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Also In This Issue Beers Worth Drinking Delaware's Twin Poets Trials of a Reluctant Vegan

W A R R E M T E N R I S W Ta

s to s tart the se y a w l u aso stef

n

NOVEMBER 2016 CO M P L I M E N TA R Y VOL. 29 | NO. 9

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6th Annual

presents

WILMINGTON

BEER WEEK A Celebration of Beer Featuring Wilmington’s Premier Craft Destinations

NOVEMBER 5-12, 2016 THE VENUES: BBC Tavern & Grill

Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant

Buckley’s Tavern

Kid Shelleen’s Charcoal House

Chelsea Tavern

Pizza By Elizabeths

Dead Presidents Pub & Restaurant

Trolley Tap House

Kelly’s Logan House

Two Stones Pub (Wilm.)

Ernest & Scott Taproom

World Cafe Live @ The Queen

Washington Street Ale House

FIND SPECIALS & EVENTS AT: 58 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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THE BEERS:

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DON’T BE AN

GUINEA PIG

SEE THROUGH BIG TOBACCO’S VAPORS. Experimenting with e-cigs is just what tobacco companies want you to do. But they don’t want you to know about the many chemical toxins you’re breathing. Don’t be their guinea pig.

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The future will belong to the nature-smart— those individuals, families, businesses, and political leaders who develop a deeper understanding of the transformative power of the natural world and who balance the virtual with the real. The more high-tech we become, the more nature we need.” Richard Louv

JOIN US FOR A PRESENTATION BY RICHARD LOUV WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 6:00 P.M. The Hybrid Mind

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 10:00 A.M. The Nature Rich Life THE PILOT SCHOOL • 208 WOODLAWN ROAD • WILMINGTON, DE 19803 For more information and tickets visit www.pilotschool.org/louv

Journalist and author Richard Louv coined the term nature-deficit disorder and outlines the benefits of a strong nature connection—from boosting mental acuity and creativity to reducing obesity and depression, from promoting health and wellness to simply having fun. Mr. Louv is the author of nine books. His landmark book Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder helped launch an international movement to connect children and their families to nature. He continues his message and promotes the stewardship of our natural resources in Vitamin N: The Essential Guide To A Nature-Rich Life.

Book sales made possible by Ninth Street Book Shop

208 WOODLAWN ROAD • WILMINGTON, DE 19803 • 302 . 478.1740 • PILOTSCHOOL.ORG

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2 INSIDE 2

23

27 Out & About Magazine Published each month by TSN Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Mailing & business address: 307 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

our staff

31

Publisher Gerald duPhily • jduphily@tsnpub.com Director of Publications Jim Hunter Miller • jmiller@tsnpub.com Contributing Editor Bob Yearick • ryearick@comcast.net

Creative Director & Production Manager Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. matt@catvis.biz Graphic Designer Tyler Mitchell, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. tyler@catvis.biz Contributing Designer Ryan Alexander, Catalyst Visuals, LLC

what’s inside START

EAT

11 The War on Words 13 F.Y.I. 14 By the Numbers 15 Worth Trying 17 The Reluctant Vegan 21 Girls’ Weekend Gone Bad 23 The Twin Poets 27 Walking the Walk

53 Fresher Than Ever 59 Bites

LEARN 12 The Eagles Helped Him Fly

Contributing Writers Mark Fields, Pam George, Paula Goulden, Rob Kalesse, Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Robert Lhulier, Dan Linehan, Mike Little, Allan McKinley, John Murray, Larry Nagengast, Scott Pruden, Eric Ruth, Matt Sullivan Contributing Photographers Jim Coarse, Joe del Tufo, Tim Hawk, Anthony Santoro, Javy Diaz, Matt Urban

FOCUS 31 Delaware’s Beer Scene 35 Holiday Hosting Made Easy 38 Suds Worth Sipping

WILMINGTON 41 Art on the Town 47 Theatre N 48 On the Riverfront

17 The Trials of a Reluctant Vegan A lifelong carnivore eschews meat for five days. Weeping ensues.

DRINK 61 Choosing Your Wine 65 Sips

By Mike Little

27 Walking the Walk

LISTEN 67 The Susquehanna Floods 70 Tuned In

WATCH PLAY

Editorial & advertising info: 302.655.6483 • Fax 302.654.0569 Website: outandaboutnow.com Email: contact@tsnpub.com

Three new craft breweries have sprung up over the past few months. By Rob Kalesse

35 Holiday Hosting Made Easy Whether you want turkey stock or six turkey dinners, area establishments are ready to help. By Pam George

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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31 Delaware’s Beer Scene: Fermenting

77 Snap Shots

On the cover: Photo by Jim Coarse/ Moonloop Photography

As director of West End Neighborhood House for the past 15 years, Paul Calistro has met community needs by building coalitions among groups that don’t normally interact. By Larry Nagengast

73 Reviews 75 Six-pack Cinema

Special Projects Sarah Green, John Holton, David Hallberg

FEATURES

Director of Digital Media & Distribution Marie Graham Poot • mgraham@tsnpub.com

53

Associate Editor Krista Connor • kconnor@tsnpub.com

7

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Donald: "Everyone knows I love The Russian. I won't apologize for that. You know what I like even better? The Russian with Gold Medal on it. I like stuff with gold on it. It's the color of winners." Hillary: "Do you know what Antonym means? It means the opposite. And that's what I stand for, the opposite of you. With Bronze, because that's a beautiful color and I love all colors including bronze."

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TONY AWARD “HILARIOUS!” The New York Times

November 15-20

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10 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START

A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

THE WAR ON WORDS A monthly column in which we attempt, however futilely, to defend the English language against misuse and abuse

Surfing the (Radio) Waves I continue to torture myself by tuning in to sports talk radio. Here are some random gaffes I heard in just one day of listening (corrections in parentheses): • “He’s a Michigan alumni” (alumnus). • “He went nuc-u-lar” (nuclear is pronounced the way it’s spelled: nuke-lee-r). • “I would have went (gone) with the other guy.” • “I couldn’t believe the amount (number) of audibles he called.” • “Because he got fired, I feel badly” (bad, because it does not describe an action, but a feeling. If referring to your sense of touch, then badly would apply). • And finally: “The truth of the matter is is that . . .” (the dreaded double is). Media Watch The first two items come from our favorite, the Wilmington News Journal: • In an editorial the day after the first presidential debate: “Us grown-ups who did stay up to watch have one thing to say . . .” That’s we grown-ups. • Quoting a contestant in a sand castle contest at the shore: “You get honed in on it and lose track of time pretty quickly.” Hone means to sharpen, and it needs no preposition, such as “in.” To home in, needed here, is to focus or target. • From Living Well magazine: “I have been through the gambit of traditional treatments for back and neck pain.” Gamut, meaning range or scope, was the word needed here. Gambit is a ploy or scheme. • From the New York Times: “Photos showed a man believed to be Mr. Rahami laying on the sidewalk . . .” That should be lying. Lie means to recline; lay mean to place or put.

By Bob Yearick

More Movie Mix-Ups Following up on the feature we introduced last month, we hereby submit three movie titles that violate grammar rules (setting aside artistic license): • Can’t Hardly Wait – It’s a double negative. The correct title would’ve been (I) Can Hardly Wait. • Marley and Me – Assuming this phrase begins a sentence, it should be Marley and I. • And two that are missing apostrophes: Two Weeks(’) Notice and The Ladies(’) Man. Department of Redundancies Dept. • Sports columnist Bob Nightengale, in USA Today: “The lively crowd, nearing almost 600, even cheered him during calisthenics.” Choose one, Bob: nearing or almost. • Headline from The News Journal: “Added competition could mean starters’ jobs could be in jeopardy.” Could it, now? • New Yorker gift subscription form: “Additional gifts have been reduced down to just $89.99.” Wait. They haven’t been reduced up? • And finally, we leave you, dear reader, to determine if this sign outside a Newark church is redundant: “Praise Worship.” Send a Picture, Win a Prize And speaking of readers, here’s a new contest for you: Send us pictures of signs, menus or other public postings with grammatical or spelling errors. The picture with the most errors will receive a gift certificate to a local establishment. Send your entries to ryearick@comcast.net. Deadline: Nov. 30.

Follow me on Twitter: @thewaronwords

Seen a good (bad) one lately? Quotation of the Month “I speak two languages: Body and English.” --Mae West, actress, playwright, singer, screenwriter and comedian (1893-1980).

Word of the Month

Send your candidates to ryearick@comcast.net

NEED A SPEAKER FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION? Contact me for a fun power point presentation on grammar: ryearick@comcast.net.

spoonerism Pronounced as it’s spelled, it’s a noun meaning the transposition of (usually) the initial sounds of words, producing a humorous result—after William Archibald Spooner (1844-1930), clergyman and educator, who was prone to this. Examples: “It is now kisstomary to cuss the bride.” (Rev. Spooner while officiating at a wedding); “Is the bean dizzy?” (Rev. Spooner questioning the secretary of his dean). And years ago, a famous Philadelphia TV anchorman introduced a segment as "nose newts."

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LEARN

THE EAGLES HELPED HIM FLY Photo Ron Dubick

Working for the Eagles gave this ‘Birds‘ fan the boost he needed to soar By Britney Gulledge Charlie Copeland

C

harlie Copeland never thought he’d be able to mix his passion for sports with his love of web design. Heck, he didn’t even know his knack for technology would manifest into a budding career, one that keeps him busy with calls from potential clients around the nation. But, in December of 2015, Copeland was scouted by the Philadelphia Eagles organization to be a front-end developer while he was still pursuing his bachelor’s degree in Web Information Systems (now called Software Design and Development) from Wilmington University. Copeland, an avid sports fan, jumped at the chance to work with such a prestigious organization, and the results were beyond his expectations. After just a few months in the position, his work was widely recognized and other organizations were knocking at his door. That’s when Copeland knew there was magic in understanding the Web—not just in creating websites, but in anticipating people’s wants and needs and having the talent to translate them online. In just a few months, Copeland went from the classroom to a dream job—and then became a business owner! Today, he runs a successful web, motion graphics and marketing services company called Action Point Design, based in Delaware.

