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thread OCTOBER 2018

UP IN SMOKE AS THE SMOKE CLEARS FROM THE CRISP, AUTUMN AIR, SCENES OF FALL ARE FINALLY REVEALED

STANDING WITH

SURVIVORS AFTER NUMEROUS REPORTS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT ON CAMPUS, OHIO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS DECLARE ENOUGH IS ENOUGH.

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Table of Contents

FALL 2018

18 Runway Realway

FRONT OF BOOK

04 Haute Online 08 Top 5 12 Editor’s Letter 13 Masthead

SEAMS

22 Celeb Style 28 Over Stated 32 Pinky Promise 36 Putting it Bluntly 40 High-er Beauty 44 Effort Less

64 From Old to Bold

DIY

56 Posh Squash 60 Patch Play 68 Stretch It Out 70 Apple of My Eye 74 A Twist On A Classic 2 | THREAD


80 Sustaining A Lifestyle

WHO, WHAT, WEAR 88 Creamy 94 Art For All

132 Body Language

MIDDLE OF BOOK

100 In The Spotlight 112 Visions of Blue 122 Up In Smoke 144 6 Looks: Timeless

CAMPUS CASUAL 154 156 158 160

Horoscopes Summer Memories Quiz: Musically Stylish Spill the Beans

BACK OF THE CLOSET

164 Cover Culture 172 Breaking the Silence 188 Grand Slams 194 First Ladies of Fashion 200 Junk to Jewelry 206 Rant/Rave: Chunky Sneakers

180 Rocky Horror Rocks Again

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HAUTE ONLINE Looking for some new blogs to add to your radar? Whether scrolling for outfit inspo or needing a quick recipe, we’ve got you covered.

DESMOND IS AMAZING Desmond is Amazing is an 11-year-old drag kid who has been taking the LGBTQ community by storm with his personality and activism. From a young age, Desmond was open about his queerness and even says that he “came out of the closet when he was born” on his website. He is openly gay, gender fluid, and often seen dressing in drag. Desmond has been making a name for himself since 2014 when he appeared in Jinkx Monsoon’s music video, “The Bacon Shake.” Since then, Desmond has continued to work and spread awareness for the LGBTQ community. Despite Desmond’s young age, he has become an LGBTQ icon. In 2017, Desmond gave a speech at the NYC Pride Rally and won the Marsha P. Johnson Don’t be Outraged, Be Outrageous Award for his activism. He has also created his own drag house called Haus of Amazing, which is an online community for other drag kids to come together in a 4 | THREAD

positive, welcoming online space. Most importantly, Desmond has been setting an example for children everywhere and challenging society’s expectations about gender. He continues to encourage people of all ages to live freely, bravely, and unapologetically. – CHLOE RUFFENNACH


haute online

BY MARI ANDREW By Mari Andrew, an inspiring writer and illustrator based in NYC, started her Instagram page in 2016 as a form of self-expression. After being stuck in a state of grief, she discovered that drawing and doodling brought her joy and clarity to what she was feeling. Eventually, her page started getting traffic, and more people started visiting and following her page. Mari’s feed is filled with a calming palette of watercolors; some of her posts rich in a palette of colors and hues, whereas others use it sparingly, only in instances of emphasis. Mari also offers creative ways of visualizing her thoughts through sketching out human figures, everyday objects, and minimalistic interpretations of landscapes. The illustrator’s mental journey to self-exploration has not only helped her, but her 900,000 Instagram followers that seem to relate a lot of what she goes through in their own lives. In an interview from June 2018, Mari states, “I feel like a lot of my experiences are very specific to me, but when I share them it turns out that we’re all so much more alike than we think we are.“ – GRACE ZIEMKE WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 5


DEAR GIANA As a 9-year-old girl, it’s hard to imagine that fame comes easily. But for Dear Giana, it seems like her second nature. Her fashion ingenuity and artistic renderings have landed her a spot in the pages of Vogue and Elle. Not to mention her vast following on Instagram. Over 20,000 followers have tuned in to adore one of the youngest fashion icons to hit the glossy pages of Vogue. So, why is Giana a person to watch? The answer comes easily once you take a peek into her website. Giana’s specialty is using her mother’s fashion magazines to practice her drawing skills. Her technique involves flipping magazine photos in half, and then freehand drawing the remainder of the image. There’s an oddity to her work, which is why it’s placed on gallery walls, in Instagram posts, and featured in multiple publications. Her artistic talent paired with her designer fashion sense is attention grabbing to say the least. It’s hard to know where Giana will take her passion as she gains more experience, but it will surely be a journey to follow. – COLLEEN HOWARD

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haute online

TYLER MITCHELL Everyone is talking about Tyler Mitchell, a 23-yearold fashion photographer. He made history when he was chosen to photograph the September 2018 cover of American Vogue. The September issue of the magazine is widely considered Vogue’s most important issue of the year. It has the most pages, advertisements, and always sells the most copies. The landmark cover was the first in Vogue’s 126-year legacy that was shot by an African American photographer. His photography style is not overly stylized; his photos really focus on the person. Beyoncé, the subject of the cover, is featured on his Instagram exuding fierceness. She was instrumental in bringing Tyler Mitchell to the project. “Until there is a mosaic of perspectives coming from different ethnicities behind the lens, we will continue to have a narrow approach and view of what the world actually looks like. That is why I wanted to work with this brilliant 23-yearold photographer, Tyler Mitchell,” Beyoncé said. Tyler Mitchell is no stranger to the fashion world.

CLICK TO VIEW THE WEBSITE!

He has also worked with Marc Jacobs, Teen Vogue, and More or Less Magazine. Fill your feed with diverse beauty inspiration @tylersphotos. – ZOE STITZER

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5 TOP

Find out the top five things that our exec board is inspired by right now.

1

RACHEL MORRISON, ASC. It

seems that in all careers there’s a constant debate about work/life balance and its obtainability.The first woman nominated for an Academy Award in cinematography, Rachel Morrison, is a perfect example that you can have the best of both worlds. As a powerhouse in a maledominated field, Morrison has recently wrapped a feature film while being 8+ months pregnant and has expressed that “motherhood is not a disadvantage” and that it has “added experience and enhanced empathy” that has made her a better filmmaker. Morrison is a huge role model of mine because she is an inspiration for all women aspiring to work in the film industry, proving you don’t have to choose between a career and a family. – BAYLEE GORHAM

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top 5

2

BOLD PANTS

Most of you probably know I’m a big fan of black jeans—I have at least five pairs. But, this year, I’m trying to be more daring with my wardrobe choices. I started by incorporating more color (gasp!) into my outfits. I picked up a beautiful cherry red pair of high-waisted trousers from Zara for days when I’m feeling super extra, but I’m also obsessed with the black and white pair of plaid zip-up skinnies I nabbed from Urban Outfitters. – KATIE PITTMAN

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3

GRETA VAN FLEET As

someone raised to the tunes of Paul McCartney, Stevie Nicks, and Mick Jagger, I have a huge appreciation for some solid guitar. That’s why when I first heard Greta Van Fleet’s chart-topping single “Highway Tune,” I knew they had something good going. The Michigan-bred band made up of three brothers and their childhood friend are changing what it means to be a rockstar in 2018. Although they may be inspired by the likes of Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, and The Eagles, these guys are appealing to a sliggghttlyyy younger generation…given that all four members are between the ages of 19 and 22. They’ve been recognized by industry legends like Elton John and Robert Plant and are due to put out their first official album this October. I was fortunate enough to interview them over the summer for my internship, too! – MAGGIE BOYLE

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4

ASTROLOGY I love astrology,

and it’s not because I can read off the meaning behind every planet, or tell you all I know about the origins of the zodiac signs, because I totally can’t. But that’s what makes it all so interesting: you could spend hours trying to understand birth charts and the 12 Houses and still come out with so many questions (I know I did). Truth be told, who knows if any of this has any meaning, and maybe none of it may actually influence who we are as humans, but I couldn’t care any less. Understanding my sign (I’m a Sagittarius) and when I was born has helped me make sense of my character, lead me to a greater sense of self-understanding, and helped me find confidence in who I am. If you have a few hours to kill, read a few articles about astrology. You never know what you might learn. – GRACE ZIEMKE


5

TROYE SIVAN Troye Sivan, an openly gay

pop artist, recently released his sophomore album Bloom. I’m obsessed. The tracks sound much happier than his debut, but he never loses the signature innocence in his voice, which complements the synth-pop perfectly. This piece of work is one we all deserved as LGBTQ youth. It begins with “Seventeen,” which sounds straight out of Call Me By Your Name. He sings about the complexity of losing his virginity to an older man. The album continues with “MY MY MY!,” a dance track begging you to fall into a lust-filled fantasy. The title track, “BLOOM,” proudly declares that submission and femininity in the bedroom are beautiful gifts, and I’m living this anthem in 20-gay-teen. One of the more significant ballads on the track is “Postcard,” where he sings about the complexity of loving a male struggling to showcase his feelings. I couldn’t help but fall deeply in love with an album that finally departs from heteronormative storylines and dives directly into gay love. – BLAKE BORER-MILLER

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Editor’s Note Another summer has flown by, but let’s be honest: Who doesn’t love fall? For students, it’s a chance to get back into the swing of things and begin something new. I can’t thank our staff enough for the energy and hard work they put into this issue, and I’m so thankful for all of the new talent who joined our team to make this issue. We’ve got some standout styling this issue, from recreating runway shows (Runway Realway, P. 18) to emulating our favorite celebs (Celeb Style, P. 22). Or, if you’re looking for something more presidential, check out the “First Ladies of Fashion” (P. 194). Chances are you’ll find at least one source of #OOTD inspo from one of our shoots. Outside of fashion, we wanted to take the time to tackle bigger issues, too. We outline the historic September that fashion magazines had, finally giving black women the space they deserve: the cover (“Cover Culture,” P. 164). In this edition, we’re also extremely proud to share the work fellow Bobcats have done to put an end to sexual violence on campus. In “Breaking the Silence” (P. 172), students gather to declare “It’s on

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us, Bobcats.” Thread stands with survivors. and we want to make sure everyone gets the support they need. We’ve listed some on- and off-campus support resources below:

National Sexual Assault Hotline (RAINN): 1 (800) 656-4673 OU Survivor Advocacy Program: (740) 597-7233 OU Counseling and Psychological Services: (740) 593-1616

Much Love,


thread EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Katie Pittman

MANAGING EDITOR Rylie Brown

PHOTO EDITOR Leanna Siupinys

DESIGN DIRECTOR Samantha Güt

PHOTO CHIEF Matt Jones & Colby Caldwell

PUBLIC RELATIONS CHIEF Blake Borer-Miller

SEAMS EDITOR Hannah Pridemore

BUSINESS MANAGER Leah Nutter

WHO, WHAT, WEAR EDITOR Nick Battaglia

FEATURES EDITOR Colleen Howard

DIY EDITOR Courtney Adams

FASHION DIRECTOR Maggie Boyle

CAMPUS CASUAL EDITOR Marie Chailosky

WEB EDITOR Grace Ziemke

COPY CHIEF Jackie Osborne

VIDEO CHIEF Baylee Gorham

WRITERS Courtney Adams, Emily Barbus, Emily Campbell, Taylor Dahl, Danielle Donavan, Shaina Dubinskiy, Hannah Ellinger, Madeline Fink, Emily Finton, Katie Hawkinson, Helen Horton, Colleen Howard, Justin Markarian, Megan Parks, Grace Roy, Chloe Ruffennach, Cat Sommer, Zoe Stitzer, Sarah Todack, Grace Ziemke COPY EDITORS: Sara Dowler, Emily Finton, Helen Horton, Chloe Ruffennach, Zoe Stitzer PHOTOGRAPHERS Emily Barbus, Chloe Barkley, Maggie Boyle, Lauren Britt, Ansel Chen, Kara Fazzone, Allison Haas, Russell James, Elliott Magenheim, Kate McCarthy, Jonathan Pierron, Kailee Richey, Leanna Siupinys, Andrew Thompson DESIGNERS Nicole Dinan, Anna Johnston, MacKenzie Krezz, Adriana Mazzotta, Sophia Reed, Jared Robb, Riley Runnels, Alex Vella VIDEOGRAPHERS Yana Durado, Baylee Gorham, Elijah Jimenez, Hope Mueller, Leah Nutter, Cat Sommer MAKEUP ARTISTS Emily Barbus, Hannah Lunt, Grace Roy

