communications and dual specializing in Fashion and Retail Production and Distribution as well as Sociology. You have probably seen some of my bylines as I started in Thread as a staff writer during my freshman year, and last year I was the section editor for Seams. Midterm season is over, and we’re more than halfway through the semester for those of you who are keeping track. If you’re feeling a bit in a rut like I usually do at this point of the year, whether it’s fashion, food, or inspiration, we have plenty of stories that should help as a little pick-me-up. Our Haute Onlines are a good place to start for those looking for new recipes, fashion tips, or podcasts. For fashion inspo check out our stories on chunky headbands (“The Bigger the Better” P. 28) and find motivation in our profiles on Lizzo (“Everyone’s HypeWoman” P. 44) and Mike Posner (“On the Road Again” P. 48), who just recently finished his walk across the U.S. Pick up a new hobby with macramé (“All in Knots” P. 56) and find a new workout routine (“Break the Cycle” P. 62) in our DIY. Get an inside look into the Vogue Forces of Fashion conference (P. 70) 12 | THREAD

from the perspective of our Campus Casual Editor who was invited to attend. Last year we published an article about the fall sexual assault issue and what Ohio University students were doing to fight against it. Now, one year after that trying semester, we have a follow-up article discussing what changes have been made around campus because of the actions of those students (“Changing the Conversation” P. 162). Having a proactive student body like OU’s helps make campus and the university a better and safer place for all. Our new exec board has been working hard to bring you all this issue, so I hope you enjoy it.

Much Love,


thread EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Hannah Pridemore MANAGING EDITOR Chloe Ruffennach PHOTO EDITOR Leanna Siupinys

DESIGN DIRECTOR Alex Vella

FEATURES EDITOR Bailey Fink

PUBLIC RELATIONS CHIEF Bailey Kormick

SEAMS EDITOR Marie Chilosky

BUSINESS MANAGER Nathaniel Stansbery

WHO, WHAT, WEAR EDITOR Shaina Dubinskiy

PHOTO CHIEF Matthew Jones

DIY EDITOR Lindsay O’Nesti

FASHION DIRECTOR Erin Lesko

CAMPUS CASUAL EDITOR Taylor Dahl

WEB EDITOR Mack Wagner

COPY CHIEF Emily Barbus

VIDEO CHIEF Yana Durado PHOTO:

Grace Auble, Emily Barbus, Anna Birk, Kate McCarthy, Andrew Guidarelli, Jillian Craig, Ansel Croft, Sarah James, Matthew Jones, Caelin Parsons, Kailee Richey, Bri Severns, Leanna Siupinys, Andrew Thompson, Mack Wagner

DESIGN:

Margaux Augier, Ashleigh Bublinec, Nicole Dinan, Amber Eusebio, Megan Fogelson, Chastity Haxton, Anna Johnston, Rilee Lockhart, Kathryn Maynard, Jared Robb, Riley Runnells, Leanna Siupinys, Madison Stephey, Grace Sublett, Alexandria Vella

PR:

Darian Berdysz, Casey Calvetta, Cydnee Livingston, Audrey Secrest, Nathaniel Stansbery, Olivia Strauss

VIDEO:

Anna Birk, Elisa Colon, Ansel Croft, Yana Durado

STYLISTS:

Stephen Barret, Chloe Challacombe, Anthony Cordell, Jillian Craig, Taylor Dahl, Leah Hammerstrom, Helen Horton, Erin Lesko, Kyrstan Mazzaferro, Troy Wally, Mackenzie Weber

WRITERS:

Margaux Augier, Emily Barbus, Jillian Craig, Cali Ciolpa, Taylor Dahl, Shaina Dubinskiy, Bailey Fink, Madeline Fink, Helen Horton, Matthew Jones, Bailey Kormick, Lindsay O’Nesti, Courtney Perrett, Hannah Pridemore, Geena Provenzano, Chloe Ruffennach, Leanna Siupinys, Nathaniel Stansbery, Amy Szmik, Greyson Thorman, Sarah Todack

MAKEUP ARTIST:

Emily Barbus, Stephen Barret, Chloe Challacombe, Jillian Craig, Anne Elizabeth, Fox-Strauss

MODELS:

Stephen Barret, Elijah Bridges, Casey Calvetta, Candace Clark, Elisa Colon, Anthony Cordell, Sophia Feinstein, Leah Hammerstrom, Ethan Hodson, Anna Hoffman, Alexa Hope, Lauren Lawler, Erin Lesko, Kysten Mazzaferro, Brea Muzykoski, Nahom, Emilianna Pennington, Mia Rino, Meghan Titterington, Troy Wally, Sebastian Weaver, Mackenzie Weber, Annalise ZinkToolis, Michael Viox, Sarah Wartinger, Ruby Williams

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 13


Behind the Scenes of

Thread Photoshoots

Styling Secondhand, 84

Not so Natural, 36

FALL

2019 VIDEOS

Body of Art, 112 14 | THREAD

Drifting Away, 124


FOLLOW

thread Check out the full issue at www.outhreadmag.com

@THREADMAG

FACEBOOK.COM/THREADMAG

@THREADMAGAZINE

THREAD MAGAZINE VIDEO

VISIT US AT OUR MEETINGS WEDNESDAYS AT 9 P.M., SCHOONOVER 450

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 15


16 | THREAD


SEAMS From the runway to the streets, and everywhere in between, here are this season’s most sought-after trends.

PAUL SMITH P. 20 WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 17


Runway Realway BY AMY SZMIK PHOTOS BY ANSEL CROFT

The luxury brand Rebecca Minkoff has been a fashion industry giant since its debut in 2005. Co-founded by brother and sister duo Uri and Rebecca Minkoff, the brand is noteworthy for its feminine styles that are practical for consumers while still having an edge. It was founded in New York City, and Rebecca Minkoff started creating designer handbags that resonated with women across the country. However, in 2009, Minkoff went back to her love of designing clothes and released her first ready-to-wear collection, cementing her place in the fashion industry. She created the line for “the modern working woman,” according to the official website, and used vibrant colors and loose silhouettes make for a stylish appearance. “Working women inspired me, the girls in our office, real people on the street,” Minkoff explained in an interview with Vogue. Normal business attire such as blazers, slacks, and sweaters were transformed into more free-spirited pieces. In a mix of bright reds, neutral sandy tones, and sky blues, her color palette related to the bohemian style while staying true to her mission to serve women in the workplace. Her ready-to-wear pieces were covered with PVC, leather, and 18 | THREAD

fur that created a lively look that worked well with her color choice. Oversized blazers, coats, and sweaters were the main staples of each outfit; whether it was a fur-lined coat or metallic bomber jacket, each gave off a strong impression. There were many standout looks from her Fall 2019 ready-to-wear collection. Her hot pink top coats were showstoppers, and paired with dark purple latex slacks, the outfit gave off the fierce attitude that Minkoff wanted. The silver bomber jacket with scrunched up sleeves was more casual, yet fashionable. Rebecca Minkoff’s newest collection was inclusive for all sizes, so all women could have a powerful look. Her pieces found a new take on the working woman and has shown Minkoff’s success not just as a designer, but as someone who truly connects with her consumers. Her looks are perfect for every woman, and the vibrant, oversized garments will be perfect for the fall weather.


R e b e c c a M i n k o f f

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 19


P a u l S m i t h

20 | THREAD


seams

Menswear designer Paul Smith arrived at New York Fashion Week with pastel-colored suits, proving once again that menswear can be playful and full of life. From pink-hued high-end suits to overwhelmingly huge suit jackets, his Spring-Summer 2020 menswear collection brought an element of whimsy. Smith’s show was reminiscent of his first business trip to New York City in 1974, which, he said backstage to Vogue, had a great impact on his style. His show felt nostalgic for the 1970s, the decade that his brand was born and he achieved success. Ever since then, Smith has been synonymous with stylish menswear and elegant suits. “It’s been so interesting for me seeing some of the shows, how many of them are back to suits again. This is our 82nd show. And we’ve never not shown suits,” said Smith to Vogue. Smith’s collections have always

showcased his British roots, and this collection proves that he pays homage to where he began. He exhibited double-breasted suits, which originate from British military jackets, and every suit was paired with Chelsea boots – famously named after the swanky London neighborhood. The simplicity of his silhouettes contrasts well with the bright colors and bursts of patterns he chooses for them. Even though it might seem daunting, the collection can be recreated by pairing trousers and a jacket of the same color. Confidence is the most important aspect of wearing a bright suit since it makes such a statement. Although he mainly designs menswear, he also designs for women after realizing that women were buying smaller sizes of the men’s clothes. Smith flows seamlessly between the masculine and feminine, blurring the lines of what either one has traditionally meant.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 21


A$AP ROCKY

22 | THREAD


seams

CELEB STYLE Rapper A$AP Rocky continues to break style boundaries with his iconic looks and love for designer brands. BY TAYLOR DAHL PHOTOS BY MATTHEW JONES

Whether he’s recognized as A$AP Rocky, Rakim Mayers, or “Pretty Flacko,” he’s been a style icon within hip-hop culture and the music industry long before his regular appearances at New York Fashion Week. While most of his recent attention has revolved around his Swedish arrest from this past July, A$AP Rocky seems to be unbothered. He returned to wearing his usual Raf Simons at Rihanna’s blockbuster New York Fashion Week gala and made appearances at Milan Fashion Week events in custom Prada. This year his outfit of choice has been the shorts suit; it’s an effortless, undeniably cool twist on trendy menswear by pairing a structured blazer with shorts. This minimalist style contrasts with his usual daring looks, such as the leopard print Supreme towel draped over his head in his “Peso” music video.