Copeland now works with clients nationwide. But for this young guy from Cecil County, Md., it all seems unreal. In 2013, he wasn’t even sure if a four-year degree was economically within his reach. “(WilmU®) felt like a place where I could succeed, and it proved me right,” says Copeland, “I see something huge here, so I had to take the risk to start a business on my own.” One of Copeland’s largest contracts is with a marketing research firm in northern New Jersey, where he flexes his web design and digital marketing muscles. Working with the Eagles boosted his street cred, but it was WilmU that helped Copeland get noticed. He was contacted by numerous companies through working with the university’s Career Services department and also by adding the university to his LinkedIn profile. And he’s not done yet. Copeland plans to return to WilmU to start his master’s program this fall. If you’re looking for a different university experience—and, like Charlie Copeland, a place where you can succeed—then look to Wilmington University for the academics, flexibility and affordability working adults prefer.

GRADUATE STUDIES FAIR DECEMBER 7

wilmu.edu/GradFair

Learn how you can advance your career on your time and budget. $35 application fee waived at this event 12 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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0

START

F.Y.I. Things worth knowing ART LOOP EXPANSION

M

ore than 20 businesses on Wilmington’s West Side are participating in the U./Linc. Art Loop—on Union and Lincoln Streets—as an extension of downtown’s Art on the Town on Friday, Nov. 4. Participants can explore restaurants, small businesses, and interactive community spaces on Union Street and surrounding areas from 5-9 p.m. Participating locations include 8th & Union, Dead Presidents, Locale BBQ Post, Mrs. Robino’s, North Quarter Creole, Skypointe Church, Flowers by Yukie and more. Exhibits include local artists, a paint night, and spoken word performances. A map with more details and locations is available on westsidegrows.org/artloop.com.

MOTIVATE THE FIRST STATE

T

he Motivate the First State campaign was developed in collaboration with the Governor’s Council on Health Promotion and Disease prevention as part of its ongoing efforts to improve health in Delaware. This program helps Delaware residents turn their activities into charitable contributions that help their communities. Whether it’s jogging your neighborhood streets, cycling the Brandywine Valley, mowing your lawn, or countless other pursuits, every time you get out and get active you’ll benefit your own well-being and a Delaware charity, like the Boys and Girls Clubs of Delaware, the YMCA of Delaware, and Special Olympics Delaware. And it’s free to participate. Create a profile on the Plus 3 online wellness portal. Log onto the portal and record your activity. Select from pre-set activity descriptions or upload data from your Fitbit, smartphone, or GPS unit. For more information, visit motivatethefirststate.com.

DELAWARE ANTIQUES SHOW

T

he 53rd annual Delaware Antiques Show, Nov. 11–13 at the Chase Center on the Wilmington Riverfront, brings 60 of the country’s most distinguished dealers, who will present American antiques and decorative arts, including furniture, paintings, rugs, ceramics, silver, jewelry and more. Honorary chairs include Gov. Jack Markell and First Lady Carla Markell, and honorary co-chair and keynote speaker Reinier Baarsen. The opening night party is Thursday, Nov. 10, from 5-9 p.m., and includes cocktails and early exclusive shopping. For the weekend schedule—lectures, presentations and more—visit the website winterthur.org/das. For tickets and ticket prices, visit the site or call 800-448-3883.

LIGHT SPECTACULAR

F

rom Nov. 18-Jan. 1, drive through Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes to witness two miles of the Light Spectacular holiday show, which includes more than 60 displays. Enjoy the fun at the Cape May-Lewes Ferry Terminal, too, which will transform into a Christmas Village that includes an ice skating rink, live music, indoor holiday workshops, and Santa and carnival rides, including a Ferris wheel. The event kicks off Friday, Nov. 18, with a 5K run and two-mile walk around Light Spectacular, followed by an opening night party at Lewes’ Crooked Hammock Brewery. Vehicle tours of Light Spectacular begin the next day, starting at 5 p.m. Tours run Thursdays through Sundays until Dec. 21. From then until Jan. 1, Light Spectacular will be open every night. Admission is $15 for cars, $30 for vans, and $50 for buses. Discounts are available in advance for groups bringing multiple vehicles. For more information, go to visitsoutherndelaware.com.

DCH RECEIVES STATE GRANT AWARD

T

he Delaware Center for Horticulture has been awarded a two-year grant of $150,000 from the State of Delaware’s Attorney General and Criminal Justice Council to support DCH’s Return to Work: Growing New Opportunities in Horticulture program. The funds will be awarded through the newly-created State Reentry Funding Program, supporting nonprofits for the development or continuation of reentry programs that sustain an individual’s transition into the community. “We are so proud to be among the first recipients of the CJC’s grant program, which serves as a testament to the strength of our now seven-year old Return to Work Program,” said Vikram Krishnamurthy, DCH executive director. “This funding will provide additional programmatic stability and allow us to provide horticultural onthe-job skills training to more individuals, translating to greater job prospects and opportunity for those we serve.” Since 2009, DCH’s Return to Work Program has hired and trained unemployed individuals, including veterans and recently released incarcerated men and women, for entry-level positions in the landscaping and horticulture industry. As of August, 60 men and women successfully completed Return to Work training, and two-thirds of the graduates went on to secure employment. The CJC funding will allow for the continuation of job placement services and support the development of two new program tracks: an educational track to support candidates in pursuing a formal degree, and small business training to support entrepreneurs in starting new businesses. NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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by the numbers

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A few Thanksgiving facts worth noting.

The ranking of Thanksgiving on a survey of Americans’ favorite holidays. Christmas is no. 1.

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46,000,000

17 79 Number of ridges on a 14-ounce can of Ocean Spray Jellied Cranberry Sauce.

1,720,000 The average number of airplane seats reserved on Thanksgiving Day.

Percentage of Americans surveyed by CNN who said eating Thanksgiving leftovers is more important than eating their regular Thanksgiving meal.

14 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Worth Trying Suggestions from our staff, contributors and readers

Seven-Day Farmer's Market

Brew With A View

Looking for that obscure, ethnic ingredient for a recipe you want to try? This place probably has it and it's most likely at the lowest price you can find. Set up like a typical grocery store, it’s in the former Pathmark location on Lancaster Pike near Route 141. A gem for anyone looking for international foods, it also has things offered in a regular grocery store, but with way better prices and the added value of foods from around the globe.

Looking for a different place to enjoy a beer and a sandwich and watch the world pass by? Try the deck at Crabby Dick’s in Delaware City, site of the original Delaware City Hotel built in the 1800s. Grab a stool that directly faces Fort Delaware and watch everything from tankers to runabouts cruise up and down the Delaware River. Of course, the beer tastes better if it comes at the end of a bike ride, and the Mike Castle Trail is just a short pedal away.

—Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer

—Jerry DuPhily, Publisher

Ready Player One Ernest Cline’s first novel offers a look at the world in the year 2044, where the Internet as we know it has become a relic of the past, replaced by an incredibly immersive and virtually realistic version called the OASIS. It’s a fitting name for an imaginary refuge that attracts billions of people disillusioned by the dystopia their real world has become: ravaged by war, famine and ecological devastation. Upon the death of OASIS creator James Halliday, it’s revealed that he bequeathed his entire fortune—and control of OASIS itself—to the person who finds three secret keys hidden within his digital universe. Thus ensues the most massive Easter egg hunt—one that quickly becomes a most dangerous game. Cline’s premise is intriguing enough to make this book a thrilling pageturner, but it’s Halliday’s obsession with the ‘80s and the clever nostalgic nods to that era’s nerd culture—Atari video games, John Hughes films, Dungeon & Dragons and the music of Rush, to mention some—that give the story a unique flavor.

Football at the Hilton The Patio at the Hilton Wilmington/ Christiana is offering big-screen football every Monday and Thursday nights. Nothing better than watching football outdoors with half-price wings and amazing nachos. Also, the Hilton’s breakfast sandwich paired with a mimosa is a great start for Sundays. —Julie Miro Wenger, Event Allies

—Jim Miller, Director of Publications

Have something you think is worth trying? Send an email to Jim with your suggestion to jmiller@tsnpub.com

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THE TRIALS OF A RELUCTANT

A lifelong carnivore eschews meat for five days. Weeping ensues.

G

od help me. The editor of Out & About recently asked me to spend five days as a vegan simply to find out if an ordinary, meat-loving person could survive not only without meat and fish, like your average vegetarian, but also without the rest of the banned items on the vegan agenda, including animal products and by-products such as eggs, dairy products, honey, leather, fur, silk, wool, cosmetics and soaps derived from animal products. I agreed, with this caveat: I would stick only to the dietary strictures of veganism. I did not toss out my leather shoes and purchase footwear made of hemp. I do not want shoes that I can smoke. Not that it mattered much in the end, for I discovered, the hard way, that I simply cannot live on fruits, vegetables and sundry meat and cheese substitutes alone. On day three I found myself at the edge of a pasture, and all the cows in that pasture looked like diagrams of livestock, complete with serrated lines within which the words “round,” “chuck ribs” and “prime ribs” were spelled out in letters only I could read. I think I was weeping. The great and incontestable argument of the vegan community is that veganism helps put an end to cruelty to animals. Vegans claim, quite convincingly, that the animals that end up on the ends of our forks or are used as involuntary subjects for testing of consumer products are treated in a barbaric manner that proves we are not a humane species. They also claim, convincingly, that our reliance on meat creates havoc in the eco-system, and radically increases world hunger.

