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Statewide Produce Gets a Brand

Where to Find the Best Local Pizza

Delaware Beer, Wine & Spirits Festival Oct. 13

G R E AT E R W I L M I N G T O N

Strange Delaware Peculiar, bizarre and spooky tales abound in the First State

OCTOBER 2018 COMPLIMENTARY


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presents

Out & About Magazine’s 39th

Annual

Special Discount Code On Your Loop Wristband!

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27TH • 8:00PM • $10 COVER CATHERINE ROONEY’S • CHELSEA TAVERN • DEAD PRESIDENTS • ERNEST & SCOTT TAPROOM • GALLUCIO’S CAFE GROTTO PIZZA • KELLY’S LOGAN HOUSE • TIMOTHY’S RIVERFRONT • TROLLEY SQUARE OYSTER HOUSE • TROLLEY TAP HOUSE

OutAndAboutNow.com

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WHERE MY BROWS GO, I FOLLOW.

YOUR FIRST WAX IS FREE* ONE WAX IS ALL IT TAKES TO FALL IN LOVE. NEWARK - CHRISTIANA FASHION CENTER | 302 731 2700 WILMINGTON | 302 529 8888

WAXCENTER.COM I europeanwax *First-time guests only. Valid only for select services. Additional terms may apply. Participation may vary; please visit waxcenter.com for general terms and conditions. ©2018 EWC Franchise, LLC. All rights reserved. European Wax Center and the other identified marks are trademarks of EWC P&T, LLC.

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–– A not-for-profit arts organization ––

OCTOBER 25-28 The Playhouse on Rodney Square

S ET D CK TE TI IMI L

S ET D CK TE TI IMI L

THUR | NOV 1 | 8PM | $27

Kathleen Madigan: Boxed Wine & Bigfoot FRI | NOV 2 | 8PM | $32-$39

SUN | NOV 4 | 7PM | $58-$68

Roots jazz. Country Swing. Street Blues. Painting our story from the streets of NY.

Over her 25 year career she has performed on nearly every stand-up show ever made.

Wanda Sykes has been called “one of the funniest stand-up comics” by her peers.

Bumper Jacksons

Wanda Sykes

S ET D CK TE TI IMI L

S ET D CK TE TI IMI L SUN | NOV 11 | 7PM | $36

The Simon & Garfunkel Story FRI | NOV 16 | 8PM | $39-$44

TRO performs An Evening of The Who SAT | NOV 17 | 8PM | $25

Plays a variety of styles including melodic folk, New Orleans R&B, and stride piano.

This show will have you reliving your memories of this iconic duo!

TRO celebrates the music of one of rock’s most influential bands

George Winston

TICKETS LIMITED!

DEC. 13 AT 8PM $55-$76

TheGrandWilmington.org | 302.652.5577 | 302.888.0200 818 N. Market Street, Wilmington, DE 19801 This program is supported, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com.

All tickets subject to box office service charges. Artists, dates, times and programs are subject to change.

OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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BEHIND CHRISTIANA MALL Christiana Fashion Center | 3194 Fashion Center Boulevard • Newark, DE 19702 | 302.366.1601 HOURS: SUN - THURS: 11AM - 10PM | FRI - SAT: 11AM - 11PM | HAPPY HOUR: MON - FRI: 4PM - 6:30PM (BAR & PATIO ONLY)

Order Online at: TEDSMONTANAGRILL.COM ©2018 TED’S MONTANA GRILL INC.

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7827 Teds Montana Grill Out and About Magazine

Trim: 8” X 10.5”, Bleed: 0.25”

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“Tipsy” takes on a whole new meaning when you drink and drive. And after you’re busted, you’ll get a suspended driver’s license, pay thousands of dollars in fines and receive possible jail time. A DUI will always cost you. It’s not worth it.

Mi Kev

Don’t let a DUI redefine you. Find a safe ride home.

ArriveAliveDE.com/DriveSober

Eliza

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Out & About Magazine Vol. 31 | No. 8

Published each month by TSN Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Mailing & business address: 307 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801 Publisher Gerald duPhily • jduphily@tsnpub.com Director of Publications Jim Hunter Miller • jmiller@tsnpub.com Contributing Editor Bob Yearick • ryearick@comcast.net Senior Editor & Digital Media Manager Krista Connor • kconnor@tsnpub.com Creative Director & Production Manager Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. Graphic Designer Tyler Mitchell, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. Contributing Designer Ryan Alexander, Catalyst Visuals, LLC Contributing Writers Adriana Camacho-Church, Cindy Cavett, Mark Fields, Pam George, Rob Kalesse, Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Dan Linehan, Mike Little, Dillon McLaughlin, John Murray, Kevin Francis, Larry Nagengast, Kevin Noonan, Scott Pruden, Leeann Wallett Contributing Photographers Jim Coarse, Rebecca Parsons and Joe del Tufo/Moonloop Photography, Lindsay duPhily, Tim Hawk, Anthony Santoro, Matt Urban

38 33 START

EAT

FEATURES

9 The War on Words 11 F.Y.I. 12 Worth Recognizing 14 What Readers Are Saying 17 Get Out and Vote 19 Worth Trying 21 Wheels of Change 25 Delaware Grown

38 Pizza Worth Trying 41 Bites

21 Wheels of Change

LEARN 10 Good for the Body and Soul

FOCUS 26 Strange Delaware 33 The Perfect Match: Oddporium and Arden

Interns Elizabeth Carlson, Emily Stover, Jacob Orledge

42 In the City 45 On the Riverfront 50 Art Loop

WATCH 53 Artistic Partners 57 Movie Reviews

DRINK 61 Sips 63 Spirited 65 A State Salute

LISTEN 66 Tuned In

PLAY

Distribution David Hazardous Special Projects Sarah Green, John Holton

WILMINGTON

On The Cover: Oddporium in Arden. Photo by Joe del Tufo

69 Halloween Loop 71 Ascend Flow Arts 75 Where to Watch the Game

A new campaign at the Urban Bike Project will double the number of city residents the nonprofit serves. By Krista Connor

26 Strange Delaware The First State, tiny though it may be, seems to play host to plenty of spirits, ghosts, paranormal activities, and even a legendary sea creature. Some of our contributors offer unnerving examples.

33 The Perfect Match: Oddporium and Arden What better location for this unusual shop than Delaware’s oddest community? By Kevin Noonan

65 A State Salute

Delaware Beer, Wine & Spirits Festival is set for Oct. 13.

Editorial & advertising info: 302.655.6483 • Fax 302.654.0569 outandaboutnow.com • contact@tsnpub.com OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

THE WAR ON WORDS A monthly column in which we attempt, however futilely, to defend the English language against misuse and abuse

Media Watch • Jarrett Bell, sports columnist, USA Today: “[Herm] Edwards strikes me as imminently equipped to relate to the minds of 20-year-old millennials.” The word he wanted is eminently. Imminently means “very soon.” • Also in the USA Today sports section, there was a reference to the “tongue and cheek” proposal that LeBron James should be named Secretary of Education. The expression is “tongue in cheek,” and it describes the physical act that originally signified contempt but evolved into an indication that the speaker is not being literal but is trying to be humorous. • According to a reader, Phillies play-by-play man Tom McCarthy was at it again during a late August game with this comment on new Phillie Wilson Ramos' run-scoring hit: “What a way to embrace yourself to the Phillies fans.” He was groping (we think) for “endear yourself.” Another reader notes that Tommy Mac calls runs-batted-in “RBIs,” when the term is properly RBI. We may soon introduce a “Tommy Mac” feature. • Jason Myrtetus, on 97.5 FM The Fan, decided to go multisyllabic and use disingenuous, but alas, it was a bridge too far. Introducing audio from a pre-season NFL game, Jason said: “Listen to how disingenuous these announcers were after a bogus illegal use of the helmet call.” The recording clearly demonstrated that the announcers were dismayed, disbelieving, not disingenuous—“insincere, dishonest.” Department of Redundancies Dept. • A reader reports that he recently received two invitations, both of which ended with “Please RSVP.” As we’ve pointed out in a previous column, RSVP is an acronym for the French phrase that means “Please reply.” The reader says it took all his willpower not to send a correction, making him a better man than I am. • Reader Luann Haney spotted this phrase in the Williamsport (Pa.) Sun-Gazette: “median strip in the middle.” • We happened upon the grammarian's holy grail—a redundancy in The New Yorker: “. . . can be traced back to . . .” Pronunciation Some media types pronounce it “asterik,” while others sometimes say “asterix.” But the word asterisk is pronounced just as it’s spelled—AS-ter-ISK.

Follow me on Twitter: @thewaronwords

Word of the Month

demimonde Pronounced demē mänd, it’s a noun meaning a group of people considered to be on the fringes of respectable society.

By Bob Yearick

The Dreaded Double-Superlative From a caller on 97.5 FM: “The Phillies are the most losingest franchise in all of sports.” John Boruk, Comcast Sports, also used the clunker, crediting Eagles Coach Doug Pederson with making “one of the most gutsiest calls in Super Bowl history.” Here’s a simple rule for avoiding this mistake: Any time you use “most,” make sure the next word doesn’t end in -est. And a Double-Comparative Caption in USA Today: “Rashan Gary is already displaying skills of a player far more older and experienced.” Your Honor, We Object . . . Came across this somewhat famous quote from Clarence Thomas, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, during his 1991 confirmation hearings: “This is a circus. It’s a national disgrace. And from my standpoint, as a black American, it is a high-tech lynching for uppity blacks who in any way deign to think for themselves.” We humbly submit that the Justice misspoke. Deign means to condescend, stoop, consent, agree. The word he should have used, it seems to us, was dare. Errant Phrases • “Fall through the cracks” is a perfectly good phrase that refers to the cracks between slats, as on a boardwalk. But the idiom is often distorted into the illogical “fall between the cracks.” Things (and people) can fall between the slats, but not between the cracks. • And when did “based on” become the wordy and weird “based off of”? And finally . . . Everyday is often used where every day is needed (it’s rampant on Facebook). Everyday is an adjective meaning “happening or used every day” or “commonplace.” It is not a substitute for the twoword phrase every day, in which the adjective every modifies the noun day. The phrase functions as an adverb. E.g., “I eat lunch every day,” “I brush my teeth every day.”

NEED A SPEAKER FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION? Contact me for a fun presentation on grammar: ryearick@comcast.net.

Seen a good (bad) one lately? Send your candidates to ryearick@comcast.net

Buy The War on Words at the Hockessin Book Shelf, on Amazon, or by calling Out & About at 655-6483.

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LEARN

Brenda Kline Roark prepares a healthy shake at Bear Nutrition Club.

GOOD FOR THE BODY AND SOUL Brenda Kline Roark fosters community around good advice and good nutrition

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hen Brenda Kline Roark took over the Bear Nutrition Club, she had never run a bricks-and-mortar business before. She had spent 16 years as a social worker or counselor after earning a bachelor’s degree in Behavioral Science from Wilmington University. But what she lacked in business acumen, she made up for in heart and determination. Sadly, Roark, a mother of two sons, had lost her husband at the tender age of 28, due to complications from Type I diabetes. “It was hard to see him go through that many surgeries,” she says. “The whole situation changed me. I knew my boys were counting on me, and I refused to leave them parentless.” According to the American Diabetes Association’s website, diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death among Americans, and 1.25 million Americans have Type I diabetes, previously known as “juvenile diabetes.” With her husband’s passing, Roark made a conscious effort to reverse her sedentary lifestyle. She focused on nutrition and lost 53 pounds. “My colleagues would comment on my weight-loss journey and ask for suggestions,” says Roark. Before she knew it, she’d grown a reputation as a supporter of those looking to make healthy lifestyle changes. Feeling empowered, she cultivated and then motivated an online community of thousands of nutrition enthusiasts—so much so that the previous Bear Nutrition Club owner asked Roark to take over the store.

More transformations occurred, and now Roark’s club is a valued community hangout, especially popular among WilmU athletes (in part because of its close proximity to the WilmU Athletic Complex on Rte. 40 in the Newark/Bear area). But who could have predicted that Roark’s knowledge of behavioral science would play such an important role in endearing her club to its community? Jenna Brown, a WilmU volleyball player, often makes a stop (or two) at the club each day. “Brenda has become someone I can talk to about everything from school to relationships,” says Brown. “You can come in for a shake and before you know it, you’ve met up with others and have great conversations.” “It’s coming full circle for me, because I still get to use my experience as a counselor while encouraging the next generation to take care of themselves,” says Roark. She’s happy to see what manifested from a life tragedy. Through this initiative, she has touched the lives of others in longlasting, positive ways. She has demonstrated to hers sons, Derek, 25, and Brett, 24, the importance of self-care, hard work, and supporting others. How does she keep her customers coming back? “I make them the ‘Mama Special,’ where I blend up everything chocolate,” Roark says. “No one can resist it.” There's no telling where a WilmU degree will take you. Entrepreneurs and small business owners/managers, like Brenda Kline Roark, can benefit from WilmU’s suite of affordable business degrees and certificates—many available 100% online. WilmU works for working adults—learn more at wilmu.edu/Business.

Get to know WilmU at Fall Open House!

Oct. 24 Apply for FREE at this event.

Three locations to choose from: New Castle • Dover • Georgetown

RSVP: wilmu.edu/OpenHouse

10 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START AND THE WINNERS ARE...

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HAUNTINGS IN HISTORY WALKING TOURS

E

F.Y.I. Things worth knowing

DAM KIDS’ CORNER: CREATIVE POWER

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eet the Silvermans. Stephanie, Alexander and their 8-year-old daughter, Sophia, have started a new outreach for young children to get in touch with their creative side. The Silvermans are part of a “FamilyIn-Residency" program at Delaware Art Museum. The program allows families a space in the Kids’ Corner to construct an interactive area for the children. The family will set up the space, with infinity mirrors, kinetic sculptures, a portrait gallery and more, and encourage children to add their own artistic touches. On Sunday, Oct. 21, the Silverman family will present their first workshop on the various materials that are used for artwork, and allow participating families to get a taste of the art world. This workshop is a free event from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Other activities and workshops will take place throughout the season. To stay informed, visit delart.org.

very Friday and Saturday in October, guests are given the opportunity to walk through Historic New Castle after the sun goes down. There will be tours given at 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., and 8:30 p.m. Tours last for an hour and 15 minutes. Join a group and follow a tour guide to explore the “haunted” Amstel House. Weave through the streets and alleyways and listen to the history that goes back 360 years, including crime, punishment and deaths that have taken place. Guests are encouraged to bring flashlights, and hopefully shed light on the ghosts that haunt Historic New Castle. This event has limited space; visit newcastlehistory.org events page to purchase tickets in advance.

n our September issue, we had another challenge for you, our intrepid readers. We asked three contest questions with answers scattered in articles throughout the magazine, and among the pool of correct responses, we picked winners Judith Carinci, Patricia Holdsworth and Rosemarie Nicholl at random. Congratulations, winners! Answers were: Wilmington & Western Railroad, September 7, the Munich Child.) Keep an eye out for more contests in this section!

BOO AT THE ZOO!

J

MAYOR’S HARVEST FESTIVAL IN NEWARK

oin the Brandywine Zoo animals and zookeepers at their annual Trick or Treat event. On Friday and Saturday, Oct. 19 and 20, starting at 5 p.m., kids and adults are invited to swing by in full costume and walk through the zoo after hours for the chance to experience zoo animal nightlife. Vendors from local businesses will be handing out wildlife-friendly “candy” or other pre-approved miscellaneous treats. There will also be other fun activities throughout the zoo for the kids. This event is free for zoo members and children under 3 and $5 for non-members.

O

MAKING STRIDES BREAST CANCER WALK IS OCT. 13

n Saturday, Oct. 6, the first ever Mayor’s Harvest Festival in Newark will take place at Olan Thomas Park from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The day will include hayrides, many crafts and games, and even dance lessons. Local food vendors will also be there with treats. Bring the family, walk around, listen to the music, and even give line dancing a try. This is a free event that also includes an outdoor movie, so remember to bring a blanket and/or chairs. Rain date is the following day.

HAGLEY CRAFT FAIR

O

n Saturday, Oct. 20, visit Hagley Museum and Library to experience the 40th annual Craft Fair. Artists will display work representing a variety of mediums, including wood, fibers, pottery, jewelry, metal and more. In addition to the artists, there will be more than 15 vendors outside the buildings providing an assortment of food choices. Admission is free for members and children 5 and under, and $5 for non-members.

