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Cooking With Beer & Wine

Fifteen Ways to Celebrate the Season

A Most Enjoyable Affaire

G R E AT E R W I L M I N G T O N

FROM BAY TO BREWERY Wilmington Beer Week collaboration celebrates oyster repopulation efforts in local waters

NOVEMBER 2018 COMPLIMENTARY


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ON STAGE NOVEMBER 28–DECEMBER 23, 2018

A SIGN OF THE TIMES

TICKETS AS LOW AS $25! Group (10+) & student discounts available

book by Bruch Vilanch story created by Richard J. Robin music supervision & orchestrations by Joseph Church choreographed by JoAnn M. Hunter directed by Gabriel Barre

REGIONAL PREMIERE! The year is 1965. In an era fueled by women’s liberation, the civil rights movement, and the Vietnam War, one woman made her own personal march – from middle America to the bright lights of New York City. Here, she would discover unexpected friends, lovers, passions, and conflicts on her journey to change not just herself, but her world. Told through the classic music of a generation and featuring such iconic songs as “Downtown,” “If I Can Dream,” “The Boy from New York City,” and “You Don’t Own Me,” this brand new musical brings together the songs you’ll always remember with a story you’ll never forget.

200 WATER STREET / WILMINGTON, DE 19801 / 302.594.1100 / DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG For more information about the show, visit www.asignofthetimes.com

This organization is supported, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com

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presents

8th Annual

WILMINGTON

BEER WEEK A Celebration of Beer Featuring Wilmington’s Premier Craft Destinations

NOVEMBER 5-10, 2018 THE VENUES: BBC Tavern & Grill

Kid Shelleen’s Charcoal House

Chelsea Tavern

Market Kitchen & Bar (Hilton)

Ernest & Scott Taproom

Stitch House Brewery

Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant

Two Stones Pub (Wilm.)

Washington Street Ale House

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2 INSIDE 2

19 24 Out & About Magazine

a collborative stout brewed with delaware bay oysters

Vol. 31 | No. 9

Published each month by TSN Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Mailing & business address: 307 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

Publisher Gerald duPhily • jduphily@tsnpub.com Director of Publications Jim Hunter Miller • jmiller@tsnpub.com

73

Contributing Editor Bob Yearick • ryearick@comcast.net Creative Director & Production Manager Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. Graphic Designer Tyler Mitchell, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. Contributing Designer David Halberg, Catalyst Visuals, LLC Contributing Writers Adriana Camacho-Church, Cindy Cavett, Mark Fields, Pam George, Rob Kalesse, Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Dan Linehan, Mike Little, Dillon McLaughlin, John Murray, Kevin Francis, Larry Nagengast, Kevin Noonan, Scott Pruden, Leeann Wallett Contributing Photographers Jim Coarse, Rebecca Parsons and Joe del Tufo/Moonloop Photography, Lindsay duPhily, Tim Hawk, Anthony Santoro, Matt Urban Distribution David Hazardous Special Projects Sarah Green, John Holton Interns Elizabeth Carlson, Emily Stover

53 START

WILMINGTON

9 12 15 16 17

42 In the City 45 On the Riverfront 48 Art Loop

The War on Words Worth Recognizing FYI What Readers Are Saying Worth Trying

WATCH

LEARN

53 An Affordable Art Binge 55 Movie Reviews

10 Wilmington University Celebrates 50 Years

DRINK

FOCUS

59 Beers Worth Trying 61 Thanksgiving Wines 65 Sips

19 15 Ways to Celebrate the Holidays 24 From Bay to Brewery 28 Beers for a Cause

EAT 31 A Dine Out Thanksgiving 37 Cooking With Beer/Wine 41 Bites

LISTEN 67 Spaceboy Gives Back 70 Tuned In

PLAY 73 A Most Enjoyable Affaire 79 Snaps: A Taste of Trolley

On The Cover: The Out & About Oyster Stout brew crew at 2SP. L-R: Tyler Mitchell (Catalyst Visuals/O&A), Kyle McLaughlin (Stitch House, GM), Rob Pfieffer (Wilmington Brew Works, brewer), Bob Barrar (2SP Brewing, Head Brewer), Justin Sprovl (Iron Hill Wilmington, Sr. Head Brewer), Andrew Rutherford (Stitch House Head Brewer). Cover photo by Joe del Tufo

FEATURES 21 15 Ways to Enjoy the Holidays A selection of Thanksgiving and Christmas activities to enjoy. By Emily Stover

26 Spirited Dishes Cooking with beer and wine can add some kick to your creations. By Leeann Wallett

67 Connecting the Community at Humble Park By programming a city park, Spaceboy Clothing is helping to revitalize a neglected area. By Jacob Orledge

73 A Most Enjoyable Affaire Our intrepid reporter undergoes a Renaissance, finds the Middle Ages can be fun. By Mike Little

Editorial & advertising info: 302.655.6483 • Fax 302.654.0569 outandaboutnow.com • contact@tsnpub.com NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

THE WAR ON WORDS A monthly column in which we attempt, however futilely, to defend the English language against misuse and abuse

Media Watch • Misusing amount where number is the right choice is a common problem, but it shouldn’t be for those in the media. Sadly, it is. Take John Clark, NBC 10 sportscaster, talking about “the amount of Bird fans who will be at the game.” Clark—and everyone in the news media—should know that plural nouns require number, while singular nouns take amount. Similarly, if you can count it, use fewer; if it’s a quantity, use less. • “Have ran” and “had ran” continue to be uttered incorrectly by sports commentators—e.g., Danny Pommells on Comcast Sports, who recently said of the Eagles’ trick Super Bowl play, The Philly Special, “It’s amazing how many teams have ran it.” • But now this miscue has crossed over to the news side, at least on Morning Joe, where Joe Scarborough uttered this: “Should you have ran that story without checking a few more facts?” To review: the past participle of ran is run. The past tense is ran. • Reader Joan Burke reports that the Weather Channel app posted this during a September storm: “This is the second time Florence has underwent rapid intensification, doing so also last Tuesday and Wednesday, before wind shear weakened it, temporarily.” Says Joan: “There is lots wrong with this sentence, including underwent instead of undergone and the comma before the word ‘temporarily.’” • A Susan Page book review in USA TODAY contained this: “The adjective most often associated with Betty Ford was candor.” Uh, Susan, that’s a noun. Betty Ford was candid (an adjective) in expressing her thoughts. • A September issue of Blue White Illustrated contained this sentence: “Penn State comes into Saturday’s game off a uplifting domination of the Panthers last week.” Like many in the media, BWI seems to ignore the rule about when to use a or an, which is: Use an before a word that starts with a vowel sound. No vowel sound? Use a. E.g., a man, an elephant; and a house, an hour (remember, the vowel sound determines usage). • A reader submits this from Delaware Lawyer: “She spent countless hours pining over answers to the difficult questions, . . .” The writer meant “poring over.” The usual mistake in this context is to use “pouring,” not pining, which means to miss and long for the return of.

By Bob Yearick

• Another reader spotted this in The News Journal: “. . . by far the most divisive race for either party, with top fundraiser Kathy McGuiness hoping to eek out a win over Kathleen Davies and Dennis E. Williams.” We let out an “eek!” of our own when we saw that the usually literate Scott Goss apparently transposed a couple of letters in the word eke. • Christopher Buskirk committed this gaffe in the venerable NY Times: “Or was he just another senator with presidential aspirations and a flare for fraternal invective?” Flare is a sudden, brief burst of bright flame or light. Flair, the word needed here, means an aptitude or eagerness for something or a distinctive style. A Recurring Mistake Reoccur and recur are verbs that are very close in meaning, so reoccur is often used where recur should be the choice. Something that is recurring happens over and over again, possibly at regular intervals. In contrast, something that is reoccurring is simply happening again but not always repeatedly. Signs of the Apocalypse A friend in the banking business says he recently was asked to “diarize some time” on his calendar for a meeting. Department of Redundancies Dept. A reader notes that a TV weatherperson in North Carolina referred to “incessant winds which never stop.” Incessant: nonstop, continuous. Literally of the Month Martin Rogers, on the sports pages of USA TODAY: “Boxing doesn’t just thrive on controversy, it literally breathes through it.” That’s a convoluted metaphor that is made even worse by the misuse of literally.

Follow me on Twitter: @thewaronwords

NEED A SPEAKER FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION? Contact me for a fun presentation on grammar: ryearick@comcast.net.

Word of the Month

alazon Pronounced AL-uh-zon, it’s a noun meaning a person characterized by arrogance, braggadocio, lack of self -awareness, etc.

Seen a good (bad) one lately? Send your candidates to ryearick@comcast.net

Buy The War on Words at the Hockessin Book Shelf, on Amazon, or by calling Out & About at 655-6483.

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LEARN

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WILMINGTON UNIVERSITY CELEBRATES 50 YEARS Humble, Yet Noble, Beginnings

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n the fall of 1968, the doors to Wilmington University (then Wilmington College) opened with a curriculum consisting of just three undergraduate majors: Political Science, English, and Business Administration. Tuition and housing fees for an entire school year amounted to just $2,700. And the faculty was comprised of eight full-time professors. Breaking with tradition, the University got its start as a pioneer for what was, in the late 1960s, a totally new concept

among American colleges: that higher education should be more accessible to more people. WilmU was one of the country’s first academic institutions to address what former trustee Dr. Phillip Wingate called “a gaping hole in national educational opportunities—the pursuit of a college degree for the students with a family and a full-time job.” The early trustees identified elements that would be necessary to attract these individuals to the classroom, and through the journey from college to university, over decades of expansive

WilmU works for working adults. Classes start every 8 weeks

Spring classes start January 14 10 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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growth, these elements have held fast as the framework for the promise Wilmington University makes to its students: Flexible scheduling Ease of access Affordability

Innovative curricula Excellence in teaching Small class size

Promises and Progress Clearly, the concept was a good one, and the promises were kept. Fifty years and 50,000 alumni later, it is the fall of 2018. The institution once known as Wilmington College is now Wilmington University, offering more than 150 academic programs—from certificates to doctoral degrees—and serving Mid-Atlantic students at 14 physical sites, as well as students worldwide through an acclaimed online campus. As for affordability, compared to 24 competitors, WilmU is the #1 most affordable private, nonprofit institution in the region.*

What’s Next? This month, WilmU opens its new, full-service Brandywine site, making affordable higher education more accessible to those who live and work in the Brandywine Valley. The University’s newly established Criminal Justice Institute, devoted to education and community outreach, just began a series of active shooter response trainings in the Brandywine School District. And the University continues also to grow its partnerships with local community colleges to offer a seamless path for associate degree holders to affordably earn bachelor’s degrees to boost their career options.

“We’re delighted to serve students in the Brandywine Valley. We look forward to providing for them the same opportunities and personalized service we’ve had the privilege of offering all of our students for the past five decades.” Dr. LaVerne T. Harmon

Wilmington University President

DID YOU KNOW? FUN FACTS ABOUT WILMU WilmU educates more Delawareans

than all other four-year, higher education institutions in the state combined.

WilmU students graduate with

60% less student loan debt than the average American college student.

More than

27,000

Delaware residents have earned at least one degree from Wilmington University.

60%

of the graduate degrees awarded in Delaware come from WilmU.

70%

of WilmU’s senior leadership is female, led by current president, Dr. LaVerne T. Harmon, Delaware’s first AfricanAmerican female university president. *

Based on 2018-19 tuition rates.

You can make Wilmington University part of your success story. Learn more at wilmu.edu.

Make a resolution to advance your education in 2019! Apply for FREE by January 9. Use code Gift wilmu.edu/Gift

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START

WORTH RECOGNIZING

Community Members Who Go Above & Beyond

THE GARNSEY SISTERS:

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JOIN WITH FRIENDS AND EVERYONE SAVES! SAVE 20%

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leven-year-old Reagan Garnsey and her 7-year-old sister, Payton, may be the youngest fundraisers in Delaware. In June 2017, the Dover residents founded Buckets of Love Foundation (BOLF), a non-profit that raises funds to purchase crafts, toys, and games to stuff in buckets donated to children ages 2-12 facing hard times, including sickness and homelessness in Delaware and throughout the country. Since then, they have raised thousands of dollars to bring smiles Payton and Reagan Garnsey. to children’s faces. Says Reagan, who originated the idea: “The buckets help distract them from a situation they don’t want to be in. If I were in a situation I don’t want to be in, receiving a Bucket of Love would take my mind off of what’s happening.” Since its inception, BOLF has donated 720 buckets to hospitals and organizations in Delaware and 1,890 throughout the country. The sisters have raised approximately $8,000 through bake sales, raffles, toy drives, and donations and help from friends, family, schools, and organizations and businesses. Some organizations in Delaware that have received buckets are the Dover Air Force Base Youth, a program for kids with a deployed parent, Boys & Girls Club of Delaware, and Shepherd Place, a homeless shelter in Dover. “What Reagan and Payton have done is nothing short of extraordinary,” says Grace Carr, community liaison at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington. “[They] have worked so hard to make a difference for children in need. Their efforts have already helped hundreds of our patients.” Reagan’s parents saw her giving nature at age 4 when she told them she wanted to set up a lemonade stand. She subsequently raised $200 and donated it to Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer. Since then, the summertime lemonade stand has raised more than $6,000 for the organization. In second grade, Reagan started a knitting club at Holy Cross School in Dover, where she and her classmates knitted more than 1,200 hats to give to adult cancer patients. “Giving, to her, is very natural,” says Reagan’s mom, Angela, a state trooper who helped Reagan get the non-profit going and watched as Reagan honed her social media skills. “They inspire us,” say Reagan’s dad, Brian, a corporate aircraft pilot. The sisters have accepted several awards and recognitions, including the 2018 Governor’s Award. They also won the Jefferson Awards Foundation’s (JAF) LEAD360 Challenge. LEAD360 asks youth nationwide to submit project ideas that improve lives. In February, out of five finalists, BOLF was voted the winner. After a winner is chosen, JAF replicates it in other states by partnering with organizations and businesses, says JAF National Director Michele Fidance. Currently, five states are running Buckets of Love projects and several others have committed. Delaware institutions replicating it include The Buccini/Pollin Group and the City of Wilmington. When the sisters see the children they give to, which is not often, they say it keeps them going. “Their smiles make me happy because it connects the dots of all the hard work we do,” says Reagan. “Giving to others is about the feeling you get when you help someone.” Adds Payton: “Seeing the children’s faces makes me really, really, really happy.” For information on BOLF, go to: bucketsoflove.us, Facebook; @bucketsoflovehq, Twitter, or #GivingBackOneBucketAtATime. — Adriana Camacho-Church

Photo Michele Czetli-Porte

They prove that giving can start at a very young age

12 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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THE FUTURE OF MAKING IS YOURS TO CREATE. Dream it, learn it, make it. NextFab is a collaborative Photo Michele Czetli-Porte

makerspace that provides access to the tools, technology, & classes you need to turn ideas into reality.

Delaware 503 N. Tatnall Street in Wilmington

Take a tour

NextFab.com

@NextFabStudio @NextFab_DE

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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–– A not-for-profit arts organization ––

4 SHOWS ONLY!

NOV. 23-25 Tickets starting at $40

The Rock Orchestra performs An Evening of The Who SAT | NOV 17 | 8PM | $25

A Charlie Brown Christmas LIVE! SAT | DEC 8 | 2PM&6PM | $35-$39

Lúnasa: Christmas From Ireland FRI | DEC 14 | 8PM | $26-$31

TRO celebrates the music of one of rock’s most influential bands

Everyone’s favorite holiday classic comes to life!

A festive evening of delightful holiday Irish music

Jim Brickman’s A Joyful Christmas SAT | DEC 15 | 8PM | $41-$50

Classic Albums Live Creedence Clearwater Revival SAT | DEC 15 | 8PM | $34

Delbert McClinton FRI | DEC 28 | 8PM | $34-$38

Be a part of holiday concert event of the season

Faithful recreation of CCR’s acclaimed album Chronicles

The Grammy winning blues rock legend returns to rock in the new year

NOTE FOR / CUTULTIMATE FOR CUT GrammyNOTE Award Winner AFTER PARTY Starring

Followed by the

MICHAEL McDONALD

at the Hotel Du Pont

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! Made possible by

Made possible by

Saturday, December 1, 2018 | 8PM

TheGrandWilmington.org | 302.652.5577 | 302.888.0200 818 N. Market Street, Wilmington, DE 19801 This program is supported, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com.