There’s no denying A$AP Rocky has been a menswear style icon for our generation. In fact, according to GQ the last time the rapper wore a tie was in 2010. He rejects what’s expected of him and doesn’t like looking like everyone else, which is exactly the reason he has so many people looking to him for what to wear next. The rapper has been the face of many high fashion ad campaigns including Alexander Wang and Dior Homme. Recently, he collaborated with Guess and JW Anderson to release capsule collections. Whether he’s wearing classic designer coordinated looks or scarves and bandanas over his head to top off a streetwear look, no critic or fan has questioned the undeniably cool presence he brings to a stage, a fashion show, or the streets of New York.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 23


BARBIE FERREIRA

24 | THREAD


seams

Barbie Ferreira, one of the stars of HBO’s Euphoria, is taking social media by storm with her unapologetic sense of style. BY HELEN HORTON PHOTOS BY EMILY BARBUS

Barbie Ferreira, an Instagram influencer turned HBO actress, is changing the style game. She entered into the public eye as Kat on “Euphoria,” but started out doing plus-size modeling for American Apparel and H&M. Her ad campaign for Aerie’s #REAL collection went viral in 2016, making her a body-positive Instagram sensation with over 1.5 million followers. Her style ranges from grungy tomboy to glam, and as a U.S. women’s size 12, Ferreira uses her style as a way to embrace her body, adding leather and latex to make her feel empowered. During the day, she can be seen in a vintage band T-shirt tied in a knot and high-waisted plaid crop pants — but at night she changes into a leopard printed bodycon dress. Ferreira’s character on “Euphoria” dresses similarly to the influencer in real life. At the beginning of the series, she dresses more conservatively in order to hide her figure. As the show progresses, and the character dives into the world of

sex work, she utilizes daring and BDSM-esque pieces like latex, chokers, and mesh. One of her character’s most iconic outfits includes a red mesh long sleeve top and a black leather body harness. To achieve her edgy-casual look, Ferreira shops at ASOS, Instagram clothing brands, and resale sites like Depop and The RealReal. She told Fashionista that she invests in a few classic pieces but sticks to a budget when shopping for everyday items. In an interview with Time, Ferreira said how women truly loving themselves can be a catalyst for change. She said, “I know so many gorgeous women who even inspired me to model to break this boundary, and it makes me feel like girls out there can dream about something without having to think about the things that they can’t change.” As a young and prominent face on social media, Ferreira struggled with her body image for as long as she could remember. Because of this, she tries to make her Instagram as real and honest as possible, promoting the idea that anyone can dress however they want, regardless of their clothing size. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 25


Blogger of the Month

How would you describe your personal style? Major:

What’s your favorite part about blogging?

What inspires you to write?

26 | THREAD

How would you describe your blog?

Favorite Hobby?


First Post Expressing her personal style is important to Greyson. She writes about her outfit choices in blog posts that highlight her bold and inspired style. Check out her first post, where she sets the standard for her series and discusses her decision-making process while creating an outfit based on a Trolls-inspired mesh t-shirt!

‘40s Fever In this post, Greyson shows how to create an outfit from straight out of the 1940s. This post focuses on how to create a vintage outfit using antique clothing, and it is in contrast with some of her brighter outfits. This particular post shows the versatility of her style. Read more about how to recreate Greyson’s ‘40s inspired look in this blog post!

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 27


28 | THREAD


seams

the BIGGER the BETTER BY COURTNEY PERRET PHOTOS BY MACK WAGNER

W

hen it comes to hairstyles, this season’s accessories are padded and embellished. The latest accessory trend comes in the form of the oversized, chunky headband. The trend first appeared during New York Fashion Week earlier this year when designer Miuccia Prada debuted the line’s famous satin headbands on the Spring 2019 runway. Each model was sent down the runway with a sparkling headband to complement the high-end brand’s newest line. Embellished, chunky headbands come in a variety of shapes and colors, ranging from classic black to shades of blush pink and bright yellow. The trend calls for wide satin and velvet bands decorated with pearls and intricate embellishments, like colorful crystals and jewels designed to make its wearer feel stylish but elegant. While high-end

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 29


THE CHUNKY “ HEADBAND IS A SIGNATURE

ACCESSORY THAT CAN ELEVATE ANY LOOK.

designers like Jennifer Behr and Lele Sadoughi make beautiful, ornate headbands made of expensive fabrics and complete with embroidery, they can cost upwards of $150. Fortunately, stores like Etsy, Urban Outfitters, and ASOS make it easier for us to emulate the Prada style without the high price. As 2019 seems to be the year of the headband, Instagram influencers and trendsetters have been seen sporting the chunky headband look with their street style. Kate Middleton was one of the first celebrities to adopt this look earlier in the year, taking some serious headband inspiration from “Gossip Girl” icon, Blair Waldorf. The chunky headband look has become a staple item in the Duchess of Cambridge’s closet this year. She attended Prince Louis’s christening last summer wearing an embellished Jane 30 | THREAD

Taylor headband with added floral decorations that gave the hairpiece an authentic flower crown effect. The chunky headband is a signature accessory that can elevate any look. No matter what style or outfit you’re going for, there will be a headband to complement the look. The key to making the chunky headband look timeless and elegant is making sure that the band is in line with the wearer’s ears. Most fashion-conscious shoppers can be seen styling their headbands with simple blouses and delicate, feminine earrings to draw just the right amount of attention to their designer headpieces.


seams

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 31


SOCK IT TO ‘EM BY GREYSON THORMAN PHOTOS BY JILLIAN CRAIG

32 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 33


E

veryone has a favorite pair of socks. They could be the comfy ones, almost too worn for wear. Or maybe they’re the ones with little succulents on them that seemed essential during a sleep-deprived grocery run. For many, socks are not made to be seen. From simple nylons to no-show ankle socks, it’s clear that the inclusion of socks as an “accessory” isn’t because they’re supposed to be a statement. But times are changing. 34 | THREAD

However, this feeling of empowerment coming from clothing can be new. Socks are a simple item of clothing, but they provide an element of intrigue to an outfit that couldn’t be replicated elsewhere. Jewelry is wonderful and hair accessories are great as well, but the world of socks has been unexplored for so long that a lot of people have yet to realize how versatile they are in design, color, and pattern. There’s really no limit to how you can style them. Translucent socks are an


seams

example of the versatility of this trend. Translucent socks have recently gained popularity online because of their soft, delicate appearance as well as their buildable design. Because of the translucent base, two or three different pairs could potentially be worn at one time to fit the aesthetic of a certain outfit. Layering socks is a great trick to finish off an outfit and and balance the color palette. While there are many ways to stack, one way is to use a longer pair

that complements the outfit, and then scrunch a second pair to be shorter and closer to the shoe. In doing so, the livelihood of the outfit continues steadily all the way down, as opposed to leaving an awkward, barren space. Socks are an incredibly easy way to complement any sense of style. There are so many cool and fun pairs of socks, stockings, and tights just waiting to be shown off. Experimenting with socks is a great way to discover a whole new realm of styling possibilities.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 35


36 | THREAD


NOT SO NATURAL BY MARGAUX AUGIER PHOTOS BY ANNA BIRK

K

arla Garcia believes her face is a canvas. New York-based artist Garcia specializes in simple yet vivacious makeup art. She began painting makeup on her face for her own entertainment at only 15-years-old. As her talent for cosmetics progressed, she started creating distinctive designs using images from the world around her. Whether it be ramen noodle packets, bandana patterns, or pride month posters, Garcia discovers inspiration in everyday objects. Her Instagram page, @KarlitaCosita, features the colorful cosmetics that she wears in her everyday life.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 37


Now, at 21-years-old, Garcia uses makeup as a way to highlight her individuality. “It’s a form of expression,” she said. Garcia believes that makeup can serve as a gateway to completing an outfit or as a mechanism to accomplish a certain style. Often in her work, she opts for a neon lip or a patterned eyeshadow, typically incorporating geometric shapes or funky designs that she 38 | THREAD

observes on a day-to-day basis. Of course, costume makeup can feel daunting to wear; however, it doesn’t need to be. “I didn’t start off where I ended up,” Garcia said. Beginning her makeup career during her sophomore year of high school, Garcia admits that she felt uneasy at first. She was unsure of what reaction her unconventional makeup would invoke from the public. After receiving a wave


of positive feedback on her Instagram page, Garcia slowly felt reassured. “Your face is your canvas,” she reiterates. “It’s a little nerve-racking [in public], but it’s a lot less nerve-racking when you’re that... of your work.” Like Garcia, this type of eccentric makeup is achievable at Ohio University. When asked about where to start when attempting costume makeup, she advised beginning with the outfit.

“See what you’re wearing that day and go from there. If you’re going to an amusement park, do a colorful look to match,” she said. Begin gradually, like Garcia, by experimenting with rarely used colors or hues. Try dusting on a purple eyeshadow for your 9 a.m. lecture or adding a swipe of turquoise eyeliner or mascara for your night out on Court St. With costume makeup, there are no rules. Gone are the days in which your lip liner needed to match your lipstick or glitter was only reserved for game days and HallOUween. If you don’t already own colorful makeup, inexpensive eyeshadow and face palettes are accessible online or at local stores. Drugstore brands like L’Oreal Paris, Maybelline New York, or Revlon carry pigmented eyeshadows and lipstick shades to complement any eye color or skin tone. These brands can be found at your local CVS Pharmacy on Court St. or Walmart on State St. If you decide to opt for higher quality makeup, Garcia suggests Kat Von D or ColourPop Cosmetics, all of which are brands you can find online. Whether you’re just starting off or simply enhancing your growing makeup talents, Garcia emphasizes the power of morale. “I think anybody can pull off anything if you have the confidence to.” WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 39


BOY BEAT BY HANNAH PRIDEMORE PHOTOS BY SARAH JAMES

40 | THREAD


T

he overall population still considers skincare routines and makeup girlie and not completely necessary. However, this is not the case. A well-rounded skincare routine is genderless and something that every human being should do twice a day. It is a daily self-care practice, and the best part is that it doesn’t have to be time-consuming. As the younger generations are un-gendering certain traits and actions, makeup and skincare should be right there with the likes of manicures, shaving your legs, and the color pink. Many men are beginning to embrace this idea and are seeking out basic skincare routines and natural-looking makeup to

seams

enhance their features. Some male skincare products have existed for decades, like aftershave and gentle face washes, but not every male-targeted brand considers toners or face masks for their consumers. While these things are genderless and can be used by anyone, some men have to consider how these products will interact with their facial hair. It would be less than ideal, tortuous even, to do a peel-off mask and rip out little beard hairs with it. This is why most skincare for men follow the same golden rule as beginner routines: keep it simple. It doesn’t have to be expensive either; drugstore skincare lines like Cetaphil and Neutrogena offer a wide array of products suitable for every skin type. A 10-step routine isn’t

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 41


necessary and can even be harmful to your skin. Keep it basic with a cleanser, toner, and moisturizer. It’s best to start with a gentle cleanser, avoiding those with harsh acids like salicylic, AHA, or BHA. Cleanse your face twice a day because even though you may not feel like it, your pores can become congested while you sleep. While toners are not necessary for every skin type, they are meant to brighten and even out skin tones. They’re great during the winter when skin can become dull from the harsh cold, and they can help clear up or even out dark spots. Again, go for something a bit gentler. A chemical exfoliant isn’t always necessary. Lastly, it’s important to always moisturize. Keeping your skin hydrated helps it stay healthy and youthful, but finding the perfect moisturizer can take a while depending on your skin type, so don’t lose hope if the first one you try isn’t a perfect fit. Bonus Tips: Apply sunscreen after your morning skincare routine. It protects the skin 42 | THREAD

and helps prevent premature aging. The American Academy of Dermatology also suggests monitoring your shaving technique to see how your skin reacts to it. A quick search on YouTube proves that natural makeup looks aren’t few and far between. For men avoiding glam looks, concealer, BB or CC cream, and bronzer are enough. These products help lightly cover “imperfections” and are easy to apply. Bronzers are mostly used for contouring, but they bring a warmer complexion to the face to balance out the single tone of foundations and concealers. It doesn’t stop there, though; filling in eyebrows with a simple eyebrow pencil and adding a little bit of mascara can help enhance bone structure and eye color. Just don’t forget to take it off at the end of the night. Makeup and skincare defy gender and these simple routines are just two of many pampering forms of self-care, don’t let preconceived notions stop you from living your best life.


seams

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 43


Everyone’s Hypewoman BY CHLOE RUFFENNACH PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

I

t would have been difficult to have lived through the summer of 2019 without hearing “Truth Hurts” by Lizzo blasting somewhere. The hit song soared to the top of the charts over two years after its release, during which time it existed mostly unnoticed. Now it sits at number one on the Billboard charts. This song is about a strong, independent woman and can be heard just about everywhere, from pre-concert tracklists to the party down the block, and it is all thanks to the creative genius and work ethic of Lizzo.