VEGAN REQUIREMENTS I’m less certain about their claims that a vegan diet is healthier than one that includes their list of banned foods, and I find some of their prohibitions to be borderline absurd. I mean, what’s with the ban on wool? The writer I’ll be the first to admit I was woefully unprepared to take the plunge into veganism. Vegans must possess certain items, such as a food processor or blender, to say nothing of a king’s ransom worth of spices. I had none of these. They must also love to cook. In fact, to make it as a vegan it helps if the kitchen is your favorite room in the house. Me, I have two meals I can cook, three if you count a badly made omelet, and four if you count a salad drenched in non-vegan-approved ranch dressing. Finally, to be a vegan you must be open to the idea of eating meat and cheese substitutes, many of which are, to put it bluntly, unpalatable. (Most of the meat and cheese substitutes are made from tofu and tempeh, which are soy-based, or seitan—it’s pronounced, tellingly, Satan—which is derived from the protein portion of wheat.) My samplings of vegan cheese, for instance, have convinced me that, while it may ultimately be discovered to have military or industrial uses, it is definitely not meant for human consumption. ►

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo Charles Sobocinski

By Mike Little

17

10/24/16 10:05 AM


START

PREPARATION To prepare for my ordeal, I THE TRIALS OF A drove to Newark Natural Foods RELUCTANT VEGAN continued from previous page on Main Street and filled my cart with all manner of fake meats, real vegetables, and vegan-approved frozen foods. Why, I even bought vegan ice cream. It cost me $150. I bought tofu burgers, portobello mushroom burgers, tofu meatballs, lots of tofu for vegan “scrambled eggs,” a brand of sausage made out of what I remain convinced is mulch, tempeh pulled pork that also tastes like mulch, some frozen vegan dinners that included a vegan pizza, a couple of frozen Indian samosa wraps, almond milk (which rendered my coffee undrinkable), and even some bona fide fresh vegetables, although I do not much care for them except in salads. On Facebook, vegans cast aspersions on me for relying on meat substitutes and prepared foods. They sent me complex recipes for things like squash soup. I did not bother to tell them that I would sooner eat chicken feed than squash soup. Or eggplant, turnips, endive, cauliflower, or zucchini, for that matter. DAY ONE I began my first day as a newborn vegan with a tofu “egg scramble” that left me nauseous, perhaps because I didn’t follow the recipe. It called for curry powder, which I didn’t own, so I used garlic powder instead. It was not a pleasant introduction to vegan eating. I lunched on salad, but was put off by the Italian dressing, which I found too tangy. I’m a ranch man, and several days passed before I found vegan ranch dressing, which was (surprise!) inferior in taste to the real thing. For dinner I traveled to my girlfriend’s house, and made a vegan chili from scratch that consisted of kidney beans, onions, and tomatoes topped by melted vegan cheese. The lack of hamburger meat left me depressed and surly. Again, I wanted to weep. And the sad part is that tempeh crumbles, which are actually edible but which I forgot to bring, probably would have made the meal palatable. Day Two was a repeat of Day One. I made another tofu “scramble,” this time using curry powder (which I’d borrowed from my girlfriend). The results, which included mushrooms and onions, looked appetizing enough, but I found myself on my sofa with a severe case of nausea. I skipped lunch—too ill—and made a few sandwiches with imitation pulled pork for dinner. I am here to tell you that that “pulled pork” was not made from tofu, tempeh, or seitan, but worn-out car tires. Again, nausea ensued. On Day Three, I was borderline delirious. So much so that I decided to forgo the tofu and make myself a grilled cheese sandwich for breakfast, using the imitation cheddar cheese that some vegans (I’m certain they’re lying) actually purport to consume. The sandwich was a gooey disaster and I didn’t come close to finishing it; I simply laid myself down on my sofa and waited, like a pregnant woman, for my daily vegan morning sickness to pass. That afternoon I thought I discovered a solution to my problem: kimchi! I love kimchi, and I purchased some from the Newark Farmers Market on Kirkwood Highway. It was delicious, and I planned to live on it until some wise guy (well, about 10 actually) on Facebook sadistically informed me that kimchi is a vegan nono since it is made with fish products. I nearly wept. For dinner I threw in the towel and ordered take-out from a very good Chinese restaurant, Bamboo House in College Square, but even then I was disappointed; the salt and pepper eggplant and tofu was bland and (predictably) lacking in texture, and did not satisfy. On Day Four I said to hell with it and, eschewing breakfast, headed straight for Newark Natural Foods and purchased a 18 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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hummus and avocado sandwich and some vegan potato salad. It was probably the highlight of my week. Why hadn’t I thought of hummus earlier? It might have saved me much agony. That night I again took the easy way out by ordering broccoli in garlic sauce from No. 1 Chinese Restaurant in Newark. It was okay, but contained nothing but broccoli, and as Shakespeare I believe once wrote, “My kingdom for a water chestnut!” On Day Five I finally got breakfast right, by making an ersatz BLT consisting of tempeh bacon I’d purchased at Newark Natural Foods the day before, the horrible fake cheese, and tomatoes. It was actually tasty, and I did not end up on the sofa, and if I were ever forced to live as a vegan I would make it a staple of my diet. For lunch I had a salad with vegan ranch dressing, and it tasted wrong. Like it wasn’t made from real eggs, but from spider eggs. I ate half of it and tossed the vegan ranch dressing off my balcony. As for dinner, I headed to my brother’s house to partake of a vegan pizza with mushrooms, and it too tasted, well, not right. It was my sister-in-law who put her finger on the problem, exclaiming, “The cheese tastes just like the butter on your popcorn at the movie theater!” After that we “enjoyed” some vegan cinnamon bun “ice cream,” which had the chalky texture of, well, chalk. This time it was my niece who diagnosed the problem, saying, “It’s okay, but it’s not something I’d eat for fun.” And that was it. The next evening I headed for the Half-Moon Restaurant & Saloon in Kennett Square, where I joyously abandoned my vegan diet by diving into a shank of wild boar like a ravenous animal. There was kangaroo on the menu, but even I have some principles. During a recent trip to Vienna, Austria, for example, I drew the line at horse goulash. It’s a favorite with old timers who ate it during World War II, from what I understand. But back to the subject at hand. My fiveday trial was not an outright disaster; more like the pitter-patter of little fiascoes. But it proved that I will always be a staunch, if guilt-haunted, carnivore. To put it bluntly, the odds of my joining the vegan parade— despite my very real moral qualms about the treatment of the animals we eat—are exactly zilch. Because the flesh, my flesh, is weak. When all’s said and done, I’d prefer to be a member of the Donner Party than the vegan party. And now I must hie myself to Cheeburger Cheeburger on Main Street, because all this talk of flesh has made me hungry.

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TRUTH & VISION 21ST CENTURY REALISM OCTOBER 22, 2016 – JANUARY 22, 2017 In Delaware, this exhibition is made possible by the Emily du Pont Memorial Exhibition Fund. Supported, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com. Image: Lemon Fall, 2015. Scott Fraser (born 1957). Oil on board, 51 1/2 × 66 inches. © Scott Fraser. Courtesy of Quidley & Company.

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20 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START

The author with her traveling companions (from left), Barbara Dugent, Joyce Newnam and their new BFF, whom they met in Savannah. Says Pam: "You can see that the water is high behind us."

GIRLS’ WEEKEND GONE BAD Everything was sunny until Hurricane Matthew came calling

T

he girls’ trip began on a positive note. The flight to Savannah, Ga., was on time—always a surprise when you leave from Philadelphia. Savannah’s architecture, which had escaped General Sherman’s wrath during the Civil War, is enchanting. So are the many public squares full of trees laden with Spanish moss. Thanks to the Savannah College of Art and Design, which renovated many of the buildings, the city boasts a hip vibe. Hurricane Matthew was way off in the Caribbean, and our local weather was sunny, with temperatures in the 80s. The Goddess of Girlfriend Weekends remained benevolent. A couple at our inn offered the three of us a lift to Charleston, S.C.—no need for a rental car. During our two-hour journey, which included a stop at the 400-year-old Angel Oak, they became our new BFFs. Meanwhile, the storm was scheduled to strike after our departure. We were golden. Then, while enjoying a lunch on the water in Charleston, our server told us that South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley had announced an evacuation. Her voice was even, but I could see the panic in her eyes. She and the other servers huddled together, whispering in corners. My shrimp-and-grits turned to concrete in my stomach. Our innkeeper took a blasé attitude. “I lived in Florida,” she said. “This is nothing.” That hardly inspired confidence, especially since the water was five steps from the inn. Bags still unpacked, I called American to change my flight to the next day. Unwilling to risk missing it, I booked a room in a Doubletree near the airport via Hotel.com. Then I called Uber and waved goodbye to my friends (who, I admit, were calmer under pressure). The canopy bed that cost me a bundle? I never slept in it. The sense of relief I felt after clambering into Uber driver Mohammed’s Honda Odyssey was brief. We turned the corner to encounter bumper-to-bumper traffic. “What is this?” he muttered. I felt like Scarlett fleeing a burning Atlanta. We inched past shop owners hammering boards over windows.

We zigged onto the packed highway, then zagged off. That’s when I noticed the “E” glowing on the dashboard. We stopped at one station only to find a crudely written sign—“Out of Gas.” The view outside my window was of warehouses, freight trains, and rundown homes. Mohammed found an open pump at the second station. “I bet you will never forget this day,” he said to me. “I know I won’t.” At the Doubletree, I discovered that there are two Doubletree hotels. Mohammed had taken me to the wrong one. Although I’d paid for the other, I checked in. “Are you going to kick us out?” some corporate types asked the front desk attendant. “No,” she said. “We have generators. We’ll be here.” The lobby bar beckoned—despite the fact that its shelves held airplane-sized bottles. (My martini filled half the glass.) The next morning, the airport was crowded with college kids who’d been turned out of their dorms. I chatted with a woman who’d had to leave her waterfront hotel. While eating my Burger King lunch, I saw EMTs wheeling a gray-haired man up a ramp with a mechanical device pinging on his bare chest. Ten minutes later, a pilot walked by with a distraught woman, evidently the wife. I thought about them heading to a hospital as a hurricane approached. To kill time, I chatted with friends online. “Is it raining?” they asked. “Why are you leaving?” The answer is clear now: You don’t evacuate during a storm. You evacuate before it. Expect pandemonium, and don’t count on the people who cook your meals or taxi you around town to help; they’re heading for the hills. I left Wednesday evening and my friends left early Thursday. The airport suspended service on Friday at noon. We did manage to escape the hurricane, which hit that weekend. And I learned there is no place like home. —Pam George NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START

Nnamdi Chukwuocha (left) and Albert Mills were appointed to their post by Gov. Markell last December.

The Twin Poets: A Single Voice for Good

As Delaware’s Poets Laureate, Nnamdi Chukwuocha and Albert Mills use their talents to advocate for the community By Krista Connor Photos courtesy of The University of Delaware/Lane McLaughlin

F

ew people have the opportunity to live out their dream careers with a loved one working alongside them. But for Delaware’s Poets Laureate—perhaps better known as Wilmington’s Twin Poets—that daydream is a reality. Identical twins Nnamdi Chukwuocha and Albert Mills were appointed to their honorary post last December by Governor Jack Markell. They are the latest in a long line of poets appointed by governors dating back to 1947, when the tradition was established by the General Assembly.