All tickets subject to box office service charges. Artists, dates, times and programs are subject to change.

14 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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F.Y.I. Things worth knowing

GREAT DAMES CONTEST WINNER TO BE ANNOUNCED NOV. 5

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elaware Lt. Gov. Bethany HallLong will be keynote speaker and will announce the winner of the Great Dames 2018 Remarkable Ideas Competition on Monday, Nov. 5. The event is set for Harry’s Savoy Ballroom in North Wilmington from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. At Great Dames Oct. 15 meeting, competition participants pitched innovative ideas that offer solutions in health and wellness, safety and security or education. They are vying for a $25,000 package of cash and services. Hall-Long also will announce the winner of the Remarkable Youth Pitches (for teen girls), which is new this year. “Women are reshaping the marketplace,” says Great Dames CEO Sharon Kelly Hake. “Women have the ability to sense great opportunities, and through this competition, we hope to provide a platform for sharing their powerful ideas and to get support.” Hors d’oeuvres and soft drinks will be served, and a cash bar will be available. Proceeds benefit the Great Dames Fund, which supports causes that empower women and girls. For more information or tickets, visit greatdames.com.

WINSLOW HOMER ART EXHIBITION

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rom Nov. 17 to Feb. 17, the Brandywine River Museum will exhibit the works of Winslow Homer (1836-1910). Homer used the newly-invented art of photography to capture the moment he was in, and went back to these images to create realistic oil paintings. The exhibit will allow you to examine the different mediums Homer worked with, and view this artist’s outlook on some of the most important moments in America’s history. For more information, visit brandywine.org/museum.

BPG 25TH ANNIVERSARY BENEFITS BUCKETS OF LOVE

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ilmington-based developer Buccini/Pollin Group, Inc. (BPG) celebrated its 25th anniversary on Sept. 28, first with a restaurant crawl along Market Street and then with an act of community service. Each BPG associate put together a bucket of love consisting of toys, art supplies, activities and a note of encouragement for a local child exposed to domestic violence. BPG associate Mandi Lemons teamed up with Buckets of Love, a Jefferson Awards-winning local charity founded by 11-year-old Reagan Garnsey and her 7-year-old sister, Payton (See Worth Recognizing, pg. 12). “It was truly a gift for our associates to have the opportunity to work with these two inspirational young ladies that cofounded a charity impacting hundreds of children annually,” said Lemons. CHILD Inc. was the recipient of the buckets. “We are thrilled to receive the 200 Buckets of Love for the children we serve,” said Lori Sitler, CHILD Inc. executive director. “Our heartfelt thanks goes out to the young sisters who founded Buckets of Love and to the leadership and staff of the Buccini/Pollin Group for their service and commitment to Delaware’s children.”

QUAKER HILL DINNER

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he Quaker Hill Neighborhood Association will host a dinner on Thursday, Nov. 8, from 6-9 p.m.to celebrate its 25th anniversary. The group has worked hard preserving the history of the Quaker Hill area, and continues to give tours, conferences, and other programs to educate the public about the Underground Railroad, George Washington, and other important historical figures and events that have been a part of Quaker Hill’s background. The dinner will feature a concert by the Wilmington Concert Opera, and presentation of the Thomas Garrett award to Lt. Dan Selekman of the Wilmington Police Department. There will also be a silent auction and several other events throughout the night. Tickets are $75. Email Ashley Cloud at ashley@ quakerhillhistoric.org or call at 388-7176, or contact Bayard Marin at bmarin@ bayardmarinlaw.com or 658-4200 for tickets and more information.

DAM INTRODUCES LANDMARK SCULPTURE

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he Delaware Art Museum has acquired a major piece of artwork — Chakaia Booker's “One Way”—the first piece by an African American artist to be represented in the Museum's sculpture garden. Created in 2008 by Booker, the sculpture was made to express the diversity, mobility, and hope that she feels. The piece is made from recycled tires and stainless steel, and is shaped in interconnecting circles, to symbolize “movement and perceptual cycles,” according to Booker, who has been a part of many group exhibitions and whose artwork is featured in several museums. The sculpture is on display until Jan. 27.

CAMPING OUT FOR COATS

O

n Friday and Saturday, Nov. 16 and 17, Operation Warm will sponsor a two-day campout in a field at 10 S. James St., in Newport (across the street from James Street Tavern). The Delaware Kids Fund created this organization to raise money to give children in need a new coat. To camp out at this second annual event, register at dekidsfund.org/operation-warm. Campers aren’t required to stay out both nights, and there will be s’mores, meals, bonfires, and games to enjoy while there. There is no registration fee, just a donation link to raise money to buy coats for kids in need. The goal is $40,000 goal, and even if you don’t camp out, feel free to donate.

STORYTIME IN THE GARDENS

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very Thursday in November, Mt. Cuba Center will host Story Time in the Garden from 10:30 to 11:30a.m. The group will meet in the Main House and then venture outside to the garden area. Bring a blanket, find a shady place to sit and listen to the storyteller bring the words to life. The stories will be centered around nature, to fit into the theme of the event. In case of inclement weather, the event will move indoors. Storytime is included with admission to Mt. Cuba Center, which is free for children under 5, $5 for ages 6-17 and $10 for adults. To learn more about this event, visit mtcubacenter.org. NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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THANKSGIVING

at the INN

1pm-7pm

WHAT READERS ARE SAYING About The Perfect Match: Arden and Oddporium What better location for this unusual shop than Delaware’s oddest community? By Kevin Noonan, October 2018

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2216 Pennsylvania Ave Wilmington, DE 19806 www.ColumbusInn.net

As a resident of Arden, I am troubled by part of your spotlight article The Perfect Match: Arden and Oddporium. It is true: we are a village community of free-thinkers who take a moment to consider life from unusual perspectives, and the Oddporium deserves some attention. But as a magazine that promotes area businesses and entertainment, it is irresponsible of you to present Jay Parker's YouTube video to boost evidence of Arden's macabre qualities so we can better fit into your Halloween-themed issue. Nothing in Arden supports his wild claims. For Out & About to use his videos is counter-productive to your purpose as a publication which promotes the Greater Wilmington area—and just lazy in terms of research, writing, and editing. Arden is a place that is bubbling with pride and volunteerism like no place I have ever lived. We want to continue to draw people of all ages to our fairs, our theater productions, and our concert venue, not scare people away with unsubstantiated stories of demonic village genesis—which is exactly where you leave the reader at the end of your article. — Jill Althouse-Wood Great article, and Oddporium is a really neat store! — Lisa Bird Kelley About Flying High While not exactly Cirque du Soleil, Wilmington’s Ascend Flow Arts helps build students’ conditioning and confidence By Dillion McLaughlin, October 2018 We have been to a show to see Ascend in action, amazing. Just a real treat. — Sally Charnock Rifenburg This is a great experience! So many people love it here! — Melinda Trainor About Rockwood’s Man in the Smoking Jacket By Adrian Camacho-Church, October 2018 I also want to thank you for the article in Out & About. We had numerous calls from people who wanted to register. We had to ask them to sign up for our Ghost Tours in January as we are booked solid for the two remaining in November…we do not have the tours in December. Thanks again. — Philip Nord, Director, Rockwood Park and Museum

HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? SEND US A MESSAGE! contact@tsnpub.com • OutAndAboutNow.com

16 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Worth Trying Suggestions from our staff, contributors and readers

Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

2nd & Charles

Looking for a new show to watch? Aren’t you always? How about one that just won five Emmys, including best actress, best supporting actress and best comedy? Then Amazon Prime’s The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is for you. The show, which just finished filming its second season, is about a newly single mother in the late 1950s who is struggling to keep her perfect life intact while pursuing a career in stand-up comedy, with the help of a wannabe talent manager. The dialogue is witty and the characters are deep and well-defined. The show is a combination of comedy, drama, and even some romance. Definitely worth trying.

Movies. CDs. Vinyls. Comics. Video games. Books. Books. And more books. This is only part of what you can find in this Newark resale shop. Not only is this the most affordable book store I’ve discovered, it also has an abundance of interesting products. Most second-hand, but there are many new items. 2nd & Charles’ tagline is “Sell What You Don’t Want. Buy What You Do.” So, this is one store that you can leave with more money than when you entered.

— Elizabeth Carlson, Intern

— Emily Stover, Intern

The War on Words

Bardea Food & Drink

C’mon, where you gonna find a better stockingstuffer for a grammar geek? And for just $10. It’s a tidy compendium of all The War on Words columns from inception in 2007 until 2011 (hmmm . . . time for a second volume?). In its pages, you’ll discover the most misused punctuation mark and the most misused word. Call the Out & About office (655-6483) or take a trip to the Hockessin Book Shelf to get your copy. A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

— Bob Yearick, Contributing Editor (and shameless self-promoter)

It’s difficult for any restaurant to meet expectations right out of the gate in terms of quality and service, but Bardea has managed to do just that. For this alone, the restaurant has earned gushing, positive reviews. But there’s more to the story. For a self-described Italian restaurant, Bardea isn’t afraid to challenge convention. How many Italian restaurants offer Tuna Tataki, Chicken of the Woods, Avocado Toast or Norwegian Salmon with, of all things, cherries, golden beets and hazelnuts? Yes, the menu requires an electron microscope to read in the chic, dimly-lit setting, and, with the crowds it’s been drawing, the volume often requires some guests to use semaphore to communicate effectively. But those are challenges that can be easily handled. Whether you are looking for something new in terms of local cuisine or a sign that Market Street may be fully turning a corner in terms of food options, Bardea fits the bill. — Jim Miller, Director of Publications

Have something you think is worth trying? Send your suggestion to Jim at jmiller@tsnpub.com.

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Sip & Shop Friday, November 16th 4–7pm

November 16th–18th Friday, 12–4pm Saturday–Sunday, 10am–4pm

Stop by on your way home from work or as you head out for the evening to enjoy a complimentary glass of wine or beer. Browse our beautiful selection of gift items and holiday décor.

Admission Free

Family Fun Day

5850 Limestone Road The Summit | Hockessin 302-746-4535

Sunday, November 18th 12–3pm

Magnificent display of beautifully decorated trees and wreaths, festive marketplace, live daily entertainment, bake shop, great gifts, raffles, and Santa!

Crafts, face painting, games, raffles, entertainment, children’s marketplace, and bake shop. Photos with Santa.

Hosted by Delaware Hospice to support its programs.

18 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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15 Ways To Enjoy The Holidays Add to your holiday fun by participating in one or more of these Thanksgiving and Christmas-themed activities By Emily Stover

Photo courtesy of Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library

STEAMIN’ THANKSGIVING On Saturday, Nov. 24, ride on steam automobiles and trains as well as tour the Auburn Heights mansion, built in 1897, all in the spirit of Thanksgiving. Head over between 12:304:30 p.m. to the Marshall Steam Museum at Auburn Heights Preserve. Visit auburnheights.org/visit/steamin-days for more information.

Photo Jackie Kane Photography

YULETIDE AT WINTERTHUR Visit Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library between Nov. 18 and Jan. 6 to experience Christmas through the years, including a dollhouse mansion that is fully decorated for Christmas. There is also a walk through the Enchanted Wood children's garden. For times and special days, including a brunch with Santa, visit winterthur.org/exhibitions-events/ yuletide or call 800-448-3883. HOLIDAYS AT HAGLEY Between Nov. 23 and Jan. 1, walk the beautifully decorated Hagley Museum grounds, taste scrumptious cookies, and check out the gingerbread house contest entries and the workshops being offered to guests. This event will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day up until Christmas Eve, which is only open until 2 p.m. Santa will visit on Saturday, Dec. 8. Visit the hagley.org calendar page for more information.

LONGWOOD CHRISTMAS Longwood Gardens has provided a “Christmas Wonderland” year after year, and this one will be no exception. Select a day between Nov. 22 and Jan. 6 to enjoy this long-standing tradition as the gardens brighten up with Christmas lights and decorations galore. For times and tickets, go to longwoodgardens.org. ► NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Poor People’s TV Room BY OKWUI OKPOKWASILI “Ruthlessly clean and clever… Okpokwasili puts the threat in triple threat.” – Time Out NY NOVEMBER 5 & 7 | 7 PM Route 9 Library and Innovation Center – Black Box Theater 2301 Kentmere Parkway | Wilmington, DE | 302.571.9590 | delart.org

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

There’s so much happening in Downtown Wilmington. Come see it for yourself! DowntownWilmingtonDE.com *Photo Credit Moonloop Photography 20 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS A NEW ARTS SEASON COMING THIS FALL continued from page 19

Photo couresty of The Wilmington & Western Railroad

WINTER ARTS FESTIVAL AT DAM On Friday, Dec. 7, you can enjoy the Winter Arts festival at the Delaware Art Museum on Kentmere Parkway in Wilmington. Local artisans will be selling items that will make great Christmas gifts, and there will be winter-themed crafts for the kids. Enjoy the holiday decorations in the museum while listening to local choirs from noon to 8 p.m. Check out the events page on delart.org for more information.

TRAIN RIDE WITH SANTA Every Saturday and Sunday from Nov. 25 to Dec. 23, catch a ride with Santa on the Wilmington & Western Railroad at 12:30 or 2:30 p.m. Guests will get a treat and a picture while enjoying this magical ride. Visit the events page at wwrr.com for available times and tickets. NEW CASTLE SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS Brighten up your holiday season by joining a celebration in historic New Castle on Saturday, Dec. 8, from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. There will be music throughout the day and buildings will be decorated for the holidays. Check newcastlehistory.org for more information about the event. HOLIDAY CANDLELIGHT TOUR IN ODESSA Starting Tuesday, Nov. 27, Odessa will offer holiday candlelight tours. Walk through the historic town with a tour guide and experience the beauty of the Christmas lights and decorations. Tours will take place every Tuesday and Thursday until Dec. 27. Register by calling 378-4119 or go to historicodessa.org for times and tickets. On Saturday, Dec. 1, take a self-guided walking tour of historic Odessa. From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., celebrate the 54th annual Christmas in Odessa. The town will have several events and crafts going on throughout the day. Visit christmasinodessa.com for tickets and information about the day’s schedule. CIRQUE DREAMS HOLIDAZE AT THE PLAYHOUSE Cirque Dreams Holidaze has it all: acrobatics, singing, dancing, and a whole lot of holiday cheer! Celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, and the New Year in this two-hour show at The Playhouse. Choose a performance on Friday, Saturday or Sunday, Nov. 23, 24, 25. Visit thegrandwilmington.org for tickets and more information. NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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HARRY’S SAVOY GRILL | KID SHELLEEN’S

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your holiday party NOW

HARRY’S HOSPITALITY GROUP www.harryshospitalitygroup.com | #HHGroupie 22 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo Tisa Della-Volpe, couresty of First State Ballet Theatre

FOCUS A NEW ARTS SEASON COMING THIS FALL continued from page 19

THE NUTCRACKER: A HOLIDAY TRADITION For some people, the holiday season isn’t complete without certain traditions. The Nutcracker is one of those traditions. It’s a ballet that has been around for more than 100 years, and Wilmington Ballet will present its 52nd annual performance of this show on Saturday, Dec. 8, and Sunday, Dec. 9. Pick a date and time at thegrandwilmington.org to reserve your spot. If you miss those performances, First State Ballet will be also be performing The Nutcracker on Friday through Sunday, Dec. 21, 22 and 23, at Copeland Hall in the Grand Opera House. Go to firststateballet.com for tickets. A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS The whole family will be excited to see this show! A live reproduction of A Charlie Brown Christmas at the Grand, filled with a familiar cast of characters who get into the holiday spirit and try to find the true meaning of Christmas. There will be two opportunities to see the play—on Saturday, Dec. 8, at 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. Visit thegrandwilmington.org to get tickets. JIM BRICKMAN JOYFUL CHRISTMAS CONCERT Guests can enjoy the sounds of the holiday at this concert on Saturday, Dec. 15. Join Grammy-nominated pianist Jim Brickman at The Playhouse on his 22nd annual tour, where he plays not only Christmas classics, but also his original songs. Buy tickets now at thegrandwilmington.org for Dec. 15 at 8 p.m. THE DAVID BROMBERG QUINTET Looking for a way to celebrate the New Year? Grab a group of friends and head over to Arden Gild Hall at 10 p.m. on New Year’s Eve to listen to the David Bromberg Quintet. You can also toast the New Year with a glass of champagne. Check eventbrite.com for tickets to the event. CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT On Sunday, Dec. 2, the University of Delaware’s Schola Cantorum Community Choir and the UD Chorale will present a holiday concert from 7-9 p.m. at Loudis Recital Hall. The concert will feature a mix of classic carols and contemporary Christmas music. Get your tickets at music.udel.edu/ onlinetickets or call 831-2204. W&W HOLIDAY LIGHTS EXPRESS Hop on Wilmington & Western Railroad’s Holiday Lights Express from Friday, Dec. 7, until Sunday, Dec. 30. The train and the houses next to the track will be decorated in thousands of Christmas lights for the 45-minute ride. Visit wwrr.com to reserve tickets. NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Rob Pfeiffer, brewer at Wilmington Brew Works, holds a visual concept of the Out & About Oyster Stout at 2SP Brewing Co.

