Page 1

thread JUNE 2012

BLOG REVOLUTION

BIG

CITY

dreams WHITE

OUT interior perspective

MODEL CITIZENS >> cover

OUTHREADMAG.COM | 1 contest winners inside


Cover photo by BECKY WILLIAMS

tableofcontents

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156 6 Looks We Like

126

Cover Contest

142 Up, Up & Away

May Day

100

Rave

118


JUNE

2012

modelns citize

4 8 12

Haute Online Top 5 Editor’s Note

16 20 22 24 32 39 42 47 52

Runway Realway Street Peeps

M FOR MAG.CO UTHREAD .O W W W ONTEST UT UT THE C CHECK O ON ABO TI A M R FO MORE IN

seams

Column: Passport to Fashion Bowutiful Case Craze Bang Thang Farmer Faux Pas Newsie Nails White Out

diy

64 69 73

DIY Sweet Dreams DIY Ohio Love DIY Collar Candy

who, what, wear

80 88 92

Derby Diva Fishy Fashion Inside Perspective

back of the closet

192 200 206 212 219 230

Men in White Rustbelt Americana Power Clashing Cutting Edge Shopping Guide Rant / Rave

224

Cat's Meow

in good fashion

OUTHREADMAG.COM | 3 WWW.AMWAY.COM/NICKGAMRATH


hauteonline Gentlemint

Gentlemint is a place for all things manly. Whether you are in the mood to read about manly cars or how to brew some manly beer, Gentlemint has it all. Co-founders Glen Strasberry and Brian McKinney created the website to draw and focus on elements such as comedy and masculinity. Want to learn 20 steps to becoming a better man? Gentlemint has the perfect link for that. Want to know why men need literature in their manly lives? Gentlemint has that too. Currently, Gentlemint is an invite-only beta website while its creators work on building a stronger community by scaling its service.

—ABEL ARAYA

ELECTRIC VIOLIN

In this piece, the writer (anonymous), has given his readers specific steps to create an electric violin. The initial drawings and designs of how the violin can be transfigured into a beautiful instrument of music makes this stepby-step procedure really interesting.

R2-D2 COFFEE MAKER

Another uncommon story featured on Gentlemint is a YouTube video of an R2-D2 coffee maker. Although the video isn’t high quality, the coffee maker itself is something both handy for making coffee and also an awesome souvenir for hardcore "Star Wars" fans.

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J's Everyday Fashion

Polished, poised and perfectly put together are just a few ways to describe almost every model found in the fashion industry. For all of you who have jealously grumbled, “If only I could be as fashionable as her,” Jeanette Scott feels your pain. J’s Everyday Fashion is a blog that pulls inspiration from those envy-inducing ads, as well as celebrity snapshots and storefront mannequins to create practicallypriced outfits that are acceptable to sport day-to-day. J is a former employee of the corporate marketing industry, but when the economy took a downturn, she lost her position and now relies on her highly-successful blog and freelancing. J’s site “is all about empowering women — to give them fashion without the frills.”

—OLIVIA OHLIN

ONLINE SHOPPING GUIDE

This tab is extremely handy for those on a budget who long for the looks that J presents on her blog. J posts links to stores she shops at that sell reasonably-priced products. There are also coupon sites and even one that will send personal emails when a store has put clothes in your size on sale.

OUTFITS

You can scroll down for days to see the photos J based her outfits on, beside the result shot of J donning her creatively crafted and affordable version. The blog features outfits college students, young professionals and even moms can learn from.

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Kolonel Mustard

Breaking news — it was Kolonel Mustard with the revolver in the conservatory. Kolonel Mustard, better known as Benjamin Galbraith, is less involved with murder-mystery games and more with his idiosyncratic men's wear blog, which showcases his polished, personal street style. Galbraith shows off his panache by posting photographs and videos of himself sporting top trends. Galbraith’s blog also gives an inside look at the life he leads in his beloved Australian town, Adelaide.

—TARA GOLENBERKE

KOLONELMUSTARD. TUMBLR.COM

Kol. Mustard also has a Tumblr that acts as a “random dumping ground,” as Galbriath phrases it, for his main blog page. This site reviews Galbraith’s sleek yet inspiring fashion sense as well as his personal life. Each snapshot allows the audience to get up close and personal with not only Galbraith’s trendy fashions, but also with his foodie, hometown-loving character.

GIMME THAT LOOK

“People’s first impression of you are your clothes, you can’t really escape it,” Galbraith says in a blog post. So, why not have a goal when you roll out of bed to look fashionably handsome, fabulous or self-expressive? To incorporate Kol. Mustard’s street style before heading to class, invest in leather jackets, plaid button-ups and saddle shoes. For a night out, indulge in more exuberant-colored suits, red and black combos or perhaps an all coffee shaded suit with a classic black tie. 6 | THREAD


thread online HTTP://TWITTER.COM/THREADMAG

HTTP://WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/THREADMAG

@THREADMAGAZINE

HTTP://PINTEREST.COM/THREADMAGAZINE

49 S. Court Street I Athens, Ohio I (740)594-7375

& Coffee House

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TOP

5

AFFIRMATION BRACELETS

Daily affirmations are important to finding happiness — just ask your mother or any celebrity shrink. For the moments when I feel a little down, it’s reassuring to look at my accessories and see that I am, in fact, a boss. (With impeccable taste.)   —JAZMINE REED

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OPI NAIL POLISH

I love painting my nails as much as the next girl, but I’ve got to have all of the colors. It’s an obsession fueled by OPI and their collections. With collections of nail polishes based on movies the fans flock to these colors. There are ones based on countries, the ballet and even cartoon characters (who else is excited about the Minnie Mouse collection?!), OPI has the colors every girl’s nails want. —CARLY WIITA

GINGHAM

This season, fold up your winter flannels and ditch the nautical print for an age-old pattern that’s making a comeback: gingham. This picnic-chic print has been popping up on runways (see: Miu Miu and Rick Owens) left and right. Careful though; be sure to pair with the right neutral — white jeans or denim cut-offs — to avoid looking like Dorothy (or your great-aunt Betty). —MADDIE GAITHER

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CAVIAR NAILS

The Beatles may be the original British Invasion but they’re not the only craze to hop the pond. Nail art is hardly a new fad, but the 3-D “Caviar Manicure” by UK nail varnish brand Ciate is now being sold at Sephora in the US. I can’t wait to get my hands on a bottle and get some caviar onto my fingers!—ALI MAZZOTTA

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ACROSS THE UNIVERSE

Nothing’s gonna change my world — except for some galaxy-inspired fashion. Even Jeffrey Campbell’s Litas got spaced out by Black Milk with patterns of the infinite universe taken from real NASA photographs. When I get my hands on these pieces, I’ll be a master of the stars — and style. —KATIE O’CONNOR

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editor’s note EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

ali mazzotta Hi Threadies! Welcome to the last spring quarter issue of Thread. At 232 pages, June 2012 is our LARGEST issue ever and also marks the first time that our readers chose our cover models! This issue also marks my last as Editor-inChief. The 2011-2012 staff has put out six issues together — and I have been consistently blown away with the progress, talent and style we’ve displayed this year. It’s no secret to the exec board that writing the Editor’s Note is my least favorite part of putting the magazine together (deciding what stories to include is like asking a mother to name her favorite child) and this note, my last note, is no exception. It’s hard to believe that I’ll no longer be spending Wednesday nights in Scripps 111 with Threadies or watching Kardashian music videos at 7 a.m. with the execs during overnight editing sessions. However, I can’t stress how excited I am for what the 2012-2013 staff has in store for Thread and I wish you all nothing but the best. That being said, I invite you, one last time, to browse our pages to find some style inspiration. On page 42, you’ll find out how to avoid an unsightly farmer’s tan in Farmer Faux Pas and learn to make an eye-catching neck accessory in Collar Candy on page 73. This issue we talked to our favorite fashion bloggers about their influence on style in Blog Revolution on page 184. Be sure to check out our 6 Looks 12 | THREAD

We Like inspired by the unique drinks of uptown Athens on page 156. As always, thanks to Athens Underground and The Other Place for keeping our models clothed and in style. Thread would also like to thank the Appalachian Hell Betties, the OU Fishing Club, the Interior Architecture program, Balloon Masters and the Ravenwood Castle for their help this issue. We’d love to hear what you think! Find us on Facebook, on Twitter @ threadmag or email us at outhreadmag@gmail.com. See you all at our final party of the year Friday, June 1 at 9pm at Jbar! Cheers, Ali Mazzotta


thread

MAY 2012

Editor-in-Chief Ali Mazzotta

Managing Editors: Catherine Caldwell & Maddie Gaither

seams editor

design editor

Anna Luczkow

Mikaela Longo

who what wear editor

photo chief

Jessie Cadle

Sarah Balser

diy editor

picture editor

Hallie Rybka

Becky Williams

copy chief

creative director

public relations chief

advertising executive

Carly Wiita

Justin Brown

Becca Goodburn

web editor

Tom Busch

Megan Hillman

WRITERS

Abel Araya, Tom Busch, Maddie Gaither, Erin Golden, Tara Golenberke, Mandi Hefflinger, Kaylyn Hlavaty, Colleen Kratolfi, Nadia Kurtz, Bridget Mallon, Olivia Ohlin, Bradley Parks, Kathryn Potraz, Nicole Ranieri, Ali Shultz, Lincoln Sklar, Kate Sierzputowski, Becky Wagner, Bentley Weisel, Seth Williams

PHOTOGRAPHERS

|

PHOTO EDITING ASSISTANT: Michelle Kappeler, ASSISTANT PHOTO CHIEF: Mary Hautman Emmy Baker, Sarah Balser, Heather Beaver, Kasey Brooks, Rebecca Ciprus, Mackenzie Cottingham, Liz Emley, Levi Finley, Allie Gottlieb, Mary Hautman, Lauren Holle, Michelle Kappeler, Audrey Kelly, Brenna Kowall, Kirsten Martinez, Michael Maurer, Sarah Miller, Tara Nolan, Deanna Sakal, Meghan Shamblen, Becky Williams, Aaron Zake