T

he annual Making Strides walk along the Wilmington Riverfront is back on Saturday, Oct. 13. The 5k walk and run raises money for breast cancer research. The American Cancer Association has a $275,000 goal for the event, so even those who don’t walk are encouraged to donate. The day is a community-building event for supporters of the fundraiser and for those directly affected by breast cancer. A special area will be reserved for survivors and caregivers so they can have a place to rest comfortably. You can register online at makingstrideswalk.org/wilmingtonde, or sign up at 7:30 a.m. the day of the walk. There will be two separate starts, the run beginning at 9 a.m., with the walk following at 9:45 and ending when the last person crosses the finish line. For further information, call 1-800-227-2345. OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WORTH RECOGNIZING

Community Members Who Go Above & Beyond

Among the volunteers at Hockessin Haunted House are (L-R): Kedar Patel, Nicholas Szupowal, Katie Hitchens, Lori Hawk, Mark Hagan, Alyssa Ristine, Arlene Hitchens, Aly Keville, Randy Ristine. Photo provided by Hockessin Haunted House

RANDY RISTINE, ARLENE HITCHENS: Creating goblins and ghosts that help save animals

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t 19 Nathalie Dr. in Hockessin, an autumn wind rustles shriveled leaves across a moonlit graveyard. Inside, Randy Ristine, 53, looking pale and gaunt, sits at a séance table waiting for a medium to conjure his dead relative. But he becomes concerned and yells in horror as he realizes that evil spirits have arrived instead. The Hockessin resident is an actor in a scene at the Hockessin Haunted House (HHH). An annual Halloween fundraiser for CompAnimals Pet Rescue Inc., in Landenberg, Pa., a non-profit that helps ill, abused, deformed and homeless pets. Since 2009, it has donated $17,103—collected through $5 entrance fees. Last year the event raised $4,705 after more than 600 folks dared to visit during the four nights it was open. “Last year’s event helped a little cocker spaniel with a jaw broken in four places,” says Leslie Hunt, CompAnimals founder and director. “He needed a CAT scan and surgery.” Besides paying for veterinarian expenses, the proceeds also help cover the facility’s heating bill. Ristine is among approximately 50 volunteers who make HHH possible. He helps create and build the spooky atmosphere that takes possession of the 2,400-square-foot, two-story house. “Some people may think it’s cheesy to hold such a production at someone’s house,” says Ristine, an electrical engineer with Siemens. But the paranormal activity that takes place at the pool, the basement, a bedroom, the library, the parlor, and other rooms is as sophisticated as those found at for-profit area Halloween attractions. It takes more than two months to set up the house and 11 days to take it down. Visitors come from local areas, including Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Homeowner Arlene Hitchens and her daughter, Lori, came up with the concept of HHH after ghoulishly decorating their living room to amuse friends and trick-or-treaters in the early 2000s.

Hitchens’ love of Halloween and her love of planning and creating a fun event to share with the community led her to open her home to the public in 2007, and to HHH becoming a fundraiser. The Hitchens and Ristine use their own money to cover HHH costs, such as costumes and contraptions that create the scary atmosphere. Hitchens says volunteers, including student actors and groups from the University of Delaware, have kept HHH growing and improving. Ristine’s script-writing and his behind-the-scenes technical and electrical expertise has taken HHH to higher levels than she thought possible, Hitchens says. “Arlene has no problem with me drilling holes in her floor to run an airline to levitate a table or rattle pots and pans,” says Ristine, who has given up his acting chores at HHH. Instead, he fixes things that malfunction, trains actors, or makes sure special effects and devices are carefully timed by sensors, switches, and queues to send books flying off shelves, creating apparitions, or triggering bodies that pop up. “I’ve created a ceiling drop box that on remote command releases a swinging body lunging toward guests,” Ristine says. He’s also helped install prison bars made of flexible PVC pipes so “lab experiments” can escape and chase unsuspecting guests. Ristine got involved in 2007 when his daughter, Alyssa, urged him to walk down to the Hitchens house to “check it out.” Alyssa is friends with Hitchens’ granddaughter, Katie. “After going through my first season of being in (HHH) and having had so much fun acting in the séance room, I was hooked,” says Ristine. “But ultimately, the greatest excitement arrives when we receive the final tally from Leslie, hoping we’ve exceeded last year’s total charitable earnings.” To volunteer at the Hockessin Haunted House and for more information visit hockessinhauntedhouse.org. — Adriana Camacho-Church

12 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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TOUCHING YOUR HEART, STIRRING YOUR SOUL, TICKLING YOUR FUNNY BONE.

RESIDENT ENSEMBLE PLAYERS

We are the REP.

LETTICE AND LOVAGE

SEP 13 - OCT 7

TENTH ANNIVERSARY SEASON | 2018 / 19

LETTICE AND LOVAGE by Peter Shaffer A mad comedy about the importance of friends, history, and the occasional teeny, tiny white lie. THE SEAFARER

SEP 20 - OCT 7

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THE SEAFARER

by Conor McPherson It’s a devil of a holiday when “Sharky” Harkin returns to Dublin for a whiskey-soaked Christmas Eve of companionship and poker.

NOV 8 - DEC 2 WOMAN IN MIND

WOMAN IN MIND

by Alan Ayckbourn A black comedy of feuding families – one real, one imaginary.

JAN 24 - FEB 10

MINOR FANTASTICAL KINGDOMS

MINOR FANTASTICAL KINGDOMS

by Michael Gotch A young couple builds an off-the-grid, tiny house in an isolated mountain paradise to get away from all the emotional, financial, and political upheaval in the world…or so they think.

MAR 7 - MAR 24

INHERIT THE WIND INHERIT THE WIND

by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee A crackling courtroom drama based on the famous Scopes “Monkey” Trial that examines the fundamental freedom of belief.

APR 17 - MAY 12

MAURITIUS MAURITIUS

by Theresa Rebeck A cunningly crafted comedic thriller about deceit, double-crosses…and stamps.

APR 25 - MAY 12

FENCES FENCES

by August Wilson Wilson’s poetic and powerful challenge to the American dream in a 1950’s African-American Pittsburgh neighborhood.

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Resident Ensemble Players

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START

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The season changes and so do our menus! *fžljoU||lj**Â?ŠrÂŒfelj}f~”Â? (?* ljƯlj**8ljƯlj9?*Klj 8?*  žr“qljÂ?fUÂ?€~U|lj`€`{“Ur|Â?šljžr~fÂ?šljƭlj_ffÂŒĹš

Don’t Forget...

WHAT READERS ARE SAYING About Worth Recognizing For Gisela Vazquez, it’s full steam ahead for her and other volunteers on the Wilmington & Western By Adriana Camacho-Church, September 2018 Terrific story about an interesting and dedicated volunteer in a truly unusual role. One of Delaware's oldest tourist destinations, Wilmington & Western Railroad is a gem everyone should experience, especially if one books the ride all the way to Hockessin and back via steam locomotive. The doodlebug is great, too! Thanks to Adriana for this fascinating profile! — Owen Thorne

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I enjoyed your article, Adriana! What an interesting woman. Thanks for shining light on what is good. — Denise Marotta Lopes

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About Restaurant Renaissance on Market Street Downtown Wilmington has become a diner’s delight with new, eclectic cuisine By Leeann Wallet, September 2018

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I think this is fabulous! I’ve always been a Wilmington believer and can only say congratulations to all those who have been working to make this happen! May your pockets be full and overflowing!!! — Nancy Marshall Saunders

Stay INN the loop FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA FOR UPDATES & EVENTS

@columbusinn

About How Kennett Became The Mushroom Capital Of The World Science, entrepreneurial spirit and circumstance combined to convert what was once a rare delicacy into a multi-billion-dollar industry By Scott Pruden, September 2018 Lovin’ the continued coverage of Kennett by Out and About. Just 3 miles from the PA/DE state line. Hoping for a nice story on The Kennett Flash soon! — Andrew Miller

@ColumbusInn 302-571-1492

2216 Pennsylvania Ave Wilmington, DE 19806 www.ColumbusInn.net

HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? SEND US A MESSAGE! contact@tsnpub.com • OutAndAboutNow.com

14 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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D


SPECIALS!

Sunday afternoon games (1 pm & 4 pm games only) & any Eagles games!* rom f r e e b f o s t $3 pin r a 10 oz pour) 2 fo 2SP Brewing ($

Thursday 9/6 8:20pm Falcon s Sunday 9/16 1pm Bucs Sunday 9/23 1pm Colts Sunday 9/30 1pm TItans Sunday 10/7 4:25pm Viking s Thursday 10/11 8:20pm Gia nts Sunday 10/21 1pm Panthers Sunday 10/28 9:30am Jaguar s Week 9 bye Sunday 11/11 8:20pm Cowboy s Sunday 11/18 1pm Saints Sunday 11/25 1pm Giants Monday 12/3 8:15pm Redski ns Sunday 12/9 4:25pm Cowboy s Sunday 12/16 8:20pm Rams Sunday 12/23 1pm Texans Sunday 12/30 1pm Redskins

* Eagles games that are an excep tion to the Sunday afternoon rul e are in red * Food specials are not available for takeout

Early 2019

16

SEPTEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WAREHOUSE SALE 2018 UP TO 80% OFF!

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At The Garrison, enjoy modern one- and two-bedroom apartments in Historic New Castle, Delaware. Enjoy a picturesque river’s edge location with access to the dining, culture, and activities of downtown New Castle. Visit TheGarrisonApts.com for more information and updates on the opening of our Leasing Office. See you soon!

505 W. 7TH ST | NEW CASTLE, DE 16 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Here’s a step-by-step guide to making your voice heard in the Nov. 6 general election. Now you have no excuse. STEP 1: REGISTER!

ABSENTEE BALLOTS Do you have a student in the family who attends a university out of state? Do you have a loved one in the military who is deployed overseas? Will you be traveling out of state or otherwise unable to vote at your assigned polling location on Nov. 6? It’s still possible to vote in the election by filing an absentee ballot. You can request an absentee ballot by mail or online at ivote.de.gov. The ballot must be filled out and mailed back to the appropriate county office of the Department of Elections. You can also visit the office in your county and fill out a ballot in person prior to the election. You are encouraged to request the ballot as early as possible. The last day absentee ballots will be mailed is Nov. 2.

CERTAIN FELONS CAN VOTE IN DELAWARE Residents of Delaware who have been convicted of a felony and have served their sentences, unless they were convicted of murder, manslaughter, a sex crime, or a crime related to bribery or abuse of office, are eligible to vote.

It’s not too late to register to vote for the Tuesday, Nov. 6, general election in Delaware. To be eligible to vote, you must register with the Department of Elections by Saturday, Oct. 13. You can complete the registration online at ivote.de.gov, by mail or in person at certain government offices. You must be 18 years old by the date of the election to register. For more information on the process, visit elections.delaware.gov.

STEP 2: FIND YOUR POLLING PLACE Don’t know where to vote? Everyone is assigned a polling location according to the address listed on their voter registration. Check your polling location online at ivote.de.gov.

STEP 3: BE INFORMED Be an informed voter. Do some research on the candidates for office who will be on the ballot in your district. Read their positions on the issues that matter to you. When you go to the voting booth and punch your ballot, be sure your choice will accurately represent your voice in the halls of government. Being informed will help you make an intelligent choice in every office up for election. Your State Representative or the State Auditor may not receive the same attention as a U.S. Senator or the Attorney General, but they play a vital part in passing legislation and executing policies that may have a direct impact on your life. — Jacob Orledge OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Juried Craft Exhibition OCT 20, 2018 – JAN 27, 2019 This exhibition is organized by the Delaware Art Museum. Support provided by the Emily DuPont Exhibition Fund. Additional support provided, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene. com. Image: No gods. No boyfriends., 2017. Ashley Catharine Smith (born 1989). Embroidered photograph with French knots and seed beads, 12 × 12 inches.Courtesy of the artist. © Ashley Catharine Smith.

2301 Kentmere Parkway Wilmington, DE 19806 302.571.9590 | delart.org

18 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Worth Trying Suggestions from our staff, contributors and readers

Jack A. Markell Trail

Runamok Maple

This may go down as one of the Wilmington Riverfront’s most important enhancements—and proof of the economic and quality-of-life benefits a bike path can provide. The seven-mile, auto-free trail includes a boardwalk path over the wetlands of the Russell Peterson Wildlife Center and an eye-catching bridge over the Christina River. Leaving the Riverfront, it connects you to Historic New Castle and—for the ambitious—Historic Delaware City and the Mike Castle Trail (which runs all the way to Chesapeake City, Md.). Entering the Riverfront, it flows nicely into the existing Riverwalk and all its amenities: restaurants, ice cream shop, beer garden…. Yes, there are many ways to package an outing on this great new amenity.

Based in Cambridge, Vt., this company produces organic maple syrup with a quality you can taste. Runamok Maple is run by husband and wife Eric and Laura Sorkin, along with their small team of self-described hunters, farmers, hippies and hipsters. Just in time for autumn for cozy breakfast pairings with your favorite pancake or waffle recipe, try the classic pure maple syrup, or be adventurous with their collection of infused, smoked and barrel-aged options. All syrups are available for order online at runamokmaple.com. — Krista Connor, Senior Editor & Digital Media Manager

— Jerry duPhily, Publisher

Poke Bros. in Fairfax

Wings at Trolley Square Oyster House

This is the latest of four locations for Poke (pronounced poh-kay) Bros. in New Castle County that offer what is essentially sushi in a bowl. It features cubed raw fish mixed in a bowl with rice, veggies and flavorful toppings. My favorite is the Johnny Utah, a salmon-based bowl with avocado, edamame, cucumber, masago (capelin roe), OG Hot Sauce and Sriracha Aioli. You can also take the build-your-own approach and craft your bowl from a wide array of fresh and healthy ingredients.

You wouldn’t expect an Oyster House to necessarily excel at wings. But then again, 10 years ago, you probably wouldn’t have expected an Oyster House to have succeeded in Trolley Square, either. That said, the wings at Trolley Square Oyster House are surprisingly superb. They might be among the best in the state, and I don’t say that lightly. While watching a recent Eagles game, my friends and I easily cleared five plates of them, raving about them while alternating between the classic Buffalo and the Old Bay. The secret to the succulence is the brine in which the wings marinate long before being cooked. The brine consists of apple juice, vinegar, and a combination of spices and herbs (which shall remain a secret). The result is a plateful of juicy, sweet, yet delightfully tangy wings.

— Bob Yearick, Contributing Editor

— Jim Miller, Director of Publications

Have something you think is worth trying? Send your suggestion to Jim at jmiller@tsnpub.com.

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Shredded paper is too small to sort. Learn ways to recycle right at RecycleRightDE.org. 16

SEPTEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

DNREC25275_RecyclingCampaign_PrintAd_8x10.5_v2.indd 6 10_Start.indd 26

8/15/18 10:18 AM 9/24/18 8:51 AM


START 1500 N. Walnut street circa 1908

1500 N. Walnut street circa 1908

1500 N. Walnut Street today

1500 N. Walnut Street today

Top left: UBP building (1500 N. Walnut St.) in 1908. Top right: UBP building present day. Main image: A rendering of the planned renovation. Photos courtesy of Urban Bike Project.

WHEELS OF CHANGE A new campaign at the Urban Bike Project will double the number of city residents the cycling-oriented nonprofit serves

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By Krista Connor

he building at 1500 N. Walnut St. has seen its share of wear and change. Constructed in 1907 as a Wilmington Public Works Department facility that housed horse-drawn repair equipment, it eventually became the city’s police stables. Later, the city-owned property was added to the National Register of Historic Places, and eventually leased to another organization until 2011. It stood empty for two years, when nonprofit Urban Bike Project (UBP) introduced repairs of a different kind after moving its headquarters there from North Market Street. Urban Bike Project provides bicycle resources to thousands of Wilmington residents with transportation and recreational needs. The spacious warehouse now is used for bike repairs and community workshops, and bikes are sold and given away from there, too. The space is about to undergo another change with the renovation of its lifetime, thanks to the Capital Campaign, an initiative launching at the end of the month.

Sourced from donor funds and state historic tax credits, the Capital Campaign will see the building updated and made more efficient for community bike repair services, workshops and more, with the help of general contractors at The Challenge Program. Financial donors include The Longwood Foundation, Welfare Foundation, Laffey-McHugh Foundation and more. Construction will begin this winter, with a projected December start date. UBP Executive Director Laura Wilburn says the renovations will raise visibility and attract more people in need. “More people will know about us, more people will be interested in coming here. I can’t tell you the amount of times people would say ‘Oh, I didn’t know you were still there — the building looks closed up.’” As a result, Wilburn says UBP will be able to expand programming and double the number of city residents they work with. ► OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START

ONLY 25/MO. $

WHEELS OF CHANGE continued from previous page

Photos courtesy of Urban Bike Project.

HOW MUCH EXTRA IS YOUR GYM MEMBERSHIP COSTING YOU?

PLUS ENROLLMENT FEE

All classes included, no additional fees. Young bicycle mechanics at Urban Bike Project.

1800 NAAMANS ROAD, WILMINGTON • 302-529-1865

KIRKWOODFITNESS.COM

SERVING CLIENTS BETTER

“Ultimately, we want to create a space that our current customers can feel proud of,” says Wilburn. “We work with over 200 kids every year, and this is a place they feel a lot of ownership over; they can come volunteer to earn shop credit, work on bikes and brag about where they work, so to give them a space that looks and feels respected in that way could be a big difference for them.” UBP’s community impact is substantial. Since it was founded more than 10 years ago by Sarah Green, David Hallberg, Brian Windle and Dwayne Crosby, it has served thousands. In 2017 alone, the Bike Project had 2,157 visitors, sold 259 bikes and gave away 60 bikes to children and adults in need. All services and programs are run by Wilburn, Shop Manager Sean McGonegal and 15-20 volunteers each week. Because of UBP’s services, many residents with transportation barriers have been able to get and maintain jobs after either purchasing or being given bicycles to get them to and from work. Of residents who have been given bikes and kept in touch with UBP, Wilburn says 75 percent have been successful in using their bikes to get back and forth to work at least six months later. “One guy had no income when he came to us, but he got a job and now he’s making $30,000 at the port,” she says. The man eventually was able to purchase a car, but Wilburn says he still cycles to work for the exercise.