The brothers are the first co-appointees in the nation, and they have enthusiastically embraced their roles as the official advocates, educators and presenters of poetry in Delaware. But it’s not just poetry they’re advocating for. Chukwuocha and Mills are both social workers, with deep roots in the community tracing back to their shared childhood, when they lived in a house at 26th and Madison streets in Wilmington, where their grandmother ran a foster home. Their father, William “Hicks” Anderson, was a well-known community leader from the late 1960s until his death in 1990. ► NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START THE TWIN POETS: A SINGLE VOICE FOR GOOD continued from previous page

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“The community is an extension of our home,” says Chukwuocha. “We were raised this way. This is second nature to us.” The Twin Poets incorporate poetry/ spoken word and creative writing programming into schools, libraries and community centers, introduce poetry as a tool for transformation within youth detention centers and adult correctional facilities, utilize poetry to serve veterans (especially those suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder), and take poetry/spoken word and creative writing into communities of need to help address gun violence. The duo also presents readings and discussions at conferences, public ceremonies and events across the state, promoting the importance of poetry and the literary arts as part of Delaware's cultural heritage. “We want to be that voice to encourage children, to help people in rough circumstances, to see that art is part of the solution to conflict resolution,” says Mills. “There’s so much we can do with art, and we want to make sure we are living examples to show that art can change lives.” In addition to being a poet and social worker, Chukwuocha is a member of the Wilmington City Council and chairs the city’s Education, Youth and Families committee, while Mills, aside from being a social worker, serves as a therapist utilizing art as a tool for foundational change in youth, families and communities. The brothers have won dozens of humanitarian awards while penning several poetry books, and they were featured on the Peabody Award-winning HBO program Def Poetry in 2000. The Delaware Division of the Arts promotes the Poets Laureates' events and activities, manages the calendar of appearances, and provides a stipend to the Poets Laureate for appearances at nonprofit organizations. “The Twin Poets employ poetry as an art form that transcends the page,” says Paul Weagraff, director of the Delaware Division of the Arts. “Their poetry sheds light on difficult social issues, raises awareness of the human condition, and provides hope to individuals and communities alike.”

24 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Says Mills: “The poem becomes us . . . while gauging each other with more than just words—facial and hand expressions."

As twins, Chukwuocha and Mills obviously have a lot in common. In addition to their long dreadlocks, both are veterans, vegetarians and fathers—Mills has two children, Chukwuocha has three. “We both work together with our poetry, we write together, do workshops, perform together, speak in classrooms,” says Mills. While the Twin Poets’ topics touch on substantial social issues, Chukwuocha says their goal isn’t to make the audience uncomfortable. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. “We want to make individuals comfortable. We make a place of comfort in our art; we can talk about gun violence, young black males and school funding in a place of comfort. You listen to the poem, and we all come up with solutions together,” he says. Mills, who tends to wake up and write in the morning, says that he and his brother—who winds down at the end of the day to write—will creatively strategize by coming up with a title and building on that. It’s been this way for years. Even when they were boys the twins would collaborate, even while playing basketball and football—challenging each other in a supportive way to make themselves better athletes, better artists and, ultimately, better people, says Mills. Their synchronicity and support for each other is perhaps most felt, unsurprisingly, during a reading or poetry recitation performance, with “a bond that is engaging and endearing,” says Weagraff. Says Mills: “The poem becomes us, we give it to the audience with the emotion that was given to us, we try to make sure the picture that we’re painting has a clear message while gauging each other with more than just words—facial and hand expressions. As twins, we’re really in unison.” For information about upcoming performances, visit artsdel.org/poetlaureate.

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START

WALKING THE WALK Calistro has been at West End since 2001, working his Rolodex to get things done.

As director of West End Neighborhood House for the past 15 years, Paul Calistro has met community needs by building coalitions among groups that don’t normally interact By Larry Nagengast Photo by Joe del Tufo/Moonloop Photography

U

nless he’s cornered for a meeting, Paul Calistro isn’t likely to be sitting at his desk. Meetings may sometimes be necessary, but Calistro believes he spends his time best when he’s out in the neighborhood that has become his outdoor office for the last quarter-century. “I always tell people, ‘let’s walk the neighborhood.’ It’s one of the keys to our success,” says Calistro, executive director of the West End Neighborhood House, the 130-year-old community center that serves residents of Wilmington’s Little Italy and many surrounding neighborhoods. Walking the neighborhood constitutes what Calistro calls “forced engagement”—a practice that’s essential to finding out what’s on residents’ minds, what they need, what they care about. “If we want to build communities, if we want to revitalize communities, if we want communities to stay intact, we have to find new mechanisms to keep people attached,” he says, even while using an old mechanism—walking the neighborhood—as an effective tool in building a more cohesive west side of the city.

“Some of the greatest things we’ve done here have come from listening to the people,” he says. “Paul is an innovative guy, a progressive thinker, with great skills in identifying unmet needs and working to find solutions,” says Monica Alvarez, who started as a grant writer at West End while she was in graduate school and worked on and off with Calistro for 13 years. She is now director of development and marketing for Interfaith Community Housing of Delaware. While his walks have helped Calistro identify needs, his greatest strength is his ability to build coalitions that have the resources to meet those needs. His “secret formula,” he says, is connecting “groups that don’t normally interact but have a common concern, a common need, a common interest.” In Delaware, and especially in Wilmington, he finds that “you can connect ordinary people to the leaders of the hospitals and the big institutions.” ►

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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A CHICAGO GUY

The guy who grew up on the West Side of Chicago, living with his parents and two brothers “in the unlicensed, retrofitted basement of a bungalow” before they moved into a blue-collar Italian-Irish-Jewish neighborhood, quickly learned that “there aren’t great ivory towers in Delaware. You can pick up the telephone and talk to almost anyone.” Calistro’s direct approach has yielded significant results at West End. Since 2001, the community center has established numerous programs to serve youths who leave foster care when they turn 18. Its initiatives have created transitional and permanent housing, employment training and mentoring—all designed to promote self-sufficiency. In 2005, West End developed a short-term loan program, Loans Plus, to provide consumers with an alternative to predatory payday loans. In 2011, West End led the creation of West Side Grows Together, a community revitalization project that covers the area from Interstate 95, between Lancaster and Pennsylvania avenues, west to the B&O Railroad line just beyond Union Street. The 10year, $35 million plan has brought together individuals and major institutions, including St. Francis Hospital, St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, the Latin American Community Center, Hilltop Lutheran Neighborhood Center, Westside Family Healthcare and the Woodlawn Trustees. “We’ve got 27 organizations, all listening to the people, trying to figure out how to do this correctly,” he says. Two years ago, in collaboration with Sir Speedy Print and Marketing Services, West End launched Popdot, a sign-printing and installation business that employs disadvantaged youth and individuals aging out of foster care. Last year, the General Assembly passed legislation enabling cities to create entities called “land banks” that could acquire vacant and deteriorating properties and package them for redevelopment. Calistro and his team at West End were advocating for the concept three years before the legislation was introduced. “It looked like it was somebody else’s idea, but we won,” he says. WALKING THE WALK continued from previous page

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“He likes to see communities that are well taken care of,” says Maria Matos, executive director of the Latin American Community Center and, like Calistro, a member of the West Side Grows Together steering committee. “This is one of his pet projects. He understands that children need a good home, and a neighborhood that is safe.” When she moved to the West Side, Christian Willauer immediately recognized the area’s potential. As her interest in community development grew, she started talking with her neighbors and, when she wanted to learn more, “they all told me to go talk to Paul.” Those talks led to employment, part-time at first and now as director of the Cornerstone West Community Development Corporation, West End’s community development arm. “Paul is an ideas man,” Willauer says. “He has a lot of understanding of what needs to be done, and how to do it. We get to be part of making it happen.” But, she adds, the 60-year-old Calistro isn’t one to sit behind his desk and let others do the work. “Paul likes to roll up his sleeves and get involved. He knows all the details,” she says. Calistro’s recognition of the importance of knowing the details began when he graduated from high school, and kept a promise to his father to work for a year at the printing plant where his father was the superintendent. He learned a bit about the business as he watched magazines like National Geographic and Playboy roll off the high-speed presses, along with the bulky color catalogs from Sears and other major retailers of the era. “I learned. I did all the things he asked me to do, and after a year, I told him I had kept my word and it was time to leave,” he says. Then it was on to Minnesota, where his older brother lived, on what he thought would be the first stop on a hitchhiking journey through the western states. He stayed a while longer, picking up some credits at the University of Minnesota while becoming a grant writer for the owner of a small residential treatment center for adolescents and taking on other jobs to pay his tuition. And he fell in love with a girl from The First State. “She got a job offer in Delaware and she said, ‘if you want to marry me, you’ll come to Delaware with me,’” he recalls. (They subsequently divorced. Calistro has three children from that marriage, two of them living in Delaware and the third in Philadelphia. He married Kim Martin, a ballet instructor, in 2009.)

28 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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A regular biker when he was younger, Calistro bought this Honda motorcycle a couple of years ago to relax and take in the scenery.

It was 1979, jobs were scarce and interest rates were soaring, but there was an opening for a federally funded position at the Salvation Army in Wilmington. Calistro knew a little about bookkeeping, just enough to get the job. “I got a book about accounting,” he says, “and a year later I was the business administrator.” He stayed there for 12 years, gradually taking on more significant roles in management. In the mid-1980s, he developed a taste for politics, taking on the old guard in Newport, where he was living at the time. He started questioning the city council—about financial statements that didn’t make sense, about roads that weren’t being repaired— and decided that he could do better. “To run for mayor,” he says, “all you needed was a pair of good shoes and a copying machine.”