STYLISTS Courtney Adams, Taylor Dahl, Lauren Friedman, Lauren Frullo, Dililah Gonzalez, Helen Horton, Sara Januszewski, Erin Lesko, Lindsay O’Nesti, Grace Roy PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM Karynne Baker, Darian Berdysz, Jena Catalano, Lauren Frullo, Bailey Kormick, Blake Borer-Miller, Nathaniel Stansbery, Johnathen Sweeney, Grace Ziemke MODELS Victor Baba, Chloe Barkley, Stephen Barrett, Nick Battaglia, Adam Begley, Gerhardt Bornsclegl, Josephine Celeste, Kayla Collins, Elaine Cooke, Abigail Croft, Taylor Dahl, Rachel Dannenhauer, Tyler Dent, Danielle Donavan, Kayla Edwards, Connor Faut, Seth Forestner, Matty Geither, Dililah Gonzalez, Kiley Guilman, Emma Herzig, Ramsey Hijawii, Will Hippler, Jemeia Hope, Colleen Howard, Elijah Jimenez, Casi Jordan, Jennifer Kash, Adin Leibovich, Erin Lesko, Micah Luke, Aaron Macer, Sofia McLemore, Makenna Moses, Lindsey O’Nesti, Erin O’Shaughnessy, CJ Remley, Sloane Riley,Natalie Rose, Keona Shibata, Izzy Strauss, Kaitlyn Urbaniak, Troy Waliszewski, Michelle Weaver, De’Vaughn Williams, Grace Ziemke WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 13


Behind the Scenes of

Thread’s photoshoots

Anderson .Paak, 22

FALL

Billie Eilish, 24

2018 VIDEOS

6 Looks: Timeless Trends, 146

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Up in Smoke 124


FOLLOW

thread Visit us at our meetings Wednesdays at 9 p.m., Schoonover 450

@THREADMAG

FACEBOOK.COM/THREADMAG

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SEAMS From the runway to the streets, and everywhere in between, here are this season’s most sought-after trends.

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Runway Realway BY MADELINE FINK PHOTOS BY MAGGIE BOYLE

Nicky Zimmermann is a designer who wants her garments to be eyecatching and beautiful, but uncomplicated and made for all women. Most of Zimmermann’s past collections have had a bohemian, girl-next-door vibe to them. However, she went a different direction for the Fall 2018 collection. The title of her fall collection is “Unbridled,” considered to be medieval-chic with a romantic, girly twist. All of the pieces consist of neutral, earthy tones like pink, gray, and brown, but the textures set each piece apart. Zimmermann’s collection is youthful and flirty, but it’s also flattering on anyone. Although the collection is quite soft and feminine, there are touches of masculinity as well. Some of the Zimmermann models wore cowboy boots with studs or had wide-brim black hats tied around their shoulders, giving the garments more contrast and definition. It is a well-balanced combination of elegance and risk for the everyday woman, which is what Zimmermann wanted. Zimmermann made this 18 | THREAD

collection with all types of people in mind. She wanted anyone and everyone to be able to wear the pieces and feel good about themselves in them. There is something for every single kind of “unbridled” person, whether that be a beautiful flowing gown or a daring brown corset. Zimmermann made this collection about allowing extraordinary be worn by the ordinary.


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BY JUSTIN MARKARIAN PHOTOS BY ELLIOTT MAGENHEIM

Founded in 2012 by industry newcomer Jerry Lorenzo, Fear of God house rose to the top of the fashion-streetwear hierarchy over its short lifespan—even scoring nods from the likes of Kanye West and Justin Bieber. Lorenzo has a certain aesthetic that he adheres to in every collection: dark, gloomy silhouettes that almost give a view into a world where ’90s fashion never faded. Fear of God has never been into flashy, attention-seeking logos that adorn many streetwear brands. Rather, the label opts for more low-key branding. Emphasis is placed on the garments as a whole and how they complement the other items in a fashion-savvy hypebeast’s wardrobe. Fear of God’s latest collection, titled “Sixth Collection,” furthers Lorenzo’s “religious grunge” motif, electing once more to favor the outfit as a whole. Stone-washed denim, wild-west bedlam inspired coats, and basic plaids characterize the drop, giving it a gritty, yet extremely fashionable flavor. Pastel blues work in tandem with weathered beiges to create a scene reminiscent of Back to the Future III. Marty McFly would’ve certainly donned the muted gray parka 20 | THREAD

introduced in this collection. There is no concrete release date for the Sixth Collection, only a vague “2018-2019” plastered on the brand’s website. Nevertheless, we can expect Lorenzo’s latest pieces to appear on SSENSE and Barneys New York sometime in the coming year. Prices will likely range between a cool $300 for base layers, and upward of $1,500 for coats and parkas. These hefty prices are not sans merit, however, these threads are sure become some of your most-grabbed-for wardrobe pieces.


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ANDERSON

. P A A K

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CELEB STYLE Rapper and singer Anderson Paak embodies both underground fashion and luxury while exuding a vibrant, soulful confidence. BY NICK BATTAGLIA PHOTOS BY ANDREW THOMPSON

When Anderson .Paak isn’t channeling the sensually charged sensations of Venice Beach or Malibu with the bubbly synths of his piano and his lively voice, he is exuding it through his wardrobe. Like his music, .Paak tends to keep his style vibrant and soulful while maintaining focused confidence that everything he does is completely true to himself. Born as Brandon Paak Anderson in Oxnard, California, .Paak originally took to the stage in 2009 under the name Breezy Lovejoy. Back then, he was 23 years old, homeless, and unemployed trying to support family. After some hard work and a lucky break in 2011 with producing legend Dr. Dre, .Paak ditched the Lovejoy moniker and began going by the chopped version of his birth name. In 2016, .Paak secured himself a spot on the XXL Freshman List, following the release of his critically acclaimed album, Malibu. It was from that point that .Paak was

able to kick back and enjoy a seat on the mainstream stage. Although his music and his personality are defined by his effortlessly lavish lifestyle, it took a lot to get to where he is today. .Paak fuses the beach bum and coastal king lifestyles when it comes to dressing. He enjoys patterned jackets and long fur coats, ratty shirts, sneakers and loafers, wide-brimmed hats, and small watchman beanies that barely cling to the top of his head. And if it’s not apparent from his music, .Paak loves accessories: pinky rings, long necklaces, scarves, and tiny round sunglasses. His personal style is rooted in a dark and earthy palette of browns, dark greens, reds, blues, and yellows. It’s a mixed bag, as he pulls from two worlds— the underground and the luxurious—both of which he has lived well within. One thing’s for sure, when .Paak steps outside his outfit will be accompanied by a gigantic and elated smile, iconic to him. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 23


BILLIE EILISH

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Sixteen-year-old Billie Eilish boasts over 100 million streams on Spotify as well as a unique sense of style that combines grudge and high-end fashion.

BY TAYLOR DAHL PHOTOS BY JONATHAN PIERRON

It’s almost impossible to not know who Billie Eilish is. Much like Lorde, at the young age of 16, Billie Eilish went viral in the music industry following her release of “Ocean Eyes” in 2016. Since then, the song has gained over 100 million streams on Spotify, and Eilish continues to relish in the stardom, collaborating with artists like Vince Staples and Khalid. Her fanbase continues to grow not only because of her young age and unique voice, but also her killer sense of style. Eilish has acquired about six million followers on Instagram (@wherearetheavocados), which is the main platform she uses to show off her oversized streetwear and designer co-ords. Eilish strays from the typical girly and flattering outfits that most pop stars are spotted in, and instead she opts for neon sweatpants and kneelength baggy shorts paired with bucket hats and beanies. Her style has ultimately made her stand out amongst other pop artists, which made a huge impact on her music career and

allowed her to gain attention from big names in the industry. Her signature custom kicks and layered chains have given her respect from some of the industry’s top-trending rappers like 6lack and Jaden Smith. Eilish somehow manages to combine grungy with tomboyish streetwear and high-end designer pieces and makes it completely cool. Eilish always seems to be wearing popular designers like Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Balenciaga, and Dolce & Gabbana. A lot of her pieces also tend to be custom, which really makes her style truly and completely one-of-akind. To channel her flashy designer streetwear look that she’s known for, customize some sneakers, or browse vintagewavez.com and @ tsuwoop_ on Instagram. One thing’s for sure, her style draws attention and she thrives on it. By expressing herself and not caring about what others in the industry think are the main reasons she’s always serving looks. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 25


&

RACHEL CALVIS

EMMA DENGLER

Major: : :

How would you describe your blog? :

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What is the best part about blogging as a team? :


blogger of the month

Student Spotlight Launch Have you ever wondered where that kid in class gets their wardrobe? Rachel and Emma launched a series on their blog called “Student Spotlight” which highlights campus’ fashion trend setters. If you’re interested in seeing who is featured next, go check out their blog!

Thrift Shopping in Athens There’s nothing more inviting than hanging a wreath on the front door to welcome guests inside a home. Jessica shows how to create a leafy wreath with one unusual material, paint chips! If this craft sounds like something to try, go check out her blog post—be ready for lots of cutting and gluing!

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BY KATIE HAWKINSON PHOTOS BY KAILEE RICHEY

N

eed something cuttingedge to brighten a bland outfit? From resin to cloth tassels, statement earrings have gained newfound popularity. Since earrings have been around for quite some time, 2500 B.C. to be exact, it’s no surprise that people have had a lot of time to experiment with styles, weight, and placement. In the 1980s, women of color founded the large earring trend, wearing oversized hoops, gaining the nickname “doorknocker” earrings. Recent trends have earrings constructed of unconventional materials, like pom-poms or glass beads. Statement earrings come in a multitude of colors, shapes, and sizes, and can be worn by all. Clip-on earrings are a great way to level up any outfit for those who don’t have their ears pierced. From bold ear climbers to single drop earrings, ears are a new way to experiment with accessories and create an impactful look. The minimal, structured earrings focus on flow and figure. A simple drop earring can complete an everyday jeans and T-shirt look. For an art-inspired option, the coral earrings from ban.do (inspired WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 29


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by Henri Matisse) would add a finishing touch. Pair these with a flowy midi dress to easily create a feminine outfit. For those willing to take a risk, an asymmetric style is a more daring option. Pairing a simple stud on one ear and a larger drop earring on the other creates an undeniable contrast and is sure to draw attention. Finding the right earrings for the right price can be difficult, with variations on style, material,

and brand name. Online stores like BaubleBar curate several varieties of exclusively-styled earrings, including ones with beaded drops that look like flamingos or thick studs with faux gemstones. Inexpensive options can be found online at Forever21, ASOS, or Boohoo. To make an impact with minimal effort, statement earrings are an effortless way to add a finishing touch to any look.