44 | THREAD


seams

This song is perhaps the best representation of Lizzo as an artist. It is an anthem about being bold and confident, and the song reached its number one status after years of hard work and promotion. In fact, her stardom comes after such a disheartening journey that Lizzo almost quit making music. She told Elle, “I just felt like I was throwing music into the world and not even making a splash. A tree was falling in the forest and not making a sound, you know? I was crying in my room all day.” Therefore, “Truth Hurts” acts as the perfect frontman for Lizzo’s diverse discography, which inspires a celebration of differences, representation, and self-love; it has come after years of unrelenting dedication and work. Lizzo presents this confidence not only through her music but through her clothing choices as well. She wears corsets, bodysuits, and sometimes, nothing. Despite her size often being criticized, she proudly sells merch with cartoon drawings of herself wearing only a thong. She is one of the only plus-size black women breaking into the mainstream and being unapologetically herself. It is incredibly refreshing to see someone who looks different than those typically represented in the media wearing outfits that emphasize her curves rather than hiding them. Lizzo’s success is WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 45


particularly important for people who look like her and have gone unrepresented up until this point. Her refusal to conform or apologize is both revolutionary and absolutely crucial for many. Her music is progressive as well, with many of her most recognizable songs being anthems preaching representation. In her track “Like A Girl” she embraces her femininity and encourages other women to do the same. “Tempo” is meant to celebrate her curves

46 | THREAD

and was a call to action for plus-sized women to embrace their figures as well. In “Boys” she expresses adoration toward men of all shapes, sizes, and sexualities. This song in particular encourages body positivity among men, which is a topic that often goes undiscussed. Her empowerment does not discriminate, and this type of music is particularly important to those who are often marginalized. Lizzo defines a generation of people who are exhausted by


seams

society’s encouragement of self-hatred. Through her empowering music and unapologetic representation, she liberates her listeners from societal constraints, even if it is only for the duration of a three-minute song. She is proud of her womanhood, size, and blackness, and she is an icon that embraces these characteristics while encouraging her audience to do the same. She is leading the charge of a new era of artists and

championing a generation of musicians who are not just thin and white. Simply by being unwaveringly herself, she is encouraging the industry and the media to mirror society and represent new voices. She spreads self-love and acceptance wherever she goes and makes a point to discuss these topics directly on stage. Lizzo is an inspiration and an advocate for all people. She has set the precedent for the next wave of artists and it is up to the industry to adjust accordingly.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 47


On the Road Again

BY NATHANIEL STANSBERY PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

48 | THREAD


M

ike Posner went from singing about being “cooler than you” and taking “a pill in Ibiza,” to walking across America on a spiritual journey. He started 2019 with the release of his third studio album, “A Real Good Kid,” and began his trek, which he finished in mid-October. Most people only found out Posner was even doing this walk when news broke that he was bitten by a rattlesnake. After he was bitten, he was airlifted to a hospital in Colorado. He was hospitalized for a few days and could not continue his walk for several more weeks. This bite was a mere set back, and as soon as Posner was able, he was out on the trail again. He had been candid about his tour and experiences on his Instagram and Twitter. Anyone

seams

could receive live updates of his trek by following him on Twitter. His website also displayed a timely update of the miles he had walked. “I’m doing this for me,” he said in an interview with Variety. Posner started his walk in Asbury Park, New Jersey and began a 3,000-mile journey west. Fans and supporters were present for his send-off. An article from Variety said, “the incentive for the trek was simple: the adventure of doing something he had never done previously, the magnitude of the land and the sky, and the difficulty connected with such a walk.” This tour was obviously different from that of a stereotypical tour; Posner played for free on a whim for whoever happened to be around in the

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 49


50 | THREAD


dive bars that he visited during his walk across the states. Posner also released a song in every state. He told Variety, “It’s a purely improvisational thing when I’ll sing. I’ll play when I want — in a park, on the street, all for free. It’s a purer way. And I should make it clear, while I am being assisted with an RV — not the way that people usually do it — I’m the only one doing the walk.” Posner also connected the conversations with people he had encountered along with a common theme: loss. “Everyone so far has lost something they can’t get back,” he said. Mike Posner has said that the emotional motivation for his walk had been his dad, Avicci, and Mac Miller. It seems their deaths motivated him to start doing what he wanted to do. Posner said to Variety, “I’m made from my dad, and in a scientific sense, he’s with me everywhere I go. More importantly, though, death is a way to reframe your own life. You don’t have forever. Death puts you in touch with what matters.” Mike Posner is not the man we used to know, but his walk is something of courage and freedom. Be sure to keep your eye out for Mike Posner, he’s much more than just a performer, and this walk has proved it.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 51


52 | THREAD


DIY

Crafting the most intricate of knick-knacks, working out the mind, body, and soul, and making the most delicious of treats.

ALL IN KNOTS P. 56 WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 53


DUMPST

I

n the era of reducing, reusing, and recycling, it is to no surprise that the “three r’s” have made their way to cleaning supplies. From clean and green sanitizing products to DIY reusable cleaning wipes, it is not hard to overhaul a cleaning regimen and make it completely eco-friendly. This stands true for dusters as well. Fleece sweaters and blankets that are no longer in use can find a second life as dusters in this quick and easy project.

MATERIALS NEEDED • A fleece sweater or blanket • Duster handle • Seam ripper

54 | THREAD

• Sewing machine and/or sewing kit • Scissors


TER TO DUSTER BY HANNAH PRIDEMORE PHOTOS BY MATTHEW JONES

1 Lay the sweater flat, and cut out two rectangles large enough to cover the head of the duster handle. 2 Cut out two more squares that are roughly 1/2 inch longer and wider than the first two. 3 Cut out four rectangles that are thinner than the previous four; you should have a total of eight rectangles. 4 Stack the rectangles with the two larger pieces in the middle; then, continue with the two medium pieces, and lastly, the thinner pieces, sandwiching them all together. Sew the pieces together up through the middle. 5 Take the two innermost pieces and sew a line roughly an inch away from the middle seam on both sides to create a slot for the duster handle. 6 Lastly, cut the edges into little strips until it resembles a duster. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 55


ALL IN

KNOTS BY BAILEY KORMICK PHOTOS BY CAELIN PARSONS

Macrame is covering the walls of every college dorm and apartment on campus. This trend is making its way back into the spotlight since its popularity in the 1970s. The intricate details and time-consuming methods of macrame may seem intimidating, but we’re going to tackle a simple knot that will impress all of your friends. Like any form of art, macrame becomes easier with practice. Starting with a small project, like a keychain, will help you master a few knots until you can take on something larger like a wall hanging or bag.

56 | THREAD


Supplies – Keyrings – Macrame cord (a cheaper alternative is any type of cotton, nylon, or satin rayon yarn) – Scissors – Tape – Comb (optional)

Steps the top of your keyring to a flat 1 Tape surface to prevent it from moving while you are tying the knots.

2

Cut five strands of yarn. One strand should measure two feet and the remaining four should measure one foot. Note: These measurements do not need to be exact, as long as one strand is significantly longer than the other four.

3

Take the 2-foot strand and fold it in half, making sure the ends meet. Loop the rounded end of the strand through the keyring from the top opening. Pull the loose ends of the strand through the loop to make a larks head knot. Make sure to pull the knot tight.

4

Repeat step three for the remaining four strands, making sure to secure those knots to the right of the 2-foot strand.

5

Once all strands are secured, take the single strand on the far left (strand 1). This should be one of the two strands from the initial 2-foot strand. The second strand from the initial 2-foot strand is strand 2. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 57


6

You’re going to complete a horizontal half hitch knot by holding strand 2 straight. Wrap strand 1 under strand 2, then back over through the opening.

7

Make sure to hold strand 2 tight as you pull strand 1 up and toward the right until it reaches the key chainring. See the image below.

8

Complete the same knot again with the same two strands.

9

Release strand 2. Complete the same horizontal half hitch knot with strand 1 and strand 3. Strand 1 should knot with each additional strand twice before moving onto the next.

10

Complete the same knot until you reach the final strand in the row (strand 10).

11

Complete one horizontal half hitch knot that pulls up and toward the right with strand 10. For the second knot, wrap strand 1 under strand 10, then back through the opening in the opposite direction as before. You want the knots moving toward the left now.

12

Continue to hold strand 10 tight as you pull strand 1 up and toward the left until it reaches the first knot. Complete these knots until you

13 reach your desired length, making sure to switch directions of the knot when you reach each end. 58 | THREAD


diy: craft it

There are multiple ways to end the keychain, but its recommended doing one extra horizontal hitch knot on the last two strands. Once you practice, you can try more difficult finishing knots like a gathering knot or

square knot. Your final step is to brush out the loose strands with a comb to give the keychain a textured look and cut them about an inch from the final knot. Finally, you can add your keys and show off your new macrame skills!

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 59


DORM DYED BY MATTHEW JONES PHOTOS BY MATTHEW JONES

The ‘70s may be long gone and normal tie-dye may be too messy to make in a dorm, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still get a little funky with some easy to make tie-dye shirts using markers and rubbing alcohol. Being groovy will never go out of style, so let’s take it back to the summer of peace and love and get a little psychedelic dudes and dudettes.

What you need Fabric, such as a cotton shirt or headband Rubbing alcohol Permanent Markers An eyedropper

1

Using the white cotton fabric of your choice, draw a small bullseye-like circle around the shirt with the permanent markers, but don’t make them too big.

2

Fill the eyedropper with rubbing alcohol and disperse the alcohol across the fabric to spread the ink.

3

Once finished, hang the fabric up to dry for about 24 hours and enjoy the new, colorful addition to your wardrobe!

That’s it! Those are three easy steps to making a tie-dye shirt without the mess. Get a little wild with it and try different patterns (the bullseye is the easiest), and put as much color as you want into it. Then, step outside and bring some color into the world!