FOUR-TERM MAYOR

He won the election in 1987 and served four two-year terms. During his tenure, two Superfund sites in the town were cleaned up and the Ciba Geigy plant on its outskirts was annexed, bringing in enough additional property tax income to nearly double the town’s revenue. “We fixed the streets, the water and sewer systems, and stabilized the revenue stream,” he says. After eight years, he told the town council he wouldn’t run again. “I held up this sheet of paper and said these were the things I said we were going to fix, and they’re all done,” he recalls. Meanwhile, in 1991, the job at West End opened up, drawing more than 100 applicants. Calistro didn’t have a college degree, one of the credentials listed in the job posting, but he did his homework —researching the organization’s history, studying its tax returns and annual reports, talking to its employees, even drawing up a five-year plan. He landed the job, rolled up his sleeves, and got to work. “Wilmington, it was a little town to me, a hamlet,” he says. “You could meet people in Wilmington pretty quickly, but there was a hierarchy in the city—the DuPont folks, the Wilmington Trust folks, Delmarva Power, and The News Journal. You had to learn the hierarchy,” he says. He learned it well, building connections with bankers, DuPont executives and members of the du Pont family, and he listened to mentors who served on the West End board of directors, including construction executive Paul DiSabatino, academic and businessman Paul Andrisani, Wilmington Trust communications director Charlie King, and Kate Wilhere, managing partner at Cover & Rossiter, an accounting firm. “I had all these mentors at the start, and the list has grown,” he says. “When I’m working on a project, they call me ‘Mr. Rolodex.’” ►

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START WALKING THE WALK continued from previous page

Having an extensive network is more important than ever now, with tight government budgets, the departure or declining influence of corporate donors like MBNA and DuPont, and the decentralization of du Pont family wealth with each succeeding generation. “Corporations have not only downsized, but they used to give grants to support a broad range of organizations in the arts, the environment and social services,” Calistro says. “Now, their giving is aligned with their business models.” Those changes have forced community organizations not only to change the way they look at their own operations but also to work together more. The West Side Grows Together effort is an example, with West End, the Latin American Community Center and Hilltop Lutheran Community Center joining forces to strengthen neighborhoods like Hilltop, Cool Spring and Little Italy. “It’s one of Paul’s pet projects, a super-duper plan for many community organizations,” Matos says. Developing such coalitions isn’t easy, and Matos admits that she and Calistro don’t always see eye to eye. “He’s opinionated, and I’m opinionated,” she says, “but we both have the same goal in mind—a perfect community.” That quest for perfection nearly propelled Calistro into the Wilmington mayoral race four years ago. He tested the waters for about six weeks, then did the math and concluded he couldn’t come out on top in what likely would have been a four-man Democratic primary. “It wasn’t worth it—to me, to West End, to my family,” he says, so he returned every campaign contribution he received. By the time the 2016 campaign season rolled around, Calistro had moved out of the city, so he couldn’t be tempted to run. He threw his support behind Eugene Young, who finished second to Mike Purzycki in the Democratic primary in September. It was only natural for Calistro to back Young, who spent parts of his youth participating in programs at West End. Calistro isn’t saying how much longer he’ll stay at West Side, but he still relishes the challenges. “He works very hard, but he also likes to joke around,” Willauer says. “His expectations are very high, but working with him can be a lot of fun.” “Community development is his life’s work,” Matos says. “It takes a lot to stay with it for as long as he has.”

30 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS

Delaware’s Beer Scene: Fermenting Three new craft breweries have sprung up over the past few months Nit Wit, a traditional Belgian witbier from Dew Point Brewing Company.

By Rob Kalesse

N

ote to craft beer enthusiasts in Delaware, particularly New Castle County: With Thanksgiving almost upon on us, you have plenty to be thankful for—namely, three new breweries that have tapped their kegs and are pouring and distributing to the beer-swilling public. We talked to folks behind the scenes at each of the breweries to get their story and discover where they are in terms of kegging and construction. To see what we found out, read on.

Bellefonte Brewing Company Despite its geographical namesake, which is north of Wilmington, Bellefonte Brewing Company is located near Prices Corner in a warehouse unit fitted with a tasting room and bar made of California redwood. But co-owner Craig Wensell started BBC years ago as a home-brewing supply shop out of his house in —you guessed it—Bellefonte. “I’ve been exposed to brewing since a very young age; my father, uncles, cousins, brothers, all of us have been involved in home brewing since the mid-‘80s,” Wensell says. “So I began opening up the front porch of my home in Bellefonte as a supply store for the advanced brewer, where people could taste what I’d brewed and purchase brewing products at the same time.” Now Wensell, along with fellow home brewer Joe Jacobs and business partner Neil Shea, is running his own full-fledged brewery, which tapped its first commercial keg on May 20. The

menu at Bellefonte relies on rye, with these four beers on tap: Grapefruit Rye IPA, Rye IPA, Rye Stout and Red Rye Abbey. “I really like rye as ingredient, even though it can be a sticky mess for brewers to deal with,” Wensell says. “It’s got a very distinct flavor and crisp spiciness that goes really well with the citrusy hops we use, like the Simcoe, Cascade and Citra.” Jacobs, meanwhile, brews what has been a very popular beer at Bellefonte since opening, according to Wensell. Called the Orange Street Ale, it’s a refreshing specialty ale made with orange blossom, honey and orange zest, though not heavily hopped, Wensell says. While no food is served at Bellefonte, there will be occasional food trucks on site, at 3605 Capitol Trail. Hours are Thursday and Friday from 5-9 p.m., Saturday from 1-9 p.m., and Sunday from 1-6 p.m. Growlers to go are $20 brand new and $15 for a refill. Bellefonte’s beers also are available locally at the Bellefonte Café (naturally), as well as North Quarter Creole, 1984 and Oddity Bar, all in Wilmington. ► NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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NOVEMBER

MUSIC

at Kelly’s Logan House

FRIDAY, 11/04

Travel Songs - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 11/05

Radio Halo - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 11/11

Cadillac Riot with The Pat Kane Experience 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 11/12

Little Ozzy - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 11/18

Old Baltimore Speedway - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 11/19

Element K - 10 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, 11/23

The Limits, Lifestream & High Reeper - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 11/25

Rocket88 - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 11/26 88MPH - 10 p.m.

1701 Delaware Ave. Wilmington, DE 19806 (302) 652-9493

LOGANHOUSE.COM Bands and times subject to change.

FOCUS DELAWARE'S BEER SCENE: FERMENTING continued from previous page

Twin Lakes Brewing Company

Almost a year to the day after closing its original digs in Greenville, Twin Lakes Brewery was up and running again in Newport in early August of this year, pumping out kegs of its popular pale ale and pilsner. Brewer Jack Wick, who had stepped away from the business for a few years after 2010, is thrilled to be back. “We’re in a better place now. We’ve got more room to brew and a 2,000-squarefoot tasting room we’re working on where we’ll be able to sell our product,” Wick says. “Everything that we couldn’t do at the old place, we can do here.” With a name like Twin Lakes, it’s a given that the water in each brew was important to the quality and consistency of the product. While Twin Lakes can no longer rely on the natural springs at the old Greenville facility, Wick’s family background in water and waste water management helped to ensure that the brewer gets as close as possible to perfection in the H2O department. “Outside of the licensing and deciding on where to relocate, selecting the water we use for Twin Lakes was one of the most important things we did,” Wick says. “We are having our water sent to us via tanker from a particular well in Chester County, so it’s free of chemicals that would affect the beer negatively, while being rich in the right minerals we need.” Co-owners Burke Morrison and Matt Day have also helped with the transition, which Morrison said has gone as smoothly as possible, although not without some concern. “We brewed as much beer as we could before leaving Greenville, but even that only lasted until about January,” Morrison said. “We’ve been essentially out of the market for more than six months, but based on the feedback we’ve gotten, I’m certain we’ll be fine,” he says. “The craft beer community is more cooperative than competitive. If you’re making a quality product, you’ll survive.” Some of the Twin Lakes quality products include the Jubilicious and Tweed’s Tavern Stout, along with the Twin Lakes Pale Ale (formerly the Greenville Pale Ale) and Blue Water Pilsner (formerly the Route 52 Pilsner), both of which reflect the change in location for the brewery. Wick, Morrison and Day are hoping to have their tasting room open sometime in November, but say a December or even early 2017 launch might be in the cards. When it does happen, they plan to cater to the happy hour crowd from 4-7 p.m. during the week. They will have growlers to go, and there will be various caterers and food trucks on site. Keep an eye on their Facebook page for updates on the tasting room opening and events throughout the fall and winter.

Dew Point Brewing Company

Nestled in the middle of acres filled with mansions, sprawling farms and woodland in northern New Castle County sits the historic mill outpost of Yorklyn. Blink and you may miss it, or make a random left or right off Rt. 82 and you’ll bypass it entirely. But keep your eyes peeled and you’ll see the area’s first microbrewery, housed in one of the old snuff mills, where passersby can stop in for a pint of freshly brewed ale or lager. Dew Point Brewing Company, named for the area’s dense morning fogs and located along Creek Road in the heart of Yorklyn, opened its tasting room in mid-August. Dew Point boasts six regular beers flowing in a taproom where Marketing Director Nick Matarese also doubles as part-time bartender. “This whole operation is like a family gathering; my uncle John (Hoffman) is a chemist and has been working out a lot of the technical issues, and my cousin Cody (Hoffman) is our head brewer,” Matarese says. “Everyone else you see around here is pretty much family helping the cause. I think there are five or six ‘partners’ altogether.” Head Brewer Cody Hoffman developed a fascination with brewing at an early age when his sister, Alexa, gave their father a brew kit for Christmas. Only 16 at the time, Hoffman was hooked. He eventually worked unpaid internships at Triumph Brewing Company in New Hope, Pa., and Twin Lakes Brewing Company in Greenville before attending Brewlab for official training in England. “No breweries would give me a chance to work at only 18 years old, so I had to work for free to get experience, like a lot of young, aspiring brewers,” Hoffman says. “When my dad and family agreed to go in on a brewery, we started doing the research and landed here.”

32 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KRESTON WINE & SPIRITS

Celebrating 83 Years

Dew Point’s tasting room has a 14-seat bar, communal high-top tables, and natural light pouring in from the surrounding valley in Yorklyn.