The brainchild of four brewers, it debuts in time for Wilmington Beer Week and heralds a resurgent Delaware oyster industry By Rob Kalesse Photos by Joe del Tufo 24 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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N

o offense to Flipper and the playful mammals that steal the show at Sea World, but the oyster may be the most curious and unusual creature in the sea, both in a practical sense and from a cultural standpoint. Whether grown in the sea or “on the farm,” these bivalve mollusks are hard workers, naturally filtering plankton from the water, and spontaneously forming pearls inside their shells. Then there’s their aphrodisiac reputation, which causes folks to line up in hopes of enjoying not only their variety of flavors but also their alleged benefits in the bedroom. “We sell more than 3,000 oysters a week and our buck-a-shuck promotion—a dollar an oyster—is by far our most popular,” says Trolley Square Oyster House Manager Francesca DeSeta-Quillen. “I think there is also the danger associated with eating raw food that people find exciting, and the variety of flavors you can get that makes people want to explore.” But oysters aren’t just for shuckin’ and slurpin’. They also have their place in the drinking culture, beginning nearly 100 years ago, when the first oyster stout was brewed in London in the 1920s. Understanding the oyster’s popularity in both the cultural and culinary realms, some local brewers put their collective hop heads together and created an Out & About Oyster Stout, in honor of this publication’s 30th anniversary. The resulting brew will be ready just in time for Wilmington Beer Week (Nov. 5-10), and its debut calls attention to the potential rebirth of Delaware’s oyster population.

Photos Mark Jolly-Van Bodegraven/University of Delaware

ONE SHELL OF A PROJECT

So, how do you celebrate three decades of entertaining the state of Delaware with interesting profiles and thought-provoking stories? You ask some of the First State’s most accomplished brewers to get together and make you some beer, naturally. Jim Miller, Out & About Director of Publications, first pitched the idea for this ambitious ale to 2SP Brewing Co. Though they technically brew beer in Pennsylvania, Two Stones has long been a staple in Delaware, thanks to locations in Newark and North Wilmington. “When Jim first came to us about brewing a beer for their 30th, we loved the idea,” says Mike “Stigz” Stiglitz, co-owner and founder of Two Stones. “We’ve always had such a great relationship with the magazine, and they’ve shown us incredible support over the years. The name ‘Out & About Stout’ just rolled off the tongue, and our brewmaster is known for his stouts. But we’d never done an oyster stout, so I was really excited to see how Bob would approach it.” That’s Bob Barrar, 2SP’s brewmaster, who boasts a resume of multiple gold medals from the Great American Beer Festival. His Russian Imperial Stout, simply called “The Russian,” is revered in brewing circles. While an oyster stout is slightly outside his higher alcohol wheelhouse, he was ready for the challenge.

Delaware Sea Grant marine advisory specialist Dr. Ed Hale (left) helps oyster farmer Mark Casey check on some of his thousands of oysters in the Indian River.

The separated oyster shells, used for the Out & About Oyster Stout.

“Stigz came to me with the idea to change things up and do an oyster stout, and I was down with it,” says Barrar. “I’d never done one before, so I started doing some research and got in touch with some other Delaware brewers to collaborate on the idea.” Those brewers included Moriah Guise, of Iron Hill Wilmington, Rob Pfieffer, formerly of Blue Earl Brewing and now with Wilmington Brew Works, and Andrew Rutherford, of Stitch House Brewery. The foursome decided to use a standard oatmeal stout recipe as the foundation, and 15 pounds of Delaware Bay oysters (including the meat and the shells) in the boil. The beer, which will likely come in around 5.5 percent ABV, according to Barrar, will have a sweet, roasted malt character, thanks to the Maris Otter malts, and somewhat earthy notes, thanks to the Fuggles hops. The oyster shells, which lend a slightly briny flavor and act as a clarifying agent to filter the beer, will help promote a clean finish with a hint of minerality. Both the Maris Otter and Fuggles are indigenous to the United Kingdom, where the stout beer was born. As noted, the 30th Anniversary Out & About Oyster Stout will be available when Wilmington Beer Week kicks off—at Two Stones in North Wilmington, along with Stitch House Brewery, Iron Hill Wilmington, Wilmington Brew Works and other participating venues (See Wilmington BeerWeek.com for updates). With only 20 barrels being produced, the brewers expect the specialty ale to go rather quickly.

A REVITALIZED AQUACULTURE

East Coast oyster lovers know their favorites. Novices tend to gravitate toward the subtle flavors of a Blue Point from Long Island Sound or a slightly salty but clean Misty Point from Virginia. For the connoisseurs, an even saltier, brinier Wellfleet from Massachusetts or a salty-sweet Pemaquid from Maine may be preferable. Whatever the choice, most oyster fans don’t seek out Delaware oysters. A once-thriving industry in the late 1930s and 1940s, it was largely wiped out by various epizootic disease strains. But members of Delaware Sea Grant, through the University of Delaware, along with Delaware State University, the Delaware Center for the Inland Bays and the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), are trying to bring it back. ►

NOVEMBER OCTOBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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State Line Liquors

INTRODUCING: OUT & ABOUT OYSTER STOUT continued from previous page

Family owned & operated Since 1933 — 4 Generations!

Great selection of...well... just about everything! —Yelp Over 3,000 Different Beers Growler Bar with 35 Taps Wine, Spirits & Beer Tastings Gourmet Food & Cheeses 1610 ELKTON RD, Route 279 . ELKTON, MD • WWW.STATELINELIQUORS.COM OUTSIDE MD. (800) 446-WINE, IN MARYLAND (410) 398-3838

November 1 - 11 Featuring the best American and International independent feature, documentary, and short films. • 11 days of films • Online ticket sales in real time • 3 screening locations • Rush ticket sales at the door • 6 festival pass levels Visit our Cinema Art Theater throughout the year for great independent films and more!

Cinema Art Theater

Home of independent films and more! For more info, visit rehobothfilm.com or call 302-645-9095

17701 Dartmouth Drive Dartmouth Plaza · Lewes, DE RBFS is Standards for Excellence® accredited, having met all the requirements for best practices in nonprofit management.

This organization is supported, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com.

Dr. Edward Hale, Fisheries, Seafood, & Aquaculture specialist for the Sea Grant, sees plenty of potential economic growth for the First State through a revived oyster industry. In 2017, Hale says, DNREC began leasing 300 one-acre sites in the Delaware Inland Bays near Rehoboth and Indian River. According to Hale, although these controlled aquaculture sites are in various stages of development, there is reason for hope. “To date, we have two individuals and one non-profit group that have active lease sites for oyster aquaculture, and our first shellfish farmer has begun to harvest some of the oysters planted nearly five months ago from a lease site in Indian River Bay,” says Hale. “Delaware has a great deal of potential economic gain and is well poised to see these gains in the very near future. We have also witnessed the development of ancillary, supporting businesses that are working directly with the farmers to help foster economic growth.” According to a 2015 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) report, U.S. aquaculture production was valued at $1.4 billion dollars, with 41 percent of that value being generated from the Atlantic coast states. Oysters represented the most profitable species in the report, generating $173 million for 35 million pounds landed. “If we look to our neighbor to the north [of the Delaware Inland Bays], oyster aquaculture production has been very profitable to the state of New Jersey,” says Hale. “In 2016 alone, oyster farmers from four counties, with farms in Delaware Bay, smaller coastal bays and the Atlantic Ocean, sold more than 2 million oysters worth a total farm gate value of nearly $1.4 million.” The 15 pounds of oysters that Barrar, Pfieffer, Guise and Rutherford are using to brew the Out & About Oyster Stout are, in fact, from the Delaware Bay, albeit the New Jersey side. If Delaware Sea Grant continues to trend upward and the Delaware oyster industry thrives once again, the oyster stout could become a very popular varietal as the craft brew industry also continues to flourish in the First State.

26 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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(302) 658-WINE

WineAndSpiritCo.com

ONCE THESE EARTHLY VESSELS ARE GONE FROM THE WINE & SPIRITS CO. OF GREENVILLE, THEY WILL NEVER BE SEEN AGAIN.

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Imperial Porter aged Elijah Craig Bourbon barrel beer. We hand selected the bourbon barrel from Kentucky and had our friends at 2SP brewery make a special beer for us. This beer was barrel aged for 8 months. Dark malty finish with a touch of caramel and sweetness.

Imperial Porter aged High West Rye barrel beer. 2SP brewery also made this beer in a similar fashion. The Rye barrel aging adds a dryer finish to the beer with a hint of herbalness. The dark malt still shows through.

Try our Exclusive Collaborations with 2SP! Monday-Wednesday 9am-8pm • Thursday-Saturday 9am-9pm • Sunday 12-5pm 4025 Kennett Pike, Wilmington Delaware 19807

NOTHING’S MORE LOCAL than beer brewed a few feet from your table.

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NOVEMBER FEBRUARY 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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BEERS FOR A CAUSE

Beer brewers may be consumed with their craft, but many also are well aware of what’s going on around them. Here is a look at some of their charitable initiatives. All of the beers listed are distributed in Delaware.

Pynk – Yard’s Brewing Company

Since 2013, Yards has donated a portion of the proceeds from this fruit beer to the Tyanna Foundation to help increase awareness and improve the lives of breast cancer patients.

Beer & Benevolence – Dogfish Head Brewery

The Milton, Del.-based brewery’s charitable outreach touches more than 150 nonprofits each year, including The Nature Conservancy, Habitat For Humanity and The Urban Bike Project.

Grateful Harvest Ale – Harpoon Brewery

Each year Harpoon releases this New England cranberry ale in time for Thanksgiving and donates $1 of every six-pack sold to local food banks.

Headwaters – Victory Brewing Company

A portion of all sales of this ale goes to preserving the company’s water source, the Upper East Branch of the Brandywine Creek (Pa.).

Blue – Sweet Water Brewing Company

This Georgia-based company donates $1 for every case sold of this wheat beer to Casting For Recovery, which uses fly fishing as therapy for women recovering from breast cancer treatment.

Last Chance IPA – Weyerbacher

This Easton, Pa.-based brewery donates a portion of the proceeds from the sale of this fruity IPA to small animal rescue organizations throughout its distribution area, which includes Delaware.

Can’d Aid – Oskar Blues

The Can’d Aid Foundation was formed as an immediate response to the massive flooding that devastated Oskar Blues Brewery’s hometowns of Lyons and Longmont, Colo., in September 2013. Since then, the foundation has raised more than $3.4 million to support its philanthropy efforts, including donating more than one million cans of water to the communities post-disaster, building 1,164 bicycles, donating 346 instruments, and recycling the equivalent of 17.6 million cans throughout the country.

Striped Bass Pale Ale – Devils Backbone Brewing Company

Inspired to help the cause while fishing on the Chesapeake Bay, the founders of this Virginia-based brewery donate $1 of every case sold to support the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s mission to Save the Bay.

All Products – Maine Beer Company

Founded by two brothers and new to Delaware, MBC’s 1% For The Planet programs donates 1 percent of sales from all its products to environmental non-profits such as Allied Whale, The Dian Fossey Foundation, The Center for Wildlife, Bicycle Coalition of Maine and others. 28 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Brewing The American Dream – Samuel Adams Brewing Company

For more than a decade, this program has partnered with small business lender Accion to offer loans up to $50,000 for emerging food and beverage companies. Sam Adams produces a commemorative 12-pack to bring attention to the initiative.

B Corp Certification – New Belgium Brewing

New Belgium doesn’t just allocate a portion of beer sales to charity, it has made giving back one of its core principals. New Belgium is one of fewer than 3,000 certified B Corporations, which means the company meets rigorous standards for social and environmental accountability established by the nonprofit B Lab. In fact, New Belgium is considered to be among the top 15 percent of B Corps in the world.

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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cider should

be bold

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EAT

White meat or dark? You have your choice at area restaurants.

Why Not Dine Out for Thanksgiving? . . . or have your meal catered By Leeann Wallett

S

ick of defrosting the Thanksgiving turkey for an entire week? Tired of the endless cleanup afterward? Then why not start your holiday season off by dining out on Thanksgiving? Think of it: no prep work, no cooking, no cleanup, just a pleasant meal where someone else does all the work. According to a 2017 survey by the National Restaurant Association, one in 10 adults plans to eat his or her Thanksgiving meal at a restaurant. And a smaller number plan to buy prepared food to supplement their home-cooked Thanksgiving meal. If you opt to dine out on turkey day, a number of Delaware’s top restaurants are happy to accommodate your party, no matter if it’s two or 15. Here are some tips and restaurant recommendations for a successful Thanksgiving outing:

Reserve Your Table (now)

Many places strongly recommend reservations, so don’t delay, especially if you have a large group, and if you’re going to a popular destination like Deerfield Golf Club in Newark. Deerfield is famous for its holiday buffet, and Thanksgiving is no exception. The club describes its Thanksgiving meal as “brunch-like” since there are so many options for diners to enjoy. “In addition to the traditional hand-carved turkey, we offer other carved options like Kobe New York strip steak and New Zealand rack of lamb, as well as roasted salmon and Deerfield’s famous crab cakes,” says Brianna Boyens, sales coordinator at Forewinds Hospitality Group, which manages Deerfield. ►

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EST. 2018

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EAT VISIT OUR WEB SITE TO VIEW THE MENUS WHY NOT DINE OUT FOR THANKSGIVING? continued from page 31

And while the menu changes slightly each year, you’re still able to enjoy the Thanksgiving staples like bread stuffing, mashed yams with cinnamon and brown sugar, and garlic mashed potatoes, “which get rave reviews year-round,” says Boyens.

Buffet or a` la Carte?