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pinky promise WRITER ANDIE HUNT PHOTOS BY MACK WAGGNER

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F

or such a small thing, the to show their commitment to pinky ring holds a lot of specific organizations. history. In ancient MesNot everyone has the wealth opotamia, men who owned land of the mafia to be able to afford and had a social standing wore pinky rings made of sapphire and rings with engravings to use as a other expensive stones. Avianne signet on documents and letand Co. have an impressive ters. The royal family of England diamond ring collection for men. has passed on signets to male The styles offered are chunky descendants as a sign of their gold mixed with other colors royalty. In the and stones. If “HISTORICALLY one did have the 1960s, men used their rings as wealth of the THE RING signs of affiliation mafia or wanted PLACEMENT IS to pretend they and status, which was popularized did, Frost NYC FOR MEN TO by the mafia. an extensive RESEMBLE THEIR has Historically, the collection AUTHORITY OR of diamond ring placement was for men encrusted DOMINANCE. and symbolized rings that vows ANYONE CAN their authority to mimic the or dominance. classic hip-hop HAVE THIS Anyone can have “swagger.” POWER—IT IS this power—it This trend is JUST A FINGER a bit primitive is just a finger after all. This in its meaning, AFTER ALL.” finger choice but anyone can became popularized by Tony claim their power and show Soprano of The Sopranos. His they are cool and classy, too. cool demeanor and sheer power The best part of the pinky ring are what attracted the public to is its versatility. It can fit into adopt this style and symbol into minimalist or maximalist styles. an everyday accessory. The mafia Some people have worn pinky claimed their stake in the pinky rings as statement pieces. Cardi ring game. They would wear a B was seen at the VMAs sporting flashy ring on their left finger emerald rings worth $4 million,

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and she made sure to include her pinky in the fun, giving it its own large magenta ring. There are a variety of different styles to choose from. Recently, rose gold styles have been popular in the pinky ring market. Mejuri has a line of “dainty rings,” which feature various singlebands with engraved patterns that provide some texture. Although, the title “dainty” seems a little counter-intuitive

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to the meaning behind the ring. David Yurman offers rings for women that pack the right amount of moxie in his line, “The Power of the Pinky.” His pieces boast thick, gold bands that have a subtle designs in the center. Pinky rings have made their way in and out of history for practical and stylistic purposes. Whether they are worn as a symbol or just an accessory, it is hard to go wrong.


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PUTTING IT

BLUNTL BY CHLOE RUFFENNACH PHOTOS BY CHLOE BARK-

Bowlcuts are one of the most easily recognizable and perhaps stand-out haircuts. It looks just as it sounds: a haircut shaped to look even in length on all sides, like a bowl overturned on a person’s head. Though it is usually a hairstyle commonly worn by young boys, celebs like Rihanna and Ruby Rose have recently begun to normalize the style and make it high fashion. Bowlcuts are not a new hairstyle. In fact, it’s actually making a comeback after decades of dormancy. The look surged in popularity during the 1960s and carried into the 1980s. The Beatles were some of the most notable celebrities to first sport the hairstyle, and the look became well-recognized due to the band’s popularity. The style faded from celebrity status in the following years, but it remained rather popular with young boys. 36 | THREAD


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Stranger Things’ Will Byers may have helped repopularlize the style, just like young Anakin in Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. Perhaps, one can attribute the rise of bowlcuts in America to its global popularity. Recently, international powerhouse and beloved K-pop group, BTS, has made waves with their unconventional personal styles. One of these trends is the bowlcut, which members Jungkook, V, and Jimin all sport. America has watched them hit the red carpet and sing to massive crowds while donning these blunt hairstyles for years. Part of the bowlcut’s recent rise in recognition can be linked to the band’s sudden popularity in the US. High caliber celebrities like Zendaya, Alicia Keys, Mary J. Blige, and Rihanna are choosing to ditch their long locks in favor of the look. Marc Jacobs assisted in keeping the trend alive by featuring neon bowlcuts in his Fall 2018 runway show. Off the runway, the bowlcut is an easy-to-maintain, on-trend style. Whether running to class or heading to the bars, the blunt hairstyle pairs well with both laidback and maximalist styles. Don’t be afraid to take a risk and shed your long locks to rock a shorter, more symmetrical style. 38 | THREAD


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“HIGH”-ER BEAUTY

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BY DANIELLE DONAVAN PHOTOS BY KAILEE RICHEY

CBD is a small but mighty acronym. CBD, or cannabidiol, has risen to fame thanks to its calming and moisturizing effects. The oil has become easily accessible so the public can learn more about its benefits and history. CBD is obtained from a

cannabis sativa plant and made into a potent oil. There are no THC properties, the effects on the body are minimal. Benefits of the oil include pain relief, anxiety and depression reduction, and cancer symptom alleviation. Though there may not be enough research to prove the exact calming properties of the oil, it’s a new alternative for

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someone looking to eliminate animal byproducts from their beauty routine. The beauty industry is known to be an experimental place, so for CBD to be infused in everyday products is no surprise. What does CBD oil in makeup do exactly? According to a 2007 study in the Journal of Dermatological Science, CBD can help in alleviating dry skin and psoriasis. These lotions are also said to help fight acne by regulating oils in sebaceous glands. Herb Essentials body lotions are known for their soothing benefits. The lotions are made with aloe vera, chamomile, and shea butter, which relieve dry skin and can reduce feelings of anxiety (think essential oils). Unfortunately, CBD-infused products are sold at a higher prices than drugstore lotions. Herb Essentials lotions run around $45, which may seem steep, but with scientific studies backing the positive properties of the oil, it may be worth the investment. Milk Makeup is also experimenting with CBD-infused beauty items. The brand recently released a mini collection including brow gel and mascara. Milk is known for staying true to its vegan values, and by using CBD oil, they can skip out on

“CBD CAN HELP IN ALLEVIATING DRY SKIN AND PSORIASIS. THESE LOTIONS ARE ALSO SAID TO HELP FIGHT ACNE BY REGULATING OILS IN SEBACEOUS GLANDS.” using beeswax. Beeswax acts as a bonding agent in numerous makeup products. Milk’s Kush products are more affordable, ranging from $18-$24. Though reviews on their products are mixed, most people seem to enjoy the natural ingredients of the product better than the synthetic ingredients of competitors’. CBD oil beauty products may seem niche, but their popularity is expected to increase within the coming years. For now, vegan makeup buyers can rejoice in a new line of animal-free makeup and beauty products. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 43


EFFORT

LESS

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BY SARAH TODACK PHOTOS BY MATT JONES

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he scumbag look is an ironic name for a style that thrives in Los Angeles’ streetwear culture. It’s ironic because the people promoting this fad are primarily wealthy, famous men. Perhaps it’s not so ironic, because despite the lazy appearance, the clothing is expensive. Big brands are profiting from the scumbag look by pricing minimalistic clothing with a high price tag. Yeezy’s collection with its less-than-exciting tees and tanks cost hundreds of dollars and plain Champion sweatshirts have surged in price.

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“THIS TREND IS LIKE THE ‘LARGER THAN LIFE CLOTHING’ OF THE ‘90S. THIS ISN’T IN ANY WAY SURPRISING SINCE MANY TRENDS FROM THE ‘90S ARE FINDING THEIR WAY BACK INTO MAINSTREAM FASHION.” Celebrities like Pete Davidson and Justin Bieber are best known for sporting this look, wearing nothing more than sweats and T-shirts. This can be described as a high-cost “just rolled out of bed” look. Another aspect of this style, besides its faux scumbag nature, is its oversizing. This trend mimics the “larger than life clothing” of the ‘90s, which isn’t surprising, since many trends from the ‘90s are finding their way back into mainstream fashion. The many variations of the look are all rooted in the classic scumbro ensemble: baggy minimalistic hoodies over a T-shirt, branded joggers, expensive sneakers, and an array of tattoos to push the attire over the edge. At first glance, one may mistake a “high fashion scumbro” for the average college stoner, but chances are the outfit costs a small fortune. Some may find this effortless look attractive, as it could resemble a lazy Sunday ‘fit. From running errands to binging Netflix, it is a cozy outfit option. So far the scumbro look has 46 | THREAD


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been predominantly male and mostly found on the streets of Los Angeles. Brands heavily market the clothing pieces to these wealthy individuals. Despite the usually overpriced nature of the scumbag look, there are ways to do it much cheaper. It’s quite easy and can be as cheap as a quick thrift shop trip. The key is buying baggy and used-looking clothing, the more mismatched the better. Most college students already have these items in their closets and the look’s layering aspect will translate well into the colder months. To avoid looking “too scumbro,” take inspiration from Ariana Grande’s style approach. She pairs sweatshirt dresses, boots, or sneakers, adding a feminine twist to the masculine garb. Who knew that reducing the amount of effort put into picking out an outfit in the morning would be the next biggest trend. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 49


mad for

PLAID BY KATIE PITTMAN PHOTOS BY LAUREN BRITT

To some, plaid might seem outdated or better off on grandma’s kitchen table. While that could be the case, the classic print is resurging as a more refined option than the typical flannel shirt. From the classic button-down to a stylish mini skirt, there is room for plaid in every wardrobe. Following plaid’s historic transformation may inspire different ways to style the pattern. To start, plaid wasn’t always named “plaid.” The pattern, which originated in Scotland, was called “tartan.” According to Smithsonian Magazine, tartan described the colors and lines specific to a fabric. “Plaids,” or heavy coats made for travel, were made in tartan patterns, hence the crossover of the names. But, originally, each 50 | THREAD

color and line combination was specific to a Scottish family or clan, serving as a crest of sorts. Once the pattern gained popularity in America and England, it was mass-produced and lost its familial ties. Perhaps one of the fabric’s most desirable qualities is its versatility. There are endless combinations of colors and lines, creating boundless styling possibilities. To bring this look into modern day, take full advantage of its wearability. For a laid-back look, opt for a cozy flannel or blanket scarf. To add some more structure to a look, a blazer or high-waisted trouser might do the trick. Fall fashion collections, inspired by the warm-colored plaids of the ‘70s, began producing the print en masse. Fast fashion


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retailers quickly caught on, filling racks and shelves with mustard, muted copper, and mocha-tinted wardrobe pieces. Missoni models strutted down the runway in groovy, neutralcolored looks, mixing patterns and layering plaids of all sizes. Reminiscent of the “plaids” in early Scotland, heavy overcoats grazed models’ ankles, as did thin, printed scarves. Coach mixed furs and plaids in their Autumn/Winter 2017 collection, adding pastel accents to muted brown shaggy coats and ruffled maxi dresses. Despite plaid rotating in and out of popularity, it has always been considered a “classic” pattern. For a nod to the Scots, don a woolen overcoat to keep warm and dry during cold fall days. A more modern take on the pattern, à la Lady Bird, layer a plain T-shirt or turtleneck under a plaid shift or overall dress. Plaid trousers offer a sophisticated take on the trend. Pairing the pants with loafers and a button-up draws inspiration from the ‘60s. But, for a grungier option, add a pocket chain and finish off the look with a worn-in band T-shirt. For this age-old pattern, the proof is in its lasting power. From serving as a familial tartan to the sophisticated staple it is today, there’s no shortage of styling possibilities. 52 | THREAD


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DIY

Crafting the most intricate of knick-knacks, working out the mind, body, and soul, and making the most delicious of treats.

A TWIST ON A CLASSIC P. 76

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Posh Squash BY GRACE ZIEMKE PHOTOS BY COLBY CALDWELL

Living with others makes it tough to find common ground when trying to decide on the ideal way to decorate for the fall. Some love to show off their space with expressive jack-o’-lanterns and plastic skeletons, while others are content with a classic leaf arrangement and gourds by the front door. This DIY pumpkin decorating will please the entire house, and keep everyone on their crafty toes. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 57


LEA F DECOUPAGE You will need Mod Podge Paint brush

Pumpkins Soft leaves

Instructions 1 Collect 5-8 leaves from the yard and lay out a pattern on the pumpkin. Find leaves that are flexible and won’t break apart as they form to the pumpkin. 2 Coat a designated area of the pumpkin with a layer of Mod Podge, then do the same with a leaf, front and back. Place the leaf down on the Mod Podge-d area of the pumpkin. 3 Continue this process until your arrangement is complete and set. 4 Let the pumpkin sit overnight to dry. 58 | THREAD


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PA INTED PUMPKINS You will need Black paint Fall-colored paints (red, burnt orange, gold, white, light yellow) Variety of paintbrushes

Instructions 1 Cover the pumpkin in black paint. The background helps to make all the other colors pop. 2 Use your creativity to create a design unique to you on the pumpkin. Try using different paint brush widths, textures, and patterns! 3 Let dry for 2-3 hours.