60 | THREAD


diy: craft it

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 61


BREAK T H E CYCLE

BY LINDSAY O’NESTI PHOTOS BY ANDREW GUIDARELLIE

62 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 63


CELEBRITIES DO IT. YOU DO IT. YOUR MOMS BEST FRIENDS ALL DO IT. CYCLING HAS BECOME ONE OF THE FASTEST GROWING AND BENEFICIAL WORKOUTS INTRODUCED. NOW WITH PROFESSIONAL CLASSES, COOL GEAR AND INTENSE WORKOUT REGIMES, THIS HAS BECOME MUCH MORE THAN JUST RIDING A BIKE. WANT TO KNOW HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR AT-HOME CYCLING ADVENTURE? HERE’S HOW!

1

2

3

4

Time is very crucial. Take your workouts in increments. Start with a 4 minute warm up, staying seated. Light tension and moderate speed work best for your body to prepare for your workout ahead.

Now, for the next 3 minutes, your tension and speed will be at a threshold. Sit with your hands in the basic position and have your tension high. You will continue this “sprint” until the next sequence.

5

Repeat these steps, feel out how your bike works best for you. Feel free to alternate these steps for your own body so you can feel challenged but still feel good throughout your body.

64 | THREAD

Increase your resistance, moderate speed and moderate tension are key to a good kick start. Stay doing this for another 4 minutes, alternating between sitting and standing.

After your sprint, you will continue to alternate between slow to moderate speed and tension for another 4 minutes. While doing so, alternating between the sitting and standing position on your bike. This will help increase heart rate, helping to burn calories!

ALWAYS REMEMBER, COOL DOWN.


diy: work it

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 65


AIN’T NO CLAWS BY LINDSAY O’NESTI PHOTOS BY MACK WAGNER

I think most of us can agree on one thing: White Claws. Whether you like mango or black cherry, this refreshing low-calorie drink has caught the attention of just about everyone. The only thing that can make this any better is making it at home!

INGREDIENTS • 8 ounces of water • ½ teaspoon of simple syrup for flavoring • 1 ¼ ounces of liquor (vodka is preferred)

• Sodastream or another carbonator • Any other additional elements you would like, such as fruit

DIRECTIONS 1. Start with your choice of water (purified, tap, etc.). 2. Twist onto the apparatus, part of the device used to connect the bottle to the machine, to produce C02 bubbles (the machine contains a CO2 tank, which can be purchased separately). 3. Press your beverage into the machine releasing the carbon from the tank. 4. After you make it to your desired fizziness, you can add just about any flavor you desire. These come in bottles that you can buy along with the machine, or you can get fancy and add your own fruits and twists on this classic. And there you have it. A simple DIY white claw in four easy steps!Going out is fun, but doing DIY White Claws with your pals and not spending money sounds like a lot more fun. This also lets you put interesting twists on flavors as well! Who knows, maybe you’ll even get the chance to be sponsored. 66 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 67


WHO, WHAT, WEAR A glance into some of Athens’ most captivating people, places, and events.

KISMET P. 74 68 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 69


VOGUE FORC

INSIDE T

70 | THREAD


who, what, wear

CES OF FASHION

THE ANNUAL VOGUE: FORCES OF FASHION CONFERENCE BY TAYLOR DAHL PHOTOS BY TAYLOR DAHL

F

or the third year in a row, Vogue held a fashion conference in New York City. The two-day conference featured panels with fashion’s most influential leaders, including Tom Ford, Tory Burch, Olivier Rousteing, Cindy Crawford, Kaia Gerber, Anna Wintour, and Donatella Versace, just to name a few. Attending a Vogue event was as alluring as one would expect: free champagne, celebrities around every corner, and outfits on people sitting next to you that would make you drop some major bank. But, the highlight of the event was hearing what successful people in the industry had to say about their craft and their advice to young people in pursuing their passions, in addition to eating a few pieces of Cardi B’s birthday cake. Day one opening remarks were presented by Anna Wintour

herself, which then led into a brief talk by Wes Gordan, creative director of Carolina Herrera. His team constructed a gown from scratch in a live atelier in the room adjacent to the discussion room. At the end of day one, the polka-dot gown was then presented to the crowd and awarded to one lucky audience member. Gordan was really able to show the admiration and dedication that a creative director has for their design house and it’s codes. The Herrera gown was whimsical and playful, yet elegant. Following Wes Gordan were Tom Ford, Julianne Moore, Tory Burch, Eva Chen, Kaia Gerber, Cindy Crawford, Tyler Mitchell, and Cardi B. Tom Ford and Julianne Moore were named the “prom king and queen” of the event; Ford was hilarious and had impeccable manners and speaking skills that had the audience the most intrigued,

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 71


which was complemented by Moore’s ability to remain charming and poised. Ironically, Ford made a point of how, nowadays, people often only really dress for Instagram, and how it makes people feel “fat, friendless, and dull.” Interestingly enough, Instagram was one of the primary sponsors of the event. Ford speaks his mind in a way that convinces people that he means what he says. Moore noted that Ford was “great at communicating his vision,” which has obviously contributed to his success. 72 | THREAD

Cardi B ended the day in place of the original speaker, Virgil Abloh of Off-White. Although she’s quite the character in the music and rap industry, the answers to her questions were nothing short of genuine. The love that she has for her daughter and the way in which she wants to keep her humble humanized her in a way that I’ve never seen in such a high profile, usually drama-heavy celebrity. The highlights of day two were undeniably Olivier Rousteing of Balmain, Anna Wintour, and Donatella Versace. Rousteing


who, what, wear

had the opportunity to premiere the trailer for his upcoming documentary “Wonder Boy,� which followed his journey through self-acceptance and proving to himself that he was as impeccable as everyone throughout his life said he was. He is definitely the most modern, young inspiration of the modern fashion age. Becoming the creative director of Balmain at age 24 was unheard of, but he does the job right. Anna Wintour and Donatella Versace were the iconic duo that many had waited

two whole days to see; their famous friendship humanized these iconic figures in fashion and made me appreciate the industry so much more than I already did. Fashion today and its future to those who spoke on it is being driven by sustainability and quality, in addition to providing an outlet for young designers to communicate their ideas effectively. We are in the midst of a new, young generation of influential figures in fashion, allowing opportunities for virtually anyone to create something amazing. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 73


KISMET

A LOCAL BO

BY LEANNA SIUPIN

W

hen two of Athens’ local clothing boutiques closed in the winter of 2018, many students began to worry about where they could go for clothing that would need to be purchased for last-minute occasions. The Other Place and Bluetique occupied some of the larger spaces uptown and offered a variety of clothing, gifts, and accessories. Once gone, options for students to conveniently shop for higher-end clothing in the uptown area became limited.

74 | THREAD


who, what, wear

OUTIQUE REOPENS AFTER A FIRE.

NYS PHOTOS BY LEANNA SIUPINYS

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 75


76 | THREAD


It was only by luck and chance that Athens had a familiar name rejoin its retail community that following spring. Some of you may recognize the name. Maybe you remember it from its prior location here in Athens, or maybe you’ve stopped by one of their locations in Cinncinati. From March 2013 to November of 2014, Kismet was located on Union Street, standing next to The Union and Jackie O’s. According to Athens News, all of these local businesses were affected by a massive fire. Although no one was injured, many of the businesses were forced to shut down for necessary repairs. While many of these shops were relocated to other parts of Athens, Kismet closed indefinitely. Since the fire, Kismet has built two locations in Cincinnati. Once Bluetique closed, however, co-owner Jocelyn Williams

decided that it was time to reopen the shop in Athens. The small shop fills with natural light streaming in through the window that illuminates the exposed brick walls and has a warm, comfortable feeling that fits right in Athens. The shop sells similar items to the locations in Cincinnati, including a variety of items geared toward women such as shoes, accessories, hats, bags, gifts, jewelry, decorations, stationery, books, and more. Brands like Billabong, Dex, Blu Pepper, Dress Forum, Twig, Natural Life, and Mae Mae line the shelves and racks of the boutique. Kismet is a great place to shop, whether you need to purchase a last-minute gift for a friend, a sweater to keep you warm during the upcoming cold months, festive decorative items to spice up your house, or a new outfit for your next formal event. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 77


Rambl On BY MADDY FINK PHOTOS BY BRE SEVERNS

78 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 79


E

than Hodson is a business major from Philadelphia, and his brand Rambl started in the spring of 2019 with 25 Champion shirts that had the Rambl logo printed on the front of them. Now, Hodson has even bigger dreams for his brand, and he plans to make them a reality. Hodson thought about the conception of his brand, Rambl, for a very long time. His initial inspiration for the name of the brand came from the Led Zeppelin song, “Ramble On.” He loved the message of the song and how it’s just about going through life and getting what’s yours, specifically the lyric “Ramble on and now's the time, the time is now.” 80 | THREAD

Hodson always understood multiple sides of the business world and knew he wanted to create a business of his own. After being gifted an Apple pencil to use for his iPad, he found a love for sketching. One day, he simply drew up the Rambl logo for fun, and the rest was history. While Hodson is the founder of the brand and made it become a reality, he simply can’t take all of the credit. He has many friends helping him out, like Travis Picquet, who helped bring the Rambl website to life. Fellow creative directors and designers Jake Taylor and Cameron Kolianos, as well as photographer Nate Yoder can also be credited for their work for Rambl. Plenty of


Hodson’s friends also help model Rambl gear for the Instagram and website. He brought his friends together, from Athens to Philadelphia, to create a dream team for developing his brand while keeping it fun and vibrant. While Rambl is primarily focused on expanding as a fashion brand right now, they are also looking into expanding in the music and media space. Hodson sees “Rambl” transforming into an umbrella of several different branches of the company. He hopes to expand Rambl into music, video production, recording podcasts, and more. Rambl is more than a fun logo on a T-shirt; Hodson wants his brand to become a household name. Rambl is meant to be a very diverse brand with many different services. As for the future of Rambl, the brand is moving quickly and expanding rapidly. Hodson plans to expand the clothing line to joggers, sweatshirts, hoodies, beanie, stickers, and more. He hopes to implement more creative designs and materials like denim, paisley, and plaid. The clothing line drops new merchandise every Tuesday, and their shirts start at $20. While the clothes have been selling, Hodson has made basically no profit from his clothing because of how much goes back into the production of Rambl. The future for Rambl is looking bright. After college, Hodson WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 81


hopes to work more on building the brand and taking it to the next level. He would love to see Rambl products in stores like Urban Outfitters and PacSun in the near future, with the goal of eventually owning his own Rambl store. He hopes to see basketball players, rappers, and other notable figures wearing Rambl to events and being photographed in the clothing. As for the music and media side, he hopes to get artists signed to Rambl and produce music with them. Additionally, with the first Rambl podcast in the works, he hopes to branch out in video and vlog production, as well. Hodson loves music, social media, fashion, and most importantly, bringing people together for a common cause and making something come to life, and Rambl is doing exactly that.

“ RAMBLE ON AND NOW'S THE TIME, THE TIME IS NOW.

— LED ZEPPELIN, “RAMBLE ON”

82 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 83


SE

84 | THREAD


styling

ECONDHAND From the rack to the runway, stylists take control of the shoot. PHOTOS BY ANDREW THOMPSON

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 85


86 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 87


88 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 89


90 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 91


92 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 93


94 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 95


96 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 97


GYM CLASS HEROES

Grab your sneakers, gym class just got a lot more glamorous.