22 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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She hopes to see more stories like this with the renovation. “We’re going to be able to serve our clients better. I think we’re going to be able to accommodate more people during the hours that we’re open, and be open more hours.” Because of the current layout, an open-door policy doesn’t really work right now, Wilburn says, but it will with the new design. “The way the new floorplan’s going to work, it’ll be easy to have the doors to the front unlocked with a glass door-front that makes it look like it’s open,” says Wilburn. “We’ll be able to see straight to the front, they’ll be able to see us.”

Follow the vibe.

—SUPPORT LOCAL ARTISTS—

ROLE OF THE CHALLENGE PROGRAM

GOOD FOR COMMUNITY INITIATIVES Space will be made for diverse programming and events including existing ones like Open Shop Program, Free Bike Program, Youth Shop, School Earn-a-Bike Programs, classes and more, says Wilburn. With the Capital Campaign changes, services will be expanded to give members of the community a chance to take the initiative in programming, too. Wilburn says there will be opportunities for the community to hold events and meetings at the space. “There’s not a lot in the way of community centers in the Upper East Side right now, so this is something to provide for the neighborhood to have a nice community hub,” says Wilburn. “And it is definitely the biggest undertaking we’ve taken on to date." For more information or to donate to the Capital Campaign, go to urbanbikeproject.org/capitalcampaign.

FIRST FRIDAY

10.5.18

5

o’clock

If you’ve been to Stitch House Brewery, Grain locations and Harvest House, to name a few, then you’ve seen the signature style of the Challenge Program team. The program provides construction training for Delaware’s at-risk youth, who in turn utilize their skills on major projects like the Bike Project. “We’re going to be working with them to build a practical, durable interior, but one that has a very light, airy feel, with a fun, industrial-chic look,” says Wilburn. As general contractors of the renovation, the team is going to work directly on interior fit-outs. They have already completed the office. They’re pulling in all outside subcontractors— plumber, electrician, roofer, etc.—getting all the quotes, creating the budget and construction schedule. The property makes up an entire block that extends from Clifford Brown Walk and from 15th Street all the way to 16th Street. So changes will certainly not go unnoticed. Exterior renovations, including a restored façade, will help meet Wilburn’s goal of raising visibility and making the structure beautiful again, she says. “We envision this as a thriving center of community activity and bringing it back to life. People are trying to revitalize this neighborhood. We want to be a part of that, not hinder it.” She said that with security always being a priority, she’s bringing in artists to fabricate “funky, unique, attractive” security grates made from old bike parts for the front windows. Other exterior renovations include structural stabilization of the roof, which is in major disrepair, Wilburn says. The Walnut Street entrance, currently inaccessible, will be reopened, and the interior space will be opened up and brightened with natural light from windows that are currently boarded up. Climate control will be introduced, which will be especially welcome during summer months.

Come vibe with us— Limited Edition Art Expo.

Meet some of the creative minds in the local art scene. Artwork will be available for sale. Support the work of these talented artists and get access to them in this intimate setting.

Featured Artists: 4Youth Productions Monica Lopez Andre Reyneard Sadiddy Hippie Danny Martinez Smashed Label Dominique Pizzo Yakime Akelá Brown Fancy Plants More to be announced!

THE ROCK LOT Located at 305 W. 8th St., Wilmington DE

CreativeDistrictWilm.com

@CreativeDistrictWilm | #BeCreativeInWilm OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Delaware Center for Horticulture’s

DANCE FOR PLANTS

Friday, Oct. 12 • 6-11 p.m. $25 in advance • $30 at the door Buy your tickets now at thedch.org

• Live music Too Tall Slim + the Guilty Pleasures •

DJ Thunder • Wine bar + specialty cocktail • Beer garden with Wilmington Brew Works • Local food from Movable Feast and the Magic Vegan Chef by Nicole • Ticket price includes 1 drink + desserts by Trader Joe’s DCH • 1810 N. Dupont Street • Wilmington, DE 19806 • thedch.org

2018 Season 2016 Season

RAMSEY’S

FARM

Open Weekends Weekends Sept. thruOct. Oct.30th 28th Sept. 22nd 24th thru Open Saturdays and Sundays 10am-5pm Fridays in October and Columbus Day Noon to 5pm Night events (5 to 9pm) every Fri./Sat. in Oct.

Wilmington, DE

Conquer our Many Mazes!

Weekday School Groups by Appointment

Hay Rides, Boy Scout/Girl Scout Events, Company Outings, Birthday Parties, Pumpkin Picking, Corn stalks, Gourds,Straw Bales, and many activities for the kids...

Do it in the Dark!

Flashlight Corn Maze (see web for details) (Private parties hosted year-round by appointment) For more information and a complete calendar of events, visit ramseysfarm.com

Located 1 mile from Concord Mall on the DE/PA line in Delaware

Visit our U-pick Pumpkin Patch

The farm is off Route 92 on Ramsey Road. Look for the “Red Arrow” signs.

GPS location: 500 Ramsey Road, Wilm., DE 19803 (this is not a mailing address)

www.RAMSEYSFARM.com

302 477-1499

24 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DELAWARE GROWN,

Delaware Proud A new state initiative connects the state’s farmers with residents and craft alcohol producers

A

griculture is Delaware’s top industry, with a yearly economic impact of $8 billion. Delaware’s 2,500 family-owned farms, which provide more than 20,000 jobs, produce fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, flowers and plants, and even live Christmas trees. But how many Delawareans know when they’re buying locally-grown produce and goods? Despite agriculture’s importance to the state, until now there has been no clear connection between consumers and Delaware-grown crops. New Jersey produce is “Jersey Fresh” and Maryland farmers have “Maryland’s Best.” What about the First State? A new initiative by the Delaware Department of Agriculture, Delaware Grown, is creating a statewide brand for farmers, so that when the state’s citizens go to the grocery store, they’ll know if they’re buying local goods. Says DDA Chief of Community Relations Stacey Hofmann: “When you go to the grocery store and you’re bombarded by choices, a lot of times you don’t know what’s locally grown. We wanted a way to show that something is Delaware-grown whether you’re at a store, local farmers market or farm stand.” Consumers can identify what’s local by a specific brand sticker. When produce is in season, shoppers can look for the logo—a graphic of a barn with the text “Delaware Grown: Pick Fresh. Pick First.” Hofmann says Delaware Grown produce is sold statewide in ShopRite, Redner's Market and Walmart, to name a few places. But an upcoming website, delawaregrown.com, will go live in November or December and allow consumers to see where they can purchase Delaware Grown products. The website will also feature recipes, videos and suggestions on how to prepare Delaware-grown fruits and vegetables. “Farmers are excited because they now have something that they can brand as ‘Delaware,’ as an opportunity to bring awareness,” says Hofmann. Overall, things are looking good for the agricultural community. As pride in farming increases, and the trend toward local and healthy foods continues, Hofmann predicts that the

number of state farms, which already make up 41 percent of Delaware’s landmass, will grow too. “We’re seeing an uptick in small farms that are producing,” says Hofmann. “People are connected now more to their food source, and they want to eat healthy.” It’s only natural then that Delaware’s top industry would meld seamlessly with another popular, and delicious, state industry—beer. “There are different beers and ales that have flavorings, so we’re trying to make sure that can be done with a Delaware Grown fruit or vegetable, depending on what the craft producer is looking for,” says Hofmann. “We’re really trying to build that connection to be stronger for craft producers and farmers.” Take barley, for example. Many area breweries use malt made from barley grown right here in Delaware. “When we look at barley, it’s a specialty area,” says Hofmann. “Now our farmers are producing more barley to meet that need.” Between 2017 and this year, about 4,000 acres of Delaware land went toward malting barley, and Hofmann says 95 percent of participating farmers are willing to grow more barley in the future. A huge player in connecting local farmers with local brewers is Proximity Malt, a company that shortens the supply chain and has a plant in Laurel. Amy Germershausen, Proximity Malt vice president of sales and marketing, says the company has provided malt, made from barley sourced within a 100-mile radius of the Laurel plant, to approximately 70 percent of Delaware brewers within the past year, as well as to some small distillers and home brew shops. She could not disclose brewery names, but she says they work with area brewers “large and small.” “We get excited about the virtuous circle created,” says Germershausen. “Brewers buy our malt, which pays our farmers, who buy their beer.” When the Delaware Grown website delawaregrown.com is up, check it out, then head to participating grocery stores featuring local products. Find farmers markets and farm stands at de.gov/buylocal. — Out & About OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS

The First State, tiny though it may be, seems to play host to plenty of spirits, ghosts, paranormal activities, and is even neighbors to a legendary sea creature. Some of our contributors offer these unnerving examples.

26 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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‘UNEARTHLY LINGERERS’ When you have been standing vigil on Market Street for more than 145 years, you’re bound to accumulate some stragglers who have passed on but have not yet crossed over to the other side. That’s certainly true of the Grand Opera House, built in 1871. But most of the unearthly lingerers only come out late at night in the presence of the technical staff and the custodial crew. Head Custodian Chaka Hollis has encountered a number of unexplained phenomena while on duty cleaning after shows: mop buckets moving from where they were placed, flickering lights in empty rooms, furniture inexplicably turned in another direction. The most disturbing incident involved a floating lightbulb. “We were changing a burned-out bulb in a ceiling fixture in Copeland Hall and couldn’t get it loose,” says Hollis. “After several tries, we gave up. Then, the bulb unscrewed itself and floated…slowly… almost to the ground. Then, it dropped the last few inches and shattered with a loud pop. It was really scary.” Hollis says that he is often aware of unexpected shadows and movement in the historic opera house when he’s the only one there. “I have learned to announce myself to the building. I say who I am and what I am doing, and then they’re fine,” he says. There’s also a strange presence on the third floor of the Giacco Building that master electrician Genevieve Fanelli has encountered. “I don’t know much about him,” she says. “He’s male and he’s pissed. I avoid that area at night and just go another way.” This is especially odd since the Giacco Building is only 18 years old. It does, however, sit on the same spot where the Aldine Theatre stood for more than 50 years. Fanelli thinks of this irritable phantom as one left over from the movie days who was disturbed by the construction of the newer building. Fanelli says that in-house staff are not the only ones who notice some of the long-term residents. “More than 10 different road crew members over the years have asked me who the woman in the balcony is,” she says. “They see her just sitting there in period garb. I say good night to her every night as I leave, because if I don’t something usually goes wrong the next day. I think of her as the spirit of The Grand itself.” And then there’s Tom, a specter who inhabits the chair on the left in a lobby outside the Masonic offices. Fanelli has sensed him out of the corner of her eye, but he avoids being seen. She asked around to understand who or what he is. “Apparently,” she explains, “there was a former secretary for the Masons who would leave the office every night and sit in that specific chair before going home, sometimes falling asleep there for hours. He doesn’t like people being in the lobby, but I acknowledge him now, and he’s much nicer.” Chaka Hollis sees these ethereal souls as protectors. “A lot of them care about The Grand,” he says, “just like we do. They monitor the building, and if you have the wrong attitude, they’ll let you know.” —Mark Fields, Out & About’s movie critic, has a day job as executive director of The Grand Opera House. He has not experienced any of these spirits in person but accepts their presence.

Photo Mark Fields

Two Stories from the Grand Opera House

The portrait of actress Sarah Bernhardt at The Grand Opera House.

SARAH BERNHARDT’S GHOST Imagine it’s 1880 and the prominent French stage actress Sarah Bernhardt is set to perform in Camille at the Grand Opera House. Due to her popularity, Bernhardt “was to receive $500 plus expenses, which included her own train from Springfield,” says Bob Parker, technical director at The Grand and the Playhouse. However, ticket sales totaled only $250, so the performance was cancelled. Though Bernhardt never performed at The Grand, her lifesize portrait stands in the namesake salon, a Victorian-style, two-level parlor on the first floor. No one knows who the piece was commissioned for or by, or when it was completed. It was “never supposed to stay,” says Mark Fields, executive director, yet it remains. Fast forward to January 2018, and The Grand has sustained severe water damage. “The pipes burst due to the bitter cold temperatures,” says Andy Truscott, associate director of marketing, music/variety. “The water soaked everything—the bar and walls—in the salon. Everything, that is, except the Sarah Bernhardt painting.” What’s even creepier is that the staff insists the fire sprinklers were fully operational during the time, so they should have burst as well. See the painting for yourself and enjoy a good laugh at the same time with the Fearless Improv at its Friday, Oct. 18, show in the Sarah Bernhardt Salon. — Leeann Wallett, contributing writer

OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo Anthony Santoro

STRANGE DELAWARE continued from previous page

The Read House in Historic New Castle.

MYSTERY MUSIC IN THE READ HOUSE Working for the Delaware Historical Society as a tour guide doesn’t produce the plethora of ghost stories you might expect. There was the occasional creak, bump, or footstep, but overall, I experienced little of the supernatural. Except, that is, for one morning when a group of elementary school students were late to the Read House for a field trip. We were scrambling to get them to the basement to start their program. Leading the children in, I heard music. Guides often put their own spin on a program, so our soundtrack didn't strike me as odd until I noticed none of the adult chaperones seemed to hear the music. The students and my fellow guides were the only ones to comment on it. It sounded like early American tavern music played exclusively with the higher notes of a piano. There was no looping, no electronic interference, and no echo. It had the clarity, fullness and immediacy only a real life human and an actual instrument can produce. I know our staff had nothing to do with the music because the head of our public programs finally, incredulously, asked no one in particular, “And where is that music coming from?” The music played for close to half an hour that morning, with no discernible source, distracting everyone who could hear it, and finally fading as suddenly as it started. In the back of our minds was this historical fact: George Read II (1765-1836) would often bring his daughter, Kitty, down to entertain guests with her musical talents—specifically, her talents on the pianoforte, an instrument that sounds like someone is exclusively playing the high notes on a piano. — Dillon McLaughlin, contributing writer, worked for the Delaware Historical Society as a tour guide from 2015 to 2017. 28 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo Adriana Camacho-Church

Make Your Reservations Now for Thanksgiving Thurs. Nov. 22

Great Weekly Specials Everyday! Mon-1/2 Price Burgers All Day The red silk smoking jacket and a portrait of Edward Bringhurst III.

ROCKWOOD’S MAN IN THE SMOKING JACKET It was around 4:30 on a late fall afternoon in 2006. The sun was setting behind the thick trees near Rockwood Mansion on Shipley Road. Philip Nord, director of the 150-year-old Gothic structure, was inside locking up for the night, rechecking every room—as he’s done for the past four years. As he went into one of the parlors, he pulled aside the curtain in the doorway, revealing a man sitting in a red velvet Victorianstyle chair in a corner of the room. Nord looked at the man and the man looked back at him. “He was a real flesh-and-blood human being,” says Nord. “I thought the staff hadn’t checked every room.” The man wore a red silk smoking jacket that Nord recognized as belonging to the Mansion’s antique collection. “As soon as I saw him wearing the smoking jacket I knew it was Edward,” says Nord, referring to Edward Bringhurst III (1884-1939), whose portrait hangs above the mansion’s main entrance. “I was dumbfounded,” says Nord. “Speechless.” Chills ran up and down his spine—the same feeling he sometimes got while walking up the main staircase to the second floor, where the bedrooms are. Nord turned his head away from the man and said to him, “I see you.” When he turned his head back, the man was gone. Says Nord: “I can’t explain it.” — Adriana Camacho-Church, contributing writer

Tues- Oyster Day All Day

Special Oyster Menu $1.25 Raw Oysters, Brick Oven Baked Oysters , $5.00 Oyster Shooters $2 Pints of Coors Light 6pm to Close

Wed.-$6 Chefs Tapas Menu Starts at 4pm $1 Off All Craft Drafts 6pm-Close $16 Pitcher of House Sangria Thurs- Flat Bread Day All Day All Gourmet Flat Breads $5.00 $2 off all Our Classic Cocktails 6pm to Close

Fri.-$1.25 Raw Oysters All Day Sunday Brunch 10am-2pm

$4 Make Your Own Bloody Mary Bar

302.376.0600 109 Main Street, Odessa, DE 19730 Mon: 11:30am-9pm • Tues - Thurs: 11:30am-10pm Fri-Sat:11:30am-11pm • Sun: 10am-9pm

www.cantwells-tavern.com OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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46 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo Anthony Santoro

STRANGE DELAWARE continued from page 29

Penn's Place in Historic New Castle.