DESIGNERS

Ashley Cappellazzi, Lauren Capponi, Taylor Evans, Emily Gardner, Alexa Hayes, Megan Hillman, Hannah Hitchcock, Rachel Keaveny, Tia Kropko, Allison Lembright, Danielle Magary, Ali Mazzotta, Danielle Morris, Dorrian Pulsinelli, Gina Ranalli, Kelsey Reef, Marcie Richardson, Kaitlyn Richert ILLUSTRATOR: Virginia Adams

STYLISTS I CREATIVE ASSISTANT: Katie O'Connor

Allyssa Bertram, Sophia Borghese, Aly Fossett, Gretchen Greenlee, Lexi Lang, Kelly Phillips, Molly Risola

COPY EDITORS

Brooke Bunce, Holly Coletta, Kate Irby, Bridget Mallon, Kathryn Potraz, Becky Wagner

PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM | PR ASSISTANT: Nicole Ranieri

Jordan Anders, Sara Andrews, Marley Brison, Kayla Carpenter, Joceyln Chiu, Ben Clos, Sydney Cologie, Chelsey Geyer, Kelly Hayes, Jenny Joseph, Scott Lambert, Hannah May, Tina Mirabelli, Katie Neeley, Rachel Portek, Megan Scalf, Kyla Schmalenberger, Anastasia Souris, Jerika Struewing, Christina Uehlein, Riana Upton, Megan Valentine, Brienna Weibel

MODELS

Amanda Blake, Heather Blazer, Ryan Boyd, Julianna Brooks, Thomas Busch, Alyssa Cardwell, Valerie Evans, Allie Gottlieb, Erika Guthrie, Shawn Finneran, Tina Fisher, Caitie Forrest, Corina M. Hurley, Chelsea King, Danielle Lewandowski, Rena Loebker, Alexandria Mariscal, Loran Marsan, Eric Osborne, Kathryn Potraz, Aaron Pynos, Mallory Radcliff, Helen Reed, Ashley Skeen, Hannah Stanton-Gockel, Kayli Stevens, Ryant Taylor, Ben Weiner

BLOGGERS

Giles Allen, Jen Barker, Steph Doan, Liz Emley, Kaylyn Hlavaty, Tony Iori, MaryKate McHugh

ADVERTISING ASSISTANT Jazmine Reed VIDEOGRAPHER Allie Gottlieb, Allie Levin OUTHREADMAG.COM | 13


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bowutiful pg. 26

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A BRIGHT CARDIGAN with striped layers of light and dark emulates the '70s vibe.

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runwayrealway VIKTOR & ROLF By COLLEEN KRATOFIL | Photos by MEGHAN SHAMBLEN

V

iktor & Rolf’s spring 2012 men’s ready-towear collection displayed a rejuvenating color palette and 1970s vibe. There was a great variety of pieces, ranging from dress suits and bow ties, to casual dolphin decal T-shirts and sweatshirts to everything in between. Viktor & Rolf took a '70s approach in the cut of pants and jackets. Trousers are flared and oversize lapels dominate as the common look. A bomber jacket with striped layers of light and dark denim emulates the era’s style because of the wide cream lapel. Uniform throughout the show was a color scheme with a neutral base of bone and sand shades infused with fresh bursts of bold yellows, red-oranges and aquatic blues. An oceanic vibe appeared in many pieces including three standouts: the horizontal-striped trousers and casual jackets in dark and light blues resembled waves, while sweaters and pants in refreshing pops of yellow recalled bright sunshine. Then there was the literal interpretation of dolphins, large and bold on sweaters, or arranged as a print on button-down shirts. In addition to eye-catching representations of the beach, the aquatic theme also was subtly showcased in citron and navy striped T-shirts, worn under suit jackets and sweaters, paired with khaki pants. To draw inspiration from Viktor & Rolf, boating stripes and bright colors are a must. Wearing one piece of a vibrant hue while keeping the other clothing neutral is a simple way to mimic the collection. Wearing shorts with a jacket or sweater, or wearing a suit with a simple striped T-shirt underneath are easy go-to choices. For a casual take on the line, throw on flared trousers, a V-neck and a cardigan. Adding slight detail to common pieces can add personality. Details such as small, perforated cut-outs on sweaters or shirts make ordinary clothing striking.

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THE RULE OF THUMB is that whatever seems completely ridiculous to put together in one outfit is actually the perfect combination.

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sass & bide By NADIA KURTZ | Photos by MEGHAN SHAMBLEN

T

he crux of sass & bide’s Spring 2012 collection is contrast. The rule of thumb is that whatever seems completely mismatched in one outfit is actually the perfect combination. One look can exhibit both polka dots and stripes, or sequins paired with a geometric metallic pattern. Another key aspect of the sass & bide collection is bright, neon colors. Pairing a vibrant orange top with a neutral-colored pant is simply not enough; clashing is the new matching as the collection features outfits of opposing color. Statement jewelry is essential for any sass & bide outfit this season. Featuring bold necklaces, bejeweled chokers and metallic cuff links, the collection ensures no accessory is discrete or simple. A sass & bide-inspired outfit can work in either a casual or formal setting. When walking to and from class during the day, it is important to make a statement while remaining laid-back. An ideal way to achieve this look is by coupling a brightly-colored tank with patterned shorts of an opposing color. Mixing hot and cold hues is another quality of the collection; a coral shirt pairs well with green-blue shorts. To accessorize this ensemble, add a slight punch of color, such as a skinny yellow belt. For the final touch, wear bold metallic sandals and a heavy tribal-style necklace. On a night out, wear a black dress and add eyecatching metallics, such as a golden belt or silver sequins. To create a more summery look, a nauticalstyle dress with either stripes or geometric shapes wears well with a bright yellow accent. Add a pair of brown leather wedge sandals to give the outfit a sophisticated sailor look. When throwing together an outfit, there's no need to focus on what will look good together and what will match. For sass & bide, the more outlandishly clashing two pieces are, the better.

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streetpeeps ready for summer fashion Video by ALLIE GOTTLIEB

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FACES MODELING CLUB Are you fashion forward? Think you can master the catwalk? Need a self esteem boost?

Join FACES, longest running Fashion based organization at OU. FACES Modeling Club We're always looking for new faces!

CONNECT WITH FACES: www.wix.com/oufacesmodeling/faces www.facebook.com/FACESModelingOU @OUFACESModeling

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blogger of the month

passporttofashion By KAYLYN HLAVATY

W

Photo by SARAH BALSER

hen it comes to anything fashion, I will always have something to say. Whether it’s a new collaboration with a designer and retailer or the age restrictions of models, I believe it is important to know what is happening in the fashion industry. There are different areas in fashion that I like to stay current with such as the editorial side of a magazine or the current trends. Like any industry involving money, there are negative parts of the fashion industry that don’t receive as much attention such as counterfeit items and retailers mimicking designers’ collections. These can include bags, shoes, sunglasses and electronics. They are things many people buy or own on a regular basis. Children workers are exploited in unfair and dangerous working conditions that are continuing to happen. Bringing media attention to humanitarian and human abuse stories is a real passion of mine; I hope to expand beyond Athens. For someone interested in fashion and pursuing a career in journalism, I plan on working to expose these conditions along with other injustices throughout the world. When I wrote my feature, “Fakes are never in Fashion,” I knew I wanted to somehow show something newsworthy to my fellow Threadies and students. 22 | THREAD

PASSPORT TO FASHION

Because I am a bit of a news junkie, I find myself always perusing through other blogs, fashion magazines and news websites. I’m the type of person that will share important information to my friends, so I thought: why not blog about the fashion news I find interesting? Sometimes flipping through the pages of a fashion magazine can become time-consuming when trying to find an article of relevance or interest because often the stories revolve around a socialite showcasing their yacht or French château. Through my blog, I share industry news that could have an interest among college students such a new designer at H&M. It’s important to know what is going on in fashion because it influences the way designers make collections, editors’ cover stories and consumers choose products. I also like to see the way others put together an ensemble; everyone has a personal touch to even the simplest pieces of clothing. Besides my perspective on industry news, I include current trends that inspire my every day and weekend wardrobe. Whether I am wearing my high-waisted shorts, a printed piece or something black, my style expresses preppy, sophisticated and vintage elements. Fashion is ever-changing and different with each culture and person, and I believe we should know what’s going on in the industry we love.


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bowutiful By AMANDA HEFFLINGER Photos by DEANNA SAKAL

B

ow ties are no longer only for formal events and overachieving nerds, and little girls and Disney princesses aren’t the only ones flaunting hair bows. There is something about these simplistic accessories that has kept them on the fashion radar since the Victorian era. Anyone can add a little pizazz to their outfit with a bow around their neck or in their hair; it’s just a matter of knowing how to wear it.

HISTORY

Bows have been around since Queen Victoria occupied the throne of England in the late 1800s. During that time, women rarely wore bows in their hair, and when they did, they were usually of a modest color like black or ivory. The French liked the idea of a “necktie” introduced by the Prussians, and decided to adopt it as their own. The bow tie became more established throughout the 20th century and was popularized by the invention of the tuxedo, while hair bows became associated with younger girls. But these stereotypes are long gone; hair bows are a sweet addition to almost any outfit and men can spruce up their daily wear with a stylish bow tie.

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HOW TO WEAR BOW TIES

Many associate bow ties with dad’s high school prom picture, English bureaucrats or Pee-wee Herman. Well gentleman, the bow tie is back with a vengeance and it’s time to embrace it. Celebrities like Swizz Beatz and André 3000 have revived this historic neckpiece and have looked incredibly dapper while doing so. The bow tie can be dressed up in the likes of black-tie events and

other special occasions, or dressed down with a simple button-up shirt and V-neck sweater. When dressing up, think black. Black is always classy and always in. If you’re thinking about dressing it down, anything goes. Bow ties are no longer restrained to fabrics like silk and satin; today bow ties are made of wools, flannels and even hopsack. Be brave and flaunt a striped shirt with a polka dot tie; you won’t be ignored.