98 | THREAD

PHOTOS BY MACK WAGNER


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 99


100 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 101


102 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 103


104 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 105


106 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 107


108 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 109


110 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 111


BODY O PHOTOS BY KATE Paint is good forMCCARTHY more than just a canvas...

PHOTOS BY KATE MCCARTHY

112 | THREAD


OF ART

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 113


114 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 115


116 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 117


118 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 119


120 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 121


122 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 123


124 | THREAD


PHOTOS BY KAILEE RICHEY

Wade into the new season and embrace the changing atmosphere.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 125


126 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 127


128 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 129


130 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 131


132 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 133


134 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 135


136 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 137


SIX LOOK

City Styles

PHOTOS BY LEAN

138 | THREAD


KS

NNA SIUPINYS

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 139


LOS ANGE

California 140 | THREAD


ELES

a

Tenesse

NASHVILLE WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 141


Nevada

LAS VEGAS 142 | THREAD


NewYork NEW YORK

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 143


MIAMI

Florida 144 | THREAD


Oregon

PORTLAND

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 145


146 | THREAD


CAMPUS CASUAL

Light-hearted reads for the quiz-taking, listicle reading, horoscope believin’ spirit in all of us.

WHAT PUMPKIN CARVING ARE YOU? P. 150 WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 147


FALL

HOROSCOPES BY TAYLOR DAHL ILLUSTRATIONS MADISON STEPHEY

VIRGO AUG 23 - SEPT 22 If you’re experiencing a bit of a tiff with someone close to you, think about if it’s really worth it to pursue further action in a power struggle. The sun will travel through your principles, yet stubborn third house, so don’t let your frustrations drive your actions and maintain the composure you’re proud to have.

SCORPIO OCT 23 - NOV 21 The sun will be submerged in Libra, aka your twelfth house of rest, until Oct. 23. Use this time to heal, rejuvenate, or take a small vacation. Now is the perfect time to fully immerse yourself into a creative project or rethink some burdens that you’ve been carrying for a bit. Try to loosen up and as Mars visits Libra from Oct. 3 to Nov. 19, it’ll push you to confront some issues that have been bothering you lately.

148 | THREAD

It’s time to get ready for change, Threadies! We have successfully transitioned from summer to fall, and with seasonal change comes cosmic change. What will the signs have in store for them? Will you be more social or more of a homebody? Will you be lucky in love or happily single? Leave me to read the stars for you.

THIS MONTH’S SIGN

LIBRA

You’re in for a busy fall, Libra. SEPT 24 - OCT 23 Mars, a planet of energy and motivation, is making its way through Libra from Oct. 4 to Nov. 19. Your schedule should be packed full, but take advantage of it, as your charisma this season is unmatched, bringing lots of attention and light to your presence.

SAGITTARIUS NOV 23 - DEC 21 The sun is going through Sagittarius’s eleventh house of friends, groups, and technology, starting the fall off in a very social and lively way, just how you like it. The visit from planet Mars will liven your networking and connections in addition to sparking synergies! Be careful not to go into people-overload.

CAPRICORN DEC 22 - JAN 19 October could be one of your most hardworking, ambitious, and successful months, so don’t waste opportunities! The sun is in Libra, but also your professional tenth house, which will equally drive your enthusiasm and stress. You might be working a lot, but it’ll help you get ahead in the future!


campus casual

AQUARIUS JAN 20 - FEB 18 The sun is traveling through your ninth house of expansion, travel, and adventure through Oct. 23. You should feel like the sky is your limit and the possibilities are endless. Now is the time to explore your ideas, but make sure to pace yourself as Saturn is in your twelfth house of hidden agendas, meaning that opposition from an unlikely enemy may come around.

PISCES FEB 19 - MAR 20 This fall, the stars have you processing your deepest emotions and getting consumed with a certain idea or project. Be wary — you’re feeling the extremes and this rollercoaster could be just the beginning of greater ups and downs to come for the rest of the year!

ARIES MAR 21 - APR 19 This fall is where relationships start looking up for you, Aries. You’ve been succeeding a lot lately, and why not share the spotlight with a companion? Your ruling planet is in Libra from Oct. 3 to Nov. 19, which means your ambitions are high and you should act on your impulses, only after checking the details first!

TAURUS APR 20 - MAY 20 This fall, the stars are aligning to restore order to your life and drive you to decluttering your space and mind. The sun is in Libra and your sixth house of organization; now is the time to rid your life of excesses. Be as proactive and solution-oriented as possible because now is the time to increase your knowledge and work toward a new skillset.

GEMINI MAY 21 - JUN 20 Don’t hold back this fall, Gemini! This season is one of the most playful and passionate for you. A fall romance could be in the work and if not, keep your eyes and arms open for something new.

CANCER JUN 21 - JUL 22 The sun is moving through Libra and your fourth house of home and family. Use this time to embrace your creativity! While there’s a lot of energy, there may also be some tension within your familial and close relationships. Transforming these relationships is key this season. Something may be holding you back, and if it is, it may be a blessing in disguise.

LEO JUL 23 - AUG 21

The sun is going through your social third house, Leo. Your fall will be jam-packed with your ideas being developed more thoroughly and clearly, and people will be eager to hear them! While your schedule is loaded with exciting events, don’t be afraid to share them and even ask for help.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 149


BY SARAH TODACK ILLUSTRATIONS MADISON STEPHEY

Autumn is a great time to show off your personal style. Whether you are lounging in a coffee shop, going to haunted houses or jumping into piles of leaves, you are sure to show off just how inspired your wardrobe is by Fall weather. Show off this personal style with your pumpkin as well. Create a look for going to a pumpkin patch and find out what pumpkin carving you should create this year.

1 PICK A TOP

2 PICK A BOTTOM

3 PICK SHOES

4 PICK AN ACCESSORY

a. b. c. d.

a. b. c. d.

150 | THREAD

Knit sweater Faux fur jacket Cozy cardigan Leather jacket

Ugg boots Knee-high boots Ankle boots Doc Marten boots

a. b. c. d.

a. b. c. d.

Flared jeans Velvet skirt Plaid pants Cargo pants

Scarf Hoop earrings Beret Chain necklace


campus casual

Mostly A’s: Classic You prefer to stick to the classic autumn look, and there’s nothing wrong with that! You love autumn and choose to spend it jumping in piles of leaves and drinking a pumpkin spice latte. An iconic jack-o-lantern is definitely for you.

Mostly B’s: Extra Halloween is a time to stand out and dress abnormally, but you already do that everyday! Peers envy your confidence when showing off your outstanding style on any ordinary day. A pumpkin that is carved intricately is the one for you since you never stray from above average.

Mostly C’s: Artsy Your favorite thing about fall is the beautiful scenery. Your style fits in perfectly with a quiet coffee shop that looks out on the colorful trees. Being artsy means that you can be more creative with your pumpkin this year. So put the knife away and get out your paintbrushes!

Mostly D’s: Edgy Your style is intimidating this autumn. You throw out the cozy sweaters, opting for a dark and edgy look. It’s spooky season, and you wouldn’t be caught dead not dressing for the occasion. Being simple with your pumpkin carving will show peers just how cool you are. Carve out some words that represent you! WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 151


TABLET TO TABLE BY JILLIAN CRAIG PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

152 | THREAD


campus casual

T

he evolution of learning how to cook has taken various twists and turns throughout history. For the longest time, people relied on simple written instructions and sometimes learning in-person to be able to cook or bake something. Often times this was just a recipe written on a piece of paper or a notecard. This form of learning to cook evolved into entire cookbooks with a variety of recipes and pictures. As television came about, so did entire TV shows with channels dedicated to cooking. Today, several forms of learning how to cook, both written and visual, exist. However, as technology advances, more platforms are arising and potentially threatening the traditional forms of learning to cook and bake.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 153


Channels such as Buzzfeed Tasty, Binging with Babish, and many others are teaching viewers to cook, bake, and everything in between on YouTube, Facebook, and other platforms. Buzzfeed Tasty, a video series produced by Buzzfeed, revolutionized instructional cooking and baking. They produce short videos that focus solely on the food being cooked. As the videos gained popularity, Buzzfeed created an app specifically for these videos and even added features to save recipes, create shopping lists, and provide step-by-step written and visual instructions. Binging With Babish, a video series created by Andrew Rea, presents a different perspective on cooking. After starting in 2016, Rea now creates instructional videos based on video games, television, and movies. These videos are typically focused on cooking basics. Rea’s channel has amassed five million subscribers and is continuing to grow in popularity. Although it appears as though television programs are largely unaffected by trendy internet cooking videos, the future of the development of online cooking programs may threaten their relevance in the future. With users being able to learn how to cook a recipe on-demand at the tip of their fingers, televised cooking programs will have to find a new and innovative way to stay relevant. The age of learning 154 | THREAD

how to cook while watching how to do so in real-time on TV seems to be coming to an end as users can find recipes, step-by-step videos, and even add ingredients to a shopping list all online. Despite the potentially grim future for cooking channels, cookbooks and magazines have


a better chance of being relevant in today’s digital society. Many viewers of cooking and baking shows, online and on TV, continue to see the value in owning a cookbook. Both Buzzfeed’s Tasty and Binging With Babish have published cookbooks of their own. Celebrities such as Chrissy

Teigen, Tracy Morgan, and even Kris Jenner have done so as well. With online cooking shows and celebrities having published cookbooks, other forms of published cooking and baking instructions will likely continue to stay relevant. What the future holds for televised cooking and baking shows remains unknown. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 155


BACK OF THE CLOSET An in-depth look at today’s most buzz-worthy topics.