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PATCH PLAY Fall is finally here, and the only item better than a favorite sweater is a pair of jeans. While jeans are a great buy, they are an even better DIY. By customizing a pair of jeans with patches, they become more durable and one-of-a-kind. Whether you want to transform a pair of your own or spruce-up some thrifted denim, patchwork is the perfect way to update your jeans this season. BY GRACE BREZINA

PHOTOS BY KATE McCARTHY

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MATERIALS NEEDED - A pair of jeans - Scissors - Hot glue gun or sewing materials - Fabric for patches

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diy: craft it

STEPS

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2

3

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Select a pair of jeans, and choose the fabrics you would like to use as patches. Old flannels and pajama pants work perfectly! If you are looking for a specific pattern, then look to a local craft supply store.

OPTION 1: For those who are less crafty, take a hot glue gun on low heat, and use it to attach the patchwork to the jeans.

Cut patches out of the fabric and place them on the denim however you prefer. Get creative and add your own style! All shapes and size of patches are recommended.

Try on the jeans to admire the final product!

OPTION 2: For those with sewing experience, use your sewing machine or needle and thread to stitch the patchwork.

Patchwork jeans make a simple, yet fun DIY. They require as little or as much effort as you prefer and the finished product could not be any cuter. This DIY is the perfect way to repurpose old fabric and spice up some jeans.

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B

F

BY HA PHOT

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BOLD.

From Old to

ANNAH ELLINGER TOS BY HUNTER WURZLEBACHER

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“AN O WOOD CHAI REUP WITH FABR CREA STUN NEW FURN

H

ave you ever found yourself in possession of an old piece of furniture that you just don’t know what to do with? Turning aged pieces into something brand new is simple and cost efficient with these easy tips and tricks. First, where can you find these diamonds in the rough to turn into beautiful staple pieces in your home? Some great places to look are thrift stores and garage sales—any place where you can find antiques or old items for low prices. You should look for pieces that are made of wood or metal and are easy to cut, paint, and manipulate. Once you’ve selected an item that you see potential in, make it easy for yourself! Browse 66 | THREAD

websites like Pinterest for ideas on how to make it your own. Some great starter tips are to use paint and/or fabric. They’re both easy to work with and available at a low cost. For example, an old wooden chair can be reupholstered with a unique fabric to create a stunning new piece of furniture. A scratched up, aged table can be sanded down and painted a new color to make an entirely new-looking table! If you find yourself in possession of an old endstand or dresser, you can easily purchase new and colorful drawer pulls at a hardware store and add some pizzazz to your piece. With these tips in mind, it’s easy to make any room look like it came straight from Chip and Jo’s house!


diy: craft it

OLD DEN IR CAN BE PHOLSTERED H A UNIQUE RIC TO ATE A NNING PIECE OF NITURE.”

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STRETCH I T O U T BY KATIE HAWKINSON PHOTOS BY LEANNA SIUPINYS

Imagine: you’ve just finished the best workout of your life—cardio, weight lifting, and you feel amazing—time for a great post-workout nap. But you can’t forget about those cool-down stretches! An often-forgotten part of everyone’s workouts are stretches, which help increase muscle retention, gain flexibility, and lower your heart rate. These stretches are meant to be held for longer than your preworkout stretches in order to increase your flexibility. Find a piece of open floor and get ready to stretch!

Lumbar Rotation Stretch Lie flat with both legs out. Bring one leg up, placing your foot across the extended leg. Next, twist your body away from the extended leg, until your shoulders are flat on the ground. For a deeper stretch, take the arm closest to the extended leg, and gently pull your leg up. Hold for 30-45 seconds and switch for each leg.

Hamstring Stretch Sit on the ground. Extend one leg, and bend the other leg in, placing your foot on your inner thigh. With toes pointed on the extended leg, lean over, and reaching both hands toward your extended foot. Hold for 30-45 seconds and repeat for each leg. 68 | THREAD


diy: work it

Deltoid Stretch Reach one arm across your body, and use the other arm to hold the stretched arm and pull it closer to the body. Repeat this stretch two times per arm. Hold for 20-30 seconds.

Tricep Stretch Raise one arm, and place the hand on the opposite shoulder blade, as if you’re trying to pat yourself on the back. With the unextended arm, grab the opposite elbow gently pull. Repeat with each arm. Hold for 30-45 seconds.

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BY GRACE ROY PHOTOS BY MACK WAGNER ILLUSTRATIONS BY NICOLE DINAN

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AS FALL APPROACHES, IT MAKES complete sense that with our pumpkin spice lattes, pumpkin cookies, and even pumpkin pies, we create a healthy fall twist on a delicious trendy treat...smoothie bowls! Yes, the summer fad of

1

smoothie bowls can be carried into the following season. Not only are they Instagram-worthy, but they’re delicious and healthy, too. That rewarding feeling you get after creating one of these beauties is totally worth the hassle.

Select your ingredients. For the pumpkin smoothie, we used 1/3 cup of pumpkin purée, 1/2 cup frozen banana, 1/4 cup almond milk, a tablespoon of almond butter, and a pinch of ground cinnamon. You can also add a protein powder of your choice.

2

Blend frozen banana and pumpkin purée until you have a chunky mixture. Then, add almond milk, almond butter, and cinnamon. Blend until smooth.

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Pour into bowl. Flatten the surface with a spatula.

4

Sprinkle a light dusting of cinnamon on top, lay/sprinkle chia seeds, almond flakes, and granola on one side of the bowl. Fan out apple slices on the other side of the bowl.

5

Enjoy your tasty creation (and maybe snap a pic)!

Smoothie bowls are a great way to kickstart your day! Not only are they a sweet treat, but they provide you with vitamins and protein thanks to the fruit 72 | THREAD

and seeds. Remember to take time to treat yourself with this happy and healthy fall twist, and you’ll be ready to take on the day after a smoothie bowl.


diy: make it

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A TWIST ON A CLASSIC BY DANIELLE DONAVAN PHOTOS BY HANNAH RUHOFF

White Russians gained fame as the go-to drink of the “Dude” in The Big Lebowski, and since then, hundreds of variations of the classic cocktail appeared on drink menus and food blogs alike. This creamy classic may give you a white-mustached grin, but you’re also more than welcome to use plant-based milk instead of dairy. To enjoy a non-alcoholic version, simply substitute the Kahlua for espresso or coffee and skip the vodka. The recipes for these two drinks are easy, quick to make, and a festive way to kick off the fall season.

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Dark Chocolate Caramel White Russian 1.

Melt dark chocolate in a microwave or on the stove top.

2.

Fill glass with ice.

3.

Add caramel flavoring to glass.

4.

Pour in two shots of Kahlua.

5.

Add one shot of vodka.

6.

Pour a shot and a half of your desired milk in the glass.

7.

Add the melted chocolate to the mixture.

8.

Stir and enjoy!

Espresso White Russian 1. Brew coffee or espresso. 2. Fill glass with ice. 3. Pour in two shots of Kahlua. 4. Add one shot of vodka. 5. Pour coffee over the alcohol and ice. 6. Pour a shot and a half of your desired milk in the glass. 7. Add melted chocolate to the mixture. 8. Stir and sip away!

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INGREDIENTS NEEDED: • • • • • •

Kahlua Vodka Coffee or espresso Creamer or milk (dairy or plant-based) Caramel syrup Dark chocolate

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WHO, WHAT, WEAR A glance into some of Athens’ most captivating people, places, and events.

SUSTAINING A LIFESTYLE P. 82 WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 79


SUSTAINING A LIFESTYLE BY GRACE ROY PHOTOS BY RUSSELL JAMES

While the term “sustainable fashion” doesn’t necessarily have a set definition, the concept focuses on environmentallyconscious means of producing, selling, and preserving clothing. The key is to use high-quality pieces that will last, resulting in a healthier Earth. The importance of sustainable fashion on a larger scale is not widely recognized due to traditional American ideals like clothing being quicker, cheaper, more profitable, and attractive. Yet, sadly, these ideals play into the second largest cause of pollution in the world: the fashion industry. The push to change these standards is extremely important as it greatly affects the world around us. Coral Wedel, the owner, founder, and designer of Coral Marie, a sustainable fashion brand in Southeastern Ohio, encourages being a conscious consumer. After attaining a bachelor of fine arts degree at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Athens native traveled just south of Los 80 | THREAD


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who, what, wear

“WHAT YOU WEAR, WHAT YOU PUT ON YOUR BODY HAS A HUGE EFFECT ON THE WAY YOU FEEL AND THAT IS REALLY POWERFUL.” –CORAL WEDEL

Angeles, California, to dive into the designing world and bring to life her art through clothing. Several years later, life found her married, pregnant, and ready to settle down as she planted her roots back in her hometown, determined to make her own difference in an often toxic fashion industry. Wedel’s love for creation and clothing began when she was a little girl. “One particular thing sticks in my mind in terms of what I now do,” she said, remembering when she was around five or six years old. “I wanted to be a bunch of grapes for Halloween. My mom took me to the fabric store and let me pick out the perfect purple, and she helped me make the costume. I think it just really clicked for me that I could take an idea and actualize that in a tangible form.” After pursuing her passion for fashion design and finishing her degree, she worked for several companies designing women’s and children’s clothing in Los Angeles. But it is also there where she began to notice the dangers of the fashion industry. After working for multiple brands, she discovered her desire to make a difference in the field and settled down in the small town of Albany, Ohio. From this moment, Coral Marie began to take from.

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The small business aims to create fashion that both lasts and benefits the world around it. Wedel’s design process begins with a pen and paper, sketching out designs in her solar-powered studio. The sketches are then brought to life with the use of 100-percent organic cotton, printed with low-impact dyes and other sustainable blends, shipped in reused or recycled packaging. Scraps from production are composted and recycled, and once it’s all said and done, she donates 10 percent of her proceeds to local organizations. Wedel admits sustainability is challenging, but well worth it. “Sustainability is like chasing a rainbow, but we can at least make conscious choices that do make a difference, even if it’s a small difference. You take that small difference and you do that over and over, in mass, over time, and it actually makes quite a big difference,” she said. The beauty in the brand is not just its ethical means of functioning, but also the individual behind the madness not only loves what she does, but loves the way she impacts others. “I love clothing, I love what it does, I love the way it affects people,” Wedel said. “What you wear, what you put on your body, has a huge effect on the way you feel, and that is really powerful.” 84 | THREAD

Coral Wedel and her brand are creating waves on a local level, by inciting change and doing justice to our oftenneglected world. And not only is she running a brand in her own home, but she is raising a family, homeschooling her two young children, and maintaining stability. When it comes to the balance between family and work, she said, “the process is


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ever changing,” and “the key [to making it work is] cooperative partnership; my husband and I work pretty well together.” She says that being a mother has changed her outlook on the world around her and the difference she wants to make. Through her brand she strives to remind people that “you CAN do it, you can chase a dream and make it happen. A lot of what I do is me being a dreamer and then trying to make it happen.” And her dream is happening right there in her little store, in her work room, in her beautiful and very tangible clothing, right in the middle of a small Ohio town. “You know… it’s home, we love it here.” You can find Coral’s brand at her website, coralmarie.com and on social media (@Coral_ Marie). You may see her work at upcoming events which can be found on the events page of her Facebook.