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HOW TO WEAR HAIR BOWS

Hair bows aren’t only adorable, they’re also diverse. They can be worn on headbands, as clips or around a ponytail. Hair bows add the perfect amount of charm to a sundress, or just a little extra spunk to high-waisted shorts and a crop top. Celebs like Katy Perry and Lady Gaga have taken the bow to extremes, but the hair bow doesn’t have to be over-the-top. Zooey Deschanel has been known to rock a classic bow over a low pony for a low-key look. The most important thing is to make this accessory your own. And ladies, don’t be afraid to try out the bow tie trend for yourself; Rihanna and Janelle Monáe are known for sporting this new trend, giving the boys a run for their money.

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casecraze By NICOLE RANIERI

i

Photos by ALLIE GOTTLIEB

Phones are taking the technology world by storm. But with a smartphone that matches everyone else’s, how can one individualize? Sure, black and white are always options, but it's still blending in with every other iPhone owner. Cue the iPhone case and cover. iPhone cases are now just as wide-

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spread as the phone itself, and designers like Chanel and Marc Jacobs are hopping on board. For those on a budget, stores like Five Below and Target offer cover options that won’t break the bank. These cute covers can differentiate a user from fellow “iFans,” and it’s possible to protect the device while showing off personal style.


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PROTECTION

Some smartphone owners opt for function. Lately, “protection” is synonymous with “OtterBox.” Men can sport the black and white, blue and white or yellow and gray combos. Ladies have the options of purple and white, pink and black or blue and white. There are even camouflage patterns and breast cancer awareness designs for those who like to make a statement and support a cause. Incipio is another brand that will protect an iPhone if it happens to make friends with a puddle. For the boys, cases with names like “Destroyer” and “Bombproof” suggest that the brand is heavy-duty. Incipio chooses to appeal to girls with case names like “Dotties” and “Feather,” which help the bulky protection pass as trendy.

STYLE

For other iPhone owners, a case that makes a statement is more important than protection. Little do they know, guys may express their personal style through a cell phone case. Black cases may be most popular among men, but some have small, contrasting designs on the back, like triangles, or stripes in

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a bright color. Sports team cases are widely popular, and some boys even have cell phone cases that look just like a baseball. Men may not order a case with the intention of expressing their personal style, but they’re doing just that. Girls, on the other hand, pride themselves on a stylish phone cover. The same rule that applies to matching shoes with a bag also goes for phone covers. For those feeling creative, Pantone-colored cases like Tangerine Tango are the perfect fit for a graphic designer or anyone who loves color. Cases with studs or mesmerizing patterns catch the eye. Bumper cases have also become a popular item. These cases surround the edges of the device but offer no protection to the front and back. Some are silicone, and others are plastic. There are even friendship cases. A half heart is split on each cover, but when you push the two phone cases together, they combine to make a heart, much like a friendship necklace. Buying a case is a simple way to stand out and express one's interests. Put thought and genuine attention into a case purchase, because there are certainly no regrets in being individual.


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Buying a case is a simple way to stand out and express your interests.

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thread

PRESENTS

NITE of WHITE Friday, June 1

9 PM | JBar | 21 & up FREE FOOD

FIND THREAD ON THE WEB: outhreadmag.com | facebook.com/threadmag | @threadmag | vimeo.com/threadmag | pinterest.com/threadmagazine 38 | THREAD


bangthang By ERIN GOLDEN Illustrations By DANIELLE MAGARY

W

ith Ohio’s wavering spring and sweltering summer, everyone is heading to the salon to change up his or her look. For some, this might mean a completely different hairstyle, but for others, only a tiny adjustment is needed to make a big difference. Sometimes the tiniest change can make or break an entire appearance, and that small modification could be a swift cut of bangs. The type of bangs cut at the salon may or may not suit every face shape or hairstyle, and no one wants to struggle through the long period of growing out bangs that just aren’t right. Here are a few guidelines to make an easy but significant modification to a hairstyle for the coming summer.

FIND THE FRINGE THAT FLATTERS YOUR FACE

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OVAL SHAPE

(widest at middle of face)

ROUND SHAPE

(most prominent part is the cheeks)

CHEEK-LENGTH STRAIGHT ACROSS Those who posses this face shape are considered lucky, as it can pull off just about any type of bangs. Whether cut straight across or combed into a sideswept part, almost any type of fringe will compliment this appearance.

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It is important to know that a round-shaped face does not mean a chubby face. Round can be just the overall shape or outline of the cheeks. Blunt and very hard lines are not the most flattering for this type. Long fringes that come down and cover most of the cheek can lessen a full face and give it a more oval look. AVOID: blunt & hard hairlines


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SQUARE SHAPE (defined jawline, hard lines)

HEART SHAPE

(narrow chin, widest at forehead)

LAYERED FRAMES Having a square-shaped face doesn’t always mean hard, angular jawlines, but most of the time this is the case. A trick for making the jawline look a little less masculine would be to have a layered haircut that is soft and frames the jaw to give it a little less prominence. Avoid dramatic layers; instead, opt for simple layers to do the trick.

WISPY BANGS Those with this type of visage should be sure to avoid any blunt, bold types of haircuts. Shorter, wispier strands that can part in the middle and cover some of the forehead are the most appealing for this face shape. AVOID: blunt & bold haircuts

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a how-to:

farmingfauxpas By TOM BUSCH Photos by MACKENZIE COTTINGHAM

W

ith sunny summer days only weeks away, there are many things on my todo list. One of those things is something I have battled with every summer that I can remember. That is, of course, trying to avoid the dreaded farmer’s tan. Because I grew up on a farm, I thoroughly understand what is meant when the phrase “farmer’s tan” is used. For those of you who don’t know what I’m talking about, a farmer’s tan is when only your arms, face and neckline have been exposed to the sun and the rest of your pale body is hidden beneath your shirt.

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FACE

NECKLINE ARMS

PALE BODY

(This may not sound horribly bad but it can be quite embarrassing when you go to take your shirt off and it looks like you’re still wearing it.)

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Over the years I’ve tried everything to avoid these uneven, unsightly tan lines. Here are a few fool-proof ways I’ve found to avoid them:

GO SHIRTLESS AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE. Whether you’re outside mowing the yard, grilling or going for a jog, pop that shirt off and enjoy the Vitamin D. 44 | THREAD


CHANGE UP THE STYLE OF THE SHIRT YOU WEAR & THE STRENGTH OF THE UV PROTECTION YOU APPLY.

NOW I UNDERSTAND you aren’t always in a position to go shirtless. In this case, change up the style of the shirt you wear and the strength of UV protection you apply. For instance, if you wear a short-sleeve shirt one day, try to go with a tank top the next. On the more conservative, short-sleeve shirt days, apply a higher grade protection, possibly SPF 50 and for the tank top days

apply a lower grade like SPF 30. This will result in a more even tan. However, you’ll still need to bring color to your torso. For this I suggest using sunless tanner or purchasing a tanning package at your local salon. Of course there is always the last alternative, which is to just never go outside. Sitting on the couch is a great way to avoid the sun, an attractive body or socializing with girls.

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BEHIND THE SCENES OF

May Day

SEE THE FULL SHOOT ON PG. 100

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newsienails By BECKY WAGNER Photos by AUDREY KELLY

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ou’re a collegiate woman looking to show off your love for all things literary without uttering a word. It just so happens your nails are depressingly bare and you have that little bit of bottom-of-the-bottle

leftover vodka that needs to somehow be put to use. Look no further for your all-encompassing solution, because newspaper nails are the perfect one. Although this trend appears complicated, it’s a surprisingly easy style to achieve. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 47


WHAT YOU’LL NEED: Newspaper

A small cup

Rubbing Alcohol

Scissors

Top Coat

Base Coat

GET THE LOOK: STEP ONE

Wash your hands thoroughly. Scrub away the dirt and exfoliate under your nails until they’re squeaky clean and shiny enough to make mama proud.

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STEP TWO

Trim, shape and buff your nails accordingly. Try to make them mirror your nail beds to ensure an even, uniform shape.


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STEP THREE

Apply base coat, then two coats of your color polish of choice.

Now wait for those suckers to fully dry. Each coat should take around 15 minutes to set completely, so make sure you’re surrounded with a sufficient amount of hands-free entertainment. Test dryness without smudging by pressing your nail lightly to your lip.

STEP FOUR

Once your nails are completely dry (you should be able to gently touch your pinky nails together and feel no “grab”), pour enough rubbing alcohol/vodka in your bowl of choice to fully submerge your prepped nail for 1.5 seconds.

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STEP FIVE

Once your nail is wet, immediately press a strip of newspaper to it. Hold it firmly to your nail for about 30 seconds, then carefully peel the paper off, making sure not to smudge the print. When it comes off, the print should be successfully reversed onto your nail. Repeat ad infinitum until all of your fingers are covered.

STEP SIX

After waiting about five minutes or so for the print to dry, apply a generous amount of top coat. This enhances the print and ensures the nails will stay set for weeks to come.

STEP SEVEN

Go dazzle friends and relatives with your bangin’ nails, you crafty devil.

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whiteout By NADIA KURTZ Photos by EMMY BAKER

A

s the sun warms up and June approaches, wedding bells are in the air. This wedding season, however, brides will not be the only ones in all white. The all-white trend is hitting the runways yet again. Last year, a few designers such as Viktor & Rolf and Celine took a leap and turned up with solely white collections for Spring/ Summer 2011. But this year the trend has been taken to a new level and it’s safe to say that white is the new black.