THE SPIRITS OF PENN’S PLACE Legend has it that William Penn spent his first night in North America at 206 Delaware St. in New Castle, but Esther Lovlie doesn’t think it’s his ghost that haunts the artisan shops, café and gallery in the building now known as Penn’s Place. Lovlie, who owns the building and runs the Trader’s Cove Coffee Shop, says an “antique gravity-defying ghost” periodically turns up, just in time to rescue martini glasses and stained-glass art works that have fallen from shelves or suction cups in the shops. The objects have a tendency to fall at night, when no one is around, and, when they’re discovered on the floor or on the carpet in the morning, they’re always intact. “How is that possible? I don’t know,” says Lovlie. “We’ve had stuff that should have broken flying off the walls and never hitting the ground.” When new artisans set up shop in the building, the electrical system tends to go haywire. “Lights start turning on and off, and the heater even shut down,” she says. “It seems to happen whenever a new person comes in.” Lovlie cites the morning last December when Fox 29 broadcast its Good Day Philadelphia show from Penn’s Place. Between segments, a cameraman asked her for an extension cord to hook up his battery-operated camera, which he said usually lasts through a full day of shooting. Lovlie recognized the problem immediately. “I told him, ‘I guess I forgot to tell you about our ghost.’” When she and her husband, Matt, bought the building in 2009, neighbors did ask them if they realized the place was haunted. Now they know. Hauntings in History walking tours take place at 7, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in October. Tours depart from The Arsenal, 30 Market St., New Castle. Tickets are $14 for New Castle Historical Society members, $15 for others. Reservations required at newcastlehistory.org. — Larry Nagengast, contributing writer DELAWARE CITY’S HAUNTED HOTEL The first night he slept in the historic Delaware City Hotel as its owner, John Buchheit had a nightmare. In it, he fought a chambermaid named Sandy dressed in clothes from the 1800s. One night afterward, he was standing at the top of the staircase when he felt a push. Buchheit’s tumble down the stairs left him bruised but not seriously hurt. Though he was not always a believer in the paranormal, Buchheit now thinks that much of Delaware City, founded in the 1820s, is haunted. The Delaware City Hotel, which was built in 1828 and now houses Crabby Dick’s Restaurant on its first floor, can feel crowded even when he’s alone, Buchheit says. As he cleans up at night, he’ll sometimes feel his hair stand up and he gets a tingly feeling. “When I’m here at night,” he says, “I actually talk to them.” Though he's polite to the spirits, Buchheit believes they want him gone, but, as he tells them occasionally, he's not going anywhere. Other paranormal believers, including ghosthunting clubs, have been drawn to the old hotel. And after finding some old cookware, Buchheit discovered a clue about at least one of the spirits haunting his steps. Inscribed on the cookware was the name “Sandy.” — Dan Linehan, contributing writer OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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THE LEGEND OF CHESSIE In my first years writing for Out & About in the mid-‘90s, I did a lengthy piece on “Chessie,” a sea creature that supposedly inhabits the Chesapeake Bay. According to local folklore expert Ed Okonowicz in his book Monsters of Maryland, the legend of Chessie may have officially begun in 1936 when a military helicopter crew flying over Bush River in Harford County, Md., reported seeing “something reptilian and unknown in the water.” In the decades to follow, Chessie has popped up in a variety of sightings: sometimes as something long and serpentine moving side to side, other times bulkier and undulating along a vertical plane; sometimes with a horse-like head and flippers, other times with scales. The hunt for Chessie took me to Robert Frew, who seems to be the only person to have captured the unknown beast on video—off Kent Island, Md., in 1982. On the phone, he conceded that the creature was something he could not identify. Based on Frew’s video, neither could experts at the Smithsonian. But after studying the footage, they concluded its subject was, in fact, a living, breathing animal. Just what kind, they couldn’t say. I also spoke with Richard Greenwell, who was then the secretary of the International Society of Cryptozoology, which seeks to explain seemingly unexplainable sightings in the wild, such as Big Foot and the Loch Ness Monster. Greenwell’s theory was that Chessie might be a modern-day descendant of the prehistoric whales known as zeuglodons. To support his theory, Greenwell pointed out that the coelacanth, a fish thought to have been extinct for 66 million years, suddenly showed up in the waters of Chalumna River in South Africa. Whether it’s a Jurassic whale, a large sea snake or an eel, one thing is sure: The Chessie phenomenon is a mystery that continues to fascinate residents of the Delmarva peninsula. — Jim Miller, Director of Publications

32 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Ken and Beth Schuler, owners of the shop, aren't really possessed.

The Perfect Match: Oddporium and Arden What better location for this unusual shop than Delaware’s oddest community? By Kevin Noonan Photos by Joe del Tufo

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o, you’re doing a little shopping for somebody special, but they pretty much have everything they want or need and you’re looking for a unique gift idea. May we suggest a lamp made from a human spine? Or how about a one-eyed pig embalmed in a giant specimen jar? Those are just a couple of the items that have been for sale at a small shop located at the corner of Marsh and Harvey roads in northern New Castle County. And the sign hanging over its door tells you everything you need to know about this place—Oddporium. Co-owner Ken Schuler says he can’t imagine another place in Delaware where his business could thrive except where it is—Arden. “This is the perfect spot for us,” he says. “It would be hard to make this work if we were in some strip mall off of [Route] 202 or something like that. But we’re located in a place that’s known

for being different, for having free thinkers, for looking at life a little bit differently than most people. That’s one of the things that make Arden unique.” Schuler grew up in Arden and his family built the building at the corner of Marsh and Harvey roads that now houses Oddporium. For many years his great-uncle, Frank Harrison, operated a barber shop from one part of the building while the other half housed, over the years, a grocery store, a sub shop and, most recently, a pawn shop. A few years ago, Schuler wanted to turn it into a photography shop, but then he realized that everyone already has a photography shop—their smart phones. That’s when he decided that he and Beth (then his fiancée and now his wife) would turn their hobby— collecting rare and unusual things—into a business. ► OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS THE PERFECT MATCH: ODDPORIUM AND ARDEN continued from previous page

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They advertise their shop as “The Gallery of the Peculiar and the Bizarre” and their website says that a visit gives people “a peek behind history’s dark curtain.” There are too many oddities to mention them all, but they include primitive medical tools—the kind you’ve seen in a thousand horror movies—and lots and lots of bones. That includes the spinal lamp, as well as an entire skeleton, which is named “Lizzy.” And let’s not forget the preserved one-eyed porker that comes with the label “Amelia, the Cyclops Pig.” All the oddities have a story behind them and the Schulers love relating those stories, so you’ll get a history lesson as well as a conversation piece when you stop at the shop. And they agree that they picked the perfect location to tell those stories. “Arden is just different, in the way that people look at us and the way that we look at ourselves,” Ken Schuler says. “There are a lot of things that separate us from other communities. And if that’s weird, then so be it.” Most of the neighborhoods in Brandywine Hundred date back to the post-war, baby boom era, but Arden predates even that by half a century. And unlike those cookie-cutter communities, Arden houses are different. For one thing, the resident owns the house, but not the land that it sits on—that is leased for 99 years and is renewable. The residents do own the houses, and they (the residents and the houses) are different from each other and especially from the surrounding “Hundreds.” This is a place where mini-mansions stand next to beat-up bungalows in a mishmash of architectural styles. Something else you don’t see much in other suburban enclaves—houses with names, like they were pets or something. There’s Friendly Gables, The Sweep, Green Gate, The Second Homestead (we’re not sure what happened to the first), Rest Cottage and the Fels House.

tickets+information: WWW.URBANBIKEPROJECT.COM/CRISPCLASSIC 34 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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100-Year-Old Homes

All those houses were designed by noted architect Will Price, one of the founders of Arden (which, again, makes Arden different; how many Brandywine Hundred communities have founders?). And all those houses were built in the first decade of the 20th Century. Arden’s primary founders were Price and Frank Stephens, who started the village with two basic principles in mind—to follow the single-tax economic tenets of Henry George and to establish an arts-friendly community with lots of green space. That attracted people who tend to be a little different. A prime example of the free-thinkers who still live in Arden is a property on Loreley Lane. The yard is filled with beautiful fountains and gardens, with an elaborate gazebo as its centerpiece. But the yard, and the buildings on it are also dotted with all kinds of signs, many of them old and rusting: “Beware of pickpockets and loose women”; “Day Bus Tours—Travel at your own Risk”; “$500 Fine for Throwing Trash on Highways and Streams”; “Slippery When Wet”, and perhaps the best— oddest?—of them all, an old, faded sign that proclaims “The New Marcus Hook Diner.” There are also various mannequins scattered around the yard in different poses, and only the lease-holders understand the meaning behind them. And to make sure nobody messes with the gardens and fountains and signs and mannequins, there is a life-sized cutout of a Buckingham Palace guard to watch over everything. It’s eclectic and eccentric. And it’s pure Arden. ►

Arden's sign and a mannequin at the house on Loreley Lane.

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EST. 2018

OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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THE PERFECT MATCH: ODDPORIUM AND ARDEN continued from previous page

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Then there’s the Lady of the Woods. She used to be a tree, but when that tree had to be cut down a few years ago the leaseholder of the property on Sherwood Road, the late Ken Sutton, commissioned Arden artist David Yoder to carve the large stump into the shape of a woman. To this day people stop by and put wreaths on her head and flowers at her feet, and it’s common to see somebody stop their car, get out and take a selfie with her, as if the sculpture was a shrine. And when somebody once defaced the lady with tar, volunteers cleaned her off and she still stands alongside the road, smiling down at passersby. But why turn a tree into a woman? Sutton was once asked that, and he said simply, “Because I can.” “He wouldn’t have even considered it if it wasn’t in Arden,” says Carolyn Cordivano, Sutton’s widow. “This is a unique place because of the people who live here and the way they look at life and the way they do things together. We’re different, but in a good way.” And it’s worth noting as we head toward Halloween that there are occult-related things in Arden—other than those sold at Oddporium. That was evident last month at the annual Arden Fair. The first thing you noticed was a guy dressed as a wizard who greeted visitors as they entered the fairgrounds, and he certainly didn’t look out of place; if a real wizard were to live in Delaware, he’d probably end up in Arden.

22 OCTOBER 36 FEBRUARY2018 2018 | | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Interested in buying some bones? Oddporium is fully stocked.

Also at the fair, there was an entire room of the Buzz Ware Village Center that was used for the Peddlers, Potions and Practitioners holistic marketplace, which displayed all sorts of, well, potions, among other things. We were going to check it out more closely, but it cost a dollar to get in and, money-wise, it came down to a choice between the Peddlers exhibit and kettle corn, and kettle corn won. Also, right next to the path leading to the Peddlers, Potions and Practitioners display was a booth that sold stuff geared toward the paranormal—magic wands (batteries and magic not included) and ritual wear and accessories, as well as Celtic, wiccan and pagan jewelry (for the well-dressed pagan)—things you don’t see at most community fairs or school bazaars.

Arden on YouTube

Arden’s darker side has been aided and abetted by Jay Parker’s YouTube videos. Parker, who spent his early years in the community, claims that his parents were part of a satanic ring that included many people from Arden. Even more to the point, he says the founders of Arden formed the village for that purpose and they used mind control to achieve their goals. According to Parker—who says the repressed memory of the abuse he suffered resurfaced as an adult in 2001, right before he left Arden—the early settlers of the village worshipped Moloch, a pagan god of the ancient Ammonites and Phoenicians. You can see all his outlandish charges on YouTube. Sadie Somerville is a long-time Arden resident who serves on the board of the Arden Craft Shop Museum and is also active with the Georgist Gild, which promotes Henry George’s philosophy of “tax land, not labor,” so she knows Arden history as well as anyone. And she says Parker’s claims are news to her. “But people tend to believe stories like that just because it’s Arden,” Sommerville says. “It’s like how people say Arden was started as a nudist colony, but that was just a few people skinnydipping in [Naamans Creek] and it got blown out of proportion. I’ve certainly never seen or heard of anything documented that would back what [Parker] says, and it would be hard to keep something like that a secret all of these years.” Parker offers no proof other than his resurfaced memories, so mark it up to just one more unverifiable legend in the colorful history of the oddest village in Delaware.

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EAT

Worth

ARGILLA BREWING COMPANY AT PEITRO'S PIZZA Is there a better meal than chomping on a slice of handtossed pizza and downing a pint of well-crafted beer? For me, there isn't, and the best local spot to do that, in my opinion, is this place. The beer, brewed on premise, is amazing, but we're here to talk pizza. Create your own pie, or pick one of the house favorites. I usually go for The Gander, Peitro’s spin on a BBQ chicken pizza, a chipotle BBQ sauce base topped with chicken tenders, bacon and fresh mozzarella. I love how they get super creative with their pies, and sometimes I'll try out their "Pizza of the Month" when I'm feeling lucky. Cheers!

PIZZA!

— Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer

NICOLA PIZZA

VINCENZA & MARGHERITA BISTRO Known as V&M, this Marsh Road establishment has offered gourmet pizzettes since opening in 2014. But in early June of this year, the restaurant began selling New York-style pies. A New Yorker would no doubt have an opinion about whether it measures up to the name, but call it what you will, it’s tasty. The restaurant is known for its baked goods, sauces and fresh ingredients, which makes this version of the Big Apple’s pie a cut above the local competition. — Pam George, Contributing Writer

DIMEO'S When given the choice (which doesn't happen often in my house), I make the call for my favorite pizza in the area: DiMeo's in downtown Wilmington. They specialize in Neapolitan-inspired pies, and I've never had one I didn't love. My personal favorite is "The Paisano" (I don't think this is on the menu anymore, but they'll make it upon request). It features a basic pesto and tomato sauce combo, with whole roasted cloves of garlic throughout. Their entrees are delicious too! — Matthew Loeb, Creative Director & Production Manager

If you’re in the Rehoboth Beach area, head over to Nicola Pizza for one of the best in Delaware. The family-owned and operated pizza parlor has been delighting pizza fans since 1971 and is home to the original Nic-O-Boli, a custom Stromboli that is proportionally sized yet packed with fresh ingredients. Nicola’s sauce is so delicious and coveted by customers that it’s sold by jar or case. Come for the pizza and stay for the atmosphere. There are two floors at the Rehoboth Avenue location. The first floor has large tables and booths that fit families of all sizes, while the second floor is dotted with large-screen TVs broadcasting sports from all over the world. Stop by Nicola’s at the beach, you’ll be glad you did. — Cindy Cavett, Contributing Writer

PIZZA BY ELIZABETHS As this popular Greenville dining destination celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, the occasion underscores just how much of a trailblazing concept Pizza By Elizabeths was and continues to be. In the early ‘90s, it was the first in this area to serve gourmet pizza, was years ahead of the curve with the wine bar concept, and it was doing the farm-to-table thing long before it became fashionable. Moreover, PBE manages to do something that seems impossible on paper: bringing a chic but accessible elegance to the pizza business. Of course, there’s more to the menu than just pizza—like the famous cream of tomato soup. But then again, how many other pizza places do you know that allow you to create your own masterpiece, working from a menu of 14 meats, 17 cheeses, 20 vegetables, 10 herbs and seven sauces? — Jim Miller, Director of Publications

GROTTO PIZZA This longstanding Delaware institution conjures nostalgia for sandy childhood romps at Rehoboth Beach. Any of its locations— and not just at the Rehoboth boardwalk—deliver the consistent taste of the brand’s signature style. — Krista Connor, Senior Editor & Digital Media Manager

38 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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MAZZELLA'S ITALIAN RESTAURANT

ROCCO’S ITALIAN GRILL & SPORTS BAR

This homestyle Italian, family-friendly restaurant serves hearty portions of pizza and pasta in an inconspicuous strip mall along Philadelphia Pike. My faves among their gourmet pizza menu selections include the spinach, roasted peppers & feta; Cajun chicken, tomato & cheddar; and the Italian pita—which “sandwiches” elements of an Italian sub between two thin pita crusts. Their Sicilian (thicker crust) pizzas are tasty as well—tangy red sauce with a nice, crispy crust. Slices and whole pies available, and they are open on Sundays! Check out mazzellas.net.

If you’re looking for the perfect pie, this establishment on Union Street has two of them. Every Friday night, we pick up our favorites to go: the Gamberi, with shrimp, crushed plum tomatoes, basil, mozz, garlic and olive oil, and the DiParma, with prosciutto, crushed plum tomatoes, mozzarella and arugula. The real mozzarella oozes off the pie, the crust is crispy yet chewy, and the specialty pizzas blow your average pepperoni and cheese out of the oven. — Rob Kalesse, Contributing Writer

— Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Contributing Writer

HOT SPOT PIZZA

CAFÉ SITALY For my money, there's nothing in the area the comes close to Cafe Sitaly on Naamans Road in North Wilmington. Legit New York-style pizza from Tony Causi, the chef who originally brought the equally excellent Marina's to Wilmington decades ago. The plain cheese pizza and tomato pie are the best around, but it's their Grandmom's Pizza, just basic plum tomato, mozzarella, basil and olive oil, that rules the menu. You'll find a line if you’re planning to eat in at their nine-table location, so order takeout or come early.