The renovated loft area of Dew Point’s tasting room features hardwood flooring, a 14-seat bar, plenty of communal high-top tables, and natural light pouring in from the surrounding valley. Some of the more popular beers, according to Matarese, include the Nit Wit, a traditional Belgian witbier, the Hopworts Express, a Harry Potter homage that is classic West Coast American IPA, and the delicious Dubbel Dip, a 7.1 percent Belgian dark ale. “Right now we’re brewing a porter, and we will also brew some stouts and sours, as well as two Belgian red ales later this month,” Hoffman says. “I like everything, really. I like every kind of beer, every style, so I’ll try to brew anything I can. We’re right around 50 barrels of production right now, but that will increase. Once we get to 100, we’ll start sending to restaurants and festivals.” Fifty barrels produces about 124 pints, all of which you can only currently get at Dew Point’s tasting room, open Thursday through Sunday. Large growlers aren’t yet available, but mini growlers, or mason jars, can be purchased to go for $4. Four-beer flights, or tasting samplers, are $8, while pints are $5. If you bring in a large growler from another brewery, they’ll “consider” filling it, according to Hoffman. “Just make sure you slap a Dew Point sticker on there,” he says, laughing. “We’re holding off on filling our own growlers until we’re at a production level that’s more comfortable. Last thing we want is to fill a bunch of growlers on Friday and Saturday and then only have one beer on tap come Sunday.” Dew Point also features an outdoor picnic area, though they don’t yet have a patio license. Hoffman says they can seal the mini mason jars, which patrons can take outside to drink, but can’t allow for a random, open pint to travel outside, per state law. No food is currently available on-site, but Matarese says they are planning to have food trucks come out on weekends, particularly in the spring. The tasting room is open Thursday from 4-9 p.m., Friday from 3-11 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m.11 p.m., and Sunday from 11 a.m.-8 p.m. For updates on Dew Point’s tap list and events, follow them on Facebook or visit www.dewpointbrewing.com.

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NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Drink real. The wine in the photo costs $11 at Moore Brothers Wine Company, where every wine is a hand crafted, sustainably farmed expression of a real place and real people, and every bottle was shipped and is stored at 56°. You know the difference between a supermarket and a farm stand. Come rediscover real wine. The Tasting Table is open every day.

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FOCUS

holiday hosting made easy Whether you want turkey stock or six turkey dinners, area establishments are ready to help

By Pam George

T

here was a time when many hosts cowered in the shadow of Martha Stewart. Faithful followers stenciled tablecloths and napkins for the Thanksgiving meal. They made the gravy from scratch and carefully tucked decorative herbs under the turkey skin for a wow factor. No more. Today’s time-starved hosts have learned the shortcuts to a stress-free holiday meal or party: buy a dish or even an entire meal from a shop or restaurant. “There’s definitely no shame in it,” says Lisa Scolaro, executive chef at Moveable Feast, a gourmet takeout shop and café in Wilmington. “Our clientele depends on us, for sure. They were asking for the Thanksgiving menu in October.” Moveable Feast, whose slogan is “cutting-edge comfort food,” is just one of the local businesses that can ease your entertaining workload over the holidays.

the whole enchilada

Many shops offer the entire Thanksgiving meal, which is a boon for you if your kitchen is small or you have a black thumb when it comes to cooking. Moveable Feast’s complete dinner includes all the favorite sides for eight to 10 people. Janssen’s Market in Greenville sells a complete turkey dinner for between two to 12 people. (If you have small children, you can likely make do with dinner for two.) The menu includes a choice of stuffing, potatoes or rice, vegetable, relish, and pie. It also includes giblet gravy, turkey stock, dinner rolls, and even cut flowers for the table. You can also find prepared turkey dinners in some unexpected places. Toscana To Go might have an Italian flair, thanks to big sister Piccolina Toscana. But come November and December, the cooks are roasting turkey and preparing America’s favorite trimmings. Not surprisingly, Wegmans in Concordville is a contender. Just remember that the super store’s full turkey meal is packaged cold. Don’t pick it up 10 minutes before guests arrive. Spending Thanksgiving solo but still want your turkey dinner? Call Montrachet Fine Foods, the catering arm of Centerville Café, which will happily prepare dinner for one. ► NOVEMBER JUNE 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS LET THE EXPERT AT BACHETTI’S CATERING HANDLE THIS YEAR’S HOLIDAY PARTY FOR YOUR FAMILY OR BUSINESS!

Quality Price Service Since 1934

Complete Thanksgiving Dinner • $15.99 per person OVEN-ROASTED TURKEY (BONELESS & SLICED WITH TRIMMINGS) TURKEY GRAVY (MADE FROM NATURAL TURKEY AU JUS) HERB STUFFING • MASHED POTATOES • CANDIED SWEET POTATOES VEGETABLE MEDLEY • COLESLAW • PUMPKIN RAISIN BREAD • CRANBERRY RELISH Please Order by Sat. (19th) • Pickup before 2:00 pm Wed. (23rd) Closed Thanksgiving Day.

w 302.994.4467 | 4723 Kirkwood Hwy. Midway Plaza

www.Bachettis.com

HOLIDAY HOSTING MADE EASY continued from previous page

on the side

Admittedly, you might delight in the smell of a roasting turkey. Or perhaps you want to pull out the turkey fryer you received last Christmas. (Remember to make the time to heat the oil, and for heaven’s sake, use it outside.) Popping the turkey in the oven or oil is one thing. Peeling and mashing potatoes, cubing bread, stirring lumpy gravy, and baking pies is another. “The most requested dishes we sell are the old standbys that take a lot of time to prep and cook: mashed potatoes, maple-whipped yams, stuffing and a lot of gravy—vats of gravy,” Paula Janssen says. “We preorder all the turkey necks we can get in the week before Thanksgiving to meet the demand.” If you like to cook but don’t like the prep, there is also an option. For one client, the Centreville Café makes the turkey stock and chops celery and onion. The client makes the stuffing. “We save her the labor,” owner Susan Teiser explains. If you decide to order prepared sides, Centerville Café will happily arrange the food on your platters or in your casserole. “Customers can take full credit for it,” she says. Without cartons and bags, your guests won’t be the wiser.

have it your way

In these days of gluten-free, dairyfree, and Paleo eating, you’ll probably encounter guests with dietary preferences. The Centerville Café specializes in customizing a dish or ingredient to meet the client’s needs. “So much of our work now is gluten-free,” says Teiser, who’ll also make sugar-free items. Janssen’s sells gluten-free stuffing and pies. Moveable Feast can provide both gluten-free and vegetarian options. Harvest Market Natural Foods in Hockessin is the go-to place for ingredients that will appease guests on most special diets. For kosher foods, turn to ShopRite in Brandywine, which has a kosher kitchen on site and will deliver throughout New Castle County. ShopRite also sells specialty meats, such as halal foods, which are permissible under Islamic law.

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holiday dazzle

Let’s say it’s Thanksgiving—the start of the holiday season hoopla—and it’s your turn to host. House a mess? Consider holding the party at an event venue, such as the Centreville Café, which can host up to 35 indoors. You could also book Domaine Hudson’s new private dining space, which seats 35, or the 20-seat private dining room. If your home is presentable but your culinary skills are subpar, Montrachet caters in a client’s home. “We’ll do full-service— whatever anybody wants,” Teiser says. More often than not, most hosts just want, well, help. Order and pick-up has become a popular option at Toscana To Go. “We have a casual catering menu that we’ve written just for home entertaining,” says owner Dan Butler. Bachetti Bros. Catering will deliver or you can pick up. (Bachetti’s also offers full catering.) Opt for the catering menu if you have more than 20 guests. Otherwise, check out the market for dips, soups, and prepared salads. Moveable Feast has a lengthy list of options, including Middle East samplers and antipasti with grilled vegetables. Restaurants also have seen opportunities in this market sector. Big Fish Grill on the Riverfront, for instance, has a lengthy menu of cold and hot appetizers, entrees, salads and desserts. Stop here if you need shrimp cocktail, a raw bar platter, or three pounds of Big Fish’s addictive smoked tuna dip. Increasingly, supermarkets have stepped up to the holiday party plate. ShopRite locations in Delaware offer a variety of catering options, including sushi. Carnivores, conversely, will appreciate oven-roasted beef tenderloin, served medium-rare with Black Bear horseradish-cream sauce. Many dishes are prepped for cooking, such as prime rib that’s tied and seasoned. Just pop it in the oven. But the most requested catered items during the holidays are appetizers and desserts, Teiser says. “Appetizers are a little fancier and desserts are a little richer.” As usual, she keeps the cheese case stocked. If you’re having a small party, stop by Bon Appetit Gourmet Food Shoppe in Talleyville, which sells apps such as lollipop lamb chops with basil-walnut pesto and skewered sesame chicken by the piece.

bu y or lease

Party planning involves more than buying food. You also need the right tools of the trade. If you’re lacking good barware, head to Target or Bed, Bath & Beyond, where you can snag up to 12 glasses for well under $20 and often under $10. You can also get some great deals on cheap white plates, cutlery, and white napkins on Amazon.com. For patterned linens, chafing dishes, tables and chairs, Teiser recommends Diamond State Party Rentals, which posts its pricing on the website.

be prepared

During the holidays, Teiser keeps her coffer full of popular items, such as lollipop lamb chops. But if you want quail egg or boneless duck breast, order at least a week in advance. As for Thanksgiving, there are only so many turkeys to go around. Determine your store’s deadline, and fill out the order form. Check it twice. Otherwise, you and your family might be eating in a Chinese restaurant on the big day.