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White is flattering on anyone and especially stands out on sun-kissed skin so it is perfect for summer. The all-white outfit can also achieve many different looks. Many white trends exhibit lace, crochet or transparency to give it a loose, bohemian vibe. Tight and shiny white fabrics channel a '70s John Travolta disco look, while a flowing white, one-shoulder dress with a gold accent is reminiscent of an ancient Greek goddess.


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(All|clothes from 54 THREAD Athens Underground)


seams

Wearing all-white outfits can work for any occasion. During the day, a white sundress looks casual and simple. Maxi dresses have also been coming out in white shades which play up smooth, tanned shoulders. For a business meeting, a white pencil skirt along with a white tailored blazer looks minimal and polished. Such a standout ensemble will demand attention and respect. For date night, a fitted white dress exudes simple elegance. To hit the bricks for a crazy night out with friends, a white outfit is fun, flirty and steals the spotlight. This season, all-white collections are popping up all over the runways, retail stores and the streets. Recently, actress and fashion icon Blake Lively looked stunning wearing a ruffled white dress, white heels and simple accessories. Some designers that showcased solely white collections include Diane von Furstenberg and Alexander McQueen. Retail stores such as Banana Republic, J. Crew and The Gap have been featuring white shorts and dresses for spring and summer 2012. Even for those that are not advocates of the all-white dress code, white pieces are important to include in any wardrobe for its ability to match almost any shade. A white dress can be spiffed up with metallic pumps or a bold necklace, and it can be dressed down with a brown belt or daytime sandals. White shorts pair nicely with floral tops or light, pastel sweaters. On and off the runway, white monotones are turning heads. Investing in some staple pieces and splurging on some fun white dresses would not be a bad idea. Say goodbye to the little black dress and make room for the LWD.

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sweetdreams By LINCOLN SKLAR Photos by KASEY BROOKS

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O

ne exciting aspect of college life is the ability to decorate and re-decorate your room however you’d like. While replacing an entire comforter set can be expensive, swapping out pillowcases is an easy way to make a change while staying on a

college budget. Turning to your pillows when you need a slight adjustment in dĂŠcor will not only help you define your space, but can also be done using supplies already in your room. You can even decorate the pillowcases for when your sweetie spends the night.

SUPPLIES Plain T-shirt

Two pillowcases

Adhesive letters

Fabric

Sewing Pins

Needle & Thread

Scissors

STEP ONE

Cut a large heart out of your T-shirt. Make sure the heart is not taller than the pillowcase, and aim for it to be on the wider side, as the pillow will make the pillowcase bulge and distort the shape slightly.

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STEP TWO

Apply the adhesive letters to form one word on each half of the T-shirt heart. One option is to say “yours” and “mine.”

STEP THREE

Turn the heart over, facing down, and pin the fabric to the back to make the background for the letters. Make sure the fabric will cover all the letters when they are cut out.

STEP FOUR

Flip over and stitch around all of the letters, sewing the T-shirt to the fabric.

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STEP FIVE

Once you’ve sewn around all the letters, carefully cut out each one. Take your time and only cut through the T-shirt.

STEP SIX

Sew each half to a pillowcase. Make sure that the side will match up when the pillows are placed beside each other. When you have finished, enjoy your new pillowcases with a welldeserved nap!

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heartstrings By ALI SHULTZ Photos by TARA NOLAN

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hy not flaunt some pride with this crafty string art of the wonderful state of Ohio? It works with any state or country, so if you are feeling a little homesick while

at school, this makes a delightful touch of home. It makes a perfect gift for family and friends who can proudly hang it on the wall. Or keep it for yourself, so no matter where you are living, you always have a piece of home. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 69


YOUR CHECKLIST: CANVAS BOARD

STRING

TAPE

TACKS

MAP OF OHIO

SCISSORS

STEP ONE

Cut the state out of the map and cut a heart around the city of your choice. To show Bobcat pride, cut a heart around Athens.

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STEP TWO

Tape the map to the canvas board, using it as a template. If you want to paint or staple fabric to the board to give it some character, do this before you tape the map down.


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STEP THREE

Nail the tacks into the board, following the border of the state, and then along the heart around the city. This can get tedious, but it will be worth it in the end.

STEP FOUR

After you finish nailing the tacks, pull the map template away from the canvas to make sure it looks just as beautiful as your state.

STEP FIVE

Tie a knot with the string around one tack, this will be where you start and end your project. Begin wrapping the string back and forth from the edge of the state to the heart. Since there are fewer tacks around the heart, some of the inside tacks will need to be returned to a few times.

STEP SIX

Once you are at the last tack, tie a knot, trim the excess string and find the best place to show off your new art.

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6 LOOKS

WE LIKE BEHIND THE SCENES

SEE THE FULL SHOOT ON PG. 156 72 | THREAD


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collarcandy By KATHRYN POTRAZ Photos by KIRSTEN MARTINEZ

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hen a wardrobe looks too familiar and unexciting, the best way to jazz it up is adding fun accessories. Inspired by the gorgeous lacy collars

at Louis Vuitton’s Spring 2012 collection, an embellished collar easily accessorizes an otherwise ordinary look. Turn heads this season with a simple, elegant accessory that you can make yourself! OUTHREADMAG.COM | 73


WHAT YOU’LL NEED: X-Acto Knife (optional)

Button-up Shirts with Collars

Embellishments

Fabric Scissors

Fabric glue

STEP ONE

Choose your collar ... It’s important to pick out a shirt that has a stiff, sturdy collar that can support the weight of the embellishments you’ll be attaching. Vintage and secondhand stores have an abundance of cheap, colorful shirts. 74 | THREAD

STEP TWO

... and the embellishments. The embellishments are the fun part — almost anything will do. Earrings, broaches, beads, store-bought studs, buttons, decorative flowers — anything goes. Sift through craft stores and old jewelry boxes for truly unique pieces.


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STEP THREE

Cut the collar from the shirt. Unbutton the shirt and lay it flat with the outside of the shirt facing you. Using scissors, cut along the seam underneath the first button on the shirt.

STEP FOUR

Arrange your embellishments. To ensure the pattern on the collar will look its best, lay out and arrange the embellishments before attaching them.

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STEP FIVE

FOR A FLOWERED COLLAR, use fabric scissors or an X-Acto knife to poke a small hole through the fabric.

Attach the embellishments.

FOR A BEADED COLLAR, simply use fabric glue to adhere the beads. For a more understated look, glue the beads just to the tips of the collar.

Then, place the flower over the hole (the hole in the flower should line up with the hold in the collar) and push a metal brad through the center. Bend the back of the brad to hold the flower in place. Repeat as much (or as little) as desired!

STEP SIX

Wear them loud and proud! To add a punch to your outfit, layer an ornamented collar under a soft sweater or T-shirt.

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Stop in for jewelry, accessories, home & garden decor, leather items, and much more! Store Hours:

Sunday 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

visit our website:

www.mountainlaurelathens.com

http://www.clickingcreaMAKE A DIFFERENCE & VOTE teschange.com/ FROM MAY 28-JUNE 1, VIEW AND VOTE FOR STORIES OF SOUTHEAST OHIO NONPROFITS

and

https://www.facebook.com/ CELEBRATING COMMUNITY events/138278592963118/ Join us for a Project C Premier

FRIDAY JUNE 1 AT 7:30 PM AT ATHENS COMMUNITY CENTER PAVILION OUTHREADMAG.COM | 77


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derbydivas By KATE SIERZPUTOWSKI Photos by REBECCA CIPRUS OUTHREADMAG.COM | 81


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oran Marsan had been a part of the Appalachian Hell Betties for a mere five months when she decided to get the logo tattooed on her back, spanning shoulder to shoulder. Elegantly lined by her soft floral dress, this tattoo serves as a perfect metaphor to her sport of choice. “I think the derby culture naturally attracts more of the bad girls, the rocker girls, the rebels,” Marsan said. “(Derby) changed my life, it made me a stronger, more independent person. To me, my tattoo is like a phoenix rising out of the ashes.” The Appalachian Hell Betties started out with just 10 girls but have expanded to more than 25 members since their 2010 inception. Practices occur triweekly. Derby takes extreme dexterity and a proclivity to pain, seeing as it is one of only three fullcontact sports for women — and the only one where a human body is considered the object in play. “You can be completely feminine (in derby) and that femininity includes knocking people down,” Marsan said. “It challenges the ways that we construct what roles women are supposed to play by the fact that you have full pads on with fishnets and a short skirt and it’s fine.” During practice at Bird Arena, the women fly around the rink in gold lamé leggings, cropped skirts, knee-high patterned socks, intricately ripped Tshirts and the infamous fishnets, exposing bicep, tricep and thigh tattoos from amid their eclectic sportswear. Although fishnets and short skirts

add to the reconstructed femininity of the sport, this in no way diminishes the purpose of the derby-associated accessories. The fishnets are a great way to keep kneepads in place, and short skirts allow for padded shorts to easily fit underneath. “We always try to wear something that will allow us to play. It’s fine to get all sexed-up and look cute, but if you can’t actually play the sport then it’s defeating the purpose,” said fellow teammate Amber Young. Many participate in the sport for its cathartic effects. It allows the women to take on alter egos. Choosing a derby name is one of the most iconic aspects of the derby culture. The derby name chosen is often in reference to intimidation and pain but can also relate to the specific interest of the skater. “It is kind of this way to suspend reality. You get to be your alter ego, you get to be your derby persona.” said Melissa Queen, a Hell Betty who worked with her last name and her musical interests to create the derby persona of ‘Queen Greatest Hits.’ Young chose ‘Vera Venom;’ ‘Vera,’ because of its simplicity, and ‘Venom’ to connect her astrological sign Scorpio’s weapon of choice. Marsan decided on the name ‘Gypsy Trample.’ “I have lived all over the country and am usually part of the riffraff, it just seemed to fit,” Marsan said. Gypsy Trample doesn’t know how long she will remain in Athens, whether it be 10 or 20 years. However, no matter how long the length of her residency, she will continue to carry her name and Hell Betties mark.