CHECK OUT THE CORAL MARIE WEBSITE HERE!

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who, what, wear

BY COURTNEY ADAMS PHOTOS BY NATE SWANSON ILLUSTRATIONS BY STEPHEN BARRETT

IT IS SAFE TO ASSUME THAT MOST COLLEGE STUDENTS are searching for their “why” in this world. There’s more to life than homework and going out. Everyone has passions, but it can be hard to pinpoint how to make a career out of them. The minimalist, yet abstract clothing line, Creamy, came about when its creator, Stephen Barrett, was trying to figure out WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 89


his “why” in life. He knew there was more he could be doing, but he wasn’t sure what his purpose was. What started out as normal conversation with his friend about how to spend his free time turned into a colorful up-and-coming clothing brand. Barrett tested out the idea of Creamy before a semester-long hiatus spent traveling and participating in Outward Bound, a program centered toward outdoor leadership and development. After 50 days unplugged in the wilderness in what Barrett described as a “soul searching trip” around Oregon, Wyoming, and Minnesota, he returned with a new mindset, major, and ideas for Creamy. Although Creamy is still in its beginning stages, it is evident that he is planning on expanding in the near future. Barrett explained the idea beyond the brand as being whole-heartedly yourself and sharing that with the world. “Creamy is a brand about embracing your individuality and celebrating uniqueness,” Barrett said. Although Creamy could be

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considered streetwear, Barrett likes to think of it as “artwear.” A fitting term, considering each shirt is decorated with handpainted, original designs. The brand started gaining popularity when Barrett posted pop art on Instagram. He is currently working on the first collection and has been busy posting content online. Although he wants to have a web store in the future, Barrett is keeping it small and selling through Instagram while he’s still in school. “Instagram is a fun platform to play around with because it’s so popular and people are checking constantly,” Barrett said. With the userfriendly platform, he stays connected to their fan base, who are through Instagram while he’s still in school. “Instagram is a fun platform to play around with because it’s so popular and people are checking constantly,” Barrett said. With the userfriendly platform, he stays connected to his fan base, who are the first to see new pieces. Each piece is one-of-a-kind, made with recycled pieces from Goodwill and other thrift 92 | THREAD

shops. Barrett and his brother sift through racks of T-shirts, sweatshirts, button downs, and jackets, searching to find articles of clothing that will help mold the brand to fit his vision. “Whatever article of clothing you are buying from Creamy, there’s a whole process that goes behind it. I went to the thrift store and picked it out, or my brother did. We pick it out based on the look that we are trying to mold the brand in,” Barrett said. In order to better create the brand, Barrett switched majors, from education to retail merchandising and fashion product development. But, he still hopes to blend education and fashion by partnering with an art-education organization. “I want to be able to be curating a positive future for future artists, so there are more opportunities for them. The ultimate goal is to give back,” Barrett said. One day, he hopes to use his retail experience and open a small, versatile space to housing a store, art gallery, and small stage for concerts. With one more year until graduation, Barrett is keeping options open for whatever opportunity comes his way, perhaps moving to the West Coast to pursue his dreams.


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AR

The young LGB

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who, what, wear

RT FOR ALL

BTQ community in Appalachia have an art escape with the PRISM ARTS at ARTS/West. BY ZOE STITZER

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A

rt is about so much more than the final product. The arts promote creativity, self-expression, and community. These are all things the founders of PRISM ARTS at ARTS/West wanted to give to members of the local LGBTQ community. Lacey Rogers, an organizer for PRISM, views art as a healthy and productive way to bring people together. The kids work in small groups, which fosters close bonds and allows for individualized attention toward their art. The kids can either work on the art project of the week or go to the music room. “It’s really just a free space for them to create art together and meet other people like them,” Rogers said. It’s important to the organizers that the adults at PRISM are there to help, but not to control the kids. They want to give the kids a lot of creative freedom and choice in expression. “Coming to a space where they already know that in some way, shape, or form these kids also identify on the LGBTQ spectrum, that might be hard to find in other spaces like school. That might not feel as safe of an environment,” Rogers said. “A lot of people feel like they can be more of themselves.” Rogers noted the lack of resources for LGBTQ youth in southeast Ohio. PRISM is the only community-based program 96 | THREAD

for LGBTQ youth in the region, despite children’s arts programs popping up throughout America in recent years. According to Americans for the Arts, an online arts education forum, research shows the positive impact of an arts education on LGBTQ youth. They have dedicated themselves to providing art as a safe haven for these individuals. United States Agency for International Development is

“IT’S REALLY JUST A FREE SPACE FOR THEM TO CREATE ART TOGETHER AND MEET OTHER PEOPLE LIKE THEM.” -LACEY ROGERS

another advocate for providing the arts to the community. USAID uses the arts as an instrument of social change in other countries. Ajit Joshi, senior LGBTQ coordinator for USAID, said the company has used the arts as a way to bring cultures closer together. “In Lebanon, USAID supported youth in photography, painting, writing, and drama as a way to express fear about ‘the other’ and find a way to understand


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those different from themselves,” Joshi said. Art has also been a means for LGBTQ members to show their real selves to friends and family, according to the Plumeria Counseling Center. The center uses things like art therapy to help children express their feelings during the coming out process. PRISM takes all of the good qualities about art and makes it even better by providing an inclusive space to do it in at ARTS/West. “There is no right way to do this, which is another reason I think art is such a good thing. There are a lot of ideas about what constitutes as art, but there is a lot of freedom there to make it the way you want to make them,” Rogers said. Tessa Evanosky, an organizer of PRISM who gives music lessons at the gatherings, said that being a part of something and claiming it as yours is just as important as what the kids create. When they step into PRISM, they are an artist, a musician, and a member of an active community. “Especially for queer kids in Appalachia, it’s really good for 98 | THREAD

them to have a title. That can bring really good self-esteem,” Evanosky said. She recalled a project they did with a pinata last year where they wrote something in their life they wanted to get rid of, like bullying or low self-esteem, and put positive notes to each other on the inside. “They smashed their bad feelings and picked up good feelings from their friends,” Evanosky said. PRISM is a safe place for young members of the LGBTQ community to tap into their right brain, create, and learn, and meet other people like them. The program is held every Monday from 3-5:30 p.m. at ARTS/West.


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT STEP BEHIND THE CURTAIN AND TRAVEL BACK IN TIME TO OLD HOLLYWOOD PHOTOS BY RUSSELL JAMES

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VISIONS

O F PHOTOS BY MAGGIE BOYLE 112 | THREAD


BLUE

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UP

AFTER THE S

PHOTOS BY LEANN

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P IN SMOKE

SMOKE CLEARS, SCENES OF AUTUMN ARE FINALLY REVEALED

NA SIUPINYS

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Late nights with friends call for a quick snack from a favorite one-stop-shop. PHOTOS BY ELLE MOORE

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Bodyguage n a L PHOTOS BY EMILY BARBUS

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6 LOOKS WE LIKE:

TIMELESS TRENDS

WE REVISIT SOME OF OUR FAVORITE LOOKS FROM THE ‘60s AND BEYOND PHOTOS BY ALLISON HAAS

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7

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70s

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90s

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CAMPUS CASUAL Light-hearted reads for the quiz-taking, listicle reading, horoscope believin’ spirit in all of us.

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FALL

HOROSCOPES BY MARIE CHAILOSKY

VIRGO AUG 23 - SEPT 22 You are all in alignment this month, Virgo. You’re going to have energy to focus on the things that might have seemed impossible a few months ago. You’re in a good headspace to start that health journey you’ve been thinking about. Hit the gym more, it’ll help your mental and spiritual health as well as benefit you physically. Your instincts will be sharp for October, so go with your gut.

SCORPIO OCT 23 - NOV 21 Oh, Scorpio, I’m sorry to tell you, but Venus is in retrograde in October. You’re going to want to switch things up a lot by making a big change. Really think before you make any permanent decisions and remember you might need to take a breather. If you’re in a relationship, you’ll have to overcome some obstacles, as Venus is the goddess of love. Good luck, Scorpio, you’re in my thoughts. 154 | THREAD

ILLUSTRATIONS ANNA JOHNSTON

It’s time to get ready for change, Threadies! We have successfully transitioned from summer to fall, and with seasonal change comes cosmic change. What will the signs have in store for them? Will you be more social or more of a homebody? Will you be lucky in love or happily single? Leave me to read the stars for you.

THIS MONTH’S SIGN

LIBRA

Happy birthday, Libra! This SEPT 24 - OCT 23 month, you are coming into yourself, feeling secure in who you are, and calling the shots. Good, you deserve it, but don’t let it get to your head. Write down your goals and use this month as a clean start for your new age. Take the opportunity to start some new projects you’ve been thinking about for a while. This is your month, Libra, you got this.

SAGITTARIUS NOV 23 - DEC 21 Since Venus, your health planet, is going into retrograde in early October, don’t make any huge health changes, like going vegan out of nowhere, or starting a really stressful workout regimen. You need to focus more on spiritual nourishment, not just physical, so start a journal or dive into meditation. Things are going to fall in place for you this month if you put your mind to it and really connect with yourself.

CAPRICORN DEC 22 - JAN 19 You have to prove yourself this month, Capricorn. Some authority figures are going to make you defend yourself, but stick to your calm energy and power through. But, nevertheless, put on your charm because there’s going to be more opportunities for love with someone special or for making new friendships. It’s a month of ups and downs, Capricorn, but you can make it through.


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AQUARIUS JAN 20 - FEB 18 A successful month is ahead, Aquarius: career goals are manifesting, motivation is at a high, and friends and family are supportive. Focus on your future and apply for that internship you’ve been iffy on. Overworking yourself might lead to poor health, so stay mindful and keep yourself healthy for this career-oriented month. Also keep your eyes open for love, Aquarius, because your attraction to successful people will peak in October.

PISCES FEB 19 - MAR 20 What a lovely month for you, Pisces. You’re going to be level-headed and confident in your choices. Health will be important for you this month, remember to assess what doesn’t belong. It’s a good month to detox those harmful patterns in your life because your decisions are not going to be too brash. You’re also going to be successful in school due to your clear head and laser focus. Good for you, Pisces.

ARIES MAR 21 - APR 19 Oh, Aries. Your love planet, Venus, is going into retrograde in early October, so you might not feel like yourself in social settings. It’s not a good idea to make rash decisions about love or friends. Start thinking about how your relationships can be improved instead of throwing away the whole relationship. Get enough rest, don’t overthink things, and try to be as levelheaded as possible. We believe in you.

TAURUS APR 20 - MAY 20 Taurus, you’re lucky. Unlike the other signs whose love lives might take a hit because of Venus retrograde, your love planet, Pluto, is moving forward. However, because Venus is the ruler of your sign, love is an option for you, but you’re being more cautious. That’s not a bad thing. You’re putting yourself first and your social awareness is improving. Outline your goals and really go for it.

GEMINI MAY 21 - JUN 20 Reflection is important for you this month, Gemini. You’re done relaxing and you’re ready to pursue your goals. Be cautious of how much you throw yourself into. You can only do so much, and you can’t perfect everything if you’re stretched too thin. Venus is your spiritual planet, and with its impending retrograde, you’re going to have to really focus on staying spiritual, Gemini.

CANCER JUN 21 - JUL 22 Focus on what you love this month, Cancer. Your passions should be your priorities and the opportunities will come since Mars, your career planet, is in its regeneration form. Your focus is also going to be intense, so success is sure to come. Initiate the necessary changes and forget what might have gone wrong in the past. It’s a new month, and Saturn is on your side.