When it's pizza time, I don't put on airs—I put on pepperoni. To me, pizza in America is primarily a working-class food, and my pie guys at Hot Spot (the Miller Road location) respect that. They deliver a good old-fashioned pizza, like grandpa used to eat, free from stuff like cyclone-dried prosciutto, micro arugula, wholegrain spelt crusts, or hand-carved artisanal Romano spirals. Their menu is also about 50 pages, so if I'm in the mood for a different hot food that hits the spot, all I have to do is call my neighborhood pizzeria.

— Joe del Tufo, Contributing Photographer

SOVANA BISTRO I’ve had the good fortune to eat pizza in Italy, where even mundane places make “incredible pizza.” The secret: light crust and fresh ingredients. Sovana Bistro, in nearby Unionville, Pa., is the closest thing I’ve had to pizza in Italy and I reevaluate that assessment almost weekly. The crust is light and crispy, the ingredients are sourced locally, and the topping combinations are creative and complementary. Of course, this isn’t exactly a secret. For more than 20 years, Sovana has been one of the top restaurants in Southern Chester County. — Jerry duPhily, Publisher

— David Hallberg, O&A Distribution

ANTHONY’S COAL-FIRED PIZZA I don’t go out to eat much, so when I do, I like it to go somewhere that I haven’t been to before that offers a variety of delicious food choices. When I sat down in Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza on Concord Pike, I was not disappointed. The group I went with got four different pizzas: cheesesteak, buffalo chicken, white, and jalapeno. While I didn’t get a chance to try the jalapeno, I can attest to the fact that the flavors in the other three were amazingly balanced. The crust was crunchy and perfectly cooked, and complemented the cheese melting down the sides while holding up the weight of the chicken, steak, and other toppings covering the entire slice. It was an altogether great experience, where not only the pizza was fantastic, but the restaurant had an atmosphere to match. —Emily Stover, Intern

CACCIATORI PIZZA AND PASTA This is a family-owned restaurant tucked away in The Shoppes at Louviers just outside Newark. The family originally hails from New York, and when they opened the shop in Delaware 12 years ago, they brought an authentic version of New York Style pizza with them. They offer 23 unique gourmet pizzas, all with cheese and crust to die for. The best feature, to me, is the sheer size of the 18-inch extra large. Pizza not your style? There’s also a full menu of pasta and sandwiches, alongside a selection of wine by the glass or bottle. — Jacob Orledge, Intern OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT APPLE SCRAPPLE FUN

BITES T Tasty things worth knowing FOOD BANK COOKING SECRETS REVEALED

F

ood Bank of Delaware Executive Chef Tim Hunter is welcoming guests to join him during cooking demonstrations this month. Make it a date night, come solo or invite friends to learn from the chef as he explains how to make delicious three-course meals. The event takes place at the Newark location on Thursday, Oct. 18, as well as the Milford location on Thursday, Oct. 11. The classes run from 6-8 p.m. Hunter will teach guests how to make a delicious appetizer, entrée and dessert. The cost is $35 per person, which includes light refreshments. Classes are limited to 20 students, so sign up early and reserve a spot at fbd.org/communityclass.

MEGA WAREHOUSE SALE

E

mile Henry USA will hold its annual Mega Warehouse Sale Friday and Saturday, Oct. 26-27, in the Centerpoint Business Complex Park in New Castle. The sale features unique kitchenware for consumers and professional chefs, including European brands and exclusive products not available at any other sale in the U.S. Doors will open at 3 p.m. on Friday and close at 9 p.m. Saturday hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event actually begins with the annual Stock Up for Seniors Meals on Wheels Delaware fundraiser on Thursday evening from 6:30 to 9 p.m. VIP admission from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. is $100 and includes a live cooking demonstration, hors d’oeuvres, and, of course, first look at all the merchandise. Admission at 6:30 is $35 and $25 at 7:30. Doors close at 9 p.m. Visit mealsonwheelsde.org to purchase tickets to the fundraiser. For more information, call 326-4800.

he annual Bridgeville Apple Scrapple Festival is set for Friday and Saturday, Oct. 12-13. Featured will be 500 crafters and vendors, as well as the usual scrapple baking contest, live entertainment, decorating contests, and more. The festival will run from 4-10:30 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-10:30 p.m. on Saturday. It will be held at 311 Market St., Bridgeville. For more information call 245-2038 or visit applescrapple.com.

BAKE LIKE AN EXPERT

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ocally-renowned culinary artist and pastry diva Michele Mitchell conducts a new series of Sunday classes for the public at Tonic Bar and Grill in Wilmington. Each class includes a demonstration, hands-on work with guidance from Mitchell, a themed cocktail and take-home recipes. Here’s the schedule (all classes are on Sundays, 2-4 p.m.): Oct. 14 – The Art of Making Macaroons Nov. 11 – Holiday Gifts - Mason Jars, Treats/Quick Breads/Loaf Cakes Dec. 9 – Christmas Cookies and Holiday Cakes

HILTON’S THANKSGIVING DAY BUFFET

T

his Thanksgiving—Nov. 22—forgo the annual exhausting cooking and cleaning. Instead, head to the Hilton Wilmington/Christiana and feast on the annual Thanksgiving Day Buffet that has been put together by skilled chefs. Not only will there be the traditional turkey entrée with cranberry relish and savory gravy, but also a taco station, Angus prime ribs and honey-lime glazed salmon. And those are just the main dishes. There will also be a variety of salads, marinated clams, sweet potatoes, and desserts ranging from beignets to Woodside Farm Creamery ice cream. Many of these dishes use locally grown ingredients from Hilton’s courtyard garden and its partners. Prices are $54.95 for adults, $19.95 for ages 4-11 and free for kids 3 and under. Call 631-1540 to reserve a spot in advance. Food is served noon-6 p.m.

TRICK OR TREAT ON MAIN STREET

T

rick or treat, it’s (nearly) Halloween. On Sunday, Oct. 28, from 3-5 p.m., the shops of Main Street in Newark are welcoming the princes, princesses, ghosts, transformers, dogs, cats, and any other costumed kids to walk the strip as they hand out candy. This event will be held at the same time as the Halloween parade, which begins at 3 p.m. Guests are also invited to walk in costume in the parade; just go to the information booth at George Read Park by 2:30 p.m. to sign in.

FARMER AND CHEF FUNDRAISER RESULTS

T

he 11th annual the Farmer and the Chef contest, sponsored by the March of Dimes, took place at the Chase Center on the Riverfront on Sept. 13. The annual event features local chefs who use ingredients from local farms. Guests sample and vote on their favorites. The award-winning dish this year was created by Chef Michael Dikeman of Grain Craft Bar + Kitchen and Powers Farm of Townsend. The dish—ground bacon and dry-aged beef slider with a Maui-onion marmalade on a focaccia roll—will be added to the menu at Grain Craft Bar + Kitchen. There were two other categories, and the first, Best Dish for first time participants, ended in a tie. Judges could not decide between the team of Chef Sherm Porter, who owns Sherm’s Catering, and Ramsey’s Farm, and the team of Chef Robert Fratticcioli, of Market Kitchen and Bar, who partnered with Reid’s Angus Farm. The final category was for the Best Booth at the fundraiser, which went to Chefs Tom Craft and Gary James and the students at Delcastle High School. The event raises money for programs that help mothers deliver healthy babies and research to lessen the number of premature babies born each year. OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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THE CITY NEWS YOU CAN USE! WILMINGTON WORKS Looking for general job information and resources? Visit http://bit.ly/WilmingtonWorks to learn about education and training, labor laws and regulations, how to apply for government jobs, as well as other employment-related information.

ACADEMIES SET FOR 2019 INTERESTED IN BECOMING A WILMINGTON POLICE OFFICER OR CITY FIREFIGHTER? THERE IS STILL TIME TO APPLY

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ayor Mike Purzycki, Chief of Police Robert J. Tracy, and Chief of Fire Michael Donohue remind interested citizens that there is STILL time to apply to become a Wilmington Police Officer or City Firefighter. WPD will open its 99th police academy in February 2019, while the fire department is currently planning for its 40th fire academy. The initial screening process for both academies will include a written exam, a physical agility test, and interview panels that will include a Chief’s interview. Applications may be obtained from and submitted to the Department of Human Resources, Louis L. Redding City-County Building, 800 N. French St., Wilmington, DE 19801. • The deadline for the 40th Wilmington Fire Academy is October 12, 2018. For more information, contact Battalion Chief John Looney at 302.576.3179 or by email at john. looney@cj.state.de.us. • The deadline for the 99th Wilmington Police Academy is October 29, 2018. For more information, contact M/Sgt. David Prado at 302.576.3177 or by email at David. Prado@cj.state.de.us.

42 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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CIVIC ASSOCIATIONS Looking for a community organization or civic association in your area? Visit: http:// bit.ly/WilmingtonCivics

MARK YOUR CALENDAR OCT 5

ART LOOP WILMINGTON

OCT 10

COLUMBUS DAY (CITY OFFICES OPEN)

OCT 12

WILMINGTON FIRE ACADEMY APPLICATION DEADLINE

OCT 22

CITY’S OBSERVANCE OF VETERANS DAY (CITY OFFICES CLOSED)

OCT 29

WILMINGTON POLICE ACADEMY APPLICATION DEADLINE

For more meetings and events in the month of October, visit: https://www.wilmingtonde.gov/.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

9/24/18 9:47 AM


A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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1. Amtrak Station 2. Opera Delaware Studios/City Theater Co. 3. Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn., WYRA.ORG 4. Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park 5. Residences at Christina Landing 6. Bank’s Seafood Kitchen & Raw Bar / Riverfront Market, BANKSSEAFOODKITCHEN.COM 7. Delaware Theatre Co., DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG 8. Docklands Riverfront, DOCKLANDSRIVERFRONT.COM 9. Cosi at the Barclays Crescent Building, GETCOSI.COM 10. Hare Pavilion/Riverwalk 11. AAA Mid-Atlantic Travel Center, AAAMIDATLANTIC.COM 12. The Delaware Contemporary, DECONTEMPORARY.ORG

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13. Justison Landing, Currie Hair, Skin & Nails, CURRIEDAYSPA.COM Veritas Wine & Spirits, VERITASWINESHOP.COM Starbucks on the Riverfront Riverfront Pets, RIVERFRONTPETS.COM 14. Del Pez Mexican Gastropub, DELPEZMEXICANPUB.COM Goju Training Center, GOJUROBICS.COM 15. Delaware Children’s Museum, DELAWARECHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG Riverwalk Mini Golf, RIVERWALKMINIGOLF.COM 16. Joe’s Crab Shack, JOESCRABSHACK.COM 17. Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant, IRONHILLBREWERY.COM 18. Public Docks 19. Big Fish Grill, BIGFISHRIVERFRONT.COM

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Visit RiverfrontWilm.com for info on events happening at the Riverfront! Photo by Joe del Tufo 20. Frawley Stadium, BLUEROCKS.COM Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame 21. Chase Center on the Riverfront, CENTERONTHERIVERFRONT.COM 22. Dravo Plaza & Dock 23. Shipyard Center Planet Fitness, PLANETFITNESS.COM 24. Timothy’s Restaurant, TIMOTHYSONTHERIVERFRONT.COM Molly’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream, MOLLYSICECREAM.COM Ubon Thai Restaurant 25. Wilmington Rowing Center, WILMINGTONROWING.ORG 26. Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge/ DuPont Environmental Education Center, DUPONTEEC.ORG 27 Riverfront Commuter Lot, RIVERFRONTWILM.COM/PARKING

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28. Penn Cinema Riverfront IMAX, PENNCINEMARIVERFRONT.COM 29. CrossFit Riverfront, CFRIVERFRONT.COM 30. The Residences at Harlan Flats, HARLANFLATS.THERESIDENCES.NET 31. Altitude Trampoline Park, ALTITUDEWILMINGTON.COM 32. The Westin Wilmington, WESTINWILMINGTON.COM River Rock Kitchen, RIVERROCKKITCHEN.COM 33. Delaware Humane Association, DEHUMANE.ORG 34. Kalmar Nyckel Shipyard/Fort Christina Park, KALMARNYCKEL.ORG 35. Jack A Markell Bike Trail, OPENING LATE SEPTEMBER 36. Constitution Yards Beer Garden, CONSTITUTIONYARDS.COM

9/24/18 10:26 AM


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D E L AWA R E T H E AT R E C O M PA N Y P R E S E N T S

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

FRI DAY, NOVEMB ER 2, 201 8 6:00 - 9:30PM

Life is a cabernet! Sip and savor some of the finest wine, craft beer, light bites, and musical delights while celebrating Delaware Theatre Company’s 40th Anniversary season. Held at the CHASE CENTER ON THE RIVERFRONT

FOOD CO-HOSTS* Banks’ Seafood Kitchen • Big Fish Restaurant Group • Buckley’s Tavern • Caffé Gelato • Domaine Hudson • Hotel DuPont • Michele Mitchell Pastry Designs • Montrachet Fine Foods • Olé Tapas Lounge & Restaurant • Piccolina Toscana • Rockford Catering • Walter’s Steakhouse • White Clay Kitchen • WP Bistro

BEVERAGE CO-HOSTS* Branmar Wine & Spirits • Breakthru Beverage Group • Collier’s of Centreville • FranksWine • Standard Distributing Company • Swigg • The Wine and Spirit Company of Greenville Photos by Joe del Tufo, Moonloop Photography.

W IN E

BEER

FOOD

LIVE AU C T IO N

S ILE NT AU C T ION

L I V E M USI C

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! YOUNG FRIENDS TICKET (21-35 years old): $75 • EVENT TICKET: $125 • EVENT + PATRON PARTY PACKAGE: $250

302.594.1100 / DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT DTC PRESENTING SPONSOR:

LIVE AUCTION SPONSOR:

SILENT AUCTION SPONSOR:

CABERNET SPONSORS*:

MERLOT SPONSORS*:

*Sponsor and Co-Hosts as of September 17, 2018

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presented by

October 5, 2018 5pm Start Complimentary Shuttle Service (see website)

cityfest A program of the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs

2nd & LOMA

St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church

DCH

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LaFate Gallery

Station Gallery

The Chris White Gallery

Cab Calloway School

Howard Pyle Studio

The Creative Vision Factory

9/24/18 9:59 AM


RIVERFRONT The Delaware Contemporary 200 South Madison St. 656-6466 • decontemporary.org Artists: Aaron Eliah Terry, Lauren Peters, Ken Mabrey

The Grand Opera House 818 N. Market St. 658-7897 • thegrandwilmington.org Artist: Todd Breitling

Carspecken Scott Gallery 1707 N Lincoln St. • 655-7173 Artist: Deborah Davis

LaFate Gallery 227 N. Market St. 656-6786 • lafategallery.com Artist: Eunice LaFate

Howard Pyle Studio 1305 N. Franklin St. howardpylestudio.org Artists: The Artists of the Howard Pyle Studio

2nd & LOMA 211 N. Market St. 2ndandloma.com Artist: Stephanie Silverman

LOMA Coffee 239 N. Market St. 384-8494 • lomacoffee.com Artist: Janice Payne King

Melloy Alley Gallery 700 N. Harrison St. 494-2256 • Artist: Dwayne Todd

Academy for Peace 203 N. Market St. 384-0156 • janeairmacklin@aol.com Artist: Sandra Bucay

Mezzanine Gallery 820 N. French St. 577-8278 • arts.delaware.gov Artist: Charles Guerin Wine Tasting

St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church 1301 N. Broom St. 652-7623 • ststeph.org Artist: Linda Gunderson

DOWNTOWN

Christina Cultural Arts Center 705- 707 N. Market St. 429-0101 • ccacde.org Artist: Stephen Kingsberry Wine Tasting The Chris White Gallery 701 N. Shipley St. 690-9051 • chriswhitegallery.com Artist: Josh Chance Creative District Wilmington: Rock Lot 305 W. 8th St. 425-5500 • creativedistrictwilm.com Artists: LTD Edition Art Expo The Creative Vision Factory 617 N. Shipley St. • 543-3082 thekingoftransit.wordpress.com Artists: Geraldo Gonzalez & Nathan Paul Smith Toni & Stuart B. Young Gallery at Delaware College of Art and Design (DCAD) 600 N. Market St. 622-8000 • dcad.edu/gallery Artist: Henry Bermudez Grace United Methodist Church 900 Washington St. Gracechurchwest.com Artist: Chris Tijierino

NextFab 503 N. Tatnall St. 477-7330 • nextfab.com Artist: DCAD Student Collaboration Exhibit The Music School of Delaware 4101 Washington St. • 762-1132 musicschoolofdelaware.org Artist: Sara F. Gallagher

WEST END The 3rd Place (3P Gallery) 1139 W. 7th St., Suite C 3rdplacewilm.org Artist: Geraldo Gonzalez Blue Streak Gallery 1721 Delaware Ave. 429-0506 Artists: Karen Delaney and Gus Semas Delaware Center for Horticulture 1810 N. Dupont St. 658-6262 • thedch.org Artist: Hank Davis Cab Calloway School of the Arts 100 N. Dupont Rd. • 651-2700 cabcallowayschool.org Artist: Chad Cortez Everett

BEYOND THE CITY Arden’s Buzz Ware Village Center 2119 The Highway 981-4811 • ardenbuzz.com Artist: Sean Flynn Talleyville Frame Shoppe & Gallery 3625 Silverside Rd. 478-1163 • www.talleyvilleFSG.com Artists: The Coffin Ball Art Show featuring Edward Abbott, Robert Bickey, Stephen Blickenstaff, Tina Dimino, Brian Durkee, Ric Frane, Michael Grosso, Eric Hendrickson, Pat Higgins, Joe Hoddinott, Shawn Kirkpatrick, Tina Marabito, Kristen Margiotta, Wendy M, Beth and Ken Schuler, Matt Stankis and more. Bellefonte Arts 803-C Brandywine Blvd. 762-4278 • bellefontearts.com Exhibit: Decorated Bra Contest a fundraiser benefiting the Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition Station Gallery 3999 Kennett Pike 654-8638 • stationgallery.net Artist: Michele Green

Next Art Loop Wilmington: November 2, 2018

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“im

e n te r

men

se

taininly g”

—The New Yo

rk Times

iou r a l i h “

s”

k —Time Out New Yor

A RARE COMEDY WITH A FULL SERVING OF LAUGHTER

OCTOBER 17–NOVEMBER 4, 2018 TICKETS AS LOW AS $25! Group (10+) & student discounts available

This devastatingly funny show follows a day in the life of Sam Peliczowski, an outof-work actor who mans the red-hot reservation line at Manhattan’s number-one restaurant. Coercion, threats, bribes, histrionics—a cast of desperate callers will stop at nothing in their zeal to land a prime reservation or the right table. Amid the barrage, Sam’s got his own needs to contend with. While juggling scheming socialites, name-dropping wannabes, fickle celebrities, and egomaniacal bosses, can he manage to look out for himself?