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Derby changed my life, it made me a stronger, more independent person. —LORAN MARSAN

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It’s fine to get all sexed-up and look cute, but if you can’t actually play the sport, it’s defeating the purpose. —AMBER YOUNG OUTHREADMAG.COM | 87


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fishyfashion By SETH WILLIAMS Photos by MICHELLE KAPPELER

B

irds sing, crickets chirp and the wind whistles. The combination of green vegetation, blue lakes and dirt paths makes up the landscape of American Electrical Power’s recreation lands. This remote place is perfect for the members of Ohio University’s Fishing Club to make camp for a fishing trip. “I’ve always enjoyed fishing growing up, it’s something that is a part of my life,” said club member Travis Von Neumann. “I would consider myself a water lover since my major is marine freshwater environmental biology.” The OU Fishing Club has been thriving for two years after a long hiatus. They schedule one formal trip in fall and spring quarters, and countless informal trips where several members of the group head out to enjoy the leisure time while fishing. They travel primarily to Dow Lake. Their main catch is bass. To the men — and the few women — in the fishing club, fishing is a casual activity, a competition and a way of life.

“I love fishing, I consider it the most relaxing thing to do,” said Ryan Detencheff. “I fish every day, by myself, for an hour or two.” Though the environment is relaxing for Detencheff, not all of the members fish just for fun. “Fifty percent of our club is devoted to leisure, the other 50 percent is competitive,” said club president Victor Collela. He is a dapper dresser at meetings; he leads the club dressed in slacks, a collared shirt and a silver watch. He doesn’t look like the stereotypical fisherman. “People think fishing is for hillbillies, or it’s not competitive,” said Brad Corrao, as he shook his head. These avid fishers take their hobby seriously. The team typically enters two members into day-long competitions where the goal is to catch the most fish. "Tournaments can last up to eight hours ... standing,” said Matt Tarr. The club is sponsored by a dozen or so local businesses, including Don Wood Ford, Lincoln and Mercury. During competition, club members don sports jerseys and team sun-

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I like to fish because I can be active, as well as be occupied, which feels good.

glasses and jump into their club boats. During tournaments, cargo shorts and jerseys are appropriate attire, Collela said. For non-competition fishing trips, club members simply wear their daily attire. “I wear denim jeans, Levi’s for leg protection and a T-shirt,” said Dan Burtenshaw. Regardless of whether they’re competing or fishing for fun, every member stressed the importance of wearing a pair of sunglasses and a hat. To them, the sun is more of a threat than any critter in the woods, because many of the team members 90 | THREAD

—ALEC DENKER

are active in the outdoors. Many club members also hunt, hike, backpack and rock climb on the weekends. For them, the energetic side of fishing is what makes it appealing. “I like to fish because I can be active, as well as be occupied, which feels good,” said Alec Denker. His team members agreed. “The feeling I get from fishing is pure excitement; it’s heart pounding,” Corrao said. “You never know what could be swimming in a lake. That giant fish could be waiting out there for me. I love that adrenaline rush.”


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interiorperspective By BENTLEY WEISEL Photos by BRENNA KOWALL

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O

n the third floor of Grover Center, one might expect to find a collection of offices or professors going about their academic business. Continue to venture back, however, and there lies the hidden treasure of Ohio University’s Interior Architecture majors in their natural habitat. Large, curved desks cluster together in a vast room of windows. Each desk is piled with personality and the necessities needed to make sleeping over in the studio to work on projects a possibility. For some, drawers are stocked with sustenance and toiletries; blankets or sleeping bags are draped over their chairs in preparation for never-ending nights of work. Newer members of the major maintain a more composed space that is filled with pictures, sketches and textile samples. Seniors Chelsea King and Catie Forrest, both majoring in interior architecture, explained the title of their major essentially means the architecture of inside space. It consists of how the walls are made and how space interacts; not drawing buildings or exteriors. A normal day in the life of an interior architect and design major at OU consists of working for a four-hour block of studio time, attending other outside classes and then returning back to the studio to keep working until the early hours of morning, King said. “You get into a routine and learn what things you want to keep at your desk space,” she said. “And you learn what food places are best. Jimmy John’s knows exactly where we are now since we always end up calling for food late at night.” Interior architecture is the forms,

who what wear

functions, materials and technology that holds something together, said Matt Ziff, associate professor of the department. “It’s not just buildings; it is everything around us,” he said. “This is the human pursuit of the built environment.” Inspirations for interior architecture majors and professors derive from a combination of Frank Lloyd Wright, Eero Saarinen and Charles and Ray Eames, said assistant professor Mary Beth Janssen. “It is not about cliché or trend; it is more about finding the authentic underpinning of how to solve the problem by design and what to create,” Janssen said. “Furthermore, it is not about the ‘what to think,’ it is about ‘how to think.’ Projects that are born out of this fundamental realization lead to a more sustainable and satisfying result. How this happens is through a truly collaborative experience with client and designer.” The lifestyle of an interior architecture major, whether they chose the major or the major chose them, affects other aspects of a person’s life, like personal style. For King and Forrest, their daily wardrobe is driven by the forces of comfort and convenience, with a hint of quirk and creativity.

This is the human pursuit of the built environment. —MATT ZIFF

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“I always opt for more basic clothing,” King said. “But that usually includes bright colors and really fun jewelry too. I like to wear things that are visually pleasing, because that is how I look at the world around me.” While Forrest maintains a similar mentality, she explained she opts for more details in her clothing. “I like to try new things with my outfits and respond strongly to textures and patterns,” she said. “I think being an interior architect shapes the way our minds view things and that is how we choose what we wear, how we see things and everything around us.” She said the more she learns about interior architecture, the more she has developed a realization and appreciation for each aesthetic detail. King said there’s more to interior design than just picking out pillows. “People often confuse the terms ‘interior decorator’ and ‘interior designer,’” she said. “Interior architecture and design is more than just selecting colors and materials and pairing them together … we strive to design spaces that are aesthetically and ergonomically pleasing to the everyday user. People inhabit interior environments everyday without realizing their impact; this is what inspires us to design dynamic spaces that leave a lasting impression.” The common thread of finding architecture in everything is best explained in the words of Janssen. “This is a transforming moment in most designers' educations. One never looks at the world in the same way. I think this comes from this transformation of ‘looking’ but not ‘seeing.’ … It is separating real from imitation, as well as status quo from possibility.” Interior architecture envelops its members and alters their outlook on 96 | THREAD

the world around them. It is a lifestyle. “One time my roommates and I all got packages delivered to our house. They all got flowers, and I got fabric samples,” King said. “Steve Jobs said it best, ‘Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.’” To see the work of OU’s senior Interior Architect and Design majors, you can visit the Trisolini Gallery on the fourth floor of Baker Center during finals week starting Tuesday, June 6.


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I think being an interior architect shapes the way our minds view things and that is how we choose what we wear, how we see things and everything around us. —CATIE FORREST

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“

I always opt for more basic clothing, but that usually includes bright colors and really fun jewelry too. I like to wear things that are visually pleasing, because that is how I look at the world around me. —CHELSEA KING 98 | THREAD


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May Day Photos by SARAH MILLER

Feel the fresh grass beneath bare feet, frolic about in floral anything and gallop around a makeshift May pole. You are the May Queen, after all, and this is your spring oasis. Infuse this ivy covered castle with sheer fabrics and darling daisies. (All clothes: Athens Underground)

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Bountiful flower crowns atop a set of masterfully unkempt locks keep these breezy looks looking effortlessly enchanting.

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Pastel shades of yellow and pink help you become one with the trees as your long skirt and May OUTHREADMAG.COM | 113 Day ribbon twirl in the wind.


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It’s time to let loose on the dance floor with your rave style. Bust out your bold colors, grab your glow sticks and shimmy into those salacious midriff-baring tops. As the roaming lights pepper the dance floor, it’s time to strut your stuff and make a move (with your wardrobe and with your dancin’). For maximum comfort — and to prevent sweaty grossness — we suggest looser-fitting clothing … and some killer shades.


RON

y AA os b Phot

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On the dance floor, don’t be afraid to shine or, in this case, shimmer. Don your slinky party dress and get groovin’.


Bold pants are in this season — on and off the dance floor. Pair with an easy-to-keeptrack-of clutch, and you’re ready for a night out.


Glow sticks give the night an extra splash of fun. Bonus points if your neon colors match your glowing companion!


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up, up& away Photos by LOREN CELLENTANI Styled by JUSTIN BROWN

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If you’re in dire need of elevating your wardrobe for the summer months, select pieces in bold colors like tangerine or magenta. (All clothing from Athens Underground)

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The luxe look of a satin blouse dresses up a floral skirt just enough to give a hint of elegance in your everyday look.

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In order to rise above the rest, ditch the spaghetti straps and maxi dresses and showcase a structured dress with sleeves to go from sloppy to sophisticated. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 133


The proof is in the details, so if you want to achieve the “beauty in the sky" look, find pieces with distinct elements like an intricate collar. 134 | THREAD


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A simple button-up blouse is a staple item, but the texture added with this pleated top heightens the interest level beyond basic.

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Take back your femininity by bursting the trend of a casual wardrobe. You’re a lady and the best way to dress like one is adding a dress to your outfit rotation.

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Sometimes a dress on its own can take flight. Try to avoid weighing down a standout item by deflating it with too many accessories. Instead keep it simple and choose a few complementary pieces.

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MODEL CITIZENS Photos by BECKY WILLIAMS

The people have spoken! Thread asked readers which past models they'd like to see plastered on the front of our May issue, and the votes have been counted. We shot Martina Johnston and Grant Perry at a location they're very familiar with: the ROTC training facility at The Ridges. Flip the pages to see these cadets trade their day-to-day uniforms for military-inspired garb.