The most difficult decision you’ll make when choosing a Thanksgiving meal is whether your party wants to graze or to be served. Luckily, Harry’s Savoy Grill on Naamans Road offers both options, but your party will have to make the decision before you walk through the door. “We serve the à la carte menu in the restaurant and the buffet menu in the ballroom, so you’ll have to choose before you are seated,” says Meg Morgan, office manager at Harry’s Hospitality Group. For those who opt for à la carte, don’t fret, there’s still a Thanksgiving dinner option, which is a plateful of the usual suspects—turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, peas, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and, of course, giblet gravy. There are also dozens of appetizers and entrées to choose from. For the more adventurous, the buffet will satisfy any appetite, big or small. Says Morgan, “We host a lavish Thanksgiving spread that includes two full carving stations with turkey and our award-winning prime rib. In addition, we have a children’s buffet, and a grand dessert buffet which includes the traditional pumpkin pie and fun favorites like chocolate-covered strawberries.”

it’s time to PLAN YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY!

toscana has a brand new space for private dining, the perfect spot for: BABY & BRIDAL SHOWERS REHEARSAL DINNERS BIRTHDAY PARTIES COCKTAIL RECEPTIONS CORPORATE ENTERTAINING

ALL WITH REALLY GOOD FOOD

Options for Everyone

This is the first year that Ted’s Montana Grill at Christiana Mall is open for Thanksgiving. “We’ve been open for Thanksgiving at other Ted's locations for a while now,” says Jessica Smith, senior director of marketing at Ted’s. “It’s because of numerous requests that we’re now open for Thanksgiving at our Christiana location.” Ted’s will be open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and will offer a set Thanksgiving feast and an à la carte menu. The feast is a three-course meal served with a choice of soup, side salad or chili; roast turkey and gravy with garlic mashed potatoes, buttered carrots, “Aunt Fannie’s” squash casserole, herb dressing and cranberry sauce, and Ted’s famous apple pecan crisp. For those not into turkey, the set menu will have guest favorites like Ted’s hand-cut bison or beef Delmonico ribeye, Cedar Plank Salmon, and a variety of burgers. In addition to its Thanksgiving day meal, Ted’s will also offer special Thanksgiving pick-up for those who need help with their at-home preparation. The same Thanksgiving roast turkey feast served at the restaurant is packaged to go and costs $120 for four to six servings and $230 for eight to 10 servings. Says Smith, “We want to make you look good, so we’re happy to help with the entire meal or just individual pieces like the accompaniments or whole turkey.” Pick-up orders should be made no later than Nov. 13—the week prior to Thanksgiving.

toscana has lots of options FOR CATERING PARTIES invite us into your home, office or one of our many EXCLUSIVE CULTURAL EVENT VENUES:

piccolinatoscana.com | 302.654.8001 1412 n. dupoont st., wilmington

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

Clear out Your Fridge

Before you make that trip to the restaurant, clear out your fridge, because you are likely to have the usual Thanksgiving leftovers, only this time they’ll be from a restaurant, not your kitchen. At Columbus Inn, for instance, most of the meal is served family-style, and anything left is packaged to take home. “Everyone who dines with us leaves with plenty of leftovers,” says General Manager Hayla DeLano. So even if you’re too full for dessert, your server will pack everything away for takeout, including Columbus Inn’s signature apple fritters and the traditional pumpkin pie. The Pennsylvania Avenue restaurant’s Thanksgiving Day menu is similar to a tasting menu and includes a soup and salad, with entrées, sides, and dessert served family-style like the traditional homemade meal. According to DeLano, “the proteins take the cake.” Columbus Inn treats its guests to not one but two entrée choices—roasted turkey and filet mignon. The restaurant also can accommodate vegetarians by substituting a pasta dish or its famous Asian fried rice for the turkey. Reservations are suggested, especially for prime-time seating at 3 p.m. Columbus Inn has limited space for large families, who are typically seated upstairs in the private dining area. WHY NOT DINE OUT FOR THANKSGIVING? continued from previoius page

Options for dining out on Thanksgiving: Big Fish Grill on the Riverfront, Wilmington When: 11 am to 7 pm Pricing: $33.95 per person, $16.95 for children ages 6 to 12 and free for children 5 and younger. Reservations are requested and are available by calling 652-3474. Walk-ins welcome. A small à la carte menu will be available. Deerfield Golf Club, Newark When: Noon to 6 pm Pricing: $59.95 per person, $16.95 for children ages 4 to 12 and free for children 3 and younger. Reservations are required, and are available by calling 368-6640 or booking online through OpenTable. Service charge and alcoholic beverages not included.

HOLIDAYS MADE SIMPLE. REALLY. We know you have a full plate for the holiday season. So we’ve made it easier. Indulge in one of our complete holiday meals with all the trimmings. Or, if you’re planning a holiday party, relax and let Janssen’s catering do all the work!

WWW.JANSSENSMARKET.COM 3801 KENNETT PIKE, GREENVILLE, DE 302.654.9941

Columbus Inn, Wilmington When: 1 to 7 pm Pricing: $48 per person, $24 for children ages 4 to 12 and free for children 3 and younger. Reservations are requested and are available by calling 571-1492. Hilton Wilmington/Christiana, Newark When: Noon to 6 pm Pricing: $54.95 per person, $19.95 for children ages 5 to 12 and free for children 5 and younger. Reservations are requested and are available by calling 631-1540. Jessop’s Tavern, New Castle When: 11:30 am to 6 pm Pricing: $25 per person Reservations are requested and are available by calling 322-6111. Last seating is at 6 pm. Harry’s Savoy Grill, N. Wilmington When: Buffet menu is available in the Ballroom from noon to 6:30 pm. Á la Carte menu is available in the Restaurant 1 to 9 pm. Pricing: Buffet $49.95 per person, $17.95 for children 5 to 12 and free for children under 5. An 18 percent service charge and alcoholic beverages not included. Á la Carte - items individually priced. Reservations are requested and are available by calling 475-3000. Ted’s Montana Grill, Newark When: 11 am to 8 pm Pricing: $29 per person, $13 for children 12 and under. Á la Carte – items individually priced. Reservations are requested and are available by calling 366-1601.

34 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Have Your Meal Catered! Want to stay home for Thanksgiving but don’t want to prepare a meal? Local caterers are ready to serve you. Make your holiday less stressful and more special by pre-ordering your entire meal or portions of it from professionals. Montrachet Fine Foods, Janssen’s Market and Bachetti Bros. Gourmet Market & Catering offer oven-ready turkeys and a host of delectable side dishes. Thanksgiving is Montrachet Fine Food’s biggest holiday; it’s even open on Thanksgiving Day from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. to accommodate those with any last-minute catering needs. “We’re open 364 days a year,” says Susan Teiser, chef and owner of Montrachet Fine Foods and Centreville Café. “We want to make your day easy, whether it’s Thanksgiving, Christmas or another major holiday.” Montrachet Fine Foods runs its catering business out of Centreville Café and is located on Kennett Pike and the corner of Owl’s Nest Road, just a stone’s throw from Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library. When you visit, make sure to head straight to its freezers to admire its beautifully presented appetizers. You’ll see mini crab cakes, tiny scallops wrapped in bacon, baby beef Wellingtons, and pastrywrapped mushroom duxelles (aka mushroom stuffing). In addition to its extensive list of appetizers, Teiser says Montrachet offers a handful of special soups; this year it’s mushroom, lobster bisque, chicken soup, butternut squash and tomato dill. Montrachet also makes six different Thanksgiving pies, including apple crumble, pumpkin and sweet potato, and four types of stuffing, including traditional, sausage with and without mushrooms, Italian-style, and chestnut. And for those afraid of serving a sub-par gravy, Montrachet roasts off entire whole turkeys, in addition to the those it roasts for customers, to make enormous batches of turkey stock for folks courageous enough to make gravy at home. Says Teiser, “There’s no wrong way to do Thanksgiving; we have some customers that only buy gravy for the big day.” Travel south on Kennett Pike and you’ll run into one of Delaware’s favorite independent grocers, Janssen’s Market. This Greenville landmark has been in business for more than 50 years and was named the country’s most Outstanding Independent Grocer last year by Progressive Grocer. When it comes to catering, General Manager Paula Janssen’s motto is simple: “Let us do the heavy lifting so you can focus on your family and what you like to do.” For example, Janssen’s offers Delaware free-range turkeys from T.A. Farms, LLC in Wyoming, Del. The turkeys are so fresh that they’re available for purchase on the Sunday before Thanksgiving, only days after slaughter.

“It doesn’t get fresher than that. The best part is that you don’t have a frozen turkey in the fridge for an entire week,” says Janssen. And, if you’re looking for a bit more flavor and pizazz, order the capon or rooster, which may be more suitable for large families since it has more meat on it than turkey on a per-pound basis. For those who don’t want to do any cooking on Thanksgiving, Janssen's offers special meal packages that are organized by number of servings and protein. For example, a dinner for six to eight people includes either a beef tenderloin, boneless sliced ham or roasted turkey, and two sides, a potato or starch, and vegetable side, which are selected by weight. Examples of sides include Indian corn pudding, scalloped potatoes, and green bean almondine. All meals include freshly baked rolls, a home-baked pie (pop it in the oven to warm, and make your house smell great), and a floral centerpiece. Pre-order by mid-November. Janssen’s is closed on Thanksgiving Day but open until 7 p.m. the day before. For those who are always late to order, Bachetti Bros. on Kirkwood Highway has you covered. Family-owned and operated, Bachetti Bros. offers everything from deli meats to whole roasted pig. And for the holiday, it offers complete Thanksgiving dinners reasonably priced at $16.49 per person. “There’s no minimum size order. We will serve one to 1,000,” says Laura Morris, catering office manager at Bachetti. The dinner, served family-style, includes oven-roasted turkey, housemade gravy, herb stuffing, mashed potatoes, candied sweet potatoes, vegetable medley, coleslaw, pumpkin raisin bread and, of course, cranberry relish. Place your order by Friday, Nov. 16, and pick up the following week, either Nov. 19, 20, or 21. Says Morris, “We close early on Wednesday, Nov. 21, so the latest pickup time is 3 p.m.” THANKSGIVING CATERING Bachetti Bros. Gourmet Market & Catering, 4723 Kirkwood Hwy, Wilmington, 994-4467, bachettis.com Janssen’s Market, 3801 Kennett Pike, Greenville, 654-9941 or catering@janssensmarket.com, janssensfinefoods.com Montrachet Fine Foods, 5800 Kennett Pike, Centreville, Susan or Kathy at 425-5808, centrevillecafe.com/montrachet

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KRESTON WINE & SPIRITS

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36 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

Restaurants regularly use both wine ard beer in dish preparation.

Cooking with Winter Beers and Wines Add some kick and variety to your dishes, whether at home or dining out By Leeann Wallett

M

ove over, pumpkin spice lattes; it’s time for adult beverage season. As we transition from summer shandies to dark, malty lagers and from crisp white Rieslings to full-bodied reds and sparkling wines, it seems only natural to pair these drinks with winter foods. But what about cooking with them? Try something new this winter. Join us on a journey to discover how to cook with winter beers and wines. But first, let’s address one of the most pressing questions many a chef has had to answer: What happens to alcohol while cooking? It’s conventional wisdom that alcohol burns off when you cook with it. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. According to a 1992

study conducted through a contract by the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food, alcohol retention after cooking ranged from 4 to 85 percent. The percentage difference is attributed to the “heat treatment” or cooking method used. For example, pot roast Milano cooked low and slow with burgundy retained only 4 to 6 percent alcohol, while a Grand Marnier sauce retained most of its alcohol—83 to 85 percent. Cooking with alcohol is a bit less intuitive than drinking or pairing. So, for guidance on how to cook with beer and wine, we spoke with some local experts—a restauranteur, two chefs and a liquor store owner—on how to properly cook with booze. ► NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT COOKING WITH WINTER BEERS AND WINES continued from previoius page

Contrast or Complement

A Holiday Tradition For Elegant Banquets & Holiday Parties Buy A $100 Gift Card Receive A Bonus $20 Gift Card 302.652.6780 | 802 North Union Street Wilmington WalterSteakhouse.com

Most dishes served at restaurants have been prepared using a splash of alcohol. Both wine and beer are regularly used in dish preparation to deglaze pans, braise or tenderize meat, make a sauce, or add additional flavor to a dish. In general, there are two ways to go about cooking with beer or wine, “to contrast or complement [a dish],” says Chef Robert Lhulier, principal at Robert Lhulier Cuisine. First, you can pick a drink that has characteristics that contrast with the flavor of your food. For example, says Lhulier, “a pan-fried rainbow trout in an almond and lemon butter loves an acidic, dry white.” Or, he says, “you can complement a dish, like when a hearty cassoulet calls for an earthy, rich red wine.” When cooking with beer, it’s as simple as adding it to soup or stew. It can stand up to strong flavors and pairs best with meat, cheese, and strong winter spices. Beer also adds more flavor to dishes and is the perfect substitute for water or storebought stock. On the other hand, when selecting wine for cooking, remember Lhulier’s adage: “What grows together, goes together.” “Rioja and paella [from Spain] will always be a classic pairing,” he says, “as well as red wines from the Piedmont and Tuscany [two regions in central Italy] with dishes that contain truffles and mushrooms.” Regardless of what you choose—beer or wine—the most important thing to remember, says Frank Pagliaro, proprietor of Frank’s Wine on North Union Street in Wilmington, is to “never diminish your dish with inferior plonk [stuff].” Use a beer or wine you would actually drink, he advises. Inexpensive “cooking wine” will not impart good flavor, nor will natty lights. Go with a mid-range pick that is table-ready and within your price range.

Beer: Light, Medium or Dark

When cooking with beer, the general rules are: light beer for delicate proteins like fish or chicken, dark beer for red meat like beef or game, and medium beer for either type of protein.

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As beer transitions from fall to winter, Pagliaro recommends trying a Belgian ale. “Belgian brews are sexy,” he says. “I’m in love with Rodenbach Grand Cru to gueuze and Saison styles. These brews will definitely warm your soul in the winter months.” Luckily, you don’t have to go too far to find decent Belgian brew. Market Street’s Stitch House Brewery has one of the most beer-forward menus in Wilmington, thanks to the fruitful partnership of owner Dan Sheridan and Master Brewer Andrew Rutherford. Try the menu regular Soirée, a 5 percent ABV Belgian Saison/farmhouse ale. The best part? All Stitch House beers are available for takeout as a crowler (can + growler) to cook in the comfort of your home. Chef Mark Eastman, owner and operator of Chefs’ Haven, offers a handful of beerforward recipes:

In addition to cooking with it, Eastman also bakes with beer. “This time of the year, I make beer bread,” he says. “The recipe uses beer as the leavening agent, rather than yeast.” His store in Hockessin is also well-known for its housemade baked goods and desserts, including a ginger molasses stout cake made with Guinness. More of a Zinfandel fan? Eastman also bakes a chocolate red wine cake. He says the wine adds “a nutty flavor,” so if you bake at home try using a heavy-body red wine. Both the ginger molasses stout cake and the chocolate red wine cake are only available by pre-order, made three days in advance.

Terroir, Not Terror

Cooking with wine doesn’t need to instill terror in home cooks. Lhulier believes that the “food should dictate what wine to assign with a dish. Terroir [region] is everything.” A simple yet stunning dish that uses wine is the Frutti di Mare or “Fruit of the Sea,” an Italian dish that includes clams, mussels and fish. Says Eastman, “I choose a dry white wine. The wine steams open the clams and cooks the fish to perfection.” Serve it with crusty bread points or on top of al dente pasta for a perfect winter dish. If you’re looking for an easy way to incorporate wine (or beer) into your dinner, make fondue, the Swiss dish that became popular in the U.S. during the 1960s. A standard fondue consists of a blend of cheeses, including gruyère, wine (or beer), and seasonings. It’s served with a plateful of bread cubes, fruit or vegetables. Other fondue variations include chocolate, which can be spiked with a bit of kirsch, dry white wine or your favorite fruity red wine. With the holidays right around the corner, it’s time to crack open a bottle of robust red. Try Pagliaro’s favorite “festive” wine, the Beaujolais, a light-bodied red made of the Gamay grape, originating from the Province of Beaujolais, just north of Lyon, France. Pagliaro prefers the “stunning” Cru Beaujolais produced in the northern-most region. And of the various crus, he recommends the “Saint-Amour, Julénas and Chenas to the north, and the Régnié and Brouilly to the south.” Regardless of which you choose—beer or wine—either will impart deep flavor into your cooking, whether it’s a beer cheese soup or a wine-braised short rib. Have fun experimenting with all types of winter beers and wines, or if you prefer, leave the cooking (and pairing) to the professionals. Stitch House hosted its inaugural beer dinner in October. With so many courses plus a cocktail hour, the dinner was a huge hit, especially with dishes like the “Up in Smoke”— smoked Helles beer paired with the halibut with hibiscus cauliflower purée, roasted cauliflower, and a blackberry reduction. Look for more beer dinners in the future. NOVEMBER AUGUST 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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1934 W. 6th Street, Wilmington (302) 543-5621 40 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT DATE NIGHT AT GRAIN

BITES E Tasty things worth knowing

Compiled by Emily Stover & Elizabeth Carlson

ART IS TASTY AT DAM

O

n the first Friday of every month this year, Delaware Art Museum has been hosting an “Art is Tasty” lunch event. The program is held at noon in the Thronson Café, where a lunch is served to guests. During lunch there is a 30-minute discussion about a pre-selected piece of art. On Nov. 2, the chosen artwork, from the Juried Craft Exhibition, is “Authentic Imitation,” by Teresa Barkley. Cost is $12 for members and $14 for nonmembers. Check out the events page on delart.org to learn more about this and other upcoming Art is Tasty pieces.

BRAILLE MENUS IN, STRAWS OUT AT GREENE TURTLE

G

reene Turtle restaurants are partnering with American Printing House (APH) to release new braille and large print menus for the visually impaired and blind. APH is a non-profit that produces items for the blind and visually impaired. The braille menus comply with the American Disabilities Act, which helps provide all people with equal opportunities. Another way Greene Turtle is making a difference is by joining the #skipthestraw movement. Greene Turtle will no longer serve drinks with plastic straws, and will distribute paper straws only on request. This movement is aimed at reducing the number of straws used in America, which totals more than 500 million per day. Sea turtles, which are the Greene Turtle mascot, are in danger because of the straws and other plastic that ends up in the ocean. With this initiative, the restaurants are hoping not only to lower their plastic waste, but also raise awareness of the problem that plastic waste creates in the world’s oceans.

njoy a night out for two at Grain Craft Bar & Kitchen. For only $39, two guests can enjoy two special entrees plus a dessert, as well as a choice of a bottle of wine or four pints of beer. This special will be available on Wednesdays at Grain H2O in Bear and Thursdays at Grain KSQ in Kennett Square. For more information, email Kelsey@GrainCBK.com or call 443-907-7905.