200 WATER STREET / WILMINGTON, DE 19801 / 302.594.1100 / DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG This organization is supported, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com

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Photo Joe del Tufo

WATCH

Clockwise from top left: actor/Fearless Improv member Melissa Bernard; actor Grace Tarves; Fearless Improv Director Jana Savini; Interim Artistic Director Kerry Kristine McElrone; Music Director Joe Trainor.

ARTISTIC PARTNERS

The Grand is now home to City Theater Company, The Rock Orchestra By Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald

A

t the close of the summer, The Grand made a very grand announcement indeed, welcoming two new organizations into its artistic partner family. Delaware’s Off-Broadway experience City Theater Company (CTC) and celebrated multigenre ensemble The Rock Orchestra (TRO) have proudly joined the ranks of Resident Companies of The Grand Opera House. Resident Companies are local or regional performing arts groups that make The Grand their primary artistic home, sharing their art in The Grand’s performance spaces and collaborating on marketing initiatives and other projects. CTC and TRO join the Delaware Symphony Orchestra, First State Ballet Theatre and Opera Delaware as Resident Companies. “The non-profit Grand Opera House is a shared asset that we manage on behalf of the residents and citizens that we serve,” says Mark Fields, executive director of The Grand. “Having The Grand now be the artistic home for these organizations gives us the opportunity to more fully connect to the community and share the joy of the performing arts with more members of that community.” CTC began its landmark 25th season in September, with Fearless Improv shows in the cozy Sarah Bernhardt Salon. Fearless’ next performance is an 8 p.m. show on Friday, Oct. 19, picking up again Jan. 9 with monthly second Saturday

performances through April 2019. CTC’s main stage starts with a blast from its (recent) past—a one-night-only, in-concert version of Green Day’s American Idiot on Saturday, Oct. 6, at 8 p.m. in the baby grand. (CTC staged the Delaware Premiere of the show in 2015.) The main stage continues with a run of Mamma Mia! (Dec. 7-15) in Studio One. "As we head into our 25th year and my first as interim artistic director, I’m excited for the possibilities ahead,” says Kerry Kristine McElrone. “The Grand is a community built on relationships, and I'm thrilled to be renewing ours. Our brand of up-close-andpersonal theater will be well-served in Studio One, where we can create worlds that immerse our audiences in the emotion and action alongside our actors.” The Rock Orchestra starts its run in The Grand with a Saturday, Nov. 17, performance of “An Evening of The Who,” followed by “An Evening of R.E.M.” on Saturday, Jan. 26, and “An Evening of Genesis: The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway” on Saturday, May 18. "The Grand Opera House has been the heart of the performing arts scene in Wilmington for as long as I can remember," says TRO co-founder Matt Urban. "Having TRO present our shows in partnership with this treasured community organization is an incredible opportunity." ► OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Co-founder Joe Trainor concurs. “Not only is it an honor ARTISTIC PARTNERS to perform in these spaces, but it continued from previous page allows us the flexibility to develop our productions into 'must-see' events and make them available to a wider audience.” “The Grand is all about partnerships,” says Fields. “We partner intensely throughout each season with numerous arts organizations, individual artists, and other types of business to advance our own mission and benefit the entire community. Our resident companies are even more in-depth partners since we share these stages and this wonderful building.” Tickets for all CTC, Fearless and TRO events can be purchased online at TheGrandWilmington.org, by phone at 652-5577, or in person at The Grand’s Box office, 818 N. Market St., Wilmington.

Christina Cultural Arts Center Opens with a Bustling Weekend of Art On Friday, Oct. 5, as part of Art Loop Wilmington, Christina Cultural Arts Center (CCAC) will host local artist Stephen Kingsberry’s exhibit, “Burden of Palestine,” in its Edward Loper Sr. Gallery. Kingsberry’s love for art was reinforced after his visit to Palestine in 2017. A Gallery Talk will be led by Mike Abel of Delawareans for Palestinian Human Rights on that evening at 7 p.m. Stephen Kingsberry's exhibit, “The Burden of “We’re excited to show Palestine,” will be shown through Nov. 25. Stephen’s compelling works,” said Raye Jones Avery. “It’s an exhibit that will undoubtedly draw strong responses from viewers and, hopefully, stimulate conversation and even action.” Simultaneously that evening, Christina hosts an Achievement & Scholarship Celebration at 5:30 to celebrate the organization’s mission to make the power of arts accessible to youth and announce a new scholarship campaign to honor the achievements of longtime CCAC Executive Director Jones Avery. Christina has long been known for intimate performances by acclaimed jazz and R&B artists (e.g., Gregory Porter, Delfaeyo Marsalis). Closing the weekend on Sunday, Oct. 7, the organization celebrates the launch of its music series with Live @ Christina Opening Night—a 3 p.m. debut performance by jazz/R&B duo The Baylor Project. The duo, featuring Jean Baylor and Marcus Baylor, debuted their CD The Journey in 2017. The release topped the Billboard jazz chart at Number 8 and in 2018 garnered two Grammy nominations for Best Jazz Vocal Album and Best Traditional R&B Performance. Christina will continue its Live @ Christina series on Friday, Nov. 2, with a 7:30 p.m. performance by five-time Grammynominated pianist Christian Sands. Tickets for each performance can be purchased at ccacde.org. The engagements of The Baylor Project and Christian Sands are made possible through the Jazz Touring Network program of Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Photo courtesy of Stephen Kingsberry

{ENJOY!}

WATCH

54 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo Tim Bayard

Mélomanie brings its Wilmington Series to Delaware Historical Society starting Oct. 7.

Music Fills (Mid) Market Street in a Historical Spot Delaware Historical Society (DHS) brings music to the “midMarket Street” area this season, partnering with two noted organizations—Mélomanie and Market Street Music—in a yearlong series of chamber music and jazz concerts in the splendid space of Old Town Hall. Wilmington-based Mélomanie is an ensemble known for its “provocative pairings” of early and contemporary works, while Market Street Music hosts its own diverse series of classical, jazz, folk and world music just off Rodney Square. Both organizations are excited about expanding their footprint and their audience with DHS. Mélomanie is the first of the collaborators, with a Season Launch & Concert on Sunday, Oct. 7. Their 3 p.m. performance will feature the Delaware Premiere of Hubble’s Eye, a multimedia piece for baroque flute, baroque violin, viola da gamba and harpsichord by Christopher Cook. The piece is complemented by the projection of actual photos from the Hubble Deep Space Telescope. “Hubble's Eye is inspired by the spectacular images from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope,” notes Mélomanie CoArtistic Director Tracy Richardson. “The time-traveling aspect of the images is reflected in the use of baroque instruments. What a provocative pairing, indeed.” The ensemble presents additional concerts at DHS on Dec. 7, Jan. 27, Feb. 24, March 30 and April 7. Tickets for all can be purchased at melomanie.org. Prices vary for certain performances. Market Street Music arrives with a three-part mini-series of Thursday Noontime Concerts on Nov. 1, 8 and 15, beginning at 12:30 p.m. Featured artists include the Taggart Grycky Duo, Sharon Sable & Shawn Qaissaunee, and the Copeland String Quartet with baritone Grant Youngblood. All Market Street Music performances are free to attend and are inspired by DHS’s exhibit, “First State at the Front,” which recognizes the centennial of the U.S. entry into World War I. “We’re always open to partnering with artists in our community and look forward to filling Old Town Hall with music this season,” says Karen Kegelman, advancement officer for the Delaware Historical Society. “Hosting performances allows DHS to welcome more guests to the museum and to provide added value to existing and potential members." OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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OP E N S OC TOB E R 1 9

Sw rl

rewards

club

Recline ON THE

RIVERFRONT SHOWTIMES AND TICKETS AT

www.penncinema.com 56 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

Life Itself

3

STARS µµµµµ Oscar Isaac as Will and Oilvia Wilde as Abby in Life Itself. Photo Jon Pack, courtesy of Amazon Studios

IMITATION OF LIFE Star-studded, multi-generational drama feels like a fraud By Mark Fields

W

riter-director Dan Fogelman created a sensation with his hit NBC melodrama This is Us this past season. Now Fogelman’s taking his effective storytelling gifts from the small screen to the big one with Life Itself, a film that features many traits that have made his TV show such a success. The multigenerational drama starring Oscar Isaac and Olivia Wilde has engaging, empathetic characters; a potent blend of humor and pathos; and a resonant underlying theme about the preciousness of life and the enduring power of love. Life Itself tells the intertwined stories of two families over the course of several generations. Will and Abby (Oscar Isaac and Olivia Wilde), a young married couple in New York City, are facing parenthood when life deals them an unexpected blow. Meanwhile, across the ocean in a Spanish vineyard, Javier (Sergio PerisMencheta), Isabel (Laia Costa) and Saccione (Antonio Banderas)

form an uncomfortable love triangle. The uniformly stellar cast also features Mandy Patinkin, Olivia Cooke, Jean Smart, Annette Bening, and, briefly and memorably, Samuel L. Jackson. Life Itself is not without its virtues. Fogelman certainly knows how to tell a story and especially how to create a dramatic moment. In particular, his use of flashbacks and juxtapositions of different time periods are creative and effective. I also liked that a solid chunk of this mainstream Hollywood feature was spoken in Spanish with subtitles. Federico Jusid’s lyrical score does a terrific job of capturing the distinctive milieus of the American and Spanish settings, while also deftly incorporating Bob Dylan’s song, “Make You Feel My Love” (the recurring thematic anthem) into the fabric of the entire score. Similarly, Brett Pawlak’s cinematography creates vivid and contrasting moods. OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH IMITATION OF LIFE continued from previous page

Department of Music Faculty Jazz

Monday, October 15, 8:00 p.m.

Joyce Chen, Harpsichord

Friday, October 19, 8:00 p.m.

Christiana Winds Goes All-American

Monday, October 22, 8:00 p.m.

Symphonic Band

Wednesday, October 24, 8:00 p.m.

University Singers and Concert Choir

Friday, October 26, 8:00 p.m.

Chorale

So why did I find Life Itself so incredibly aggravating while others in the theater around me were quietly sobbing? Because, while this movie is quite moving at times and mostly well done, it is also so over the top, so determined to make its point, so manipulative of its audience that it never feels real. Life Itself is an imitation of life. It is, as I experienced it, a cheat. Granted, all movies are manipulative. Filmmakers use every tool in their kit to lure the viewer to a certain endpoint. That, ultimately, is the storytelling craft. But the very best, the ones who transcend craftmanship and achieve artistry, are the ones who reveal their intentions gradually, subtly, leading you to their inevitable conclusion without your realizing that’s where you were heading from the outset. You are never aware of the man behind the curtain. Unfortunately, Fogelman doesn’t seem to trust us. He has made a film that so obviously connects the dots for us that we don’t have to make an effort. Consequently, when I was finally led to the moral at the end of his story, I was not genuinely moved. In fact, I was more than a little perturbed. I would have been more satisfied with a movie that didn’t try so very hard to hit every point. Also opening in October: Bradley Cooper directs and stars in the latest remake of A Star is Born, co-starring with Lady Gaga, Oct. 5; Ryan Gosling plays Neil Armstrong in First Man, directed by La La Land’s Damien Chazelle, Oct. 12; The Hate U Give, a poignant drama that explores America’s racial divide, with Amandla Stenberg and Regina Hall, Oct. 19; and also Oct. 19, Jamie Lee Curtis revisits the horrors of Haddonfield 40 years later in Halloween.

Saturday, October 27, 8:00 p.m.

Percussion Ensemble

Monday, October 29, 8:00 p.m.

John David Smith, horn, and Julie Nishimura, piano

November 1 - 11

Wednesday, October 31, 8:00 p.m.

Chamber Orchestra

Featuring the best American and International independent feature, documentary, and short films.

Friday, November 2, 8:00 p.m.

Tiger Lily Music: Works by Women, African Americans, and Latinos

• 11 days of films • Online ticket sales in real time • 3 screening locations • Rush ticket sales at the door • 6 festival pass levels

Monday, November 5, 8:00 p.m.

Still Breathing Contemporary Music Ensemble

Wednesday, November 7, 8:00 p.m.

Visit our Cinema Art Theater throughout the year for great independent films and more!

Schola Cantorum At the DSO

Cinema Art Theater

Friday, November 9, 7:30 p.m.

Lawrence Stomberg, cello, and Julie Nishimura, piano

Home of independent films and more!

Friday, November 9, 8:00 p.m.

MUSIC.UDEL.EDU

For more info, visit rehobothfilm.com or call 302-645-9095

17701 Dartmouth Drive Dartmouth Plaza · Lewes, DE RBFS is Standards for Excellence® accredited, having met all the requirements for best practices in nonprofit management.

This organization is supported, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com.

58 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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JULY 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KRESTON WINE & SPIRITS

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60 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

FALL SOCIAL FOR A CAUSE

SIPS

Here's what's pouring HEALTHY-ISH HAPPY HOUR

O

n Thursday, Oct. 11, the Polly Drummond McGlynn's Pub location will sponsor a happy hour fundraiser for Healthy Food for Healthy Kids (HFHK). The foundation works with schools to start programs where students grow vegetable gardens and incorporate lessons about gardening and healthy foods into their science curriculum. The happy hour runs from 5-9 p.m. Sit at the bar and an automatic 10 percent of your bill will be donated to HFHK. If you sit in the dining area, bring in a flyer for 20 percent of the sale to be donated to HFHK. For those who do not have a flyer, print one out by going to eventbrite.com and search HFHK.

‘MOBEER MONDAYS!’

E

very Monday through New Year’s Eve, Midnight Oil Brewing Company hosts a hop-filled event, “MObeer MOndays.” Guests will be able to try a brand-new beer from a small batch of experimental brews from 7-10 p.m. Midnight Oil is located at 674 Pencader Dr., Newark. Go to midnightoilbrewing.com for more information.

I

n the mood for a wine and dine night? Head to the Chateau Bu-De Vineyard and Winery in Chesapeake City, Md., from 6-9 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 12, for Mid-Atlantic Foundation for Safety and Education’s Fall Social. There will be a tour of the winery and an opportunity to taste some of the locally made wines. After the tour, guests are invited to partake in a dinner buffet followed by a coffee bar. The event also will include raffles and an auction, with all proceeds going to support child safety education. For ticket prices and to reserve a spot, go to midatlantic.aaa.com.

DTC HOSTS WINE FEAST & AUCTION

L

ooking for a chance to “wine down” after a long, hard week at work? The Delaware Theatre Company (DTC) hosts its annual Wine Feast & Auction on Friday, Nov. 2, at the Chase Center on the Riverfront. Proceeds go toward the DTC’s education programs and main stage productions this year. The event will include wine tastings as well as silent and live auctions for the most exquisite wines. The event also includes live entertainment to celebrate DTC’s 40th anniversary season. The evening starts at 6 p.m., and tickets start at $75. For ticketing information and more, call 594-1100 or go to delawaretheatre.org.

BLUE SOUL FEST

B

lue Earl Brewing will host its fourth annual Blue Soul Fest on Saturday, Oct. 13, from 12-7 p.m. at the brewery in Smyrna. The event will celebrate all things craft beer and feature live music and food trucks. Tickets are $25. The brewery will also be releasing a beer specially made for Blue Soul Fest, and t-shirts and glassware will be on sale. Go to blueearlbrewing.com for more.