302.655.8600 | ToscanaToGo.com 1412 N. Dupont St., Wilmington

PLEASE ORDER BY THU, NOV. 17th

219 complete (serves 10) Thanksgiving meal $

~ A Dinner & Dessert With All The Fixin’s ~

• 16-18lb Turkey oven ready or fully cooked & re-heat ready • 4lb Focaccia Sage Stuffing • 2qt Rustic Turkey Gravy • 1qt Fresh Cranberry Sauce • Harvest Salad mixed field greens with roasted butternut squash, candied pecans, dried cranberries, smoked gouda in an apple cider vinaigrette • 4lb Seasoned Mashed Potatoes with roasted garlic • Family Pan of Mac & Cheese with aged Vermont Cheddar • 1 Homemade Pie of your choice

Whole Turkeys • Fully Cooked – $90 16 - 18lb + 1qt of gravy; ready to reheat • Oven Ready – $70 brined and seasoned with roasting vegetables in an aluminum roasting pan

Thanksgiving To Go Visit our web site for a complete Thanksgiving To Go Menu and details

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS

SUDS WORTH SIPPING A few winter brews we think you may enjoy

21ST AMENDMENT BREWERY | FIRESIDE CHAT Gather around a crackling hearth this fall and winter and enjoy a few cans of Fireside Chat, a spiced winter ale from 21st Amendment Brewery. One of my favorite seasonal ales, this nearly-eight-percenter is full of chocolate malts, cocoa nibs and spices like nutmeg and cinnamon. Plus, in these trying electoral times, it's reassuring to see old FDR's likeness on the can, giving us all a little hope that things will turn out fine. — Rob Kalesse, Contributing Writer

ROGUE ALES | YELLOW SNOW IPA I love a good IPA every time of the year, but I think winter brings out my favorites. Yellow Snow IPA ranks around the top of the list, and I always seek out a 22-ounce bottle when the temperature drops. As the name suggests, this beer is a pale golden IPA that uses one variety of hops, Amarillo, that gives a very nice fruity aroma and flavor. — Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer

JOLLY PUMPKIN ARTISAN ALES | MADRUGADA OBSCURA DARK DAWN STOUT The Madrugada Obscura is a tart imperial stout. It’s dark in color, sour tasting with malty, smoky, coffee qualities. If it sounds like something you’d hate, I bet you will. But if it sounds interesting, my advice is this: Pour it. Taste it. Get over the initial shock. Wait a few minutes and try again. You might find that it’s a little unusual but really delicious. — Marie Graham Poot, Director of Digital Media & Distribution

MONK'S CAFÉ | SOUR FLEMISH ALE As our readers may already know, Monk's Cafe is an iconic pub in Philadelphia and is well known for its Belgian/Sour beers. Sours aren't always easy to find locally, but I've managed to discover this one at Frank's Wine in Wilmington. Grab a four-pack and enjoy this sweet & tart brown ale on a chilly evening by the fire pit. — Matt Loeb, Creative Director/ Production Manager

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EVOLUTION CRAFT BREWING COMPANY | RISE UP STOUT The Rise Up Stout has been a favorite among Out & About staffers for many years and for many reasons. Utilizing locally roasted beans from Rise Up Coffee in Easton, Md., the alchemists at Evolution merge the best of both worlds—beer and coffee—nailing the center of a Venn diagram connecting brew lovers and morning caffeine addicts. The harmonious results present bold roasted flavors that neither overpower nor disappoint. A perfect pint for happy hours during the wintry weeks to come. — Jim Miller, Director of Publications

FOUNDERS BREWING COMPANY | PORTER Choosing a winter beer from so many full-bodied, cozy-by-the-fire options — Founders Breakfast Stout! Bell's Best Brown Ale!— was difficult, but Founders Porter, like an oft-ignored younger kid growing up in a sibling's shadow, was a great surprise. Unlike many other porters and stouts, its ABV isn't too crazy at 6.5 percent. Not too bitter, not too sweet, and the robust flavors of chocolate and caramel are rich and satisfying to the last sip.

SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. | CELEBRATION ALE This is a decade-long holiday tradition for me. Celebration is one of the first examples of American-style IPA and was introduced to the public in 1981. Though each year’s batch tastes different, Sierra Nevada insists it has been using the same recipe since 1983. It’s simply the fact that the flavor of hops changes from year to year (in fact, from field to field), they say. — Jerry duPhily, Publisher

2SP BREWING COMPANY | GALACTIC RELEASE I recently tried this beer on a quick stop before heading out on a kayaking trip. I wanted something that was heavy enough to quench my thirst while taking a break from paddling, but light enough that I could enjoy it in the sun and keep going. This beer has easily become my favorite— pouring smooth with a bright ivory head, and balancing this really distinct blend of sweet and tart tastes. — Joe del Tufo, Contributing Photographer

— Krista Connor, Associate Editor

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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STACEY SILVERS PR PRO & GREEN GAL

Fred Armisen Tuesday, November 1

Just Drag! Saturday, November 5

Wilmington Beer Week Sat, Nov 5 - Sat, Nov 12

From Art to Landscape Tuesday, November 8

Market Street Music: Haifa/Philly Thursday, November 10

Delaware Innovation Week Fri, Nov 11- Sat, Nov 19

Delaware Antiques Show Fri, Nov 11- Sun, Nov 13

Mark Wilson: Destructive Creation Thursday, November 17

Andrew W.K. Saturday, November 19

Untapped History Series Saturday, November 19

Riverfront Rink Season Opening Friday, November 25

Basil Restaurant

DSO Classics w/ Jinjoo Cho 2 forSeries specials Friday, November 18

Full details for these events, plus hundreds more at:

inWilmingtonDE.com

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CITY OF WILMINGTON

The Un-Still Life: A Celebration of the Eccentric Possibilities of Still Life, Zuexis at the Toni & Stuart B. Young Gallery at DCAD.

w

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE REFRESHMENTS

K

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

DT

DOWNTOWN LOOP

WE

WEST END LOOP

NW

NORTH WILMINGTON LOOP

WG

WEST SIDE GROWS LOOP

ART LOOP WILMINGTON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4 5 - 9 p.m. artloopwilm.org

cityfest

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Downtown Loop

artloopwilm.org

THE WILMINGTON ART LOOP

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4 5 - 9 p.m.

cityfestwilm.com/artloopwilmington cityfest STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO THE ART LOOP. STEP 1: Select exhibitions that interest you. STEP 2: Map out your choices and select transportation. You may want to walk, drive or take the downtown DART Trolley. A limited number of seats are available on the Art Loop shuttle. Please reserve your seat by calling 302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov.

STEP 3: Meet local and regional artists while enjoying the newest exhibitions to open in Wilmington and the surrounding areas.

STEP 4: Enjoy one of Wilmington’s excellent restaraunt or nightlife locations. Please visit the food and drink

The Delaware Contemporary 200 S. Madison Street Wilmington, DE www.decontemporary.org New exhibitions by Jury Smith, Caroline Chen, Brad Vanneman and the New Wilmington Art Association; Forged Fashion runway show by Ellen Durkan; aerial performances by Ascend Glow Arts; DJ Skinny White & DJ Zip; spirit tasting by Dogfish Head; food trucks; and cash bar. Art Loop reception 5-9 PM. On view Tues, Thurs, Fri, Sat - 10 am-5 PM; Wed, Sun - 12 - 5 PM through November 30th. Delaware Technical and Community College 300 North Orange Street Wilmington, DE 19802 www.dtcc.edu Delaware Tech students, staff and alumni showcase photography and artwork.

section of inwilmingtonde.com.

STEP 5: Repeat the first Friday of every month!

FREQUENLTY ASKED QUESTIONS WHERE DOES THE ART LOOP START? The Art Loop is a self-guided, go-at-your-own pace tour that can start at any of the locations listed in this guide. There is no designated route for the Art Loop.

HOW DO I APPLY TO EXHIBIT ON THE ART

Zaikka India Grill 209 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE www.zaikka.com Say It With Words, Casey J presents a thought provoking journey of images and prose sthat will leave bystander thirsty for more. Art Loop Reception 5 – 8PM. On view Monday – Friday 11A – 8 P through October 31st.

LOOP? Participating galleries book and curate the exhi-

bitions and should be contacted directly at the contact information provided in this guide.

HOW DO I TAKE THE ART LOOP SHUTTLE? Reserve one of the limited number of seats by calling 302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov. The bus will pick-up and drop-off at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts.

42 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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2nd & LOMA 211 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE www.2ndandloma.com The creative journeys of Laura Klein and Laurie Tobia (showing jointly) began in Newark, Delaware. From this starting point their styles developed into different surreal interpretations of reality while containing visual parallels. Art loop reception 5:00 PM – 8:30 PM. On view Mon – Fri 9:00 – 5:00 PM through November 23rd. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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Downtown Loop

artloopwilm.org Toni & Stuart B. Young Gallery at DCAD 600 North Market Street Wilmington, DE www.dcad.edu The Un-Still Life: A Celebration of the Eccentric Possibilities of Still Life, features works by Zeuxis, an association of still life painters. Shown is “Celestial Shrine” by Trevor Winkfield. Art Loop reception 5 to 8 PM. On view Mon – Fri 9 AM – 9 PM and Sat/Sun 10 AM – 4 PM.

Fluent, Linda Celestian, The Delaware Division of the Arts is pleased to present a selection of new work by 2016 Individual Artist Fellow in Painting. Art loop reception 5 – 7 PM. On view 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM through November 23rd.

608 North Market 608 North Market Street Wilmington, DE 19801

LuxiaSuites 1007 N. Orange Street Wilmington, DE www.luxiasuites.com

Artists Rick Hidalgo, Hallie Albano, Rosa Howard, Nick McNevich, Tynisha Lomax, Liz Mateson, Simone Welsh, Nick Blanco, Sean Burns, Natalie Burns, Jennifer WIlliams & Harry Mazzio will be showcasing work ranging from paintings, sculptures, clothing, jewelry, photography and video projections. Art Loop reception 5 – 9 PM. On view through November.

Stay Sharp with Art: Redefining Luxury Photography” In collaboration with The Mill,-for November’s Art Loop, Luxiasuites will open its doors to the public to feature hand-built frames surrounding beautiful photography. This exhibit will be conveniently accessible from The Mill on the 4th floor of the Nemours Building. Art Loop reception 5:30 – 7:30 PM. On view November 4th only.

Jerry’s Artarama 704 North Market Street Wilmington, DE www.wilmingtonde-jerrys.com

Howard Pyle Studio Group 1305 N. Franklin Street Wilmington, DE www.howardpylestudio.org

Nature, John Holton. Art Loop reception 5 PM – 8 PM. On view Mon – Sat 9 AM – 6 PM, Sunday 11 AM – 5 PM.

A member exhibit of Abstract work. Art loop reception 5:30 – 8:00 PM. On view by appointment only 302.652.7847 through December 1st.

Denim Bar 704 North Market Street (upstairs) Entrance on 7th Street Wilmington, DE www.sawphotog.com

Zion Lutheran Church 2101 Lancaster Ave Wilmington, DE View and enjoy the 40 Union Park Gardens Historical Display Boards to learn about John Nolen, our Town Planner and what was happening in Wilmington when Union Park Gardens was built in 1918. Residents of all ages will display their drawings, paintings, or photographs of their homes. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome! Plenty of free parking available. Art loop reception 5:30 – 8 PM. On view through November 4.

Dreaming in Black & White, Explore through the photographer’s lens when Shannon Woodloe dreams, only in black and white. Art Loop reception 5:30 – 8:30 PM. On view Monday – Saturday 12 PM – 7 PM through November 30, 2016.