PUNK POSERS P. 176 156 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 157


g n li

y c l l ia pcy c So U

D K IDE IN Y F ROV E P IL BA S BY O BY T O PH

T

hrift shopping has been a hot trend ever since Macklemore’s hit song “Thrift Shop” came out in 2012, but now with social media, thrift shopping can be done from the comfort of your own home. Selling clothes on e-commerce sites like Instagram, Poshmark, Mercari, and Depop isn’t a new concept, but it has become increasingly more popular over the past couple of years, especially among college students looking to make some quick cash. One of the first peer-to-peer e-commerce sites for people to resell their clothing was eBay, founded in 1995. However, when Poshmark hit the scene in 2011, the competition began to grow. The idea for Poshmark was created around the launch of the iPhone 4, when the founders realized it was the perfect place 158 | THREAD

to shop and sell clothing all from the palm of your hand, according to its website. Today, Poshmark is the leading social commerce marketplace, competing with Mercari, founded in 2013, and Depop, also founded in 2011. These apps are all mostly run the same way, with items being resold from top brands for up to 70% off. Some websites offer more than just fashion, as Mercari also sells toys, home goods, and technology. These companies pride themselves on the ease of buying and selling on their apps, each advertising that the selling process only takes minutes. Additionally, the seller doesn’t have to worry about shipping, as the company provides all shipping labels, so all the seller has to do is put it in their mailbox. However, the major downfall of selling on one of these


e-commerce sites is the selling fee that the company takes. Mercari and Depop both take 10% of sales, and Poshmark takes a flat commission of $2.95 if the sale is under $15, but if it is over $15 Poshmark takes 20% commission, which can turn potential sellers away. “I have tried doing Mercari and Poshmark, the only thing is I try to run my account the way that I would want to follow someone,” said Morgan Arcoraci, a sophomore dance major here at OU. “Also, those apps, they take a percentage … and those applications up the shipping and I think they’re actually [doing it] in order to make a little bit more, I guess, because it doesn’t cost $10 to ship a T-shirt.” Arcoraci began selling her clothes on Instagram nearly a

year ago using her account @thrifty_can_i, which now has over 2,000 followers. On this account, she sells clothes and accessories that she thrifts, buys on sale, are too small for her, or that she no longer wear, and ships them all across the United States. “I’m getting the money back on something, or I’m making a profit off something, but I’m not just throwing it away.” The account started as a closet cleanout but has since morphed into a thrifting account where she also buys clothes on sale and resells them if they don’t fit her. “While donating to Goodwill is great, sometimes the clothes just [sit] there, and a lot of people don’t go out and find it, but with the whole social media outreach, I have a pretty big follower base, WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 159


INSTAGRAM

POSHMARK

MERCARI

DEPOP 160 | THREAD

so something that I could just send to the Athens, Ohio, [Goodwill] maybe someone in California would have bought it and used it for what it was supposed to be,” Arcoraci said. Arcoraci runs her account by taking photos of the pieces and editing them to keep the account’s aesthetic. Then, she posts the piece with a short description and a low-ball price, which still makes a profit, to begin the bidding. Bidding is done in increments of one dollar in the comments and she leaves the bidding up for 24 hours, while also advertising the live sale on her Instagram story. Once the bidding ends she messages the winner and uses Venmo or Paypal to make the sale and then ships it out. “I have just learned so much about the postal service in the United States,” she said with a laugh. “I’ve shipped to 30 states. It’s ridiculous … I’m from North Carolina, [so] say I post an NC State shirt and someone from Wisconsin, who their dad went to NC State, wants a shirt, but they can’t go out and buy it in Wisconsin, and if you’re balling on a budget you don’t want to go buy a new one, so, it just works out [for everyone].” Sandra Slenker, a senior


campus casual

biological sciences and chemistry major, began her Instagram page dedicated to selling clothes @a.sandy. closet over the summer to downsize her closet and make some extra pocket money. However, once she became successful and sales stayed consistent, she decided to continue selling through the fall semester. “It turned into one of my new favorite side hustles,” she said. “Getting rid of items here and there has brought in over $700 in four months.” Arcoraci says she learned a lot about how to run her account from other thrifting accounts that she already followed, and they helped her start out by giving her shout outs and teaming up for giveaways. She says the community is very supportive and willing to answer any questions for new sellers starting out. “It’s something I enjoy doing … it’s very fulfilling and I’ve made a lot of e-friends that way. It’s so easy when it’s on your phone. Literally, it’s just another notification … when I do organize it, put the work in, and do everything that is expected it works out very well,” Arcoraci said. “If you’re a college student that has a bunch of clothes

in your closet that you don’t wear, but are not bad quality, I don’t see why [not sell them].” Arcoraci says if someone wants to start selling their clothing they need to make sure they have the time and can be quick on communicating in order to bring in a good follower base and stay credible in the e-commerce community. However, Arcoraci and Slenker have both been successful in selling their clothing on social media, and both recommend it as an easy way for college students to make money and get rid of their unused clothes.

“I LEARNED A LOT ABOUT JUST HOW WASTEFUL THE FASHION INDUSTRY IS AND THE MORE THAT YOU CAN RECYCLE AND REUSE AND REPURPOSE STUFF … IT’S JUST A WIN FOR EVERYONE.” — MORGAN ARCORACI WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 161


CHANGING THE CONVERSATION ON SEXUAL ASSAULT

162 | THREAD


DURING THE 2018 FALL SEMESTER, AFTER NUMEROUS REPORTS OF SEXUAL ASSAULTS ON OHIO UNIVERSITY’S CAMPUS BROKE, THE OHIO COMMUNITY BANDED TOGETHER TO STAND UP FOR SURVIVORS AND BRING AWARENESS TO PROBLEMS HAPPENING ON CAMPUS. NOW, AS FALL SEMESTER IS IN FULL SWING, OHIO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS HAVE ALREADY BEGUN CHANGING THE CONVERSATION SURROUNDING SEXUAL ASSAULT ON CAMPUS. BY BAILEY FINK PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 163


sexually assaulted

S

ince the beginning of the semester, there have been three reported sexual assaults as of Oct. 16; one was reported to the Ohio University Police Department and two to the Athens Police Department, but Ohio University is making the news for a different reason: banners. During Welcome Week, a photo posted on Twitter by Bobcat Barstool featuring six students in front of their house with a large bed sheet that read, “you taught them to walk we’ll teach them to ride” went viral. Following this tweet, the popular account SheRatesDogs, known for calling out men on their inappropriate behavior, quoted the tweet and added “....... anyway ladies, tasers are $10 on Amazon Prime,” which quickly brought in over 14,000 retweets and 106,000 likes. 164 | THREAD

Throughout the week, more tweets featuring photos of inappropriate banners continued to get attention. One read, “Girls, my mint pod won’t be the only thing in your mouth” and another said, “Your son might want to come & stay but we’re gonna make him cum & leave.” As these banners were gaining negative attention, different banners hung by the sororities on campus were gaining attention for their positive messages regarding standing with survivors. These banners said things like: “We have the right to be heard #WPABelievesSurvivors,” “Ask her what she’s asking for #ADPIBelievesSurvivors,” and “You taught them to be fearful we’ll teach them they deserve better. #SigKapStandsWithSurvivors.” In 2018, Sigma Kappa was the first sorority to hang a banner in


campus casual

support of survivors outside of their house after 20 reports of sexual assault occurred within the first month of school. After a few days, 17 other sororities and fraternities hung banners to show that the Ohio University Greek Life community would not stand for these assaults. As more banners were being hung, the Ohio University Greek Life community began making national news for their support of sexual assault survivors and the movement they were creating, including a USA TODAY article featuring OHIO students. Following the national attention, two Utah State University fraternities hung banners promoting sexual assault awareness and cited an Ohio University Interfraternal Council (IFC) tweet for the motivation behind hanging them, according

to the Utah Statesman. “We’re not talking about it to get attention or to praise ourselves, but I think [the attention] helped show that like ‘look we’re having these issues, but we’re trying to do something about it,’” says Mary Pittro, president of the Women’s Panhellenic Association (WPA). This year during sorority spirit week, the week before the semester begins in which sorority women return to prepare for formal recruitment, WPA asked the sororities to make new banners to hang during welcome week to show that Ohio University sorority women stand with survivors. “I hope [the banners] made a difference for the women who went through recruitment and I hope that they felt more empowered going through

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 165


“WE STAND ALONGSIDE SURVIVORS OF EVERY RACE, ETHNICITY, GENDER AND SEXUAL ORIENTATION. WE BELIEVE YOU AND WE SUPPORT YOU.” — RAEANN ENSWORTH

166 | THREAD


campus casual

recruitment,” says Raeann Ensworth, WPA’s vice president of public relations. Following the arrival of the “WPA Believes Survivors” banners, Ohio Panhellenic tweeted their explanation for these banners. “The beginning of the school year usually mean[s] it’s time for Panhellenic Recruitment, but it’s also the ‘red zone’ — a period of time that is the most dangerous for campus sexual assault. WPA believes in a strong sisterhood that looks out for each other: all the time, every day. We stand alongside survivors of every race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation. We believe you and we support you — we are your sisters.” All of the Welcome Week banners went up during the “red zone,” which, according to NBC News, is the time from the first week of school until Thanksgiving break where sexual assault reports increase. “You saw the horrific banners that went up on Welcome Weekend, but I think at the same time you also saw people directly responding either [on] social media or straight up in-person just saying like ‘look I’m not okay with this, I’m not going to interact with people that do that,’” says Ensworth. Not only is the Ohio University community taking a stand against sexual assault, but also college communities across the country. It’s On Us, a national organization

originally founded in 2014 as an initiative of the Obama-Biden White House to stand up for sexual assault survivors and now with 250 campus chapters, hosted their first national student leadership summit to combat sexual assault at Ohio University from Aug. 2-5, 2019. The summit provided students, faculty and other attendees with an intensive weekend of training, workshops, keynotes and an opportunity to connect and share ideas with one another. “I was assaulted on this campus and so I felt like getting the opportunity to come and to learn more about what had happened to me and what happens to so many other people on the place where it happened I’m, I guess, the kind of weirdo that would find that extremely healing,” Ensworth, who attended the summit, says. Attendees were required to attend three workshops on sexual assault awareness/ consent education, bystander intervention and survivor support. Additionally, they were able to choose three more workshops focused on tools in public policy and legislative action, campus organizing and changing the culture on campus. “Specifically, why I think it’s important it happened [in Athens] is because I think it’s in a way a response to a lot of the things that happened last year on our campus, especially during the fall WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 167


semester, with the high amount of sexual assaults,” Ensworth says. Ensworth said the summit was important because she was sexually assaulted by a friend and won her case in court, so it was a good place for her to learn more about the other cases of sexual assault that can happen and the outcomes of those. She also explained that as a vice president on WPA she felt a responsibility to learn about the things that happen to WPA members and to become educated on how to be the best ally possible. “When you start having the conversation about what sexual assault is before the students even get here then you’re probably primed to have that conversation once they are here,” she says. It’s On Us is not new to Ohio University, in September 2018, in response to the increasing number of sexual assaults on campus, three students, now alumni, organized the It’s On Us, Bobcats march. Organizers Cody Shanklin, then-WPA president Mallory Golski, and Hannah Burke brought nearly 500 supporters to College Green where students shared their experiences with sexual assault. Additionally, for the past three years, the Women’s Center, in partnership with other offices and organizations, has sponsored an art exhibit to bring awareness and show support for the victims of sexual assault. This year the 168 | THREAD

“Through the Survivors’ Lens” exhibit provided 52 photographs from 20 sexual assault survivors that tell their stories. Some of the photographs reflected stories of childhood trauma, sexual violence in college, and domestic violence in long-term marital relationships. The exhibit was displayed in the Trisolini Gallery from Aug. 26 to Sept. 14, where last year’s exhibit “What Were You Wearing?” was also displayed, which was an exhibit showing what victims’ were wearing at the time of their assault to change the narrative and show that what they were wearing never mattered. In 2017, the Monument Quilt came to Ohio University and was displayed at Peden Stadium, the quilt provided a promise and a reminder for survivors that they are never alone. OHIO students aren’t the only ones taking action, Ohio University has taken new preventative steps to promote sexual assault awareness on campus. At the beginning of fall semester, students may have noticed new, brightly colored banners on light posts around campus publicizing resources and how to be a better bystander, also OUPD purchased thousands of coffee sleeves around Athens that said “We need your help to stop sexual assault.” Additionally, on Aug. 19, Ohio University launched a new app called Bobcat Safe that allows students to share their location and


campus casual

virtually walk home with friends and also get in contact with the police easily, if needed. “My goal for this campus would be that … rapists are uncomfortable in every venue they go into. I just don’t want them to feel comfortable in a bar, I don’t want them to feel comfortable at a house party, I don’t want them to feel comfortable with the way that they are,” says Ensworth. “I think that is starting to change because we don’t find your jokes

funny, we don’t find your banners funny, it’s over … and we’re not going to put up with it anymore.” Ensworth believes as the conversation continues to change and women realize the power they have, the culture can begin to change as well. Even as the “red zone” is coming to an end, it is important that the conversation surrounding sexual assault does not stop here. If we continue to talk about it and become better bystanders, maybe one day the texts from OUPD will never come again. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 169


Fast Fashion: FRIEND OR FOE?