VEGAN THANKSGIVING AT TWO STONES

O

n Monday, Nov. 12, Two Stones Pub in Newark will host a vegan Thanksgiving, with beer pairings for the night. Guests are encouraged to purchase tickets for $40 per person, gratuity included, which pays for a fourcourse meal along with beer pairings for each course. The event will begin at 7 p.m. at 2 Chesmar Plaza. For more information, visit twostonespub.com.

A TASTE OF REHOBOTH

O

n Thursdays and Sundays throughout November, you can sample Rehoboth Beach cuisine via the beach town’s Eating Rehoboth campaign. The walking tour allows guests to visit five restaurants and a specialty shop. You must book at least two weeks in advance and if you have a party of 12 or more, you can create your own tour. Cost is $55 per person; reserve by calling 888-908-7115.

METRO DINER ADDS CONCORD PIKE

W

ith locations in Newark and Middletown, Metro Diner has served comfort food to Delawareans for more than 25 years. Now it’s adding a third location, at 5600 Concord Pike in North Wilmington. Like all Metro Diners, everything will be made from scratch in-house, and the menu will feature well-known foods with a twist— think burger between two grilled cheeses. The new location is expected to employ nearly 100 people. If you are interested in working there, go to metrodiner.com or call 426-2226.

HOME GROWN CAFÉ UNVEILS NEW MENU

H

ome Grown Café in Newark has just released a new fall/winter menu that General Manager Matt McConnell says is “our most ambitious menu ever. Our chefs were encouraged to take risks in terms of creativity and execution, to step everything up a notch.” Executive Chef Andrew Thorne’s new features include coffee-braised short ribs (featuring Newark’s Little Goat coffee), Caribbean fried grouper, petite beef filets, and braised short rib macaroni and cheese. Home Grown also boasts one of the area’s more robust vegan and vegetarian menus as well as a host of gluten-sensitive options. For a complete look at the new menu visit HomeGrownCafe.com

TILTON MANSION HISTORY TOUR & MEAL

F

rom now until the New Year, the University and Whist Club in Wilmington is offering private tours of Tilton Mansion, with two meals included. The tour includes a Revolutionary War presentation about the history of Tilton Mansion, location of the University and Whist Club. The private tours must be scheduled by guests. Cost is $25 per person for lunch or $45 with lunch and dinner included. For more information, contact Stacey Inglis at 658-5125. NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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NEWS YOU CAN USE! WILMINGTON’S ANNUAL LEAF COLLECTION PROGRAM UNDERWAY

MAYOR PRESENTS PLANS TO IMPROVE EDEN PARK, BAYNARD STADIUM

I

n October, Mayor Purzycki announced a plan to renovate and improve two City parks, and to provide more recreation opportunities for Wilmington’s citizens, especially its youth. The Mayor’s plan will result in the revamping/reconstruction of two, popular City-owned sports facilities—Eden Park on the City’s eastside and Baynard Stadium on the west side. The updated facilities will dramatically increase public access, with the Baynard Stadium part of the plan involving an ambitious public/private partnership between the City and Salesianum School. “This proposal will vastly improve two important city assets while making the facilities more readily available for sporting events and public use,” said the Mayor. “Salesianum’s steadfast commitment to the City will bring about the renaissance of Baynard Stadium, and also enable the City to channel much needed resources to make the revitalization of Eden Park possible.” More information about both proposals can be found online: https://www. wilmingtonde.gov/Home/Components/News/News/4111/225

The Department of Public Works began the City’s Leaf Collection Program on October 15, and it will continue through Friday, December 21. City sweeper or vacuum trucks will collect leaves from the street in designated areas on scheduled days. Residents are asked to sweep all leaves into the street, next to the curb, for collection. For more information on the City’s Leaf Collection Program, please contact the Public Works Call Center at 302.576.3878, Mon. – Fri. from 6 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The 2018 leaf collection schedule can be found online: www.WilmingtonDE.gov/leafcollection.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR NOV 2

ART LOOP WILMINGTON

NOV 6

ELECTION DAY (CITY OFFICES CLOSED)

NOV 22-23

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY (CITY OFFICES CLOSED)

NOV 24

55TH ANNUAL JAYCEES CHRISTMAS PARADE

For more meetings and events in the month of November, visit: https://www.wilmingtonde.gov/.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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302-425-4890

RIVERFRONTRINK.COM

FOLLOW US

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@RIVERFRONTRINK

10/24/18 10:32 AM


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1. Amtrak Station 2. Opera Delaware Studios/City Theater Co. 3. Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn., WYRA.ORG 4. Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park 5. Residences at Christina Landing 6. Bank’s Seafood Kitchen & Raw Bar / Riverfront Market, BANKSSEAFOODKITCHEN.COM 7. Delaware Theatre Co., DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG 8. Docklands Riverfront, DOCKLANDSRIVERFRONT.COM 9. Cosi at the Barclays Crescent Building, GETCOSI.COM 10. Hare Pavilion/Riverwalk 11. AAA Mid-Atlantic Travel Center, AAAMIDATLANTIC.COM 12. The Delaware Contemporary, DECONTEMPORARY.ORG

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13. Justison Landing, Currie Hair, Skin & Nails, CURRIEDAYSPA.COM Veritas Wine & Spirits, VERITASWINESHOP.COM Starbucks on the Riverfront Riverfront Pets, RIVERFRONTPETS.COM 14. Del Pez Mexican Gastropub, DELPEZMEXICANPUB.COM Goju Training Center, GOJUROBICS.COM 15. Delaware Children’s Museum, DELAWARECHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG Riverwalk Mini Golf, RIVERWALKMINIGOLF.COM 16. Joe’s Crab Shack, JOESCRABSHACK.COM 17. Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant, IRONHILLBREWERY.COM 18. Public Docks 19. Big Fish Grill, BIGFISHRIVERFRONT.COM

10/24/18 10:33 AM


Opening November 23 riverfrontrink.com

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Visit RiverfrontWilm.com for info on events happening at the Riverfront! Photo by Joe del Tufo 20. Frawley Stadium, BLUEROCKS.COM Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame 21. Chase Center on the Riverfront, CENTERONTHERIVERFRONT.COM 22. Dravo Plaza & Dock 23. Shipyard Center Planet Fitness, PLANETFITNESS.COM 24. Timothy’s Restaurant, TIMOTHYSONTHERIVERFRONT.COM Molly’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream, MOLLYSICECREAM.COM Ubon Thai Restaurant 25. Wilmington Rowing Center, WILMINGTONROWING.ORG 26. Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge/ DuPont Environmental Education Center, DUPONTEEC.ORG 27 Riverfront Commuter Lot, RIVERFRONTWILM.COM/PARKING

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28. Penn Cinema Riverfront IMAX, PENNCINEMARIVERFRONT.COM 29. CrossFit Riverfront, CFRIVERFRONT.COM 30. The Residences at Harlan Flats, HARLANFLATS.THERESIDENCES.NET 31. Altitude Trampoline Park, ALTITUDEWILMINGTON.COM 32. The Westin Wilmington, WESTINWILMINGTON.COM River Rock Kitchen, RIVERROCKKITCHEN.COM 33. Delaware Humane Association, DEHUMANE.ORG 34. Kalmar Nyckel Shipyard/Fort Christina Park, KALMARNYCKEL.ORG 35. Jack A Markell Bike Trail 36. Constitution Yards Beer Garden, CONSTITUTIONYARDS.COM Horizon Services Riverfront Rink, RIVERFRONTRINK.COM

10/24/18 10:33 AM


presented by

November 2 5pm Start Complimentary Shuttle Service (see website)

cityfest A program of the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs

Howard Pyle Studio

DCAD

Movable Feast

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LaFate Gallery

Station Gallery

Mezzanine Gallery

Bellefonte Arts

Howard Pyle Studio

The Grand Opera House

10/25/18 10:55 AM


RIVERFRONT The Delaware Contemporary 200 South Madison St. 656-6466 • decontemporary.org Artists: Gina Bosworth, Linda Celestian, Linnea Tober, Serge Marchetta, Jenna Lucente and Hugh Atkins

DOWNTOWN 2nd & LOMA 211 N. Market St. 2ndandloma.com Artist: Denise Palestini Pino Christina Cultural Arts Center 705- 707 N. Market St. 429-0101 • ccacde.org Artist: Stephen Kingsberry The Chris White Gallery 701 N. Shipley St. 690-9051 • chriswhitegallery.com The Creative Vision Factory 617 N. Shipley St. • 543-3082 thekingoftransit.wordpress.com Artist: Geraldo Gonzalez Toni & Stuart B. Young Gallery at Delaware College of Art and Design (DCAD) 600 N. Market St. 622-8000 • dcad.edu/gallery Artist: Henry Bermudez EatClean 225 N. Market Street 476-8928 Artist: James Wyatt Grace United Methodist Church 900 Washington St. Gracechurchwest.com Artist: Bobbie Chelucci

The Grand Opera House 818 N. Market St. 658-7897 • thegrandwilmington.org Artist: Ray Magnani Hotel du Pont 100 W. 11th St. 594-3256 • hoteldupont.com Artist: TBA LaFate Gallery 227 N. Market St. 656-6786 • lafategallery.com Artist: Eunice LaFate Mezzanine Gallery 820 N. French St. 577-8278 • arts.delaware.gov Artist: Henry Bielicki MKT Place Gallery 200 W. 9th Street 438-6545 Artist: Roldan West The Music School of Delaware 4101 Washington St. • 762-1132 musicschoolofdelaware.org Artist: Sara F. Gallagher Studio on Market 219 N. Market Street 229-7108 Artist: Michael Orhelein

WEST END The 3rd Place (3P Gallery) 1139 W. 7th St., Suite C 3rdplacewilm.org Artists: 4th Annual Ornament Show Artists

Blue Streak Gallery 1721 Delaware Ave. 429-0506 Artists: Lisa Bartolozzi, Maggi DeBaecke, Alida Fish, Larry Holmes, Jeannie Pearce, Rick Rothrock, Lynda Schmid, Greg Silvis, Bob Straight, and Steve Tanis Howard Pyle Studio 1305 N. Franklin St. howardpylestudio.org Artists: The Artists of The Howard Pyle Studio featuring Bonita Frawley Movable Feast 2510 W. 5th Street 656-8892 • movablefeastde.com Artist: Adam M. Smith St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church 1301 N. Broom St. 652-7623 • ststeph.org Artist: Pacem In Terris Traveling Youth Peace Exhibition

BEYOND THE CITY Arden’s Buzz Ware Village Center 2119 The Highway programs@ardenbuzz.com Artist: Heather J. Siple Bellefonte Arts 803-C Brandywine Blvd. 762-4278 • bellefontearts.com Artist: Heather J. Siple Christ Church Christiana Hundred 505 E. Buck Road 978.460-8120 • dfva.org Artists: Delaware Foundation for the Visual Arts Fall Art Show Station Gallery 3999 Kennett Pike 654-8638 • stationgallery.net Artist: Linda Ford

Next Art Loop Wilmington: December 7, 2018

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10/24/18 10:38 AM


OPEN THANKSGIVING AT 7PM!

Polly Drummond Location Only

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MONDAYS

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Enjoy Our Great Specials During Every Pro Football Game! $7.99 Wings •$7.99 Nachos • $5.99 Tots • $8.99 Coors Light & Yuengling Pitchers • $12.99 Blue Moon Pitchers • Free BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwiches During The Game! TUESDAYS

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WEDNESDAYS

All You Can Eat Wings $12.99 after 5pm $1 Off Craft Draft Beers 7pm-Close

108 Peoples Plaza (Corner of Rtes. 40 & 896) | Newark, DE | 302-834-6661 8 Polly Drummond Shopping Center | Newark, DE | 302-738-7814 800 North State Street | Dover, DE | 302-674-0144

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A


Photo courtesy of The Delaware Contemporary

WATCH

"Wildflowers" by Gina Bosworth, one of the artists who will be part of SABA IV.

Go on an (Affordable) Art-Buying Binge! Just $25 gets you an original work By Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald

T

he Delaware Contemporary gives us all the chance to live an art collector’s life at its annual event, SABA IV, on Saturday, Nov. 17, 6-9 p.m. at the museum’s Riverfront-area location. Dubbed a “Small Art-Buying Adventure,” the event is a large-scale exhibit of selected 6x6-inch works by artists from across the world. So far, the event has acquired pieces from emerging artists from the West Coast, international artists from as far away as China, and established artists such as Ola Rondiak, Stan Smokler, Rick Rothrock, Nanci Hersh and Eddy RhenalsNarvaez. In addition, there will be plenty of pieces from our local community’s talent. All artwork will be displayed anonymously until sold—and all will be available for sale to patrons at an exceptionally affordable sum of $25 apiece.

“Part of the excitement with SABA is that none of the work is revealed until the event, and it's displayed anonymously, so you don't know whose work you are buying until you literally take it off the wall,” days Delaware Contemporary Marketing Manager Tatiana Michels. The event is capped off with live music from Milan and the Sour Goat, dinner by Drip Café and a cash bar. An exclusive Patron Preview begins at 6 p.m., serving complimentary champagne and hors d'oeuvres with the opportunity to preview and reserve one artwork choice before the Open Party, which begins at 7. Tickets for the Patron Preview are $100; Open Party tickets are $35 in advance or $40 at the door. All are available at decontemporary.org. ► NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH GO ON AN (AFFORDABLE) ART-BUYING BINGE! continued from previous page

“While all the works available during SABA are ‘unlabeled,’” says Michels, “we wanted to give patrons a sneak peek and acknowledge two participating artists in honor of the Contemporary’s 40th anniversary—Gina Bosworth and Rick Rothrock. “Gina was our first executive board president and as one of our founding members, her presence has been instrumental in shaping the vision and direction of Wilmington's art environment,” notes Michels. In addition to helping establish The Delaware Contemporary in 1979, Bosworth owned and operated a business, Axis Fine Arts. She has exhibited regionally and nationally, with exhibitions at the Delaware Center for Horticulture, the Read-Johnson Gallery in Santa Fe, N.M., and the Delaware Art Museum. Bosworth has also been the recipient of the Delaware Division of the Arts Opportunity Fellowship and the Interweave Press Award for best in show at the Northern Colorado Exhibition. Michels notes that Rick Rothrock spearheaded the development of an artist collaborative called the "ArtSquad" in the 1970s that created participatory, environmental art installations throughout the Wilmington area. Rothrock’s endeavor eventually led to the establishment of the Delaware Center for Contemporary Art (now The Delaware Contemporary). He went on to serve as the first acting director and remained on the board of directors for eight years. Since then, he has created public works for institutions across the nation. Both Bosworth and Rothrock have or will have exhibits at the Contemporary this season as well. Bosworth’s, called “Confluence,” is running now through March. Rothrock's joint exhibition with Stan Smokler, entitled “Origins,” will be on display Jan. 8 through April 21. “We’re pleased to have had an incredible amount of donations from artists at all careers levels,” Michels says of the event. “The essence of SABA is that not only does it spark an interest in art collecting for those that may not know where to begin, it gives all artists equal opportunity to showcase their work in a museum setting.” What’s more, Michels adds, the event’s timing and price is perfect for one-of-akind holiday gifts. 52 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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The Delaware Historical Society’s (DHS) exhibit, The First State on the Front: WWI and the Road to Victorious Peace, memorializes the centennial of World War I while exploring Delawareans’ participation, experiences and sacrifices both in the war and on the home front. Museum visitors will be transported back to 1917, as they explore attitudes toward the United States’ entry into World War I. Portions of the exhibit touch upon the experiences of African American soldiers, Delaware organizations and activities that supported the war effort and experiences of Delaware veterans after they returned home. It will also honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice. To augment this exhibit—which includes notable artifacts like a soldier’s gear, letters, medals and wartime propaganda posters—the staff of DHS wanted to add another layer of interactivity, and Market Street Music’s Music Director David Schelat was happy to oblige. “We were seeking a new avenue to serve the community demographically and artistically,” says Schelat. “This collaboration was the perfect solution—it makes available a free arts experience to a larger, more diverse audience, connects two distinct groups of existing patron bases, and provides an enhancement to a cultural program in our downtown footprint.” The result is three dates (consecutive Thursdays, Nov. 1, 8 and 15, at 12:30 p.m.) during which Market Street Music will present complementary works from the era, featuring a new ensemble of performers and genres each week. First up on Nov. 1 is University of Delaware flute and guitar duo Eileen Grycky and Christiaan Taggart. On Nov. 8, Delaware jazz favorite Sharon Sable is accompanied by multi-instrumentalist Shawn Qaissaunee. Finally, the Copeland String Quartet and local baritone star Grant Youngblood perform on Nov. 15. How did the repertoire develop? Schelat first selected the perfect ensembles for this delightful and resonant space, then talked with DHS to pick the repertoire that fit the theme. “I think it will be great,” he says. “We’re covering everything from popular songs interpreted by songstress Sharon Sable, Debussy played by the wonderful TaggartGrycky Duo, and the luscious songs of George Butterworth by the [Copeland String] Quartet and Youngblood.” “Our intention is to arrange and perform songs we've chosen in a way that honors the emotion of those times,” says Sable of their Nov. 8 performance. “Shawn and I have chosen some beautifully honest and emotional pieces, as well as songs that provided some respite from the sadness of the war.” Sable notes that it's important to her to choose songs that she can connect with, and sometimes that means finding lesser-known music. “A lot of our repertoire is from The Great American Songbook, which is mostly from the post-WWI era. It’s been interesting to get a sense of what was happening in popular music pre-WWI and how it became a reflection of what was happening in the country.” “DHS is particularly pleased [with this partnership], because coupling music from the era with this exhibit uniquely enhances our guests’ experience,” says Advancement Director Karen Kegelman. Kegelman notes that popular music of the time helped Americans cope with the realities of wartime and helped to rally public support for the war effort. The “Tin Pan Alley” era produced patriotic tunes and ballads to cheer on the fighting men and tug at the heartstrings. Kegelman cites examples such as “Over There,” written by George M. Cohan and “My Sweetheart is Somewhere in France,” sung by Elizabeth Spencer, both from 1917. “These songs, which captured the tragedy of the world at war, families separated, and loved ones lost, continue to resonate a century later,” says Kegelman. Admission to the exhibits is free for Historical Society members, $6 for adults over 18, $5 for seniors/military/students, and $4 for children age 4-18. Admission is waived the first Friday of each month. Admission is free to all Thursday Noontime Concerts. ►