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(Coat: Athens Underground)

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OUTHREADMAG.COM | 147 (Dress Athens Underground)


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O W K E S LIK E The signature drinks of six Athens bars transformed into fashionable attire. Photos by HEATHER BEAVER and SARAH BALSER

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Indulging in too many crystal ballers could leave your fortune hazy, but layering a simple dress, funky fringe top and patterned vest while accessorizing with oversized rings and a bold headscarf shows that you have a clear vision when it comes to style. (Clothing provided by The Other Place) OUTHREADMAG.COM | 159


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RAZZ WHEAT

With the summer months approaching, finding a relaxing retreat away from the brutal sun is a necessity and Jackie O’s provides the perfect laid-back setting and beverage. So throw on your favorite flannel and channel the Razz Wheat to embrace the easygoing lifestyle of the summer months. (Hat and overalls provided by Athens Underground)

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AQUARIUM After placing an order for an aquarium at The Pub, you may feel as if you are drowning in a sea of liquid, but following the aquatic trend in this translucent ocean-colored dress will ensure that you stay afloat when it comes to your look. (Dress provided by Athens Underground)

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HOT NUT The combination in Tony’s infamous specialty shot will boost your spirits and give you the lift you need to act like the hot nut you truly are. This monochromatic mocha ensemble has polish but evokes a carefree image of a Court Street enthusiast by dressing down a fitted blazer with a basic T-shirt.

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CHAMPAGNE

SLUSHY

Broney’s offers a decadent taste in their blended champagne slushy that provides an elegant alternative to the beverages served at the average frat party. A nude frock topped with a cherryred flowered headband mimics the appearance of the mixed drink in a way that looks just as refreshing as the drink tastes. (Dress and headband provided by Athens Underground)

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BLACK WIDOW The venom of Pigskin’s black widow cocktail is arguably as deadly to the bar’s patrons as the spider’s bite is to its prey and this black dress is no exception when it comes to drop-dead gorgeous fashion. (Dress provided by Athens Underground)

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SMALL TOWN

DREAMS

AND BIG CITY

SCHEMES

These noteworthy Ohioans took the leap and left an imprint on the fashion industry by COLLEEN KRATOFIL Illustrations by VIRGINIA ADAMS

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A

thens can often feel like its own protective bubble. Living in a small town where the community is close and almost everything is in walking distance can leave students feeling removed from the rest of the world; most notably, the fashion world. With style capitals located in Paris, Milan and New York, living in Ohio can make dreams of working in the industry seem out of reach.

However, three notable Ohioans made the leap from small town dreamers to big city stars. Full of setbacks, hard financial times and difficulty establishing themselves, they proved Ohioans can make a tremendous impact in the Big Apple. Nanette Lepore, Sarah Jessica Parker and Althea Harper are the epitome of success, persistence and plain old hard work. They are proof that hometowns do not hold back style icons.

Graphic by HANNAH HITCHCOCK OUTHREADMAG.COM | 171 and MIKAELA LONGO


IN LEPORE’S JOURNEY, NO SETBACK WAS TOO GREAT Nanette Lepore’s trek to become a serious force as a women's wear designer was not a clear and easy ride. For years, she struggled financially, turning to her father and sister for support. Lepore was born and raised in Youngstown, Ohio, by bohemian artists and encouraging parents. She graduated from Boardman High School, finishing her undergraduate studies at Youngstown State University with a degree in business before making the move to New York City. She enrolled in the Fashion Institute of Technology to study design and hunted for her first job in the Garment District, where she continues to work today. She jumped around to different designer showrooms in New York but never found her place. So she went out on a limb and opened her own store, Robespierre. Still making very little money ($100 a week for three years), she showed her

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collection in the trade show Coterie, bringing in $250,000 in orders. Even with money borrowed from her father, Lepore went into debt for five years in order to supply the demand. The sacrifices she made paid off in the long run when noted saleswoman Annette Brindell picked up her clothes, prompting department stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue, Neiman Marcus, and Macy's to carry her line. Lepore maintains stores internationally and has a huge celebrity following after her NYC Fashion Week debut in 2000. Gregg Andrews, fashion director for Nordstrom, describes Lepore’s collections as “always ultra-­feminine with a nod to retro style and a touch of whimsy.” Her road to success was not always glamorous; it was filled with empty wallets and discouraging jobs, but Lepore’s journey shows that hopeful Ohioan success is possible.


Spring/Summer 2012 collection

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A STAR IS BORN: THE NEXT TOWN OVER Sarah Jessica Parker played Carrie Bradshaw, the epitome of the New York City style icon, in "Sex and the City," making her a top fashion figure. But before earning the big bucks, her childhood was full of monetary hardships, as Parker has recalled worrying about the phone, electric and gas bill as a child. During her interview on Inside the Actors Studio, Parker described that despite the difficult times, she would not want her life any differently. Parker was born in Nelsonville, Ohio, and moved to Cincinnati when she was young. During her interview, Parker described her large family as having a “small town feel,” because they all relied on one another. Her family went on welfare and her mother devised ways to save money while still dressing her daughters in the latest Polly Flinders dresses for a bargain and providing theater experiences to her children in cheap ways. Parker remembered being without certain luxuries at times, such as Christmas presents, but has no regrets. She filled her days with ballet training, playhouse theater work, and "Creative Dramatics," a Saturday TV

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program. In a Cincinnati newspaper, she spotted an after-school special audition, subsequently snagging a lead role at 8 years old. After loving the experience, Parker and her brother went to New York City for a brief role in a Broadway play. Agents persuaded them to audition for more shows, and the family made the risky decision to move to New York. Parker describes that the family knew “it was a crapshoot.” Nevertheless, they moved to Yonkers, N.Y., having yet to purchase a home. Parker’s mother was also pregnant. The family endured and, as Parker put it, “never looked back.” She worked as a child actress and had a successful career, but the role of a lifetime changed her from actress and performer to mega style icon. She was offered numerous ad campaigns, which led to her perfume line of five different fragrances. She also began a clothing line for Steve & Barry’s named “Bitten” and priced all items under $20, showing her ability to still remember “where she came from.” In 2010 she worked as the head of Halston Heritage label.


Carrie Bradshaw "Sex and The City: The Movie"

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Carrie Bradshaw "Sex and the City:" Season 6, Episode 93 178 | THREAD


Carrie Bradshaw "Sex and The City: The Movie"

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FROM UNDERDOG TO FAIRY TALE SUCCESS STORY Althea Harper has been called a “genius” by Tommy Hilfiger, “extremely talented” by Tim Gunn and a “fabulous glam-azon” by her fans. Her second place finish on Project Runway propelled her career, putting her on the map as an up-­and-coming designer. Born in Dayton, Ohio, Harper faced impressive competition in the casting session for Project Runway. Other finalists held degrees from Parsons New School and the Fashion Institute of Technology, and maintained their own clothing line, while Harper entered as a fresh graduate from the University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning (DAAP), without ever having a job as a designer. Interning for six different designers throughout her studies prepared her for the daunting challenges ahead. She most notably worked for Anna Sui, Zac Posen, Alexander McQueen and Vivienne Westwood. While in London she studied with the Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design. Her raw talent and internship experiences were key to snagging a role on the show. After finishing as first runner-up in 2009, Harper has continued to show

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her self-­titled clothing line in New York Fashion Week, moving to New York City after an invitation to work for Tory Burch. In 2010 she left Burch’s company to focus full time on her own collection, which has attracted a celebrity following from Kerry Washington, Eva Longoria, Heidi Klum and Kourtney and Kim Kardashian. As her client base grows, Harper is hoping to grow in the mainstream retail market. Harper proved it doesn’t take a degree from the country’s top design schools to break into the industry. Her talent­— with a mixture of luck — earned her the opportunity to debut her creativity. "Project Runway" is the glue that connects all three designers. Parker and Lepore appeared as guest judges on the show and Harper as a contestant. Seeing three Ohioans appear on the Emmy-nominated reality TV show and praised for their accomplishments shows just how far Ohioans can go in the industry. Despite the setbacks these women faced, they give assurance to Ohio optimists that success is possible. Becoming established in the city may have taken them time, but the ability to persevere in the fashion world sets these women apart.


Fall/Winter 2011 collection

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BLOG 184 | THREAD


revolution

STYLE BLOGS TAKE OVER THE WEB By BRADLEY PARKS Photos PROVIDED

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ON I H S A F y a d j'S every

S

tyle blogs went from tiny blips on the Web’s radar to a driving force in the fashion industry. Even as recent as 10 years ago, people were not scouring the Internet for fashion advice from someone they had never heard of with a computer, a camera and a lot of free time. But that is exactly the type of appeal that formed the blogosphere of today’s information age. Blogs tailor to the individual. Today, anybody can write a blog about anything, from anywhere in the world with Internet access, most of the time at little or no cost to them. With such possibility, however, how does the Internet community sort out the good from the bad? Thousands of 186 | THREAD

people try their hand at creating content that appeals to a wide enough audience to ultimately be a success. “I’ve always loved fashion magazines,” said Jeannette Scott of J’s Everyday Fashion. “As blogs started becoming popular I felt like there was an opportunity being missed – fashion from the perspective of the average Joe, minus the fantasy.” The same can be said for the men of The Midwestyle blog; they saw a hole in the fashion media. They had an idea that fit one of their own needs. Jeff Kieslich, the brains behind the blog, said they found their niche in the blogging community. The idea came at a time when most blogs were focused on women’s fashion and located on the coasts of the country,