LEO JUL 23 - AUG 21

Family is going to be your strength this month, Leo. Support will be plentiful and you might want to make it a priority to visit your family soon. School will be there when you get back, so take time to focus on your loved ones. Romance might prove difficult in October as Mars, the planet of conflict, moves into your house of love. Focus on your family and friends in October, and don’t be too bothered if love doesn’t work out like you wanted. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 155


‘‘

BEST SUMMER

MEMORIES Members of our staff share some of their fondest moments from summer vacation

I had the pleasure of visiting my friend in Nevada. While there I summited a mountain, Wheeler’s Peak. I didn’t know until halfway up the mountain that we would be at 13,000 feet. I thought I was going to push my friend off the cliff for surprising me with such an outlandish request. After yelling at him and crying a bit I finally made it. The experience as a whole was life changing but grabbing my first peak is something I wish I could experience every day. –DANIELLE DONAVAN

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LONG STORY SHORT:

I met Oprah (and I even had the courage to speak to her). Life. Made. –KATIE PITTMAN

This summer, while getting ready to pack up and move away from my best friends, I found I needed a couple days to sit back and focus on the time I had left at home in West Virginia. We spent the summer finding the best hiking, picnicking, and relaxing spots home had to offer, but somehow we hadn’t taken a roadtrip yet. On a whim, we packed up our things and drove two hours to the mountains for a weekend with beautiful views and no cell service. Nestled between waterfalls and overlooks is Davis, West Virginia. We spent hours exploring the most picturesque places I can remember. I can’t think of a better way to say goodbye to home and friends. -MACKENZIE KRESS

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QUIZ:

MUSICALLY STYLISH 1

A. The classic piano

WHICH SAD CAROLE KING LYRIC DESCRIBES YOUR MOOD RIGHT NOW?

B. The voice is the best instrument of them all

A. “So far away, doesn’t anybody just stay in one place anymore?”

C. Guitar

B. “It’s too late, baby, now it’s too late. Though we really did try to make it. Something inside has died, and I can’t hide and I just can’t fake it.”

WHAT INSTRUMENT SPEAKS TO YOUR SOUL?

D. The accordion because it’s two instruments in one

2

HOW DO YOU LIKE TO LISTEN TO MUSIC? A. My record player. It just has a different sound quality B. iPhone, definitely. Earphones in, world out

3

C. But, like, who is Carole King? D. “Tonight with words unspoken, you said that I’m the only one. But will my heart be broken when the night meets morning sun?”

C. Live in concert D. In the background

MOSTLY A’S:

VINTAGE

You are second-hand savvy and love finding unique pieces at your local thrift stores. You are nostalgic for a time period you never knew, and you get to live out this fantasy through your wardrobe. You would throw Coachella tickets out the window if it meant getting to attend a Victorian ball. You would definitely have an outfit for the occasion! 158 | THREAD

MOSTLY B’S:

STATEMENT PIECES

No outfit is complete without the “wow” factor. From chunky jewelry to sky-high thigh boots, you are always the star of the show. Accessories are your game, and you play to win. You know exactly how to dress up an everyday look, and that is why your street style is so awe-inspiring. You are fun, outgoing, and love to stir the pot every once in a while.


Fashion and music taste are central to who we are as individuals. Without having to say a word, you can express yourself through fashion. Your taste in music lets others do the talking (or singing) for you. Take this quiz to find out what your music taste says about your personal style. BY ZOE STITZER

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ILLUSTRATIONS BY EMMA QUINN

ARE YOU LISTENING TO MUSIC RIGHT NOW?

6

A. No, but I have a melody stuck in my head

5

WHICH OF THESE GENRES WOULD YOU KILL OFF FOREVER? A. Death metal

B. No, but I wish I was

B. Kidz Bop

C. Yes, but not by choice

C. Country

D. Yes, when am I not listening to music?

D. Musical theatre

WHICH ARTIST WOULD YOU LISTEN TO FOR A SEVEN-HOUR CAR RIDE?

7

WHAT WOULD YOU GIVE UP MUSIC FOR? A. Time travel

A. Frank Sinatra

B. Nothing

B. Led Zeppelin

C. Money

C. Ariana Grande

D. Magic

D. No one, probably

MOSTLY C’S:

MOSTLY D’S:

Your closet is stacked with all of the highend brands. You like luxury in everything that surrounds you. You live for the finer things in life and won’t settle for anything less. You practice for when you make it big and need to hide from the paparazzi by wearing sunglasses at night.v

You couldn’t possibly commit to a longterm personal style—you want the latest fashions at the lowest prices so you can switch them out whenever you want. You probably have commitment issues­—but that’s okay! You like to change it up and never get stuck in the same old routine.

RUNWAY ICON

FAST-FASHION

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SPILL

THE

BY KATIE PITTMAN

BEANS

ILLUSTRATIONS ADRIANA MAZZOTTA

YOU CAN GET IT ANY WAY YOU WANT: dripped, poured, pressed, or percolated. But, honestly, what’s the difference between all the ways you can make your coffee? We break it down for you in our guide to what all those prep words mean and how they affect the flavor of your morning cup o’ joe.

POUR-OVER COFFEE

You’ve probably seen pourover coffee in recent Instagram posts or at smaller coffee shops. This method includes using a drip cone, which sits on top of a coffee mug or cup. After placing a specially-shaped filter in the cone, sand-like grounds of coffee are added. It is important to get the size of the grounds right here—finer or coarser grounds can result in a mess, or worse, poor-tasting coffee. The typical rule is six ounces of water to every two tablespoons of coffee, but you can adjust that for a weaker or stronger flavor. Use water that just above boiling temperature to pour over the grounds slowly. A slow pour extracts and enhances the beans’ flavor, allowing for a more complex flavor profile.

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PERCOLATOR

Looking for an extra-strong cup in the morning? A percolator may be your best bet. This contraption comes in three parts: a water reservoir, a grounds chamber, and a pot. Start by adding water to the reservoir, then place the grounds chamber (which sort of looks like a funnel) on top. The chamber will fit right on top of the water reservoir, allowing for the actual pot part to be screwed on. Once it’s all together, place the percolator on the stove and let it do its thing. Sounds too easy right? Here is how it works: as the water in the reservoir boils, it passes through the tiny tube into the main pot. This water splashes over the grounds, creating the brew. The water continues this cycle until it runs out, boiling up and over the grounds. Once the water from the reservoir is gone, it gathers in the pot as brewed coffee. This produces a strong, bold cup of coffee for those who need a bigger caffeine kick. No matter how you like it, there are a myriad of ways to fix your morning (or midnight) cup of coffee. Or, if you are running late, there’s always a local coffee shop who would love to give you the kick start that you need.

FRENCH PRESS If coffee filters aren’t for you, a french press is a great option. It requires no filter, and it’s a pot and brewer in one. Since there’s no paper filter, some of the flavors and oils that are often absorbed by a filter are left in your actual cup of coffee, creating a deep, smooth finish. A french press comes in two parts: the pot and the plunger. The plunger has a long stem with a mesh metal piece on the end, which pushes the grounds to the bottom of the pot. To start, place a couple of tablespoons of coarsely-ground beans to the pot. Coarse grounds prevent buildup in the mesh of the plunger and don’t float to the top of the pot. Heat water to a near boil and immediately pour it into the pot. Place the plunger in the pot, but don’t push it down. Simply let the mesh sit at the top for a few minutes. Some people say four minutes is the magic time to wait, but three to five minutes is sufficient time for the beans to steep. When the time’s up, slowly push the plunger down.

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BACK OF THE CLOSET An in-depth look at today’s most buzz-worthy topics.

BREAKING THE SILENCE P. 172

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COVER CULTURE

THIS YEAR, FASHION PUBLICATIONS HAVE FINALLY REPRESENTED BLACK WOMEN ON THEIR COVERS AFTER YEARS OF SHOWCASING WHITE STANDARDS OF BEAUTY.

BY PURVA INDULKAR PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

A decade ago, Vogue Italia released their first ever “Black” issue. Long-time editor Franca Sozzani had a knack for using the pages of the most prestigious fashion magazine in the world to talk about uncomfortable subjects like drug abuse, terrorism, domestic abuse, plastic surgery. Sozzani was inspired by the candidacy (and style) of Barack Obama, and she was impressed with how black women were not afraid to stand out. “They are so elegant,” she said in a 2008 story from Time magazine by Jeff Israely, “It is an innate elegance.” The “Black” issue came out in July 2008, featuring four different covers with four powerful black models: Naomi Campbell, Jourdan Dunn, Liya Kebede, and Sessilee Lopez. A full 100 pages were dedicated to these four women which featured a spread by photographer Steven WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 165


Meisel. The issue only featured black models and tackled the challenges black people face on a daily basis. There were interviews with former First Lady Michelle Obama, director Spike Lee, and another with former Vogue Paris editor Edmonde Charles-Roux, who quit his job in 1966 because the publisher wouldn’t let him put a black model on the cover. Vogue Italia’s circulation at the time was 120,000 units, and despite the entire magazine being printed in Italian, the “Black” issue sold out in the United States and United Kingdom in 72 hours. More copies had to be printed—30,000 more for America, 20,000 for Italy, and 10,000 for Britain. People were soon selling the original copies of the issue on eBay for three times the price. The momentum slowed down, until now. “I was told that it was hard for me to get onto covers of magazines because black people did not sell,” Beyoncé told Vogue US for their September issue this year, donning the cover in a heavy floral headdress. In Beyoncé’s Vogue story she says, “Until there is a mosaic of perspectives coming from different ethnicities behind the lens, we will continue to have a narrow approach and view of what 166 | THREAD

the world actually looks like.” The photographer, Tyler Mitchell, a 26-year-old, politicallyengaged artist, is the first black person to photograph a cover for Vogue in its 126 years of publication. Soon after the issue was released he tweeted, “Hi if ur new I did this unrepresented. Fully solo just manifesting dreams.” Vogue is just one of the many magazines that have decided to put black women on the cover of its September issues this year. While Beyoncé is bathed in colors and textures for the September cover of Vogue US, Rihanna and her thin eyebrows are grabbing attention on the cover of Vogue UK. She also made history as the first black woman to be on the cover of the September issue of the British edition. “I couldn’t believe it,” Rihanna says in a behind-thescenes video uploaded on British Vogue’s website. “I just didn’t expect it to be September.” The September issue is considered the most important issue of women’s fashion magazines—in 2012, the September issue of Vogue US had 916 pages. This is because the issue is released at a time when most magazines forecast what designs will be trending in the coming year. There is more of everything—more


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pages, more stories, more advertisements, and this year, more diversity. The September issue is so important, Vogue even made a documentary on it. Guess what it was called? Spoiler: The September Issue. Having black women on the cover of any magazine is a meaningful achievement, but putting them on the September cover goes beyond just giving them a voice—it proves that they have marketability. Countless black women are featured across front pages worldwide. Rihanna on British Vogue, Tiffany Haddish on Glamour, Lupita Nyong’o on Porter, Issa Rae on Ebony, Slick Woods on Elle UK, Zendaya on Marie Claire, and Aja Naomi King on Shape. Often, black men and women appear on the covers of magazines with smaller runs or smaller readership. Harper’s Bazaar featured Kanye West and his two children on its cover, but that version was only sent to the subscribers, however, on the newsstands, Bruce Springsteen and his daughter were the cover. This issue is tied to the myth in the beauty and fashion industry that black people don’t bring sales. Dr. Carolyn Kitch, journalism professor at Temple University, explained that “Cover subjects ‘sell’ when audiences feel a connection with those people due to a sense of ‘knowing’ them or wanting to know them.” 168 | THREAD


This might explain why so few black women made it to the covers of magazines before. In August 2017, Fashionista reported that only three US titles had featured women of color on the covers of their September issues. But according to a Nielsen study done in 2017, black women are among the media’s most savvy and loyal consumers. Even in a shifting media landscape, they have remained dedicated to buying physical magazines.