Photo courtesy of The Delaware Historical Society

Delaware in WWI Commemorated in Exhibit, Complemented with Music

Department of Music Schola Cantorum At the DSO

Friday, November 9, 7:30 p.m.

Lawrence Stomberg, cello, and Julie Nishimura, piano Friday, November 9, 8:00 p.m.

Juliana Osinchuk, piano, and Sheila Browne, viola

Tuesday, November 13, 8:00 p.m.

Calidore String Quartet

Wednesday November 14, 8:00 p.m.

Jazz Ensembles I and II

Thursday, November 15, 8:00 p.m.

Delaware Steel

Monday, November 26, 8:00 p.m.

Faculty Jazz

Friday, November 30, 8:00 p.m.

Brian Carter, baritone, and Julie Nishimura, piano

Saturday, December 1, 8:00 p.m.

Carols by Candlelight

Sunday, December 2 7:00 p.m.

Serafin String Quartet & Friends

Monday, December 3, 8:00 p.m.

Symphonic Band and Friends

Tuesday, December 4, 8:00 p.m.

Wind Ensemble

Wednesday, December 5, 8:00 p.m.

Symphony Orchestra

Thursday, December 6, 7:00 p.m.

Choral Celebration

Sunday, December 9, 3:00 p.m.

MUSIC.UDEL.EDU NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH Newly Remodeled Shop! Including a brand new 250-square-foot vinyl record room, new CD room, a whole wall of 45s and cassettes, new clothing space, and more!

GO ON AN (AFFORDABLE) ART-BUYING BINGE! continued from previous page

Presents

First 100 customers get an exclusive FREE 13” x 22” poster designed by local UD student Eric Varakian! Shirts with his design will also be available, printed by Spaceboy Clothing.

Rainbow Records is a certified Record Store Day location and will be offering more than 125 limited-edition vinyl records from:

John Coltrane, The Breeders, The Doors, Ramones, The Grateful Dead & Jerry Garcia, Herbie Hancock, Paul McCartney, Phish, Rage Against the Machine, Dead Kennedys, Talking Heads, Muddy Waters, and more!

54 E MAIN ST, REAR, NEWARK, DE WWW.RAINBOWRECORDSDE.COM (302) 368-7738

Arden continues to draw a broad spectrum of artists to its stage this season, this month welcoming Kaia Kater on Saturday, Nov. 3, at 8 p.m. Born in Québec of African-Caribbean descent, Kater’s banjo skills, jazz-fueled tones and skillful craft have garnered her accolades, like this from Rolling Stone: "...plaintive, mesmerizing...writes and performs with the skill of a folk-circuit veteran..." Kater started her career early, releasing her EP Old Soul (2013) when she was just out of high school. Since then, Kaia Kater she’s released two additional albums, Sorrow Bound (2015) and Nine Pin (2016), won a Canadian Folk Music Award and a Stingray Rising Star Award, and embarked on a tour from Ireland to Iowa, including stops at The Kennedy Center, Newport Folk Festival and Cambridge Folk Festival. Kater is joined by Richie Stearns, a favorite banjo player of Arden, who performed previously with his band The Horse Flies. He has a new duo—Richie and Rosie—with the fabulous Rosie Newton. Stearns and Newton grew up 150 miles and a few decades apart. While both were raised by professional musicians, Stearns started banjo at 14 and Newton began classical piano at 8, moving to viola as a teen. Stearns’ family founded the iconic GrassRoots Festival of Music & Dance, and Newton, by her junior year of high school, was playing fiddle and touring with folk-rock band The Mammals. The two met at Saratoga Springs’ Flurry Festival—a meeting that ultimately sparked a friendship and musical bond. Tickets for the performance are $12 for Arden Gild members and $15 for the public at Eventbrite.com. In other breaking Concert Gild news: While the Sunday, Dec. 9, Lisa Loeb show has been long sold out, tickets are available for the popular annual performance by the Spring Standards, which makes a move from Boxing Day to Saturday, Dec. 29. And—this just in— fans can ring in 2019 on Dec. 31 with the David Bromberg Quintet. Better move fast on these two…they’re sure sell-outs!

Photo Raez Argulla

A Canadian Import Rocks the Arden Stage

Christina Cultural Arts Center Hosts Grammy-Nominated Jazz Pianist

Christina Cultural Arts Center continues its music series, Live @ Christina, on Friday, Nov. 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the intimate Clifford Brown Performance Center. The series welcomes the return to Wilmington of five-time Grammy-nominated jazz pianist Christian Sands. Christina Executive Director Raye Jones Avery and faculty member Ken Brown first met Sands during a National Guild of Community Schools of the Arts conference in Boston more than a decade ago, when Sands was a teenager. The two subsequently invited Sands to Wilmington to perform in concert at the Delaware Theater Company with his ensemble. Not yet 30 years old, Sands is one of the most in-demand pianists in jazz. In the last few years, he has toured the world as a bandleader and recently appeared as a sideman on records by Christian McBride and Gregory Porter. Sands made his dynamic debut CD Reach in 2017. Facing Dragons, his newest CD, was released this year and heralds his return to the recording studio with a solid group of musicians and an unwavering allegiance to “the groove.” Tickets for the performance are $35 and are available at ccacde.org. This engagement of Christian Sands is made possible through the Jazz Touring Network program of the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

54 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

Beautiful Boy

5

STARS  Timothée Chalamet as Nic Sheff hugs Maura Tierney, who plays Karen Babour, wife of Steve Carell, far right, who plays Nic's father, David. Photo Francois Duhamel, courtesy of Amazon Studios

A FAMILY IN ADDICTION CRISIS Beautiful Boy features rich performances, troubling story By Mark Fields

N

owadays, the headlines are rife with the alarming consequences of the opioid epidemic. But, of course, this is by no means the first (or likely last) drug addiction crisis modern society has faced. Recent drugs of choice include crystal meth, crack cocaine and heroin. Go further back in our human history and you will encounter the horrors of opium, morphine and laudanum. Addiction is nothing new, but the statistics fail to capture the tragedy that drug addiction wreaks on the individuals and families involved. Beautiful Boy, a film based on the real-life experience of David and Nic Sheff (and their parallel books on the subject), makes the noble effort to put this national crisis into human terms. The movie distills the essence of one family’s encounter with addiction in all of its searing and sometimes contradictory emotions: despair, optimism, anger, love, denial, perseverance, surrender and grief.

Informed by sensitive, resonant performances by Steve Carell and Timotheé Chalamet (as well as Maura Tierney and Amy Ryan) and thoughtfully directed by Felix Van Groeningen, Beautiful Boy is a cinematic experience that I will not soon forget, but the film also transcends this individual story to encourage a greater dialogue about an issue facing all of us. Based on David Sheff’s book of the same name and his son Nic’s book Tweak, the movie depicts a supportive, loving family as they slowly begin to realize that their teenage son has become addicted to a variety of recreational drugs. Beautiful Boy takes the viewer slowly, excruciatingly through the relentless patterns of rehab and detox as all of the family attempts to cope with the toll of this disease. As the film concludes, one realizes that while there may be one happy ending here, recovery for most addict families, even the Sheffs, is a continuing struggle. I found myself thinking how fortunate, and incredibly lucky, I am that this story was not more familiar to me personally. ► NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH A FAMILY IN ADDICTION CRISIS continued from previous page

Incidentally, the fact that the Sheff family had the resources needed to get Nic into treatment, and yet to no permanent recovery, reinforces two powerful points: 1) not every addict has such luxury to get much-needed help, and 2) addiction is a disease that is impervious to affluence, education, age, geography or class. Steve Carell, who is more familiar to movie audiences as a comedic actor, brings subtle depth and feeling to his role as father David. And Chalamet, who broke through with his Oscar-nominated performance in Call me By Your Name last year, demonstrates that he can hold his own. Tierney, as David’s current wife, and Amy Ryan, as his ex, turn in quiet but impactful performances. A special shout-out to LisaGay Hamilton for her brief but memorable speech as a support-group mother dealing with the pain and grief of her family’s loss. There is nothing astonishing in the craft of the direction or the screenwriting, except that both wisely keep the human drama at the forefront. Similarly, the movie’s set/art direction and music are unobtrusive. Beautiful Boy is one of those occasional movies that may be less important as a film than for what it could represent in making this issue worthy of more consideration and conversation. It takes a headline and makes it real and human. For that, I am grateful. Coming also in November: Rami Malek (Mr. Robot) stars as rock star Freddie Mercury in Bohemian Rhapsody, Nov. 2; The Girl in the Spider’s Web reboots the Swedish thriller series with Claire Foy in the lead, Nov. 9; the latest story from the Potterverse, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, Nov. 16; Creed II with Michael B. Jordan, Tessa Thompson and Sylvester Stallone, Nov. 21; and If Beale Street Could Talk, a Harlem-set family drama from director Barry Jenkins (Moonlight), Nov. 30.

56 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

WINTER BEERS

STITCH HOUSE SHO NUFF STOUT My beer selection often changes with the weather and my stout season has arrived. I recently tried the "Sho Nuff Stout" at Stitch House and sho ‘nuff, it was everything I expected—creamy, smooth and slightly malty with a hint of chocolate. It went perfectly with my bowl of chili. — Matt Loeb, Creative Director & Production Manager

FOUNDERS CBS (CANADIAN BREAKFAST STOUT) You can't go wrong with any stout from Founders; the Breakfast Stout is a staple, and their imperial, bourbon barrel aged KBS (Kentucky Breakfast Stout) brewed with coffee and chocolate, is quite simply amazing. Now imagine KBS was aged in bourbon barrels that were previously used in aging pure Michigan maple syrup. Voila! The flavors are quite good—rich maple syrup, roasty coffee and decadent chocolate. At almost 12 percent ABV, this is my definition of a "winter warmer." — Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer

2SP BABY BOB STOUT Many 2SP fans refer to this stout as the American baby brother to “The Russian”—brewmaster Bob Barrar’s legendary Russian Imperial Stout—which also happens to be one of the most awarded beers in the history of both the Great American Beer Festival and the World Beer Cup. Such familial comparisons are moot if you are looking for a session stout. Baby Bob is much more approachable in that regard at just 6.5 percent ABV, where “The Russian” looms much larger, north of 9 percent. Both pack a solid first punch, with lots of roasty flavors upfront. But Baby Bob manages to be bold without bowling you over, while being light, smooth and sweet enough to keep you coming back for more. — Jim Miller, Director of Publications

DOGFISH HEAD BITCHES BREW STOUT I am typically a year-round IPA guy, but for a warm winter meal-in-a-bottle, Dogfish Head's Bitches' Brew is an annual favorite. A delicious imperial stout brewed with honey conjures notes of Miles Davis' iconic trumpet, and the classic album cover adorning its slate black bottle is a perfect frame. — Joe del Tufo, Contributing Photographer

FOUNDERS PORTER East Coast craft lovers looking to keep warm in the face of colder temps should look no further than the coast of Lake Michigan. The folks in Grand Rapids know their robust beers, and Founders Porter is the perfect example, hopped up at 6.5 percent, but full of sweet chocolate notes and a velvety finish. Catch a pint of this midwestern magic at Trolley Square Oyster House for just $4.75 a pint. — Rob Kalesse, Contributing Writer

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

Thanksgiving Wines Our expert provides guidance through the myriad choices By John Murray

T

hanksgiving is a festive time, and a day to bless the harvest with a bacchanalian feast. Choosing wine for this feast is easy. There are many flavors of food on the table that complement many varietals: white, red and rosé, so there is no wrong or right wine. As I say to anyone who asks, drink what you like! I usually pour wines from Oregon and California for our Thanksgiving. Here is a short, basic guide to wines that match the feast.

Whites

Riesling: A grape that exhibits floral and soft perfume, with a delicate bouquet and flavor. It’s a light, clean, delicate and bright wine, which can be dry to sweet. Three examples are Kung Fu Girl from Washington State (yes, that’s really the name), Dashe dry Riesling from California, and Helioterre Starthistle cuvee from Oregon.

Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris: This varietal is related to Pinot Noir. Melon and tropical fruit flavors give this grape a medium-bodied, slightly oily, rich texture. An excellent example is Adelsheim from the Willamette Valley in Oregon. Sauvignon Blanc: This is a usually crisp and dry grape with a medium body. Sometimes hints of minerals, herbs and grassiness are present, making a perfect match for the bird. Producers of this wine include Dry Creek Vineyards, Frog’s Leap, and Sidebar by Ramey. ►

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK WINE THERAPY continued from previous page

Chardonnay: This is the greatest and most well-known white grape varietal in the world. It is medium- to full-bodied dry wine with hints of apples, pears, citrus, melons, and butter cream. Examples include Iron Horse (no oak), Ramey Russian River or Sonoma Coast, and Argyle from the Willamette Valley. Champagne/Sparkling: Every year, we start our Thanksgiving feast with a touch of bubbly. It’s a festive and delightful wine that tantalizes and tingles the taste buds. It can be enjoyed before, during and after dinner. Some people try to include Iron Horse Brut, A to Z Rose, and Gloria Ferrer Blanc de Noir. There are other whites that will work well with the meal, including Chenin Blanc, Gruner Veltliner, Gewürztraminer and Grenache Blanc.