VENDEMMIA WINE AND FOOD FEST IS OCT. 28

T

he 15th annual Vendemmia da Vinci Wine and Food Festival is set for Sunday, Oct. 28, from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Wilmington/Christiana Hilton. The festival features four local celebrity chefs who will be making delicious food to sample with the wine provided. There also will be a silent auction with live music provided by Steve Silicato. The event helps support the da Vinci Society of Delaware, a non-profit organization that provides scholarships and grants, and promotes the Italian language and culture. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit societadavinci.org/vendemmia.

KENNETT BREWFEST SET FOR OCT. 13

T

his year’s Kennett Brewfest, on Saturday, Oct. 13, will feature more than 90 local and regional craft beers. The event, which runs from 1:30 to 6 p.m. at Genesis HealthCare on Broad Street in Kennett Square, will include music and a variety of food and merchandise. Funds will help support the Kennett Square Historical Society and its efforts to maintain the beauty of the town, which is more than 100 years old. This year, the brewfest will offer a connoisseur ticket that allows early admission to the event at noon. General admission begins at 1:30 p.m., and there is also a ticket option for designated drivers. For information and to purchase tickets, visit kennettbrewfest.com. OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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CHARCOAL HOUSE & SALOON

Spend the

HOLIDAYS

with HHG

www.HARRYSHOSPITALITYGROUP.com

w

October

Entertainment Schedule

EVERY MONDAY: Showtime Trivia EVERY TUESDAY: Jefe, DJ Andrew Hugh & DJ Niknak

EVERY THURSDAY: DJ Willoughby EVERY FRIDAY: EDM DJ Dance Party

Join Us for the 3rd Annual Sunday, Oct. 14

LIVE BANDS!

All Proceeds Benefit Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition

THURSDAY: 10/25-Swift Technique 10/31-Tweed FRIDAY: SATURDAY:

8AM Registration/9AM Start Register at Races2Run.com Huge After-Party Following the Race Pink Nachos and $5 Grapefruit Crushes!

Day!

$1 from every purchase goes to Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition during the month of October

10/5- The Relatives 10/12-Party Fowl 10/19-Fish Out of Water 10/26-Cherry Crush

Wed- 10/10: The Unforgiven (Deer Park Goes Pink Pre-Party)

10/6-Last Night Out 10/13- Stereo Giants 10/20-Chorduroy 10/27-Hot Bed

Football Specials Are Back! During Every Pro Football Game:

$7.99 Wings • $7.99 Nachos •$5.99 Tots • $8.99 Coors Light & Yuengling Pitchers •$12.99 Blue Moon Pitchers MONDAYS ½ Price Appetizers ALL DAY!

TUESDAYS ½ Price Burgers ALL DAY! $4.50 Double LIT’s

WEDNESDAYS - MEXICAN NIGHT! ½ Price Nachos & Quesadillas ALL DAY! $3.25 Dos Equis Lager & Margaritas • $2 Tacos $15.99 9oz NY Strip Steak All Day

THURSDAYS ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Wings (5pm-Close) ½ Price Burgers (11:30am-3pm) • $3.25 Rail Drinks

Next time you stop in don’t forget to sign up for our Ashby Hospitality Groups VIP Loyalty Program! 302.369.9414 | 108 West Main Street, Newark | www.deerparktavern.com

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62 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

Spirited Our recommendation from an area pro

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TAVERN & GRILL

WATCH THE EAGLES and other NFL games On Our 8 Large-screen HD TVs on Sunday & Monday Night Football!

From Joe Renaud, Beverage Director, Home Grown Café

PIMM’S CUP

Originating in England, this gin drink is packed with flavor and leaves you wanting more. Featuring all things fresh, it gives flavors that quench while tickling the taste buds. We know you’ll love it, and when the winter comes it will give you something to come back to when you're missing the warmer days. Things you’ll need: • 1 oz. Hendrick's Gin • 1 oz. Pimm's liqueur • 5 mint leaves • 3 lemon wedges • 3 cucumber slices • Ginger beer To make: In a mixing tin add the cucumber, mint and lemon wedges. Muddle all ingredients thoroughly and then add your gin and Pimm’s. Add ice and shake well. Strain into a glass with fresh ice and top with ginger beer. For garnish, cut a cucumber wheel and a sprig of mint. After all this you can now sit back and enjoy! Cheers

DURING THE GAMES, ENJOY: $3 Miller Lites • $6 Tall Vodka Drinks $1 OFF Terrapin and Other Craft Drafts $3 Beef or Shrimp Tacos $1 Wings - Choice of Buffalo, BBQ or Thai sauce $4 12oz. Specialty Beers

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BBCTAVERNANDGRILL.COM OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Check Out Our Craft Beers! presents 8th Annual

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64 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

Take it from this group—the Dover event is loads of fun. Photo Abby Shepard, courtesy of Kent County Tourism Office

a state salute Delaware Beer, Wine & Spirits Festival set for Oct. 13

d

elaware’s craft alcohol producers take center stage on Saturday, Oct. 13, at the 9th Annual Delaware Beer, Wine & Spirits Festival at the Delaware Agricultural Museum and Village in Dover. The 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. event is a long-standing Kent County tradition and is the only statewide festival that features the full roster of Delaware producers—from beer to wine to spirits to mead. “This is a tremendous opportunity to celebrate the industry and showcase all that is produced in our state," says John Doerfler, Sales & Event manager for Kent County Tourism. There are a few notable changes for 2018, including returning the event to Dover after several years at the Delaware State Fairgrounds in Harrington. Kent County Tourism has historically managed the event. This year, Event Allies, a Wilmington-based event management company, will assume the role. Event Allies produces a host of Delaware events, including the Wilmington Grand Prix,

Separation Day, City Restaurant Week, Newark Food & Brew Festival, River Towns Ride & Festival and Wilmington Beer Week. Also new this year is a VIP ticket ($79), which includes early access (11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.), exclusive and unlimited tastings, premium free parking, catered lunch and a glass souvenir cup. General admission tickets are $50 and include unlimited tastings and a souvenir cup. Live music will be provided by bands representing various parts of the state, including Lyric Drive, Clifford Keith Band and Element K. Other features include free parking, food trucks, homegrown products, festival games and guided tours of the Agricultural Museum and Village. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit DEBeerWineSpirits.com. — Out & About OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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OCTOBER MUSIC at Kelly’s Logan House Now featuring early shows from 7-10 p.m. every Friday night with original local music. #livemusicforearlybirds 10/05 – Terretta Storm/Outcalls 10/12 – Blues Reincarnation Project/Calla Bere 10/19 – Xtra Alltra 10/26 – Hot Breakfast/Sweet Leda

Look for these great bands upstairs!

FRIDAY, 10/05

Shotgun Betty - 10:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, 10/06 Photo Elias Muhammad

Click - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 10/12

Cherry Crush Band - 10:30 p.m.

LISTEN

TUNED IN Not-to-be-missed music news EARTH RADIO’S DEBUT EP RELEASE CONCERT

Indie folk band Earth Radio has set a release party for its debut EP, We Built a Mountain, at 1984 in downtown Wilmington on Friday, Oct. 19. , at 9 p.m. Formed last year, Earth Radio has played its original tunes at a multitude of Delaware events during the past year. The fourmember band consists of two folk singers, Joanna Osborne and guitarist Jani Duerr, bassist Jay Jolly and jazz-rooted drummer Dan Lord. The self-described “high-energy, USDA-certified organic, grass-fed, cage-free, Delaware-bred” indie-folk band has played several festivals over the summer, including Delaware Pride Festival, Delaware Weedstock and Dewgrass Music Festival. Their music is currently available on Spotify and Bandcamp.com. The party begins at 9 p.m. and is open to adults 21 and older. Admission is $5. For more information, go to earthradioband.com.

SATURDAY, 10/13

Big Rumble Twist - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 10/19

Mega and The Bad Larrys - 10:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, 10/20

Stereo Giants - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 10/26

The Relatives - 10:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, 10/27

Chorduroy - 10 p.m. 1701 Delaware Ave. Wilmington, DE 19806 (302) 652-9493

LOGANHOUSE.COM Bands and times subject to change.

MUSIC SCHOOL OF DELAWARE SETS OPENING NIGHT

The Music School of Delaware will host its first concert of the 2018-19 season with an orchestra performance on Wednesday, Oct. 3. “Opening Night - The Magic of Music” will run from 7-9 p.m. at the school, 4101 Washington St.. The performance will be a combination of the school’s musical faculty and guest performances from orchestras across the region. Additionally, the school is bringing back free monthly open mic nights on the second Thursday of each month, beginning Oct. 11 through June of 2019. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for sign ups and performances begin at 7. Professional-quality equipment can be provided for performers. Pizza and beverages will be available for sale. For more information, visit musicschoolofdelaware.org.

66 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Macarons 2.0 Photo Stephen Tolton

with Michele Mitchell

Sunday October 14th 2pm-4pm

REHOBOTH ALE HOUSE TUNES

Continuing Rehoboth Ale House’s 2018 music lineup, special guests Universal Funk Order (UFO) perform on Saturday, Oct. 13, from 7-10 p.m. at the Ale House, 15 Wilmington Ave., Rehoboth Beach. UFO is a popular Newark-based funk band, started in 2011, that has played at many Delaware festivals and bars. For more information, visit rehobothalehouse.com/entertainment.

www.tonicbargrille.com or 302.777.2040 for reservations $40 per person

DELAWARE’S SPOOKY SOUNDS

Celebrate Halloween with two adult-only music events later this month. On Friday, Oct. 26, Halftime Sports Bar & Music Venue in Newark will host an unusual Halloween party—Halftime HallowSCREAM, featuring a lineup of metal rock bands that includes Lost Continent, Through Extinction, Ashes to Vanity, Gravelord and Virtue of Lions. It will be a 21 and older costume event with a $10 cover charge, starting at 8 p.m. For more information, call 369-3205. On Saturday, Oct. 27, at 7 p.m., 1984 will host a Halloween party, Rawktoberfest. This tribute event will feature local bands, all in costume, covering the songs and signature style of legendary acts such as No Doubt, The Cure, Pearl Jam and The Damned. Seasonal and pumpkin beers will be available, and a food truck will be on hand. Admission is $7. For more information, call 384-6479.

THE KING OF SLYDECO VISITS THE QUEEN

limited seating available

111 W. 11th St. Wilmington, DE 19801 Pumpkin Beer Flights October 24th-31st

The King and Queen are getting back together. Sonny Landreth, a well known blues musician known for his slide guitar playing and nicknamed the “King of Slydeco,” will perform at The Queen, 500 N. Market St., Wilmington, at 8 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 26. The show, sponsored by Big Noise Presents and WXPN, is reminiscent of April 1, 2011 when Landreth was the first artist to perform at the newly renovated Queen. The Greg Sover Band will also play that night. For more information or to buy tickets to the show, visit thequeenwilmington.com. Tickets cost $28.

OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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HAVE YOU HEARD OF SOMETHING?

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68 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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PLAY

L-R: Queeny DelRosano, Gabriel Vincent, Christel Bushra and Brandon Dougherty enjoy a little bar-hopping in costume. Photo Anthony Santoro

A NIGHT WITH CHARACTER—LOTS OF THEM 39th Halloween Loop set for Saturday, Oct. 27 he Halloween Loop is almost 40. In other words, we’re old enough to know better. But it’s tough to shake old habits, so forgive us if we fail to act our age on this one night of the year. Or, act like we’re someone else, say…Donald Trump, Prince Harry or any of the Kardashians. Wilmington may be the place to be somebody, but on Halloween Loop night it’s the place to be somebody else. Ten venues are set for this citywide costumed pub crawl. The official start is 8 p.m. and everyone 21 years or older is invited. In fact, those under age 21 can watch the show from the sidewalk or street. The costumes are quite entertaining. “In terms of annual nightlife events in Wilmington, nothing really compares to the Halloween Loop,” says Jim Miller of Out & About Magazine, the presenting sponsor of the event. “Three things make it such a supremely successful series: longevity, draw and spectacle.” This year’s Loop lineup includes Catherine Rooney’s, Chelsea Tavern, Dead Presidents, Ernest & Scott Taproom, Gallucio’s Café, Grotto Pizza, Kelly’s Logan House, Timothy’s Riverfront, Trolley Oyster House and Trolley Tap House. A onetime $10 cover gains you a wristband that is your admission to all participating Loop venues. This year’s Loop Series continues its partnership with Lyft, the nationwide ride-on-demand company. A special code will be printed on all wristbands, entitling attendees to a free or

T

discounted trip (depending on their destination) on their first use only. It’s one discount per caller, but if you work as a team your group can utilize Lyft all night for minimal cost. There is no official starting point to the Loop. You simply select the nightspot you’d like to visit first, pay the cover charge, and receive your wristband. Here are a few other Halloween Loop tips: • Costumes are strongly recommended. This is a costumed bar crawl. Many venues have prizes. In fact, the Loop Patrol will be awarding on-the-spot prizes for costumes that catch their eye. • Make it easy on yourself and have Lyft pick you up at your house. Then you’ll never have to worry about driving or parking. • Wear a comfortable costume. Make sure it allows you to see where you are walking and use the rest room with ease. And make sure it doesn’t cause you to become overheated. • Get there early. Lines begin forming by 9 p.m. • If you don’t use Lyft, designate a sober driver or plan to stay in the city for the evening at a friend’s place or one of the city’s five hotels. There are also several complimentary Last Call Lots where you can leave your car overnight and pick it up the next day. For a list of venues, Last Call Lots and updates on the Halloween Loop, visit outandaboutnow.com. — Out & About OCTOBER 2017 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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70 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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PLAY PLAY

Flying High

While not exactly Cirque du Soleil, Wilmington’s Ascend Flow Arts helps build students’ conditioning and confidence By Dillon McLaughlin Photos by Brianna Wendt

A

Adriene Howle performs with aerial silks at the Ascend Flow Arts studio.

scend Flow Arts occupies a small, unassuming building at 10 Meco Circle in Wilmington, a few turns off Maryland Avenue. It’s obscure, known only to a select few. But for those determined to learn the aerial arts, Ascend offers a unique opportunity to improve their physical fitness and mental well-being, as well as join a dedicated group of supportive hobbyists and performers. It was founded five years ago by Brianna Wendt, a 29-year-old dynamo who directs all activities, ensures Ascend is at the forefront of aerial arts safety, knows her students by name, and often handles the front desk herself. The students and her instructors make her long days worthwhile, she says. “I love knowing when I come to work, I’m surrounded by beautiful people.” Wendt prefers to use the term “aerial arts” to describe her passion. It’s simple, and it encompasses the activities offered. The main three “aerials” are the silks, hoops, and trapeze, and all three apparatuses hang from the ceiling. The silks allow performers to twist, flip and roll in knots of their own making, while the adventurous can build controlled “drops,” where the student rapidly unrolls in the silk and

catches herself in a knot or wrap lower in the fabric. Hoops focus more on using muscle for suspension, and trapeze requires skills closer to the spinning and swinging motions of Olympic gymnastics. A fourth class, which doesn’t necessarily fall under the aerial arts, is Acro Yoga, a ground-based fusion of yoga and aerial arts principles.

Marketing Challenge

Wendt admits the term “aerial arts” has problems, since it’s not something anyone ever thinks to Google. It’s that lack of searchability and a common vernacular that forms one of the main difficulties of marketing her business. When she tries to explain her studio to people, she says, “No one has a clue what I’m talking about most of the time.” She’ll sometimes fall back on “a version of Cirque du Soleil,” since a lot of the equipment used in those performances can be found in her studio. But, she says, “It’s hard to compare yourself to something like that,” noting that most people get intimidated at the mention of the world-famous act. ► OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Wendt herself is an example of the value the aerial arts can bring to someone’s life. FLYING HIGH “When I was younger, I was just depressed. I never continued from previous page moved, and movement is amazing for your mental health,” she says. Her introduction to what is now her vocation came late in her time at Middletown High School. She saw aerial arts acts on TV and knew they were something she wanted to pursue. It took a few years, but she began taking classes at the Philadelphia School of Circus Arts. At an hour’s drive, it was the closest school she could find. In her early 20s, after a few years of training, she became an instructor. She bought a 20x24x24-foot wooden outdoor rig with one rigging point that could comfortably accommodate 10 students and set it up in the backyard of her Wilmington home. It worked for a while, but she soon found her students wanted more. Mainly, they wanted to spend more time practicing and wanted to bring friends for classes. “My students begged me to get a [bigger] place,” she says, citing their complaints of losing hard-earned strength over winter breaks, when Wendt had to break down her outdoor rig and put it in storage. She went looking for a location and found a surprisingly cut-throat leasing world. Buildings with the square footage, heights, and open space necessary for an aerial arts studio are rare, and landlords demanded steep monthly rents, 15-plus years of commitment, or both. She searched for nine months before finding the building on Meco Circle. “I ran across this place and met the owner. He’s actually my neighbor,” Wendt says. “I’m really glad I found him because [our lease] is very low risk. I love this place.”