Many trends that are worn by black women soon become mainstream fashion followed by celebrities and fans alike. In the same study, it is reported that in only three years from now, black men and women will be spending close to $1.5 trillion in the overall economy, and women will be the key players in this shift. This might be the reason why the publishing world has finally used the platforms it has created to not only feature black WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 169


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faces, but also black voices. Dr. Kitch’s is the author of The Girl on the Magazine Cover: The Origins of Visual Stereotypes in American Mass Media, and she believes that this year’s September issues are challenging definitions of beauty and prominence. “The presence of so many women of color on September issues is an indication that visual ideals of beauty are now multiracial and multicultural,” Kitch says. “Visual diversity is now a norm rather than an exception on magazine covers.” At a time when most industries are making active efforts to create inclusive working spaces for people of different backgrounds, this show of support from fashion magazines reflects the power and point of view of the black community. But, ultimately, it is a statement for and by black women—that they are not afraid to stand up or stand out. Isn’t that what innate elegance really is?

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BREAKING the silence

AFTER AN ALARMING AMOUNT OF REPORTED SEXUAL ASSAULTS ON OHIO UNIVERSITY’S CAMPUS, STUDENTS GATHER TO DECLARE ENOUGH IS ENOUGH. BY EMILY CAMPBELL

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PHOTOS BY LEANNA SIUPINYS


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What is happening? It’s the question many Ohio University students have been asking themselves as email after email from Ohio University Police Department appears in their inboxes. “Crime Alert: Wanted for Rape” has been the subject line of numerous emails. As of October 15, more than 15 incidents have been reported in Athens to both OUPD and the Athens Police Department. Athens Police Department’s Annual Report shares that in 2016, 40 rapes were reported in total. To compare off- and on-campus reporting, 33 rapes were documented on campus in 2017, according to Ohio University’s Clery Annual Security Report. The Clery report also shows that rape reports are rising over the past three years. This is a growing problem in the Athens community. Ohio University students have had enough and are speaking 174 | THREAD

out and organizing with the help of social media. Groups on campus are voicing their opinions in ways that grab the attention of not only fellow students, but national news organizations. A spike in reported assaults sparked a student-powered, bystander-centered conversation. A GroupMe named “Safe Walk Home” rapidly grew to over 1,000 members after a screenshot of the chat was posted on Twitter, encouraging women to add their friends. Mary Ryznar, the Ohio University student who started the group chat, shared that she had to reach out to GroupMe in order to expand the capacity of the chat because of how large it became. Greek Life members on campus have shown their support for survivors and stressed the importance of consent by decorating their houses with clear messages. Several sorority houses hung


WE STAND WITH SURVIVORS. - THREAD STAFF

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banners declaring that enough is enough, with messages varying from “Our bodies. Our rules,” “Consent is sexy mandatory,” and “No does not mean convince me.” Fraternities showed their support by stringing up banners stating “Stand with Survivors” and “The absence of a no does not mean yes.” Several photos have been shared on social media, gaining hundreds of favorites and shares. After six rapes were reported on campus, a group of frustrated students decided to take action. Mallory Golski, a fourth-year student at Ohio University, was impressed by the wave of activism on campus like the group chat and 176 | THREAD

banners. Golski explained that she kept the momentum going by joining forces with two peers, Cody Shanklin and Hannah Burke. Shanklin is the vice president of external affairs for BobcaThon, Burke is the vice president of Student Senate, and Golski is the president of the Women’s Panhellenic Association. The group was able to use their unique backgrounds in leadership to create a full-fledged event for people to stand together and make it known that sexual violence is not tolerated on Ohio University’s campus or the Athens community. They created a Facebook event, It’s On Us, Bobcats, with a goal to


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“promote accountability and shut down acts of sexual violence at Ohio University.” The event kicked off with a march and ended at the heart of campus, College Green. “Yes means yes, and no means no” chants echoed through uptown Athens, with several people viewing and videotaping from the sidewalks. Golski shared that many students can relate to feeling angry, frustrated, and scared each time they receive an email, but rarely do students act on these emotions. She is hopeful that they can continue the momentum through student-driven activism and encourage others to make a difference, too.

It is extremely difficult to identify the jurisdiction of the reports because the Athens community and Ohio University are undeniably intertwined. Several local businesses have implemented ways to combat sexual assault by using social media as their platform for advocacy. A photo of The Overhang’s staff was posted online after they completed Ohio University’s Better Bystanders training; Cat’s Corner’s started offering an “angel shot,” a coded order that alerts bar staff that individuals are in uncomfortable situations and need to get home safely; and Brenen’s Coffee Cafe shared an article listing four free apps to WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 177


help people get home safely. These are only a few examples of how the Athens community and Ohio University are working together to put an end to sexual violence. Not only are community members speaking out against sexual assault, but they are making an effort to support survivors as well. Lotsa Stone Fired Pizza used Twitter to promote its teaming up with the Survivor Advocacy Program. SAP is a part of the Division of Student Affairs at Ohio University, providing confidential support and advocacy to survivors of sexual assault. Lotsa set up a tent outside its storefront with tables manned by program representatives offering informational pamphlets. In addition, 50 percent of all Lotsa sales were donated to SAP, helping the program continue as a valuable source of support for survivors. OUPD has also taken a stand on social media, displaying their guidance and support. The department tweeted out a series of messages conveying they will not tolerate such behavior. One tweet read: “Having sex with someone who hasn’t consented—even if they’ve consented previously—is a felony. Understand consent before you have sex or the state will give you a room for 3 to 11 years while you figure it out,” accompanied with a photo of an empty jail cell. OUPD also used strategic sarcasm in their tweet: “If your partner is too drunk to walk, then they’re probably unable to consent (in police work 178 | THREAD

we call that a clue).” The majority of their recent tweets on consent have gained hundreds of likes, showing the community’s support for their straight-forward strategy. Social media can be a valid tool to spread messages on college campuses. Ohio University has proven that individual students, groups, local businesses, and community members can come together and use social media as a base for communication. Raising awareness is a crucial first step toward making a difference. Will conversations and groups created through social media be enough to create a campus-wide change and a universal understanding of consent? As students at Ohio University, we affect change both on- and off-campus, and right now, our voices are impossible to ignore. OU has an undeniable, close-knit campus and community, but there is always room for improvement. Whether we’re walking alone or in a group, leaving a bar or the library, at 2:00 a.m. or 2:00 p.m., regardless of what we’re wearing, we have the right to feel safe and reach our destination with out being assaulted.

IF YOU ARE SEEKING SUPPORT National Sexual Assault Hotline (RAINN): 1 (800) 656-4673 OU Survivor Advocacy Program: (740) 597-7233 OU Counseling and Psychological Services: (740) 593-1616


“LET’S KEEP THE MOMENTUM GOING AND EMBR ACE THE FACT THAT OUR VOICES HAVE POWER.

IT’S ON US, BOBCATS.”

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RO C K Y

Horror

ROC K S AG A IN BY NATHANIEL STANSBERY PHOTOS BY NATHANIEL SWANSON & RILEY PERONE

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T

he Rocky Horror Picture Show started out as “The Rocky Horror Show,” a stage show in London, England, starring Tim Curry. Curry played Dr. Frank-N-Furter, a hypersexual alien and mad scientist. As for The Rocky Horror Picture Show we know today, Curry was able to reprise his role as Frank-NFurter in this movie. Rocky Horror takes place in Denton, Ohio. It is the tale of Brad and his new fiancée, Janet, who get stranded in the woods with a flat tire. They look for help and find Dr. FrankN-Furter’s castle during the Annual Transylvanian Convention. This show tackled America’s sexual revolution, rock era, and embedded conservatism, all within less than two hours. Conservatism and sexuality are prevalent issues in American culture, and the two clashed long before Rocky Horror was produced. However, this show has been a rallying event for all, especially those of the LGBTQ community, because it gives people a place to feel safe, accepted, and free, instead of cast out. Its message of tolerance and shameless indulgence, as well as gender indentity, make this production more important than ever because the issues addressed are at the forefront of politics today. Even with its enormous success, Rocky Horror almost did not make it big; initial test 182 | THREAD


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screenings did not go well, and producers at Fox almost did not produce the movie. Tim Deegan, who worked for Fox, eventually decided there was a midnight audience. The popularity grew until fans, dressed up in costume and wielding props, had to arrive hours prior to the show and face the possiblity of not getting in, much like The Rocky Horror Picture Show here in Athens. The show in Athens has been performed annually since 2001, said current Director, Darragh Liaskos. Liaskos has been a part of the production since her first year at Ohio University, whether it be makeup or directing. She chose to do this show for 184 | THREAD

many reasons. “I loved Rocky Horror before college, and I was not accepting of my sexuality. Now that I’m a senior, I haven’t been holding anything back. I know I have a group of people who love me for who I am,” Liaskos said. The show has brought people together here in Athens and allowed them to feel accepted, even if for a short time. Liaskos also speaks on how important audience involvement is, both for the


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cast and for the audience. “Audience involvement is a tradition. The Union doesn’t allow the audience to bring the traditional props, like toast, hot dogs, rice, or squirt guns because it could be hazardous. “We want to put on a great show and both new and veteran cast members know how important this show is. When a whole bar sings the songs you’re singing, it’s empowering, as are the callbacks between audience and cast,” she said. When it comes to costumes, both cast and audience come dressed to their comfort levels. Members of the show and audience don lingerie, fishnets, or even bodysuits. Audience members are encouraged to dress up as characters from the show. Liaskos has an important message for her audience, “Please feel free to wear whatever you want, but if you wear lingerie or anything like that, please be safe and aware of your surroundings and to not be alone.” She also said she is not allowing her cast to walk to the show in their costumes because of the recent assaults on campus. The work that goes into The Rocky Horror Picture Show is meant to create a fun and accepting environment. The show stresses keeping an openmind, an open-heart, and being what makes you feel confident and free. As they sing in the show, “Don’t dream it, be it.” WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 187


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Grand Slams

Almost half a century since the passage of Title IX, women are still slammed for what they wear as athletes. Rules and regulations restrict the types of clothing female athletes can wear while doing their jobs. BY SHAINA DUBINSKIY

PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

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F

rom the court to the ice, advancements in women’s sports have come a long way. Yet, as opportunities for women in the athletic industry are slowly rising, censorship and criticism of their uniforms and clothing are held to a prolific measure that is unjust and sexist by many. As more and more female athletes use fashion as a platform to express themselves in a highly competitive environment, it’s essential to see how far they have come and how much they have left with the censorship that comes with being a woman in a male-dominated industry. The most recent example was when tennis player, Serena Williams, whose appearance has been scrutinized for years, appeared at the 2018 French Open wearing what was quickly nicknamed the “catsuit.” The all-black, skin-tight bodysuit, custom-made by Nike for the four-time Olympic gold medalist, was meant prevent blood clots after she experienced health complications following her daughter’s birth. The catsuit was met with its fair share of criticism. Bernard Giudicelli, president of the French Tennis Federation, announced a new dress code in August 2018, banning the suit worn by Williams. The ban caused tennis fans all over the world to share their outrage, citing sexism and racism as potential motives behind 190 | THREAD

Giudicelli’s decision. Williams reacted by sporting a vivacious outfit choice—tutus and fishnet tights at her first two matches at the 2018 US Open, both of which she won. “Obviously, the Grand Slams have a right to do what they want to do,” the tennis star said. But Williams remained optimistic, “Everything is fine, guys. I think it’ll be just fine.”

“OBVIOUSLY, THE GRAND SLAMS HAVE A RIGHT TO DO WHAT THEY WANT TO DO.

EVERYTHING IS FINE, GUYS. I THINK IT’LL BE JUST FINE.”