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Reds

Pinot Noir: This is successfully grown around the world in cooler climates. Here in the states, we have fruit from the Willamette Valley in Oregon and in cooler coastal areas of California. Characteristics of this grape match well: soft and elegant, with hints of raspberries, cherries and strawberries make a perfect Thanksgiving match. Try Baileyanna from California; St. Innocent Freedom Hill and Le Cadeau from Oregon; and Moshin Westside Crossing from Sonoma. Red Zinfandel: With fuller bodied fruit flavors with lots of black currants and pepper spices, this is one of my favorite varietals and is only grown successfully in California. Several to enjoy are Dashe Dry Creek, Pedroncelli Mother Clone, Steele, Neyers, and Ridge Vineyards. Other reds that will work with turkey are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Petit Sirah and blends. Use your imagination and drink what you like. It all works. Don’t forget the rosés. There are still some amazing dry rosés left on the market, including Pedroncelli Dry Zinfandel Rosé and Tablas Creek Patelin Rosé. In closing, Thanksgiving is a festive time, so why not try different wines and figure out what your family and friends like best? It makes for a fun afternoon between football games. Enjoy! John Murray is proprietor of State Line Liquors

62 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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HAPPY HOUR 3-6pm • Mon-Fri Half-Price Burgers $5 Homemade Mozzarella Pizza Topped w/ Fresh Basil $1 OFF Terrapin, Yuengling, Miller Lite and Any Other of Our 16 Craft Draft Beers $6 Select Wines

1709 Lovering Ave Wilmington (302) 655-3689 Gallucios-de.com Facebook “f ” Logo

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Check out our catering menu on-line

Knights of Columbus Fundraiser

HAPPY HOUR NACHOS ONLY $9! 4019 KENNETT PIKE • GREENVILLE, DE 19807 • 302.655.3785

Gluten-free, Vegetarian & Vegan Menu Half-price Wines Every Wed. & Sat. Night

BBCTAVERNANDGRILL.COM

with Guest Bartenders Friday, Nov. 2. 7-10pm

SUNDAY-FUNDAY SPECIAL! LARGE CHEESE PIZZA & 1 POUND OF WINGS ONLY $15! Eat In or Take Out (Sundays Only)

64 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

STRETCHING FOR A BREW

D

SIPS

Here's what's pouring

oes alcohol help you loosen up? Enough to do some serious stretching? Then Midnight Oil Brewing Company in Newark may be a destination for you. The craft brewery is hosting yoga classes and providing beer as a reward. Classes are held every other Tuesday at 6 p.m. beginning Nov. 6 through Dec. 18, and one Sunday a month on Nov. 11 and Dec. 9 at 10:30 a.m. Cost is $15 per class and includes a pint of beer. Guests may contact the venue at 286-7641 for more information.

WINE TASTING AT THE MARY CAMPBELL CENTER

T

he Mary Campbell Center in Wilmington will host a wine tasting and silent auction on Friday, Nov. 2, from 6:30-8:30 pm. All proceeds will go to center to assist disabled adults. Guests can enjoy wines provided by Kreston’s Wine & Spirits and participate in a silent auction, which will include a wide range of items. Appetizers and desserts are included in the $35 tickets, which will be available at the door or by calling 652-3792.

Compiled by Emily Stover & Elizabeth Carlson

D

uring the 26th annual Wine Feast & Auction on Friday, Nov. 2, the Delaware Theatre Company will honor a few people who have made the company what it is today. The founder, Cleveland Morris, is one of the honorees, as well several directors who have retired. These individuals, along with many others, have created programs for people of all ages to enjoy this expression of art, and have performed and developed a great number of shows. The event will be held at the Chase Center at the Riverfront from 6- 9:30 p.m. Guests can enjoy fine wine and craft beer, food, and a live band. There also will be a live auction and a silent auction. Tickets are available at DelawareTheatre.org or by calling 594-1100.

BEHIND THE SCENES AT DOGFISH HEAD BREWERY

CANAL BREWFEST

D

O

ogfish Brewery is teaming with WHYY, the public media association, to host a behind-the-scenes look at its Milton brewery on Thursday, Nov. 8. Guests can tour the brewing station and distilling operations, taste new products, and participate in a Q&A session. All proceeds from the event will go toward WHYY programs and services. There will be two tours, one beginning at 5 p.m. and the other beginning at 7:15 p.m. For more information, visit support.whyy.org/dogfishhead.

n Sunday, Nov. 11, Grain H2O in Bear will hold its first annual Brewfest, featuring 18 beers on tap from more than 10 local breweries. There will be live music from local artists as well as an endless buffet. Included in the buffet is a pretzel sampler with different sauces, a chili bar and other options. Tickets are $39 for the 2-5 p.m. event, and brewery swag is included in the price. Visit meetatgrain. com/canal-brewfest for more information or to purchase tickets.

ONCE THESE EARTHLY VESSELS ARE GONE FROM THE WINE & SPIRITS CO. OF GREENVILLE, THEY WILL NEVER BE SEEN AGAIN.

W

ilmington Brew Works, the first production brewery to be located in Wilmington’s city limits since 1954, has been selected to be part of The 48 Beer Project, a year-long project by Maine-based artist Heidi Geist to create artwork for breweries in each of the continental United States. Geist has designed labels for nearly 20 craft breweries over the last three years. She is currently on a national tour via her minischool bus mobile studio. During her threeday stay, Geist will create artwork on two of Wilmington Brew Works’ wooden barrels. The artwork will become semi-permanent fixtures on display in the brewery taproom.

26TH ANNUAL WINE, FEAST & AUCTION

ALC. BY VOL. 7.2% IMPERIAL PORTER AGED IN BOURBON BARRELS BREWED BY 2SP BREWING, ASTON, PA ONE PINT, 9.3 OZ / 750 ML

WILMINGTON BREW WORKS PART OF NATIONAL ART PROJECT

THE WINE & SPIRIT CO. OF GREENVILLE RELEASES 2SP COLLABORATIONS

B

eer lovers now have the opportunity to try two very exclusive collaborations from 2SP Brewery and The Wine & Spirit Co. of Greenville. The first, Heaven’s Gate, is an Imperial Porter aged for eight months in Elijah Craig Bourbon barrel. The beer is describe as having a “dark malty finish with a touch of caramel and sweetness.” The second brew, also an Imperial Porter, has been aged in a High West Rye barrel, which has added a dryer finish and an hint of herbal flavor. NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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The NFL Season IS FINALLY HERE!

AND STANLEY’S IS STILL THE PLACE TO WATCH! Win a 2 year lease on a NEW Ford Fusion or Nissan Altima

Courtesy of the

Sheridan Auto Group

Join our Frequent Fan Club (it’s free to join). Every visit you make to Stanley’s from Sept. 1, 2018 until Jan 1, 2019 gives you a chance to be one of the four weekly finalists! Drawing will be during half-time of the Pro-Football Championship Game! You must be present to win. Must be at least 21 years of age. Must qualify for lease & supply your own insurance for the car lease.

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66 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

Connecting the Community at Humble Park With comedy nights and concerts, Spaceboy Clothing spearheads an effort to help revitalize a neglected area of Wilmington A comedian performs at a Humble Park event.

By Jacob Orledge Photos by Noah Merenda

T

wo years ago, the park on Fourth and Shipley streets in Wilmington stood abandoned and rundown. Since then, Spaceboy Clothing has led a movement to make what is now known as Humble Park, a part of downtown Wilmington’s revitalized nightlife. The initiative got its start when Spaceboy, a custom clothing store on Market Street, partnered with comedian Brandon Jackson to host comedy nights in the store’s basement. “We were doing comedy shows in our basement for a while and it started to get really popular,” says David Sanchez, coowner of Spaceboy Clothing. The crowds got so large, in fact, that it became a fire hazard to continue hosting them in the basement. So Sanchez began to look at other venues. That’s when the park down the road caught his eye. Officially named Delaware Tech Plaza, the park features a large sculpture shaped like a sail. When Sanchez thought about using it to host a series of events, he reached out to the artist who created the sculpture, Ric Snead, who gave his blessing to hang a “Humble Park” sign on the sculpture.

“I wanted everyone to feel welcome there. No matter who you are you shouldn’t have to feel like you are better or not as good as someone else,” Sanchez says. “That’s where the humble comes from.”

Enter Downtown Visions

Although there have been efforts to officially rename Delaware Tech Plaza, nothing definitive has happened yet, but members of the community have begun referring to the area as “Humble Park” instead of the rather cumbersome Delaware Tech Plaza. To clean up the park and organize a series of events at the site, Sanchez approached Downtown Visions, a nonprofit that has been working to revitalize downtown Wilmington since 1994. “They contacted us to see how they could have an event at that park,” says Lani Schweiger, Project and Communication manager for Downtown Visions. “We helped with getting permits from the city. The park was forgotten and kind of run down. There was a volunteer day where local neighbors, businesses, artists, residents, all came out. Downtown Visions staff, the city Public Works also were out there.” ► NOVEMBER JUNE 2018 2017 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

HOW MUCH EXTRA IS YOUR GYM MEMBERSHIP COSTING YOU?

ONLY 25/MO. $

CONNECTING THE COMMUNITY AT HUMBLE PARK continued from previous page

PLUS ENROLLMENT FEE

All classes included, no additional fees.

Concerts were also on the schedule at Humble Park.

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Now in its second year of using Humble Park, Spaceboy Clothing organized six events this past summer in a series christened “Keep It Cool.” The events included comedy nights hosted and led by Jackson as well as concerts featuring bands like The Bad Larrys, Gozer and Eye Bawl. “It’s a big, huge community gathering at this park that no one knew about to promote the city and get people together and open people’s eyes,” Sanchez says. Sanchez and his business partner, Noah Merenda, don’t just want to run a business in Wilmington. They want to use their business to connect the Wilmington community and build a culture of music and entertainment downtown. “You go to all these other cities and there is stuff happening,” Sanchez says. “I see Wilmington, it’s on its up and up, but we need more of a selection, more options and just more stuff going on downtown.” While Sanchez and Spaceboy Clothing are just starting out, this isn’t Downtown Visions’ first rodeo. They assist in setting up the Cinco De Mayo festival and the Downtown Brew Fest every year. But the Keep It Cool series of events is unique for them. “Fourth Street disconnects Market a little,” Schweiger says. “The park is right in that area. Cleaning up the park and programming it, it connected things a little better. It’s another way to reinvigorate the park as a community space that artists can come and collaborate, and the community can come and hang out and feel safe.”

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Day!

Other Sponsors Pitch in

Downtown Visions isn’t the only local organization that has helped these events get off the ground. Sponsors include IN Wilmington, Bruce Productions, Poppycock Tattoo, Jerry’s Artarama, The Buccini/Pollin Group, Tri-State Underground and Southbound Comedy. All the money Spaceboy Clothing receives from these sponsors goes toward Humble Park and paying the artists who perform there, according to Sanchez. “Spaceboy doesn’t make any money,” he says. “If anything, we are spending money on this.” It’s too cold to host events at Humble Park over the winter, so Sanchez and Merenda hope to eventually resume events in the basement of their store to fill the void in the calendar. “I’m hoping to do art gallery stuff, more music events, flea markets, anything to bring people into the store and into the city,” Sanchez says. Before that can happen, he says, they have to clean up the space to increase the number of people the basement can safely hold. The last event for this year’s Keep It Cool series was a comedy night hosted by Brandon Jackson at Humble Park on Oct. 5. Although there will be a pause in events until next summer, Sanchez says Spaceboy Clothing looks forward to continuing to contribute to the downtown community. “We have to use that business as a tool and as an outlet for the community for more than just to make money,” he says.

An Oct. 5 event was the last one until next summer at the park.

w

November

Entertainment Schedule

EVERY MONDAY: Showtime Trivia EVERY TUESDAY: Jefe, DJ Andrew Hugh & DJ Niknak

EVERY THURSDAY: DJ Willoughby EVERY FRIDAY: EDM DJ Dance Party

Open at 7pm on Thanksgiving!

LIVE BANDS!

WEDNESDAY:

FRIDAY:

SATURDAY:

11/2-Jump Off 11/9-The Loop 11/16-LowBrau Bastards 11/23-Chorduroy 11/30-Kalicade

11/21-Shotgun Betty 11/3-Radio Halo 11/10-It’s All Good 11/17-Party Fowl 11/24-Big Rumble Twist

Football Specials Are Back! During Every Pro Football Game:

$7.99 Wings • $7.99 Nachos •$5.99 Tots • $8.99 Coors Light & Yuengling Pitchers •$12.99 Blue Moon Pitchers MONDAYS ½ Price Appetizers ALL DAY!

TUESDAYS ½ Price Burgers ALL DAY! $4.50 Double LIT’s

WEDNESDAYS - MEXICAN NIGHT! ½ Price Nachos & Quesadillas ALL DAY! $3.25 Dos Equis Lager & Margaritas • $2 Tacos $15.99 9oz NY Strip Steak All Day

THURSDAYS ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Wings (5pm-Close) ½ Price Burgers (11:30am-3pm) • $3.25 Rail Drinks

Next time you stop in don’t forget to sign up for our Ashby Hospitality Groups VIP Loyalty Program! 302.369.9414 | 108 West Main Street, Newark | www.deerparktavern.com

Be our friend on Facebook!

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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NOVEMBER MUSIC at Kelly’s Logan House Look for these great bands upstairs!

FRIDAY, 11/02

Fish Out of Water - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 11/03 88mph - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 11/09

Common Courtesy - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 11/10

Radio Halo - 10 p.m. Photo Elias Muhammad

FRIDAY, 11/16 Eastern Elk and MEGA - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 11/17

Take Cover - 10 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, 11/21

Thanksgiving Eve with Cherry Crush - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 11/23

Prep School - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 11/24

The Way Outs - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 11/30

Party Fowl - 10 p.m. 1701 Delaware Ave. Wilmington, DE 19806 (302) 652-9493

LOGANHOUSE.COM Bands and times subject to change.

LISTEN

TUNED IN Not-to-be-missed music news BLACK FRIDAY RECORD STORE DAY AT RAINBOW RECORDS

An official Record Store Day location, Rainbow Records will celebrate Black Friday by offering more than 125 limited-edition vinyl records for sale that feature John Coltrane, The Breeders, The Doors, The Germs, The Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia, Herbie Hancock, Paul McCartney, Phish, Rage Against the Machine, Ramones, Dead Kennedys, Talking Heads, Muddy Waters, Type O Negative and more. The first 100 customers get an exclusive free 13x22-in. poster designed by local University of Delaware student Eric Varakian. Shirts with his design also will be available, printed by Spaceboy Clothing. Over the summer, Rainbow renovated the entire shop adding a 250-square-foot vinyl record room, new CD room, a wall of 45s and cassettes, and new clothing space.

JASON AGER RELEASES NEW EP

Out officially on Oct. 24, Jason Ager’s Bad Guy EP appropriately appeared just in time for Halloween. Described by Ager as “unique, dark, and quirky,” the EP offers horror-movie scenarios “from a twist on the trope of zombies in popular culture to an original murder ballad about the historical figure the Axeman of New Orleans.” The four-song EP was recorded at BIAS studios in Virginia, and engineered/mixed/produced by Ken Barnum. Bad Guy is currently available on Apple Music and will stream soon on Spotify. Ager plays more than 100 shows a year in the Mid-Atlantic region and has directly supported artists like Bronze Radio Return, Donovan Frankenreiter, Trevor Hall, Eric Lindell, Bushwalla and Mudcat. He describes himself as “a dedicated father, a passionate college professor, and a hyper-literate original songwriter.”

HOMEGROWN SETS ACOUSTIC NIGHTS

Starting every Wednesday in November, from Nov. 7 through Dec. 26, Homegrown Cafe on Newark’s Main Street will host an acoustic night featuring local music, a late-night menu, and $7 homegrown cafe cocktails. The event will go from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. The cafe features options for everyone, including vegan and vegetarian. The drink menu includes a variety of wines, cocktails and beer on tap. For more information, call 266-6993.

70 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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ROB ZINN SNAGS GRAMMY NOMINATION

The album Walk The Walk by Rob Zinn and produced by two-time Grammy-winner Paul Brown has been selected from all albums submitted for first ballot voting in the Best Contemporary Instrumental Album Category for the 61st Grammy Awards. The album features Brown on guitar, and Andrew Neu and Michael Paulo on saxophones. Zinn and Brown wrote five songs on the album, and the other five were written by wellknown L.A. songwriters. Voting members of the Recording Academy (artists, producers, songwriters and engineers) will select five albums from the 197 First Ballot entries. The five albums receiving the most first-round votes will be officially nominated within the Best Contemporary Instrumental Album Category, and members vote again from the final five selections, with one taking home the coveted Grammy. Final nominations are announced Dec. 5, and the 61st Annual Grammy Awards will be televised on Feb. 10.