As blogs started becoming popular, I felt like there was an opportunity being missed – fashion from the perspective of the average Joe, minus the fantasy. —JEANNETTE SCOTT

something that obviously did not tailor to the needs of young men living in the heart of the United States. “I knew I wanted to start a men’s blog,” said Kieslich, “but I wanted to focus it on a specific region that was often overlooked as a destination for fashion.” The Midwestyle found its place within the fashion community by producing content that affected a wide range of people. But the true reason behind the blog’s success is the passion the men share for the content they produce. Starting the blog was not to gain page views or become famous, according to Seth Putnam of The Midwestyle. They thought their idea would contribute to their needs and the needs of people like them. The same can be said for

almost all successful blogs. There must be a need and consequently someone eager to fill that need. “A successful blog needs to be something that you’re compelled to blog about,” said Putnam. “You’re willing to do it for free, you’re willing to do it any time in your free time.” With any luck, a blog can build a small community of readers with plenty of room to grow. Many bloggers have had that type of success, which has opened the door to new possibilities. One of the biggest possibilities: Money. It is difficult to find a successful website left without some business eager to capitalize off its page views. And why wouldn’t they? A popular website is just as good as a popular television show, magazine, newspaper OUTHREADMAG.COM | 187


or radio station. If people view the content, a successful advertiser wants its company’s logo and slogan butted right up against the content, giving it the best possibility of being clicked. The great thing about blogs is they are most often organic. Someone with a great idea managed to put together popular content. A blogger does not need to be an expert or a millionaire, but bloggers often offer what many big-time publications cannot: practical advice. This is ever true in the fashion blogging community. J’s Everyday Fashion is the prime example of practical advice. The blog focuses on making the most popular looks feasible for everyday women. Most magazines and style institutions will write as if folks have the freedom to drop $10,000 on a jacket on a whim. However, a person like J is someone who has lived on a budget and has adjusted her fashion to fit her lifestyle. That is the beauty of the fashion blogging community. People with lifestyle situations that match those of their viewers are the proprietors of successful fashion blogs. Thus, the content produced affects a much broader spectrum of people. More people are going to be interested in reading J’s Everyday Fashion and The Midwestyle, because the content better fits their situation. More people are shopping on a budget than are frequenting Louis Vuitton. “Blogging gives us an incredible power to be the media that we want to see,” said J. “The reason I blog is because I want more realistic choices in fashion journalism, but I didn’t have to wait for a company to give me a crazy idea of pared-down ‘everyday fashion’ a chance. I’m able to prove that it works on my own.” Problems arise, however, when advertisers do enter the blogosphere. 188 | THREAD

One concern is whether advertisers tamper with the organic feel of a blog? Can an audience trust a J. Crew shirt is honestly a great-fitting shirt when a J. Crew ad is staring them in the face from the margin? Putnam argues businesses cannot interrupt the purity of the blog as long as bloggers remain honest, especially when it comes to product placement. “Receiving products from companies to demo and review and things like that is not bad,” said Putnam. “You just need to be transparent about it.” However, if a company sponsors a site and the company is directly related to the content at hand, then there might become a conflict of interests. Using Putnam’s example, if Gillette sponsored a site about shaving, readers might suspect poor practice. Style blogs, though, have not only the ability but also the duty to keep clothing and garment companies honest. Bloggers contend that there is nothing wrong with companies teaming up with blogs as long as there remains a sense of transparency. In fact, it can be a good thing. Just as traditional media are responsible to check the government, fashion reporters must check the industry. This opens up opportunities for the future of blogs, mainstream publications and clothing companies to work together to create a more comprehensive fashion community. The fashion sphere can continue to do what it does — help people get dressed. But with increased sunshine and teamwork, the institution can run more efficiently than ever before.


le

y t s e w d i m e h t

I knew I wanted to start a men’s blog, but I wanted to focus it on a specific region that was often overlooked as a destination for fashion. —JEFF KIESLICH

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back of the closet

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cutouts pg. 212

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meninwhite Photos by LEVI FINLEY

We didn't think this weather could get any hotter — until these guys decided to do some laundry. Everyone loves a man who can get domestic (or has a lovable puppy!), and in this super heat, simple V-necks will suffice. Pop on a pair of shades for a style as easy as the sheets blowing on the clothes line.

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rustbeltamericana By KAYLYN HLAVATY Photos by LIZ EMLEY 200 | THREAD


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T

he exression, “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” is commonly used to describe a piece of worn-down furniture at a yard sale or an old lamp from an antique store. For Sam Sloma, his jewelry line, Rust Belt Americana, embodies that phrase. Antique coins, chains, metals and military tags are reinvented by Sloma into wearable and stylish pieces while still maintaining the history behind each one. Sloma describes his line as “vintage junkyard jewelry” because of the variety of places he finds his one of a kind treasures and how each one represents a time in American history. Three years ago when he started the line, it was originally called ARTifact Ohio, but Sloma decided to change the name. “It didn’t permeate with me or any of the people that I talked to. It didn’t feel good or sound good,” he said. “I got to thinking, and then I just realized where the majority of my antiques come from, which is the rust belt.” Every material he uses is representative of America, such as old coins, metals and military tags. The materials he uses are like personal chapters, Sloma said. “Nothing is good unless it has more than one chapter and that is what my pieces represent. I have pieces from the early 1920s and I have pieces from the 1990s.” Instead of just buying beads and metal from a wholesale distributor, Sloma uses a range of resources to acquire his eclectic mix of antique supplies. He buys beads at Beads & Things, a local store selling beads from countries such as Indonesia, Peru and the Czech Republic. He further fulfills his inventory of antique 202 | THREAD

baubles at estate sales, antique stores and through eBay. A dream, a desire to change and a passion were all Sloma needed to take his interest in antiques and transform it into something useful and meaningful. Sloma had always been interested in antique stores, but he never knew what to do with the wares he bought until he had a dream he bought material from an antique store and made jewelry with it. The poor quality of jewelry from retail chains such as Urban Outfitters, American Eagle and Forever 21 also motivated Sloma to start his own line. Sloma now spends more money than he used to because quality has increased and he chooses to buy better antiques and materials. Even though his materials are high quality, he still strives to keep his pieces moderately priced. “I’m a broke college student, so I am not going to charge an arm and a leg to other people,” Sloma said. Hard work and craftsmanship have paid off and Sloma has been able to showcase and sell his work at fairs such as the Athens Farmer’s Market and the Moms Weekend Market. He also landed a spot as a vendor during the National Beach Volleyball Championship in Florida this June. The process of jewelry-making remains a learning experience for him because there are many different styles. He strives to make his interactions with customers personal by catering to their needs with his willingness to add or change pieces on the spot. Rust Belt Americana is different than other retail chains or small businesses, because his antiques are rich with history. “I think the story that comes


along with any one of my pieces makes it different because everything is guaranteed to be older than you and I,” Sloma said. “I have used championship metals from a bowling tournament that may have been passed down from generation to generation. I try to tell those stories as well as I can.”

He researches each piece he acquires in order to provide an accurate story to his customers. “I may not be able to remember faces or names, but I can remember where I get my antiques from,” Sloma said. “The story behind my pieces is what makes my line different than other lines.” OUTHREADMAG.COM | 203


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The story behind my pieces is what makes my line different than other lines. —SAM SLOMA OUTHREADMAG.COM | 205


powerclashing By BRADLEY PARKS Photos by MICHAEL MAURER

N

othing catches the eye quite like clashing clothes. For the longest time, mismatching colors and patterns have caught attention in the worst way. However, since the fifth season of NBC’s "30 Rock," pairing opposite patterns put plaid and paisley together in a place people thought they would never be. Jack Donaghy, played by Alec Baldwin, coined the term “power clashing” when his alter-ego questioned why he was wearing a striped tie with a different patterned striped shirt. What Donaghy said in response (to himself) put the trend on the map; “It’s called ‘power clashing,’” he said, “and I do it because I can.” 206 | THREAD


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Nowadays, power clashing plays an ever-present role in popular fashion. What was once deemed tacky and lazy is now one of the hottest trends in the industry. People are wearing black and brown together without thinking twice. Men could grab a jacket, shirt, tie and pocket square from their closets with blindfolds on and (most of the time) come out with a solid outfit. Still, power clashing is not entirely random; there is a method to the madness. Men must focus to make sure their clash exercises “complete control” over its “cool confusion.” When a man chooses to clash, he must control it to an extent. In other words, the clash cannot be outrageous. There needs to be a plan behind the combination. The first rule of power clashing is to be sure that colors match somewhere in the patterns. For example, a red and black tie should not be paired with a blue and green shirt and a purple pocket square. It should not look as if a Skittles bag threw up on the suit.

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Another rule to follow is that one color and/or pattern needs to be neutral. A man does not want three or four separate patterns going on at once; the suit becomes too busy and the point of clashing is lost. Patterns can be the same, such as checks on checks (on checks). However, when matching similar patterns, the size of the pattern should be noticeably different so as not to create confusion. If patterns are too close in size, the outfit could turn into a hypnotic mechanism rather than a well put together suit of clothing. The most important thing to remember in power clashing is to have fun and not be afraid. Yes, clashes both good and bad stand out. However, what stands out more than anything is a well-dressed man. One of the most fun things about fashion is taking chances. Some work better than others, but when that perfect combination is found, the payoff is huge. Don’t just power clash to power clash. Do it because you can.


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It’s called 'power clashing' and I do it because I can. —JACK DONAGHY

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cuttingedge By OLIVIA OHLIN Photos by LAUREN HOELLE

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F

orget relying on miniskirts and crop tops to show some skin this season. Cut-out fashion is the latest style bandwagon to jump on. Whether it’s flowy, skin-tight, a top, a dress, casual or formal, this trend is stomping down the runway and flooding retail stores. Givenchy, Balmain and Stella McCartney are all partial to this trend for spring/summer 2012, featuring strips of fabric cut out on the shoulders, ribcage, backs and even upper abdomen of dresses and tops. Celebrities from Halle Berry to Rihanna and Kim Kardashian have also been recently photographed embracing the sexy cut-out trend. Cut-outs are designed to give a flattering peek-a-boo and highlight certain parts of the body. The trend not only looks fabulous, it creates a pleasant airflow on steamy spring days. However, there are certain rules and guidelines that should be considered before snatching the first cut-out item you come across in a boutique. Here are three FAQs to consider before diving into the trend. How much skin is too much? Unfortunately, some cut-out garments look as if an angry Edward Scissorhands got a hold of them. When trying on or examining a piece of clothing with cut-out designs, the more exposed skin than actual material, the bigger the red flag that it needs to be hung back on the rack.