- SERENA WILLIAMS

This is not the first time a female tennis star has been in hot water for challenging dress code. In 1985, Anne White appeared at Wimbledon wearing a full-length bodysuit similar to the one worn by Williams 33 years later. White was promptly scolded by an umpire and told to wear a more appropriate suit at the next match. The following day, the uniform attracted more attention from the media than the game itself. At the 2018 US Open, French player, Alize Cornet, was thrown


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into the public eye when she was punished with a code violation for momentarily taking off her shirt in order to turn it around during a heat break. Similar to Williams’ ban, Cornet’s violation sparked outrage all over social media, critizing the sexist and unfair policies of the Women’s Tennis Association, considering male players often change their shirts in front of crowds without facing violations. US Open organizers later expressed “regret” for the way Cornet was treated and have 192 | THREAD

since issued Cornet a warning with no further penalty or fine. The narrow scrutiny of women and their clothing in sports expands beyond tennis players, as female figure skaters are often in the public eye for their outfit choices on the ice. In 1988, German skater Katarina Witt’s costume inspired a ban. She performed at the Winter Olympics in Calgary wearing a feathery blue leotard that barely covered her backside. The ban made it mandatory for women


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to wear a skirt that covered their hips, butt, and midriffs. That same year, figure skater Debi Thomas, the first black athlete to ever win a medal at the Winter Olympic Games, performed in a unitard and no skirt, prompting a temporary ban on figure skating costumes without skirts. Fortunately, both bans were lifted in 2003, but the International Skating Union still remains strict on its policies for women’s costume limitations. Dictating that the costumes

must be “modest, dignified and appropriate for athletic competition—not garish or theatrical in design.” These limits on women’s rights to express themselves through clothing while performing in an industry that already holds them to unjust standards shows how much more they have to work toward leveling the playing field. It is unclear how many more bans will be created and later broken until we finally allow all athletes to dress how they want. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 193


FIRST LADIES

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S OF FASHION BY HELEN HORTON

PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

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s long as America has had presidents, they’ve had First Ladies of the United States (FLOTUS). In America’s 242 years, the role of the First Lady has evolved just as much as the fashion has. Traditionally, the role of the first lady was highly visible to the public eye, especially in terms of the social life of the nation. The late 20th century brought them more responsibilities such as heading political campaigns, managing the White House, volunteering for social causes, and heading ceremonial occasions. All of these tasks gave the first lady a chance to become more independent and personalize aspects of their tenure in Washington. The very first FLOTUS, Martha Washington, was notably a lavish spender (as she was one of the wealthiest women of that era), and she made sure that she had the best choice of clothes. Her wedding shoes were recently displayed at Mount Vernon: royal purple silk heels—historians call them the Manolo Blahnik’s of their time. The marvels of the 19th century brought Lou Henry Hoover and Mamie Eisenhower, the former landing a cover for Vogue (the first FLOTUS to do so), and the latter to have a look named after her: “The Mamie,” inspired by Dior—full-skirted dresses, lots of accessories, and short hair. 196 | THREAD

A person’s style says everything. What one wears speaks volumes, and those statements leave a legacy, for better or for worse. A major turning point occurred when the First Lady became more of a style icon than a political icon, personified by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. Ms. Kennedy captivated the hearts of the world, and many called her the first true international style icon. Throughout her childhood, she

“TRENDS CHANGE OVER TIME AS WELL AS THE ROLES OF THE FIRST LADY, BUT FASHION IS THE CATALYST THAT CAN EITHER UNITE OR DIVIDE THEM.” perfected her classic and preppy style, especially when she met the dapper Jack Kennedy. They wed on September 12, 1953, in Newport, Rhode Island, with the bride donning an Annie Lowe white taffeta ballgown. Once John F. Kennedy became a household name as president of the United States, she effortlessly stepped into the role of First Lady. She redecorated the White House in 1961, making sure that


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historically accurate pieces were returned to their original places while adding her own personal touch to every room along the way. She gave a televised tour in February 1962, winning her an honorary Emmy. Her style kept her in the headlines, establishing her place in history as American royalty. Tragically, the death of her husband also produced an enigmatic piece of history, both in the political world and within pop culture: the Pink Assassination Suit. The blood stained ensemble cements a cataclysmic event in time. The first ladies of the late 20th and early 21st century were reasonably tame. They avoided irreparable harm and scandal, save for a couple of incidents, like 198 | THREAD

Nancy Reagan secretly borrowing designer suits and gowns despite their need to be disclosed under the Ethics in Government Act. Pre-internet figures like Nancy Reagan, Betty Ford, and Rosalyn Carter tackled topics like feminism, drug trafficking, and mental health in a way that allowed them to contact the public, but the public really had no way to share their response. Any modern-day FLOTUS would have a different result—we can thank Twitter for that. In a time of social media, Michelle Obama had the chance to become the people’s first lady, as they truly got to know her through online interactions. She was both loved and criticized her fair share during her husband’s


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presidency, notoriously showing off her toned arms and shopping from everyday brands like J. Crew and Target. Yet during a 2009 family vacation to the Grand Canyon, Michelle donned shorts and the public went into an uproar, calling it inappropriate. However, Michelle handled constant criticism with grace throughout her eight year tenure as FLOTUS and gained respect through her devotion to school lunch programs and education initiatives like raising college admission, equalizing girls’ and African-Americans’ education, and advocating for the arts. Melania Trump is viewed a little differently in the public eye. Ms. Trump can easily be called the most controversial first lady

so far. She is the only first lady to have nude photographs of her in existence, and to have designers publicly refuse to dress her. The list includes Zac Posen, Cristian Siriano, Marc Jacobs, Tom Ford and Philip Lim. She’s no stranger to scandal, most notably wearing an olive-colored jacket with “I Really Don’t Care, Do You?” emblazened on the back when she visited a children’s immigrant detention center. A year prior, Melania wore heels to a Hurricane Harvey relief trip and received major backlash. Americans retaliated, saying it was condescending of Melania to be dressed in designer heels when people had lost everything due to a natural disaster. Other incidents include not wearing a headscarf to Saudi Arabia, wearing a pussybow blouse during her husband’s “grab her by the pussy” scandal, and donning oversized Gucci sunglasses to an Arlington National Cemetery visit. She offended many Americans with the size of the sunglasses and the sunglasses themselves, as it was a sign of disrespect. Trends change over time as well as the roles of the first lady, but fashion is the catalyst that can either unite or divide them. Dressing the part is just a fraction of what it takes to fill the shoes of an ideal first lady; one needs to have respect, courage, and compassion. But a good pair of shoes isn’t a bad place to start. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 199


JUNK TO JEWERLY BY MEGAN PARKS PHOTOS BY PROVIDED

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ustainability is an important part of everyday life. Then again, so is accessorizing. What if there was a way you could do both? Junk Party Jewelry is a Cleveland-based company that refurbishes and sells sustainable and upcycled jewelry. Founder Marseille Markham grew up in Athens, Ohio, and received her master’s degree from Ohio University. “The creation of Junk Party is a long time coming,” Markham says.

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in good fashion

“Growing up, I spent a lot of time with my grandmother who lived through the Great Depression. She was always coming up with ways to reuse disposable products and be thrifty. My mom is a hippy, and she encouraged reusing materials rather than recycling,” Markham says. With her family background and interest in jewelry making, it is no surprise that this is where she ended up. And it is more important now than ever to consider different ways one can help the Earth as well as be conscious of how precious the world is. It’s on us to be the change we want to see in the world. As Markham says, “I’m now obsessed with reducing waste. So, when I launched Junk Party last year, it felt really natural and exciting to integrate both jewelry and reducing waste.” Markham turned her dreams into a reality, like so many aspire to do. So, how is Junk Party

Jewelry actually helping the environment? “Junk Party strives to reduce waste by creating jewelry from old electronic cords and cables, packing and shipping each piece with reused materials, making jewelry built to last, and offering free repairs for life,” Markham says. It’s a good way to help the environment because items are being repurposed instead of thrown away. Not to mention every product is unique and individually made. Cultivating individuality is an important part of supporting local businesses. It is amazing to give back to the community and to people, rather than big corporations. For those not from the Cleveland area, there is no need to worry, there are ways you can still get some of Markham’s products. There has been an overwhelmingly positive response to these eco-friendly products, so Markham has expanded her brand. At first,

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Markham said, “People in Cleveland and Athens were so supportive. Then, I started getting customers from all over the country. The demand got too large, so I moved Junk Party to Etsy.” She then added that “eventually, I’d love to travel to different markets around the country, hire employees, and expand to home décor.” By using these products you’re not only doing well by the environment, but you’re wearing unique, individual products that are selective to your own closet. Markham says, “I loved the marriage of art and jewelry.” Interested in learning more about Junk Party Jewelry? Find her on Instagram @junk_party_jewelry or through her website www. junkpartyjewelry.com.

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RANT/RAVE Ugly/Chunky Sneakers

RAVE

BY SARAH TODAK

According to Footwear News, Balenciaga’s “dad shoes” could help the high-end brand hit the billion-dollar sales mark. That alone shows the rising popularity in chunky sneakers, especially in high-end consumers. But why are people still calling them “diabetic shoes?” It’s simply because of how closeminded individuals tend to be with clothing, unless of course they’re acclimated with street fashion trends. I, for one, am obsessed with this fad. I have my own a pair of Fila sneakers that never fail to make me feel confident when strolling down the streets of

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Athens. A key reason why I feel like a modern-day supermodel in these chunky sneakers is because of the added height. My Filas give me at least half an inch, maybe more. They’re high heels with comfort instead of pain. The main reason chunky sneakers have become so popular lately isn’t just because of the brands like the most popular Balenciaga, Fila, and Nike, but because of how undeniably attractive they are. These shoes aren’t the easiest to style with, but they’ll look great with some key wardrobe items. The key pieces include the newly popular cropped wide-legged pants or jeans. The cropped and bell bottom pants make the feet look less massive compared


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to if you paired them with skinny jeans. As for overall style, these shoes look the best in casual streetwear. This can range from a tucked-in, branded shirt with a jean jacket to something with an edgier look like baggy, camo joggers, and a sheer top. The amount of looks you can create with these shoes seems endless. Now that I have undoubtedly convinced you, the readers, here are some options on joining the trend. Affordable websites like Romwe and Ego have an array of Balenciaga-inspired sneakers for a low price. If you’re looking for an affordable sneaker that will withstand daily wear, opt for the roughly $65 Filas. Spend as much money as your pocket will allow you, and you’ll find the best possible option for your individual style.

RANT

BY COURTNEY ADAMS

Chunky sneakers are back and as monstrous as ever. Spending over $100 on a pair of sneakers that are frighteningly similar to the ones I had as a young, awkward child is a no from me. The Fila Disruptor II is an affordable alternative to the Balenciaga Triple S, but I still can’t bring myself to drop $60 on a pair of shoes that make it look like I am ready to yell at my kid at

his little league game. I have spent my adult years cringing at the photos that document the fashion disaster that has orbited back onto our radar. I go by the rule that if the Hadids can’t wear it and rock it, then it will be hard for the rest of us mortals to wear them. Chunky sneakers are the epitome of wearing a dad joke, and even my dad who divides his indoor and outdoor sneakers does not have sneakers this thick. All you’re missing are zip-off cargo pants and a cell phone belt clip to complete the dad trifecta. Who would’ve thought that designers like Balenciaga, Louis Vuitton, and Valentino would be taking fashion tips from Sketchers? No one wanted to be caught dead in these shoes when it was just Fila and Sketchers selling them, but once the Kardashians wear them, they fly off the shelves. Let’s just take a step back and reflect: Do we want these shoes because we want them, or are we being told we want them? While comfort and support are important factors in any type of footwear, I still cannot get behind the chunky sneaker phenomenon. It is just down right wrong to put these sneakers next to the timeless designs of Adidas Stan Smiths, Air Jordan 3s, and Nike Air Max 1s. Here’s to hoping these rotate out of our lives just as quickly as they came.

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October 2018

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