Gathering Students

Wendt depends largely on word of mouth to get students in the door. Jackelyn Maloney, now an instructor, first heard about Ascend from two friends. A yoga instructor, Maloney wanted to try a class right away, but her job had her working odd hours. After a year of scheduling conflicts, Maloney found a day off and signed up for her first class in fabric and hoops. “I felt that I’d gotten so much out of the first session, I kept committing,” Maloney says. “Eventually, I wound up doing a few [classes] and ended up teaching. I really felt a wonderful pull into this community and art form.” Unanimously, Ascend Flow Arts students say they experience skyrocketing confidence. “I have gotten so much stronger physically and mentally,” says Maloney. “I see how empowering it is when something clicks. It makes me so excited as a teacher and a peer.” While students and instructors spread the word about the unique fitness class that strengthened them emotionally as well as physically, some students have come to Ascend through the internet. “I poked around online and lo and behold, an aerial studio had opened in my own backyard,” says Kristina Millionta-MacPherson, another instructor. “At the end of the 90-minute [intro] class, I was exhausted, thrilled, and had even done my first drop on trapeze.” Whole families have discovered Ascend. The Rissolo family turned the intro class into a family outing. “It’s very out of the box,” says Susan Rissolo. “It’s like gymnastics and dance and climbing and weight lifting all rolled into one.” After the intro class, Rissolo’s daughters, Megan, 12, and Emily, 10, stuck around for more classes and are now on their third six-week session. They love it for different reasons. Megan enjoys the support in class and at practice. “If you need help,” she says, “there’s always someone [around].” Emily takes her lessons to school: “When I bring out the mats at recess, we do ground tricks and I teach new tricks to my friends.” Millionta-MacPherson found her acrophobia melting away as she became proficient in aerial silks. “I’ve learned all the theory behind [silks] really well,” she says. “Learning those details gives me control over my fear, and as long as I can hold onto something, I’m not afraid of heights anymore.” Changes are noticeable in the younger students as well. Susan saw new strength in her daughters soon after their first classes. “Our 12-year-old isn’t really into sports,” she says. “[But] after the first class, she decided she had found [hers]. Our 10-year-old has really gotten more confidence and is excited to show off her moves in the kids’ showcase.”

Building an Audience

Ascend’s performance team has also helped spread the word. The team has been featured at a gala for the Kalmar Nyckel, at local renaissance fairs, and at the Ice Cream Festival in Rockwood Park. Wendt says one of her favorite performances was for local blacksmith Ellen Durkan, the owner of Iron Maiden Forge.

72 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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The NFL Season IS FINALLY HERE!

AND STANLEY’S IS STILL THE PLACE TO WATCH! Win a 2 year lease on a NEW Ford Fusion or Nissan Altima

Courtesy of the

Kristina Milionta, Ascend Flow Arts staff member, performs with aerial silks.

“I was looking for local performers to open my [Iron Maiden runway show], and they were perfect,” Durkan says. “I [had already] organized this event, from the metal to having a friend compose and play 50 minutes of original music. I wanted to add something else awesome to the event. It’s always stunning and impressive to watch them. I gave them music and said, ‘do your thing,’ and it was beautiful.” Ascend also has regular showcases in the home studio. Students get performance opportunities at the end of their classes and there’s interactive theater, with a unique twist on traditional stage plays. “[Interactive theater shows] have a storyline and we try and play with the crowd. We [also] do aerial bartending,” Wendt says. “I have somebody in a hammock or a sling fabric who serves drinks upside down.” There are plans to start booking more outside performances, particularly weddings. Ascend’s team performed at a former student’s ceremony and Wendt knew having photos from that and other receptions would show off the talents of her performers, the beauty of the aerial arts, and the unique entertainment Ascend brings to upscale events. “Once you get those photos, everybody wants you for their wedding,” Wendt says. Normally, to find the kind of opportunity Ascend offers, students would have to travel to cities like Baltimore, Philadelphia or New York. Having a studio like it in a city the size of Wilmington is an anomaly. Yet here it is, bringing more and more people into the aerial arts, a community that’s vibrant, energetic and welcoming.

Current Classes

Adults can test their mettle in the Introduction to Aerials Workshop, a single class that explains the basics of aerial fabric, static trapeze and hoop. Both Wendt and Ascend’s website stress that no experience is necessary for this class. The other aerial courses are Fabric/Hoop and Fabric/Trapeze, both with four levels of difficulty, each level taking six weeks to complete. Each builds on what comes before it, and, again, no experience is necessary. ►

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PLAY FLYING HIGH continued from previous page

PEOPLE ATE IT UP! THE FARMER AND THE CHEF Presented by

BEST DISH OVERALL Chef Michael Dikeman, Grain Craft Bar and Kitchen partnered with Powers Farm

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Chef Sherm Porter, Sherm’s Catering partnered with Ramsey’s Farm

On the ground, Acro Yoga is a six-week class that builds strength and communication by fusing yoga and partnered acrobatics. The yoga aspects teach students different poses, while the acrobatics instruction enables them to sequence poses to create flowing stunts. Principles learned here can be used to build aerial skills. A new offering is Acro Flow. It starts with acrobatic basics like handstands, cartwheels, rolls and splits, then brings in dance techniques to form more acrobatic Staffer Jen Kroon performs on static trapeze. movement. It promises a bit more active movement than Acro Yoga, as well as more balanced fitness and more emphasis on building muscles needed for aerial work. No matter the class, Ascend’s instructors ensure that the environment is friendly and supportive. “We have a pretty eclectic student base,” says Millionta-MacPherson. “People you might not otherwise meet become cheerleaders for your progress. Maybe part of it is that when you struggle along with someone and you achieve milestones on your aerial journey, you become part of something special together.” For more information on joining a class or workshop, visit ascendflowarts.com and use the contact form on Ascend’s site, or call 998-2985. Upcoming appearances by Ascend Flow Arts students and artists include Ascend’s Cirque Nevermore on Monday, Oct. 15, at the Ascend studio.

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74 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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PLAY

WHERE TO WATCH THE GAME Autumn brings college football and intriguing NFL action back to a bar near you. Because of the multitude of options—number of TVs, choice of beers on tap, best food—we’ve come up with this directory to guide you through the selection process. Compiled by Cullen Robinson & Jacob Orledge

8TH & UNION KITCHEN 801 N. Union St., Wilmington; 654-9780 8thandunion.com Number of TVs: 5 Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 38 Crowd Favorites: Half-price burgers, tacos, appetizers, and $1.25 oysters.

CHELSEA TAVERN 821 N. Market St., Wilmington; 482-3333 chelseatavern.com Number of TVs: 4 Beers on Tap: 31, Bottled Beers: 190 Crowd Favorites: Wood burning oven pizza, Chelsea cheeseburger, and BBQ pork nachos.

COLUMBUS INN 2216 Pennsylvania Ave., Wilmington; 571-1492 www.columbusinn.net Number of TVs: 5 (and a projector screen) Beers on Tap: 8, Bottled Beers: 28 Crowd Favorites: Lobster fried rice, filet sandwich, and signature crab cakes.

DEAD PRESIDENTS PUB & RESTURANT 108 W. Main St., Newark; 369-9414 deerparktavern.com Number of TVs: 21 Beers on Tap: 22, Bottled Beers: 31 Crowd Favorites: Wings, mix combo, and nachos.

BBC TAVERN & GRILL 4019 Kennett Pike, Greenville; 655-3785 bbctavernandgrill.com Number of TVs: 7 Beers on Tap: 15, Bottled Beers: 60-75 Crowd Favorites: Nachos, caprese salad, house-made meatloaf, and BBC Burger.

BIG FISH GRILL 720 Justison St., Wilmington; 652-3474 bigfishriverfront.com

DEER PARK TAVERN 108 W. Main St., Newark; 369-9414 deerparktavern.com Number of TVs: 21 Beers on Tap: 22, Bottled Beers: 31 Crowd Favorites: Wings, mix combo, and nachos.

DELAWARE PARK

BUFFALO WILD WINGS

777 Delaware Park Blvd., Wilmington; 994-6700 delawarepark.com Number of TVs: at least 37 at each location, including many 100-inch screens and one 150-incher Beers on Tap: 5-6, Bottled Beers: 15 Three bars – Club 3, The Cove, and the Sports Bar – all featuring plenty of pro football action plus the sports lottery. Crowd Favorites: Flame-broiled cheeseburgers, dollar hot dogs, cheese pizzas from Picciottis, wing zings, jalapeño crab fritters, crab fries, crab cakes and lobster.

Multiple locations: Bear, Christiana, Dover, Middletown, Newark, Rehoboth buffalowildwings.com

ERNEST & SCOTT TAPROOM

Number of TVs: 9 Beers on Tap: 7, Bottled Beers: 26 Crowd Favorites: Fresh, chef-inspired seafood dishes, large outdoor patio and lounge on the Riverfront.

Number of TVs: 42 Beers on Tap: 24, Bottled Beers: 18 (Features sports lottery at Bear, Dover and Middletown locations) Crowd Favorites: Boneless or traditional wings in any of 16 signature seasonings or sauces.

902 N. Market St., Wilmington; 384-8113 ernestandscott.com Number of TVs: 11 Beers on Tap: 26, Bottled Beers: 34 Crowd Favorites: Blackened mahi tacos, loaded fries and burgers. ► OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Join Us for the 3rd Annual

Sunday, Oct. 14

8AM Registration/9AM Start Register at Races2Run.com

Huge After-Party Following the Race

Pink Nachos and $5 Grapefruit Crushes! $1 from every purchase goes to Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition during the month of October.

Enjoy Our Great Specials

Next time you stop in, don’t forget to sign up for our Ashby Hospitality Groups VIP Loyalty Program!

During Every Pro Football Game!

$7.99 Wings •$7.99 Nachos • $5.99 Tots $8.99 Coors Light & Yuengling Pitchers • $12.99 Blue Moon Pitchers Every Thursday night Pro Football game: PIG SKIN PIG ROAST!

Free BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwiches during the game!

108 Peoples Plaza (Corner of Rtes. 40 & 896) | Newark, DE | 302-834-6661 8 Polly Drummond Shopping Center | Newark, DE | 302-738-7814 800 North State Street | Dover, DE | 302-674-0144

Be our friend on Facebook!

www.mcglynnspub.com

STOP IN FOR SUBS, STEAKS, & MEATBALLS FOR YOUR FOOTBALL TAILGATE PARTY! Celebrating 60 Years!

Casapulla’s SUB SHOP “Home of the Classic Italian Sub” 3rd Generation Owned & Operated!

HEAT & EAT

Our Party Trays & Lunch-Meat Trays Are GREAT For Family Reunions, Parties & Special Events

Featuring: MEATBALLS, SAUSAGE & PEPPERS, And STUFFED SHELL TRAYS SUBS • STEAKS • BURGERS MEATBALLS • SAUSAGES NAPOLETAN AND MORE!

514 CASAPULLA AVE. • ELSMERE

(302) 994-5934

76 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FAMOUS TAVERNS Seven locations: Polly Drummond, New Castle, Hockessin, and two in Newark and two in Wilmington famoustaverns.com Number of TVs: 12-15 Beers on Tap: 8, Bottled Beers: 10 Crowd Favorites: Surround sound and full lineup of wine and spirits.

GALLUCIO’S 1709 Lovering Ave., Wilmington; 655-3689 gallucios-de.com Number of TVs: 8 Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 15 Crowd Favorites: Pomodoro pizza, California turkey Ruben, sautéed seafood medley, stromboli, and homemade lasagna.

GRAIN CRAFT BAR + KITCHEN Newark, Summit North and Kennett Square, Pa. meetatgrain.com Number of TVs: 12 Beers on Tap: 24, Bottled Beers: 60 Crowd Favorites: Fried pickles, street tacos, and Cubano.

GROTTO PIZZA 16 locations in Delaware grottopizza.com Number of TVs: 15-25 Beers on Tap: 6-14, Bottled Beers: 16-22 Crowd Favorites: Boneless wings, appetizer combo, and broccoli bites.

IRON HILL BREWERY & RESTAURANT Wilmington and Newark ironhillbrewery.com Number of TVs: 4 Beers on Tap: 12-20, Bottled Beers: 7-9 Crowd Favorites: Cheesesteak eggrolls, voodoo chicken pizza, crab cake sandwich, petite filet mignon, scallops, and house nachos.

KELLY’S LOGAN HOUSE 1701 Delaware Ave., Wilmington; 652-9493 loganhouse.com Number of TVs: 18, including a big screen Beers on Tap: 22, Bottled Beers: 18 Crowd Favorites: Buffalo wings, chili nachos, and dirty bird grilled cheese. OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KID SHELLEEN’S 14th & Scott, Wilmington; 658-4600 kidshelleens.com Number of TVs: 8 Beers on Tap: 13, Bottled Beers: 50 Crowd Favorites: Shelleen’s nachos, buffalo wings, and chicken quesadilla.

MCGLYNN’S PUB Three locations: Polly Drummond, People’s Plaza, Dover mcglynnspub.com Number of TVs: 22 with NFL Package, all games all week Beers on Tap: 24, Bottled Beers: 40+ Crowd Favorites: Wings, nachos, burgers, and prime rib.

MEXICAN POST 3100 Naaman’s Rd., Wilmington; 478-3939 mexicanpost.com Number of TVs: 5 Beers on Tap: 5, Bottled Beers: 24 Crowd Favorites: Fajitas, chimichangas, and nachos.

PIKE CREEK PUB 4809 Limestone Rd., Wilmington; 235-8368 facebook.com/PikeCreekPub Number of TVs: 12 Beers on Tap: 8, Bottled Beers: 18 Crowd Favorites: All draft beers $3, Bud Light, Miller Lite, and Coronas are $3.

ROUTE 2 TAVERN 4305 Kirkwood Hwy, Wilmington; 256-0803, facebook.com/route2tavern Number of TVs: 15 Beers on Tap: 12, Bottled Beers: 15 Crowd Favorites: All draft beers are $3, Bud Light, Miller Lite, and Coronas are $3.

STANLEY’S TAVERN 2038 Foulk Rd., Wilmington; 475-1887 stanleys-tavern.com Number of TVs: 40 Beers on Tap: 25, Bottled Beers: 66 Crowd Favorites: Award-winning baby back ribs, wings, and tavern nachos.(Also features sports lottery) 78 OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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STITCH HOUSE BREWERY 829 N. Market St., Wilmington; 250-4280 stitchhousebrewery.com Number of TVs: 9 Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 50 Crowd Favorites: Sunday brunch, sandwich board and burgers.

STONE BALLOON ALE HOUSE 115 E. Main St., Newark; 266-8111 stoneballoon.com Number of TVs: 5 Beers on Tap: 17, Bottled Beers: 50 Crowd Favorites: Beef & bacon lollipops, keg fries, chicken gyro dumplings, tuna poke and short rib pot roast.

TONIC BAR & GRILLE 111 W. 11th Street, Wilmington; 777-2040, tonicbargrille.com Number of TVs: 15 Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 24 Crowd Favorites: Crab cakes, fried calamari, and lobster tail.

TROLLEY SQUARE OYSTER HOUSE 1707 Delaware Ave, Wilmington; 384-7310, trolleysquareoysterhouse.com Number of TVs: 16 Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 26 Crowd Favorites: Live music, open until 1am daily, Best of Delaware winner for lobster roll, large raw bar, $1 drafts on football Sundays and Old Bay dry rub wings.

TWO STONES PUB Three locations: Newark (294-1890), Wilmington; (439-3231) & Kennett Square (610-444-3940), twostonespub.com Number of TVs: 6-10 Beers on Tap: 20-25, Bottled Beers: 40-90 at each location Crowd Favorites: Fry piles, hog wings, and chicken wings.

WASHINGTON STREET ALE HOUSE

HOLIDAYS MADE SIMPLE. REALLY. We know you have a full plate for the holiday season. So we’ve made it easier. Indulge in one of our complete holiday meals with all the trimmings. Or, if you’re planning a holiday party, relax and let Janssen’s catering do all the work!

1206 Washington St., Wilmington; 658-2537, www.wsalehouse.com Number of TVs: 9 Beers on Tap: 24, Bottled Beers: 20 Crowd Favorites: Draft beer selection and Sunday brunch with a build-your-own bloody mary bar.

WWW.JANSSENSMARKET.COM 3801 KENNETT PIKE, GREENVILLE, DE 302.654.9941

OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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th annual the 9 vip & ga tickets

live music three bands!

on sale now!

exclusive tastings

a celebration of our state's craft producers!

saturday october 13, 2018 at the delaware agricultural museum & village, in dover, dElaware

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r e k a mwith within

Unleash

the

October 2018 • #inWilm

The Magic of Music

Henry Bermudez

The Science of Sorcery

Shakespeare, Poe & Fiends October 13

October 17 - November 4

Basil Restaurant Hagley Craft Fair

Meshell Ndegeocello

October 3

October 12

2 for specials October 20 & 21

October 5-25

October 21

James McGall & Gwen Barker NextFab Wilmington

Bellefonte Ball

NextFab 1 Year Anniversary

Bang On A Can All-Stars

Fully Committed

Boo at the Zoo

FSBT’s Don Quixote

Opera Uncorked

Ghost Tales & Spirits Night

Halloween Loop

October 6

October 21

October 11

October 19 & 20

October 27

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October 11

October 19 & 21

October 27

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Out & About Magazine October 2018  
Out & About Magazine October 2018  
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