BY GEENA PROVENZANO PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

170 | THREAD


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 171


T

hanks to technology, there is no longer a need to travel to fashion malls or brick-and-mortar stores. One can purchase whatever they need, from clothing to groceries, without having to get out of bed. Although convenient for consumers, online shopping is detrimental for brands that lack a significant online presence. According to Business Insider, more than 3,800 stores closed their doors in 2018 alone. With so many businesses leaving the industry, others have had the opportunity to make their presence known, particularly online fast-fashion brands. Fast fashion is a trend in which retailers mass-produce large quantities of clothing quickly in response to current fashion trends. This varies from past practices in which brands would produce only a few lines per season. Now, fast fashion brands release new lines weekly. Because so many items must be produced so quickly, cheaper products are used to create the clothing, and the overall quality is low. Many brands have adopted the fast fashion trend including Forever 21, ASOS, and Fashion Nova. Online fast fashion brands have been able to grow in popularity for a variety of reasons. Fashion Nova’s denim line, which is one of the most 172 | THREAD

popular features on the site, offers inclusive sizing ranging from 0 to 4X. Body image is one of the biggest obstacles women of all ages face today, and for years, luxury brands have emphasized the notion that you have to be a certain size to be beautiful. It is uplifting to see Fashion Nova doing something to fight the stigma. Fast fashion brands have also mastered the art of brand awareness by investing heavily in celebrity endorsements. This strategy has given them the ability to reach a certain platform that other brands cannot. Many people, especially teenagers, depend on celebrities for style inspiration. When a young person sees someone like Kylie Jenner modeling a particular brand, they want to wear it too, and because of fast fashion retailers, they actually can. Celebrity promotion has proved to be worth it for Fashion Nova, for example, and Cardi B’s second collaboration with the brand sold over $1 million on the first day, according to Refinery29. Celebrity promotion is also how some students at Ohio University became familiar with the brand. “I first heard of Fashion Nova about a year ago from watching videos on YouTube,” said sophomore Morgan Simonski. “I saw it pop up more on Instagram after models and


back of the closet

“NOW THE MUGLER GOWN, SOMETHING THAT WAS ONE OF A KIND, WAS AVAILABLE TO EVERYONE FOR A MERE $49.99.” — KIM KARDASHIAN

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 173


influencers starting making deals with Fashion Nova.” Fast-fashion brands are appealing because they bring the general public celebrity-inspired looks that they otherwise would not be able to afford. However, this strategy often comes at the expense of others, particularly celebrities and couture designers. There is a fine line between using designs as inspiration and blatantly knocking off someone’s work, and Fashion Nova is notorious for crossing it. In 2019, Kim Kardashian-West appeared at the fifth Annual 174 | THREAD

Hollywood Beauty Awards wearing a vintage Thierry Mugler gown. The ensemble served as a preview for what was to be shown at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts’ exhibition, “Thierry Mugler: Couturissime.” Hours after Kardashian-West walked the red carpet, Fashion Nova debuted the “Winning Beauty Cut Out Gown” which was identical to the Mugler piece. As a response to the scandal, Kardashian-West tweeted, “It’s devastating to see these fashion companies rip off designs that have taken the blood, sweat


back of the closet

and tears of true designers who have put their all into their own |original ideas.” Fashion Nova is not the only fast-fashion brand that faces such controversy. In 2019, Kim Kardashian-West sued Missguided, claiming that the brand used her name for promotion without her consent. The retailer would tag Kardashian-West on its Instagram pictures, making it look like she endorsed their products. However, Kardashian-West never wanted to promote their brand, nor was she paid to do so. In addition, Missguided used models that looked like Kardashian-West on their website. According to The Verge, a judge sided with her argument, and as a result, the brand was forced to pay the reality star $2.7 million. Online fast-fashion retailers such as Fashion Nova and Missguided have built their empires off of the same business models created by companies such as Forever 21. They rely on creating trendy products as fast as possible and for the lowest price. Such practices often result in poor quality but have proven to be successful in the past. According to Business Insider, at its peak, Forever 21 reached $4.4 billion in sales in 2015. Recently, however, this strategy has resulted in a decrease in sales. In February 2019, Charlotte Russe filed for bankruptcy,

followed by Forever 21 in August. It is unknown whether or not the practice of sacrificing quality for cheaper prices is the sole cause. However, it will be interesting to see if newer fast fashion brands, with identical business models and mounting lawsuits, will follow in their predecessors’ footsteps. Despite the growing success for fast fashion retailers over the past few years, Ohio University students have yet to jump on the trend. Of the 34 students surveyed, six claimed a fast-fashion retailer as their favorite store. In addition, 23 students would rather pay more money for higher quality, as opposed to the cheap products that companies such as Fashion Nova and Missguided market at lower prices. Such trends could be a result of the poorly made garments these retailers produce. Of the 22 students who reported shopping at fast-fashion retailers, 78% claimed the item that they purchased was of poor quality, and 46% admitted that it was either too large or too small. Of the students surveyed, 15 said they would not recommend these companies to a friend. It is unknown whether or not the practice of sacrificing quality for cheaper prices is the sole cause of some fast fashion brands’ declines. However, it will be interesting to see if newer fast fashion brands, with identical business models and mounting lawsuits, will follow in their predecessors’ footsteps. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 175


Punk Posers BY AMY SZMIK PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

S

kater style has never been as popular as it is right now — you can’t go down the street without seeing at least one person in that familiar Thrasher T-shirt. Brands typically associated with the “skating” scene have slowly crept into the fashion world in recent years and saw a steady increase in “non-skaters” wearing their brands. No longer is HUF, Thrasher, Vans, or Spitfire restrained to actual skaters as a new influx of consumers are rushing to buy the latest products under these labels. However, it has not come without backlash from the skating community themselves, who see those as “posers” trying to be a part of a culture that they were never a part of. Skate culture emerged in California where it really took off in the ‘70s. It was something for outcasts to feel like they belonged, and as skating’s popularity grew, brands and companies were created for 176 | THREAD

them. These brands dedicated specifically to skaters quickly became symbolic for them. However, skating has taken the fashion industry by storm, and something so anti-mainstream became the focal point of everyone’s attention. Supreme, Thrasher, and Vans have all been important in the skateboarding world when it comes to authenticity. When the fashion world took notice of these brands and started to capitalize on them, there was an obvious outcry. Skaters saw a lack of authenticity in everyday people wearing these brands. When these labels are worn outside of the particular group, there is a sense of losing what it originally stood for. Skating fashion slowly crept in through the years, becoming popular in the 2010s, but it is difficult to pinpoint what started this trend. The sudden spike helped these big brands gain a larger consumer base as they started marketing themselves


WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 177


more. Social media, celebrity endorsements, and skating’s overall popularity helped boost these labels into the mainstream. Brands would also rely on the newfound fascination with skateboarders, giving them their products so they would wear them in the public eye. With skaters wearing the brands out and about, others would notice the clothing and want to replicate the style. Stores like PacSun and Zumiez sell these labels, which provide easier access for people to buy the clothing without having to find a specific store or go into a skate shop. Nevertheless, it was the exposure 178 | THREAD

of these skaters and their own personal styles that intrigued people. Vogue Magazine once did a whole week of stories surrounding skating and fashion back in 2016. Liana Satenstein wrote a series of articles including the most infamous one, “How the Thrasher Tee Became Every Cool Model’s Off-Duty Staple,” where she wrote, “There’s a roughed-up appeal to the skater lifestyle that seems contrary to that of the model.” Fashionista Magazine did an interview with an anonymous skater, and he said, “I think Vogue is f**king dumb and knows


nothing about skating, and their approach was ignorant and stupid.” His explicit rant is not uncommon among skaters who feel offended that their culture is being seen as a trend without genuinely getting to know the scene. Another incident was incited by Thrasher Magazine’s editor-in-chief Jake Phelps after photos of singer Rihanna and Justin Bieber in Thrasher gear surfaced. In 2016, in an interview with Hypebest, Phelps is

famously quoted saying, “‘We don’t send boxes to Justin Bieber or Rihanna or those f**king clowns. The pavement is where the real sh*t is. Blood and scabs,

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 179


does it get realer than that?’” Although many skaters are up in arms over their culture being “appropriated,” not everyone is angry. Alexis Castro, a journalist for Fashionista interviewed employees at KCDC Skateshop on their opinion about people wearing skate brands as a trend. “I think the people who get mad about it are those who try to ‘own’ skateboarding, but you

180 | THREAD

can’t own skateboarding. It’s for everyone and you can’t try to claim it as your own,” said Nathan (an employee at KCDC). There is a divide on whether or not fashion taking on skate style is a big deal. “I started skating when I was younger so I immersed myself in skate culture. I don’t have a problem with people wearing the brands because it’s supporting the


back of the closet

companies I have loved over the years,” said Izzy Dadosky, a freshman majoring in international business and marketing. This divide among skaters can be sharp depending on their viewpoints. “I think if they truly followed the ‘I don’t care’ skater attitude, they wouldn’t care about things like that,” said Alex

Semancik, a freshman journalism major. The future for skate-style infused fashion seems to not be slowing down anytime soon as some of the most popular clothing brands are, in fact, these skater brands. It is unclear if they will fall out of trend and the fashion world will glue themselves to something else, but for now, skate style is here to stay.