Macarons 2.0 with Holiday Gifts Michele Mitchell with

Executive Pastry Chef Sunday October 14th Michele Mitchell 2pm-4pm Nov 11th  2-4pm www.tonicbargrille.com For tickets & info visit or www.tonicbargrille.com  302.777.2040 for reservations $40 per person

THANKSGIVING CANTATA AT RESURRECTION CENTER

The Resurrection Center in Wilmington will present the fourth annual Thanksgiving Cantata on Saturday, Nov. 17, beginning at 6 p.m. This spiritual concert will have many talented artists, including an orchestra conducted by Dion LeMon and a performance by guest artist worship singer Brittany Stewart. The Resurrection Cathedral Choir will also take the stage, and guests will hear co-pastors Bishop Todd Townsend and Dr. Cleo Townsend speak. There is no admission charge, although there will be an offering time. The Resurrection Center is located at 3301 N. Market St. For more information, go to trclive.org and check out November events.

DSO’S ALBUM NOMINATED

Since 1906, the Delaware Symphony Orchestra has been performing and creating music. The DSO is the only professional orchestra in the state, and is one of the premier regional orchestras in the country. Led by David Amado, the orchestra has presented many educational programs as well as special events for the community. This year, the DSO’s album, The Book of Signs, is one of five nominees in the Classical Album category of the Latin Grammy Awards. Also performing on the album is the Brasil Guitar Duo. The Latin Grammy Awards will be held on Thursday, Nov. 15, starting at 8 p.m., and will be broadcast live on Univision.

Live music Fridays & Saturdays 111 w 11th Street Wilmington DE

302.777.2040 for reservations Saturday Night Filet Specials 6oz $20 8oz $24 10 oz $28

TONIC EVENTS IN NOVEMBER

Throughout the month of November, Wilmington’s Tonic Bar and Grille will host several music-related events, each running from 8-11 p.m., featuring their finest liquor. The lineup looks like this: Friday, Nov. 2, Joe Dephne; Friday, Nov. 9, the Stone Shakers; Saturday, Nov. 10, Lew and Dan. On Wednesday, Nov. 21—the day before Thanksgiving— Tonic will feature Charlotte Hash from 6-9 p.m. NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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HAVE YOU HEARD OF SOMETHING?

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, e t a r b e l e c k n i r d HHG , t a e , e t a r b e l ce k n i r d , t a e HARRY’S SAVOY GRILL & KID SHELLEEN’S

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and ge

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72 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/24/18 3:50 PM


PLAY PLAY

Jousting was a feature of the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire, which ended last month. Photo Knumina Studios / Shutterstock.com

A MOST ENJOYABLE AFFAIRE Our intrepid reporter undergoes a Renaissance, finds the Middle Ages can be fun By Mike Little

P

rithee, dear reader, let me tell you a tale about the scariest thing I’ve ever done. And I’m not talking about public speaking. I’m talking about going to a Renaissance faire. “Oh, come on,” I hear you saying, “everybody loves Renaissance faires. Who doesn’t want to be magically transported back to that Golden Age of bad teeth, rancid food, terribly abbreviated life spans, bubonic plague, holy wars, inescapable vermin, near universal ignorance, fiendishly creative torture devices, and famine?” Sure, Renaissance faires (don’t even think about dropping the “e”) give people the opportunity to play dress up, allowing them to be Tormund Giantsbane for a day. And they’re big on spectacle— where else can you find quality jousting nowadays? That said, my take on Renaissance faires has always been the same as my take on the quaint Medieval practice of trepanning—I need one like I need a hole in my head. But, hey, Renaissance faires are big deals and I get paid to do the things I least want to do, so I pointed mine iron steed toward the heart of Amish Country and the Mt. Hope Estate & Winery in historic Mannheim, site of the 38th Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire, which took place over 13 weekends from early August to late October.

Getting to the faire was part of the fun, if your idea of fun runs to the nerve-wracking. Horse-drawn buggies filled with Amish in their Sunday best thronged the edges of the scenic (and very narrow) back roads of Pennsylvania Dutch Country, and we English in our horseless buggies were forced to pass them, often on hair-raising hairpin curves. As for my costume, I originally intended to wear a T-shirt that read “I Hate Renaissance Faires.” But my fiancée warned me that I risked being bludgeoned to death by an incensed mob wielding oversized turkey legs. So I put codpiece aside, donned a standard T-shirt and shorts, and went dressed as a nondescript historical anachronism. I discovered that the Mount Hope Estate & Winery is well worth a visit. The spooky Victorian mansion that stands guard at the entrance to the faire comes complete with stained glass windows and widow’s walk, and would make the perfect setting for an Addams Family movie. And the adjacent winery store, with its selection of some 30 hand-crafted vintages, is a vinolovers’ delight. ►

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PLAY A MOST ENJOYABLE AFFAIRE continued from previous page

A PYRATE INVASION

The large formal garden that serves as a fairground is breathtakingly lovely. Unfortunately, its flowerbedecked grand avenue and winding stone walkways were crawling with hobbits, elves, and sundry other backyard pests, and you couldn’t swing a cutlass without hitting a fearsome buccaneer (it was “Pyrate Invasion” weekend). Upon entering the faire, I was thrilled to see a plump friar munching on that historical mainstay of the Elizabethan Mike with Alexandre Abdoulaev, who displays his spring-loaded wrist dagger. diet, ye olde pickle on a stick. If there’s one thing I love to do it’s eat, and while none of the faire’s 27 “royal kitchens” were selling roast swan, calves heads, or heifer’s udder pudding, I did have my choice of such authentic Renaissance fare as pizza, egg rolls, kettle corn, ice cream, hamburgers, and that handy staple of the wandering minstrel, the “king-sized walking taco.” As for potations, parched patrons were not limited to Mount Hope plonk. They could also slake their thirst with Swashbuckler Ales and Lancaster Ciders at the faire’s 11 pubs and “pourhouses.” And soda, fresh fruit smoothies and crushed ice were on proffer for the puritans and wee serfs in attendance. And I didn’t have to wipe my greasy hands on the alehouse dog after dining, either; evidently napkins and plastic cutlery were common in Sir Walter Raleigh’s day, as were the “Got Beer” Dr. Seuss hats being sold by one of the faire’s numerous vendors, although I’ve yet to see a portrait of Sir Walter wearing one. But enough with the snark. Because here’s the thing: If I walked into the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire expecting to succumb to a bad case of black bile, I was quickly won over by the very thing I was prepared to mock—the people. “All the world’s a stage,” wrote my 10th grade English class nemesis, William Shakespeare, “and all the men and women merely players,” but the folks I saw weren’t taking their roles too seriously. They were enjoying themselves, and the mirth was—despite the cynicism I wear like a suit of armor—contagious. And such an infinite variety of players! While I didn’t encounter a single wandering minstrel (thank God), I soon found myself surrounded by monks, privateers, bully rooks, and strumpets, to say nothing of one fairy-winged chihuahua and a very out-of-place human in a Corgi suit.

KNIGHT OF THE BLACK LAUND

I took the opportunity to chat up a convocation of elves, then accosted Alexandre Abdoulaev, who cut a dashing figure in grey cowl, black leather vest, puffy pirate shirt, colorful cape, orange breeches and hanging mead stein. Abdoulaev explained that his outfit was inspired by the video game Ubisoft Assassin’s Creed II, and proudly told me it was his wife who designed it. The outfit’s piece de resistance: a trigger-operated wrist dagger that made me glad I’d passed on the “I Hate Renaissance Faires” T-shirt. While Adboulaev was menacing, John Riggin made him look like Sir Wimpalot. Riggin went full-tilt Knight of the Black Laund in a suit of black armor complete with helmet, face-obscuring visor, and very real sword. The day was warm, and Riggin must have been hot as Joan of Arc (I have it from my tailor that armor doesn’t breathe nearly as well as cotton) but he was unrelentingly cheerful, and laughed when I asked if it was his goal in life to provoke nightmares in small children.

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10/25/18 12:51 PM


Mike with John Riggin.

He told me his idea of fun is standing outside pourhouses, waiting for tipplers to mistake him for a statue. He has, he said, scared the wits out of plenty an ale-soused fairgoer just by moving, and I believed him. The Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire has more than enough activities to keep you busy all day long, and as a result you have to prioritize. I happen to be a big fan of mayhem, so the first thing I did was rush to Gaming Village. There I hurled a few battle axes, and it only cost me three bucks to The author with the Knight of the Black Laund. learn I wouldn’t have lasted 10 seconds in mortal combat. In troth, dear reader, I couldn’t hit an Orc in the ass at two paces. You could also test your knife-throwing and archery skills, and there were a couple of primitive (and very dizzying) rides for the kids. I’m sad to report I didn’t catch the falconers, but at the rescue aviary (the province of many a rare bird) I met Edgar the one-footed raven, who would snatch a dollar out of your hand with his beak and then hop it over to a nearby donations box. I also enjoyed a meet-and-greet with Lily the Unicorn, who spends her regular work hours visiting children’s hospitals. It was while waiting to pet Lily that I met Captain Jack, a 7-year-old chatterbox and Jack Sparrow wannabe who warned me about the very crusty Captain Grumbles, an elderly buccaneer in a motorized cart who had all the charm of the French pox. I’m not certain if Captain Grumbles was said freebooter’s real name, or merely a sobriquet bestowed upon him by Captain Jack, but it was appropriate. “Get in line, stay off the road, and keep out of my way!” he snarled as Jack and I stood in line. In fear for our throats, we did just that. I was sorry to miss the goings on at the Mud Pit, but don’t regret skipping the dreaded human chess game; verily, dear reader, I can’t imagine a duller way to while away one’s day. I would sooner down a flagon of dragon’s piss, or check myself into the Tower of London. And the same went for the bawdy theatrical troupes treading the boards at the faire’s various stages. I don’t know about you, but my idea of Old School humor begins and ends with the Will Farrell movie. I gave the musicians a wide berth as well; my taste in music runs toward classic (not classical) rock, and the last thing I wanted to hear was “We’re an American Band” played on sackbut and tabor. But there was no way I was going to pass up on the jousting at Bosworth Battlefield, and rollicking good entertainment it was. Canned trumpet fanfare was followed by some royal pageantry and much witty banter by the king’s crier, whose talent for inflaming the crowd soon gave said games the bloodthirsty feel of a WWE steel cage match. ►

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NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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next to anthony’s pizza at Stoney Batter Plaza

HOME OF THE “EVERY DAY”

3&$4 DRINKS!

$

PLAY

“I can tell by the gleam in yon eyes that ye want to see something more violent,” he cried after the knights on horseback demonstrated their skill at spearing hoops at A MOST ENJOYABLE AFFAIRE full gallop. Mad cheers. “Knights could be injured or even continued from previous page killed,” he added darkly. Even madder cheers. “You people have some serious issues,” he said, clearly concerned. And he was right; you should have heard the hue and cry when a jouster was knocked from his steed. And the large Francophobe contingent raised a lusty cheer when England’s knights emerged triumphant. Verily, brethren, I can’t think of a more vicious good time this side of a public drawing and quartering.

SOUVENIR SWORDS

ALL DRINKS $3

Monday-Thursday 5-7pm Friday 4-7pm free food @5!

NFL GAME SPECIALS

12 BUD LIGHT BUCKETS

$

(FIVE 12OZ)

2 GREEN MONSTER SHOOTERS

$

Of course no trip to the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire would be complete without souvenirs, and the vendors thronging Guildsman’s Way were selling all manner of historically suspect goods. I doubt you could buy lip balm in Henry VIII’s London, and if you could it almost certainly would contain enough mercury to kill you. But the faire is the place for you if you’re in the market for a real sword. Or a wooden or rubber sword, for that matter. Also on sale: corsets, hats, masks, herbs, wooden ducks on sticks, crystals, capes, parasols, commemorative T-shirts, animatronic beasties, fake elves ears, dragon eggs, incense and gewgaws. Oh, and while many vendors weren’t accepting credit cards, yon handy ATM was ready to dispense thee all the farthings required for a Borgia Family-sized spending spree. I did note the absence of such realistic Renaissance touches as raw sewage and offal running in the streets, tumbrels filled with plague victims, and peddlers hawking the wellnourished kittens that were believed to cure jaundice. But then again, where else are you going to see a friar in red walking with a goth knight with ram’s horns helmet, or find oneself caught up in a queen’s entourage making a mad dash for the women’s privy? Don’t get me wrong; Renaissance faires are, to borrow a phrase from David Foster Wallace, a supposedly fun thing I’ll never do again. But there’s no denying they’re filled with all manner of weird yet wonderful people. Just be wary of Captain Grumbles. The man’s a bloodthirsty menace.

(DURING ALL EAGLES GAMES)

NEW LOCATION NOW OPEN!

SUNDAY TICKET EVERY GAME ON 13 HDTVS

WIN 2 FREE FRONT ROW Eagles tickets!

2nd place wins a Goose Island

rolling cooler. Customers receive

one raffle ticket per day during all NFL games beginning

Sept. 6th. Drawing will take place at halftime during the

Dec. 9th Eagles/Cowboys game. 4809 Limestone Rd Wilmington, DE 19808 (next to Anthony’s Pizza)

facebook.com/PikeCreekPub

Northern Delaware’s Premier Cinema Art House

GY M•GRO UP CL A SSES•PER S ONAL T RAINING 2801 Lancaster Ave. Wilmington, DE

(302) 658-5077

Nemours Building 1007 N. Orange Street (302) 571 4075 For more information and tickets, visit:

TheatreN.com

Join for a year and get

TWO MONTHS FREE!

Good for either standard or unlimited memberships.

76 NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Unleash

t s i t r awith within the

November 2018 • #inWilm

Christian Sands November 2

Delaware Antiques Show November 9-11

Basil Restaurant Up Front with FSBT 2 for specials November 16 & 17

Monika Lopez & Pat Hinton

Creative District’s Mural Squad

Delaware Innovation Week

Kevin Bielicki’s INterlace November 2 - 30

November 3

Jim Norton

Artist Spotlight: Megan Marino November 11

November 15

November 2-10

November 10

CoroAllegro: Music She Wrote The Rock Orchestra: The Who November 17

November 17

Kaia Kater

Wilmington Beer Week

Lewis Black

Performance Series Preview

Yuletide Jazz & Wine Series

Cirque Dreams: Holidaze

November 21 - December 19

November 5-10

November 15

November 23-25

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10/24/18 4:25 PM


“Tipsy” takes on a whole new meaning when you drink and drive. And after you’re busted, you’ll get a suspended driver’s license, pay thousands of dollars in fines and receive possible jail time. A DUI will always cost you. It’s not worth it. Don’t let a DUI redefine you. Find a safe ride home.

ArriveAliveDE.com/DriveSober

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PLAY

SNAPSHOTS 2.

1. 3. 4.

5.

TASTE OF TROLLEY

Photos by Lindsay duPhily

1. Nicole Wesley (from VA), Marietta Barnes, Curtis Anderson (Kennett), Sarah Wesley

& Veronica Dominique (VA) at Trolley Square Oyster House. 2. (L-R) Jackie Leuze, Joe Ruff & Lyndsey Brown (with guitarist Jared Lashbrook in the background) at Catherine Rooney’s.

3. Matt & Jenn Brown with Carly Herring & Sky Beckley on the patio at Trolley Square Oyster House. 4. Four-year-old Ellie Stretch plays Connect Four at Piccolina Toscana. 5. Guests enjoy the spirits tasting station at Piccolina Toscana.

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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March 2, 2019

500 North Market Street, Wilmington, DE

82 APRIL 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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lightupthequeen.org/shinealight 10/23/18 4:41 PM 10/24/18 10:43 AM


SPECIALS!

Sunday afternoon games (1 pm & 4 pm games only) & any Eagles games!* from r e e b f o s t n r) $3 pi for a 10 oz pou 2 2SP Brewing ($

Thursday 9/6 8:20pm Falcon s Sunday 9/16 1pm Bucs Sunday 9/23 1pm Colts Sunday 9/30 1pm TItans Sunday 10/7 4:25pm Viking s Thursday 10/11 8:20pm Gia nts Sunday 10/21 1pm Panthers Sunday 10/28 9:30am Jaguar s Week 9 bye Sunday 11/11 8:20pm Cowboy s Sunday 11/18 1pm Saints Sunday 11/25 1pm Giants Monday 12/3 8:15pm Redski ns Sunday 12/9 4:25pm Cowboy s Sunday 12/16 8:20pm Rams Sunday 12/23 1pm Texans Sunday 12/30 1pm Redskins

* Eagles games that are an excep tion to the Sunday afternoon rul e are in red * Food specials are not available for takeout

Early 2019

82 APRIL 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Out & About Magazine November 2018  
Out & About Magazine November 2018  
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