There’s a thin line between sexy and sleazy, and you don’t want to cross it. But showing a modest amount of skin never hurt anyone. What kind of cut-out fashion should I choose for my body type? The hallmark areas for cut-out fashion are the back, shoulders and sides of the torso. Have you been hitting the gym and toning your abs? Show off your hard work and rock a cocktail dress with circular side cuts. If you’re self-conscious about your midsection, choose a piece that features the trend on the shoulder. The back can also serve as a large canvas for cut-out fashion, with garment options ranging from subtle cut-outs to large, stand out statements. Some tops are completely bare backed with small strips of fabric creating a pattern, while others have a modest, mediumsized hole. If you have an urge to embrace “business in the front, party in the back,” choose this option. Where in Athens can I find cut-out clothes? Artifacts Gallery, Figleaf and The Other Place are all pro-cut-out, carrying several dresses and tops. They are ideal for wearing to class or a fancy night out on Court Street. The tops are between $20 to $30, and the dresses range from $30 to $40. Now knowing all the essentials of cut-out fashion, shop on Court Street in-between classes or make it a weekend outing with girlfriends and invest in the cut-out craze.

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[ [

**

447 E. State st. Athens, Ohio

[740] 592-4500

(740) 592-4500

@classasounds

*

www.classasounds.com

Ravenwood Castle and Medieval Village Cottages

65666 Bethel Road | New Plymouth, Ohio 45654 www.ravenwoodcastle.com | (740) 596.2606 218 | THREAD


shoppingguide By BECKY WAGNER Photos by MARY HAUTMAN

W

ith clothing stores along Court Street offering their patrons outfit options for every occasion — from first dates to girls’ nights out — it may be time to plan a shopping spree in Athens. Map out your day of finding new fashions with our shopping guide.

Price Range

Broney’s

Athens Underground

Courtside

Import House

Stephen’s

Figleaf Artifacts

low $ moderate $$ high $$$

Dales BP

Pawpurr’s The Pub

Pigskin CI Universitees

Attractions Court Street Diner

Lucky’s

Red Brick

Lucky’s Specialty

Athena

Bagel Street

Brenen’s

The Other Place

Chipotle

Perk’s

College Book Store

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Broney’s

THE OTHER PLACE

Courtside

Pawpurr’s The Pub

PRICE RANGE: $$ LOCATION: 43 S. Court St. The Other Place carries both individual pieces and popular brand names. Found here are casual-cute pieces that can easily transition from class to the Crystal — think off-theshoulder tops and studded tote bags. They carry a wide selection of jeans, shoes, scarves and lingerie. As for their brands, they have extensive collections including a rainbow of American Apparel basics, TOMS shoes and a full Vera Bradley collection. The Other Place also carries hair extensions, which can be inserted in-store, adding beauty procedures to their already varied fashion repertoire.

Attractions

Lucky’s

Lucky’s Specialty

Bagel Street

Chipotle

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Perk’s

Co


ARTIFACTS Import House

Stephen’s

Dales BP

Pigskin CI Universitees

Court Street Diner

Red Brick

Athena

Brenen’s

ollege Book Store

PRICE RANGE: $ - $$ LOCATION: 2 W. State St. Walking into Artifacts Gallery, the sweet scent of incense immediately envelops the senses. Located on the corner of Court and State streets, Artifacts is a hipster haven that provides an extensive collection of sundresses, witty men’s T-shirts, breezy tops and a wide range of jewelry. There’s an Urban Outfittersesque collection of novelty gifts, including bacon band-aids, “I-JustTouched-My-Genitals” hand sanitizer and assorted stick-on mustaches. They also sell intricately-patterned tapestries, the aforementioned incense and an amusingly eccentric selection of postcards. The clothes, mostly consisting of women’s dresses and tops, are bright and trendily boho-patterned.

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Broney’s

Courtside

FIGLEAF

Pawpurr’s The Pub

Attractions

Lucky’s

Lucky’s Specialty

PRICE RANGE: $$ LOCATION: 57 N. Court. St A women’s store specializing in all things popular and feminine, Figleaf is the Athens girl’s go-to store. Simple pieces with eye-catching details are abundant and statement bags hang from multiple hooks. They carry a wide variety of dresses, ranging from day casual to formal, with a whole rack of LBD’s to choose from. While the clothes are of excellent quality, the prices are surprisingly affordable, making Figleaf one of the best places to get the most bang for your buck on Court Street. 222 | THREAD

Bagel Street

Chipotle

Perk’s

C


ATHENS UNDERGROUND Import House

Stephen’s

Dales BP

Pigskin CI Universitees

Court Street Diner

Red Brick

Athena

Brenen’s

College Book Store

PRICE RANGE: $$-$$$ LOCATION: 90 N. Court St. Once customers descend the steep stairs to Athens Underground, they are greeted by a vast, winding basement filled to the brim with costume jewelry shimmering behind glass cases, whimsically dressed mannequins and a great stretch of clothing dating from every decade imaginable. A combination antique and vintage store, Underground carries a large assortment of gently used clothes, shoes, hats, wigs, home décor and accessories galore. Whether searching for an ’80s-style prom dress or a worn ’90s T-shirt, Athens Underground never fails to deliver unique pieces with an authentic history. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 223


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in good fashion

cat’smeow By BRIDGET MALLON Photos by REBECCA CIPRUS OUTHREADMAG.COM | 225


seams

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in good fashion

A

RTS/West usually houses plays, musicals, concerts and other community-based artistic ventures but one weekend a year the space is taken over by copious amounts of clothing. The Cat’s Pajamas Clothing Exchange is held at the venue and all of the money raised at the event benefits ARTS/West. The event gives community members the chance to refresh their wardrobes and pass along pieces they no longer use without breaking the bank. Emily Beveridge has been the head organizer for the clothing exchange for the four years it has been around. She originally came up with the idea to benefit the Federal Valley Resource Center, where she worked through AmeriCorps VISTA. “I liked the idea of clothing exchange and thought it could be made into a larger scale event,” she said. “People who don’t necessarily know each other could get together and exchange.” The single weekend event lands on the same weekend every year, Ohio University’s Moms Weekend. And every year since its inception the event has continued to grow. “Well we had twice the attendance we had last year and raised twice the amount of money, we’re all pretty excited about it,” Beveridge said. “I think we had over 250 to 300 people.” Patrons paid a $5 one-time entrance fee and were then allowed to

return at any time during the weekend. They could take as many pieces for free as they donated and then every additional item is just $1. People who donated their clothes early were allowed to take as many pieces as they liked, regardless of how many pieces they donated. This entices people to bring in clothing early, in order to give the organizers time to sort through each piece. “It gives us a chance to sort the clothes, anything that is ripped or stained we do not put out,” Beveridge said. “People who can sew sometimes go through those and recycle them in some way.” Volunteers prepare the clothes for the exchange. “We spray them with eucalyptus oil and water to make them smell fresh and we fold them and sort them into different categories,” Beveridge said. Beveridge said she gets about 90 percent of her clothes from the exchange and that she and other people who participate in the exchange love seeing their old clothes go to a happy home. “I would say that my favorite part, besides getting my ‘new’ clothes is when people start getting really excited over the fact that they see someone else taking an item they brought and being really happy about it,” she said. “It’s almost tying me to the community in a way. You never know who might be wearing the clothes you brought or who might stop you and ask about it.”

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You never know who might be wearing the clothes you brought or who might stop and ask about it. 228 | THREAD

—EMILY BEVERIDGE


in good fashion

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ombrehair rant

By AMANDA HEFFLINGER

I

’m not oblivious to the fact that ombré hair is quite the trend. Hollywood dignitaries such as Whitney Port and Rachel Bilson have jumped on this two-toned bandwagon, but I’m not so quick to trust their judgment. My hair has been one solid color from birth to age 19, and this bipolar trend isn’t going to change that any time soon. Perhaps the more subtle specimens of ombré can be disguised as a creative take on highlighting, but the extreme cases make a head of hair look like dip-dye gone wrong. And some of the worst cases look simply skunk-like. And this is no style to attempt to DIY — at-home ombrés almost always turn out horrifically, and getting it done professionally can cost as much as $180 to $200. There are certain circumstances under which I find this hairstyle tolerable (Drew Barrymore not being one of them). It is possible to make ombré hair look incredibly classy, although I find it far too easy to make it look trashy. Hollywood can keep this trend on the west coast in my opinion — one color of hair on my head is quite enough for me.

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rave

By MADDIE GAITHER

A

m I a fan of ombré hair? Why, yes, I am. Why, you may ask? I’m not a fan of having to make appointments at the salon every three-to-five weeks to touch up my roots. I’m also not a fan of having one-dimensional hair, or being boring for that matter. For these reasons, the ombré trend is wrong in all the right ways. I mean, seriously, when else has it been socially acceptable (or actually stylish) to let our natural roots show? Hollywood’s most sought-after manes are embracing the ombré trend by showcasing their affinity for two-toned locks. While this style is not for everyone (sorry, Grandma, stick to your hot rollers), its versatility with different hair types and popularity among celebs has me picking up the phone to schedule an appointment with my stylist. Ombré away!


S ILLU TRAT ION B

Y DAN G IELLE MA

ARY

.

OM BRÉ: having colors or tones that shade into each other — used especially of fabrics in which the color is graduated from light to dark

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thread MAGAZINE

would like to thank all of its wonderful writers, copy editors, photographers, designers, stylists, models, PR gurus, advertising team and anyone else who made thread possible this year!

KEEP CHECKING WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM FOR THE LASTEST STYLE NEWS

athens culture, stylishly tailored

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June 2012  
June 2012