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 181


SCROLLING THROUGH ERAS

BY JILLIAN CRAIG PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

SEAMS

DIY

WHO WHAT WEAR

MOB

CAMPUS CASUAL

thread scrolling through eras |

182 | THREAD


thread.jpg

FEATURES

BOC

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 183


IN THE PAST TEN YEARS, many things have changed because of the internet. People today are living much of their lives online and utilize the internet more for a variety of reasons. With the progress of the internet, the world of fashion has followed suit, from advertising to purchasing clothes. Much of the way consumers purchase clothes and how brands sell clothes has become a virtual process. The rise of the internet has created an opportunity for people without any particular skill set to become popular. With popularity comes sponsorships and sometimes public appearances. Tana Mongeau is a social media influencer on both Instagram and YouTube. Because of her popularity on social media, companies such as Fashion Nova use her to promote their products. In the case of Fashion Nova, Mongeau simply wears their clothes for a picture, adds the photo to her Instagram account, and gives credit to Fashion Nova for the outfit. Lisa Williams, professor of human and consumer sciences, has realized what many businesses noticed with the advancement of the internet: fashion inspiration and innovation stems from social media. 184 | THREAD

“Instead of most fashion ideas trickling down from the runway we now see trends come from fashion innovators and influencers through what they are wearing on the street and communicating through social media,” said Williams. This idea of using influencers and celebrities is a common practice for a variety of companies. Many cosmetic brands have started a practice of sending new products to celebrities and YouTube makeup artists, such as NikkieTutorials and Jeffree Star, to try out and review. There is a chance that this could backfire on certain brands, though. For example, Kim Kardashian-West’s brand, KKW Beauty, and Kylie Jenner’s brand, Kylie Cosmetics, have received negative reviews from online makeup artists. Some brands, however, use that as an opportunity to improve their products. When Kim Kardashian-West released the name of her newest business venture, shapewear, she received excessive backlash for apparent cultural appropriation of the name Kimono. After the backlash, she chose to change the name to SKIMS. The way businesses advertise their products has changed significantly over the past 10 years. The future of ads is


back of the closet

thread.jpg

WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 185


thread.jpg

186 | THREAD


back of the closet

progressively moving away from print and continues to evolve into digital. Digital ads on social media continue to rise and are often sponsored by influencers and celebrities. One popular brand, Flat Tummy Co, pays celebrities, such as Kim Kardashian-West, to give testimonies about products on social media platforms. Others, like Sugar Bear Hair, have used both influential YouTubers, like James Charles, as well as celebrities, like Kylie Jenner, to promote their products. In addition to sponsored ads, the internet has increasingly made use of targeted ads via cookies gathered when users visit websites and make web searches. The trend of targeted ads and sponsored ads seem to be increasing in prevalence, despite how users feel about websites using their data. Although some users are unhappy with the use of their online data when they visit websites, cookies have not deterred users from online shopping. Online shopping today is more than just eBay and Craigslist; now, users are able to buy from companies that are solely online and have no physical store, and people can even purchase clothes from

Instagram accounts. Additionally, online shoppers can purchase handmade clothes online. Etsy, a website dedicated to handmade crafts and other items, has sellers who offer a variety of different kinds of clothes. With an abundance of new ways shoppers can purchase clothing online, there is less motivation for non-chain physical stores to stay open. “I believe that physical stores will always have a presence and will be important for the consumer, but retailers are going to have to continue to adapt to create a seamless experience for the consumer between the physical and the digital,” said Williams. For better or for worse, the way the internet has affected fashion in the past 10 years has been quite dramatic. The future of the fashion world is unpredictable, but Williams is hopeful that advancement could be positive. “I think we will be able to have an even wider variety of cultural influences on designs as fashion from different countries becomes readily available through online purchasing,” she said. As technology continues to rapidly change, consumers can expect fashion to do so as well. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 187


Blame it on the Juice BY HELEN HORTON PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

F

irst there came clean eating — now it’s all about clean beauty. It’s the latest trend in skincare focused on natural and organic products that eliminate the need for toxic and potentially harmful ingredients. Juice Beauty is one of the most prominent names in clean and organic beauty and for good reasons too. Juice Beauty was founded in 2005 by Karen Behnke when she was pregnant with her first child. As a natural beauty aficionado, Behnke was horrified to see some of the ingredients listed in her 188 | THREAD

favorite skincare products she presumed to be healthy for her skin. She didn’t want to absorb chemicals like phthalates and parabens while pregnant, as studies have correlated them to be endocrine disruptors. Therefore, she developed Juice to bring high-performance organic skincare and makeup to the mainstream market. As one of the first corporate wellness companies in the U.S., Northern California-based Juice Beauty creates vegan makeup and skincare with an antioxidant juice base that contains over 70%


organic content in every product to fight dullness, aging, and environmental impacts on the skin. The juice base is made up of aloe, jojoba, grapeseed, and shea oils with a citrus infusion — unlike most prominent organic beauty brands that dilute their products with water. These ingredients are directly targeted to fight free-radicals and skin damage before it shows. In addition to antioxidants, Juice Beauty formulates its products without several thousand harmful ingredients, including, but not limited to, gluten, silicones, artificial dyes, petroleum, pesticides, and propylene/ butylene glycols. Their CLEAN BEAUTY Challenge encourages customers to look into some of the ingredients commonly found in conventional and natural beauty products and compare it to Juice Beauty, who utilizes plant-based and organic formulations in every product. If you WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 189


can’t find information on the ingredients used in a product, the Think Dirty app is a great resource for discovering potential chemicals that could be doing more damage than good for your skin. The skincare Juice Beauty offers ranges from eye care to peels to sunscreens and everything in between. Their most popular skincare products include a Green Apple Brightening Emulsion, Stem Cellular Exfoliating Peel Spray, and a Blemish Clearing Serum. Juice’s best-selling makeup includes the Phyto-Pigment Satin Lip Cream, SPF 30 Tinted Mineral Moisturizer, and Phyto-Pigment Cream Shadow Stick. Their most popular products range in price from $22 to $115, depending on what you’re looking for. Behnke is conscious to source her products from sustainable and organic farms in the

GREEN APPLE BRIGHTENING EMULSION $48 190 | THREAD

Northern California region to reduce environmental impact and assure product quality. One of the company’s three main values include promoting organic farming and sustainability because they believe it’s important for suppliers to interact with the ingredients and farmers on a one-on-one basis to ensure premier product quality — it’s all about providing an antioxidant-rich, complete product to the consumer. In a blog post, Behnke said, “Organic farming, which limits synthetic pesticides and fertilizers, produces ingredients with the highest antioxidant levels for products that deliver powerful results and protect you, the planet, and animals from pesticide residue.” Most of the farms that Juice Beauty uses for its products are powered sustainably by wind and solar, supporting the

STEM CELLULAR EXFOLIATING PEEL SPRAY $52

BLEMISH CLEARING SERUM $30


back of the closet

PHYTO-PIGMENT SATIN LIP CREAM $24

SPF 30 TINTED MINERAL MOISTURIZER $32

company’seco-values. To increase the number of antioxidants in her skincare line, Benhke recently purchased a farm in Sonoma Wine Country to conduct scientific research with the University of California Davis to develop grapes and olives specifically for skin benefits. The farm produces 40 to 50 tons of grapes annually as well as grows nearly 300 olive trees on the property. Juice Beauty is the first farm-to-face brand to have its ingredients studied by academia, including sunflowers, apples, and evening primrose. However, organic farming isn’t the only way Juice Beauty is promoting sustainability. The company packages its products in 100% recycled containers and utilizes soy-printed ink to reduce the amount of petroleum, an oil-based naturally-occurring substance that when released into the environment leads to

PHYTO-PIGMENT CREAM SHADOW STICK $22

ocean acidification and global warming. Additionally, all products are manufactured in the U.S. to reduce the environmental impact of transportation and fuel. Juice Beauty’s website also features a blog on lifestyle and skincare tips with some posts featuring the company’s products. Some articles listed include chemical sunscreen PSAs, the environmental benefits of organic farming and how to refuel after a workout with Juice Beauty’s own Prebiotix Antioxidant Beauty Boost. If you’re enticed to try Juice Beauty but concerned about the steep price tag, look into their student program. Through StudentBeans, the company offers a 15% student discount on all products unless otherwise listed. Proof that you can look amazing and save the environment without paying full price. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 191


RANT/RAVE MULLETS ILLUSTRATIONS KATHRYN MAYNARD

RANT BY GREYSON THORMAN

I

magine you’re walking home from class when you catch a glimpse of the most beautiful person you’ve ever seen across the street. They have a great face with a nice smile and short hair that you could run your hands through for hours. You’re captivated. The walk symbol appears ahead and you’re headed right toward them. This is it! As you pass them you see it and your heart sinks: an atrocious extension to what could’ve been the most amazing head of hair you’d ever seen. With your hopes and dreams both ruined, you sulk home. How many mullets have ruined chances of true love? How many times has this phenomenon interfered with even the most platonic of social situations? It’s outdated and attention-grabbing in the worst way. Mullets are regaining popularity since their prime in the ‘80s – a decade frequently mocked for its bad hairstyles. The return of the mullet is a hair epidemic; 192 | THREAD

they’re unsuspecting and ugly, but they convey more than just a poor choice in hairstyle. The danger of mullets is that they promote a chaotic duality through the idea that one does not have to choose between short and long hair. The suggestion that a person can have a “business in the front, party in the back” hairstyle is horrific, to say the least. Weren’t the ‘80s enough? When will society learn? There is no denying it. These grotesque examples of expressive freedom are creeping up from the past, and there is no telling how prevalent these monstrous hairdos will be. Be wary, friends. Stay safe and, please, don’t lose your heads.


RAVE BY EMILY BARBUS

It’s no longer something your dad wore in college; this time, mullets are back and better than ever. They’re beautiful, striking, and can be done in a variety of ways. You don’t have to have the super short hair on top and crazy, ponytail-length locks in the back anymore. Thankfully, society has progressed over the last three decades and found a better, less shocking version of the original mullet. Celebrities have been rocking mullets for years, including

Rihanna, Pentatonix member Mitch Grassi, and NCT 127 member Taeyong. Looking at their hairstyles, you can see it’s all about the subtlety. Men’s mullets now can have shaved sides in the style of a fade, making the longer hair in the back less offensive. Not many people are growing out the “party in the back” to extreme lengths either. So, to everyone who is adamant about hating the new mullet trend, take a look. They’re simple, trendy, and fit well with street fashion. Believe me, I think we’re all thankful Billy Ray Cyrus’ hairstyle was left in the ‘90s. The new, edgier version of the mullet allows people to find yet another way to express themselves through hair. The style didn’t even originate in the ‘80s; in fact, men have been rocking mullets for centuries. History dates as far back as Ancient Greece as the first mullet sighting, claiming such a style to be practical for keeping men’s necks dry and warm. So, not only is it a cool fashion trend on your head, but it’s also a historic relic. Anyone can wear the mullet, whether it be men, women, and everyone in between. So, wear your hair down, (or at least, the back of your hair), and celebrate the second coming of a great hairstyle! WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 193


194 | THREAD

Thread

October 2019

Profile for Thread Magazine

October 2019  

October 2019