Poppycock Tattoo 115 W 8th Street Wilmington, DE www.poppycocktattoo.com

Black Light Spooktacular Group Art Show; Poppycock Tattoo is having a group art show with glowing black light paintings! Artists including Eric Hendrickson, Dave Mele, Tina Marabito, Wendy Mitchell, Ken Schuler, Beth Ann Busch, Ric Frane, Allison Sharpe, Demian Unkle D, Emi Boz, Gus Fink, Pat Higgins, Kristen Margiotta, Frank Oh, Robert Bickey and Daniel Pollard. Art loop reception 6 PM – 10 PM. On view Monday through Saturday 12 PM – 7 PM through November 30th. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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Mezzanine Gallery 820 N French Street Wilmington, DE www.artsdel.org

Blue Streak Gallery 1721 Delaware Ave Wilmington, DE 302.429.0506 Painting the Town and All Around, You may know Bill Montgomery as a dedicated public servant, but may not know that for the past 16 years his other passion has been working in oils on canvas; creating colorful still life paintings in the studio, landscapes in the Brandywine Valley , and other cityscapes in Wilmington and Quebec City. Art loop reception 5 – 8 PM. On view Tues – Fri 10:00 – 5:00 PM; Saturday 10 AM – 4 PM through November 29th. NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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West End Loop & North Wilmington Loop

artloopwilm.org

Delaware Center for Horticulture 1810 N Dupont Street Wilmington, DE www.thedch.org

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Robert E. Lyons, PhD has been a photographer for over 35 years and through research and study he has learned to capture that ephemeral moment when flowers are at their peak. He has exhibited his work nationally and received awards from the Garden Writers Association of America. At loop reception 5:30 – 7:30 PM/ On view 8:30 A M – 5 PM through December 21st.

The Station Gallery 3922 Kennett Pike Greenville, DE www.stationgallery.net Over the Marsh - New Paintings, Michele Green. Landscapes in oil of marshes, waterways and paths from the remote areas of the Delmarva Peninsula. Live Bluegrass Band and Book Signing. Art loop reception 5 PM – 8 PM. On view Mon – Fri 9 A – 5P; Sat 10 AM – 3 PM through November 23rd.

All Artwork on Display Art Loop Night Only (unless noted) 5:30 – 8:30 PM

Somerville Manning Gallery Breck’s Mill, 2nd Floor 101 Stone Block Row Greenville, DE www.somervillemanning.com

The 3rd Place 1139 W. 7th Street Wilmington, DE 3rdplacewilm.com

Arden’s Buzz Ware Village Center 2119 the Highway Arden, DE www.ardenbuzz.com Meditation Cynthia Bonnes Photography is meditation, in the moment. Present and aware, finding beauty and experiencing everything in a much deeper sense. It’s stopping time by capturing an image to share an experience, emotion, vision. In sharing my work simplistic beauty. Art loop reception 6 – 9 PM. On view by appointment only Mon – Sat 8 AM – 8 PM through November 30th.

Fierro Cheese 1025 N Union Street Wilmington, DE fierrocheese.com

Bellefonte Arts 803 Brandywine Blvd Bellefonte, DE www.bellefontearts.com

Locale BBQ 1014 N. Lincoln Street Wilmington, DE localebbqpost.com

Group show “Distortions:” a change, twist, or exaggeration that makes something appear different from the way it really is. Featuring submissions by Alice Reid, Ann White, Tanya Bracey, Lois Johnson, and Hannah Chillingworth. Art loop reception 5 – 8 PM. On view Tues – Fri 11 A – 5 PM, Sat 10 – 4 PM, Sunday 12 – 4 PM through November 30th.

Chainsaw art on display by George Willauer.

Behind the Easel, The Unique Voices of Twenty Contemporary Representational Painters. This exhibition surveys the state of representational painting at the beginning of the 21st century and features works by 20 contemporary realist artists from throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. Art loop reception 5 – 7:30 PM. On view 10 AM – 5 PM through November 19th.

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ON THE ART LOOP

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The Mug Show Continues at The 3rd Place with mugs from Terra Opera Pottery, Peter Saenger, Lauren Vanni, Megan Flachier, and many more. Gift baskets will be available. James Day Coffee Roasters will be on hand for coffee tastings. Jump on your gift giving and support local businesses!

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The lot next to Fierro’s Cheese comes alive for Art Loop with the Delaware Microbusiness Guild, cheese samples, pumpkin soup, and hot chocolate. The Delaware Microbusiness Guild is a collective of small start-ups, microbusinesses, handicrafters, herbalists, artisans, artists, etc.

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A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

10/24/16 10:03 AM


West Side Grows On The Art Loop Shish Interiors 1012 N. Lincoln Street Wilmington, DE shishinteriors.com

artloopwilm.org

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Grace Hunsinger, A Vermont Visit. A continuing series of cows originally inspired by Fairdale Farms in Bennington, Vermont.

Kurtz Collection 1010 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE kurtzcollection.com

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JoAnn Sears is a local artist here in Delaware. She specializes in beaded jewelry with semiprecious stones and pearls.

Lang Carpet 1001 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE langcarpet.com

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Skypointe Cafe celebrates the West Side Art Loop with a host of live peformances (spoken word, music) and art centered around the them: Ode to Wilmington. Past. Present. Future.. Kerrea Meekins is from Wilmington Delaware (west side). She is a veteran who left the military to pursue her dream in art. Her style is inspired by graffiti and comics.

Corleto Latina Family Center 805 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE

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Join Corleto Latina Family Center for their inagural Paint Night hosted by Mary Latina. 12 individuals can sign up by emailing sleser@westsidegrows.org. A $10 supply fee will apply per person. Also, there may be an opportunity to hear an organ recital!

8th and Union Kitchen 801 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE 8thandunion.com

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The photographer Scott Hewitt is an award winning image creator comfortable on set with Talent or in a field with a miniature donkey. Seriously!

Enjoy happy hour specials and delicious dining at 8th and Union Kitchen while absorbing the work of Eugene Hero. Eugene Hero perceives color as the foundation of life, intertwining vibrancy in all of my works. His perspective allows him to bring familiar objects such as vases, mirrors, shoes, clothing, skateboards and of course canvases to life in a unique and inspiring way.

Blue Ballby Barn Flowers Yukie 1914N.West Park Drive 916 Union Street Wilmington, DE 302.577.7020 shopflowersbyyukie.com destateparks.com/alapocas-run

Bella Luna Ristorante 729 N Union Street Wilmington, DE bellalunawilmington.com

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Yvette Rennee Johnson, in the inspiring and by Yukie storefront. Steverefreshing Attinger,Flowers Retrospective – Steve Light fare, music, and beautiful Attinger is live a self-taught artist whoseflowers works will abound! “Yvette Reneememories Johnson ofislife a relate to powerful, emotional Wilmington self-taught abstract, growing up native in the and earlyatwentieth century.
 Art mixed media artist. pieces a Loop reception 5-9 Her pm. colorful On view Mon are – Fri juxtaposition of faith,November healing, and 8am – 4pm through 13th.the hope found in letting go of the past, and embracing an uncertain future.

First State Health & Wellness 910 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE firststatehealth.com

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First State Health & Wellness hosts an open house with no charge consults, Delaware business networkers, nutrition consultations, home fire safety information, costume artists, and mala beads from Shelley Best. A Beaded Intention was born from the need to create custom prayer bead necklaces to support Shelley’s own personal yoga, meditation and intention practices. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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Skypointe Café 807 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE

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Bella Luna, now under new management, will be open for dinner and drinks with art from Brian Tharan decorating the dining room.

Rocco Italian Grill 701 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE roccoitaliangrill.com

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Joe Melloy is an experienced painter of more than thirty five years, native of Wilmington, studied under Ed Loper at the Delaware Art Museum, skilled at colored acrylic painting, performed pen and ink drawings for best selling book – “Chateau Country, Thirty three DuPont mansions in Delaware Valley” -, currently painting floral paintings of his late wife’s flower arrangements, which she performed at Winterthur Museum. NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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West Side Grows On The Art Loop Dead Presidents Pub & Restaurant 618 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE deadpresidentspub.com

artloopwilm.org

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Dead President’s will have the Better Block Union Street mural on display. Plus, Geraldo Gonzalez, the King of Transit, will share his colorful masterpieces.

Lucy Smith’s striking, emotional artwork combines intense subject matter with portraits and rainbows of color. Oils are the primary medium used. Mental health awareness is a commonly ignored topic, and it is the hope of the artist to create an internal dialogue within the viewer about the mental health experiences depicted.

Hair Designs Just 4 U 610 N. Union Street, Wilmington, DE

Prodigy Urban Wear 310 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE

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Grand Opening Celebration!! Call Mi Cocoa Art, I paint strength, resilience. I paint vulnerability. What inspires me grows daily but I never cease to be inspired by the beauty and the versatility of black women.

JaQuanne LeRoy original paintings will be on display in a creative urban wear space just past 4th Street. Born and raised in Wilmington, DE the art of JaQuanne Leroy tells the story of a young man dealing with the turbulence of life.

Mrs. Robino’s Restaurant 520 N Union Street Wilmington, DE mrsrobinos.com

Comegys Pub 210 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE

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Michael Melloy will showcase his paintings at this Little Italy favorite. More about the artist: “I love history, nature and photography, and my work gets to combine these passions. Many of my works begin with aerial photography, primarily of historic landmarks and places. I capture these icons from a unique aerial perspective, and edit the images to bring attention to the primary subject.” Enter through Mrs. Robino’s back patio.

J. Stanley Salon 210 N. Union Street Wilmington, DE jstanleysalon.com

Telo Massage 506 N Union Street Wilmington, DE telo-massage.com

Zion Lutheran Church 2101 Lancaster Ave Wilmington, DE zionluther.org

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Fred Comegy’s held a unique eye for beauty, capturing the essence of a scene that very few in his profession could ever do. This innate ability was recognized numerous times throughout his career, culminating in being awarded the 1985 Photographer of the Year award, as voted on by his peers.

The C.A.U.S.E. @ 512 N Union 512 N Union Street WG Wilmington, DE www.causetheworld.com The Cause, Starfish Casters, The C.A.U.S.E Connection will be open for the month of November, starting Nov. 4th, creating a space for the community to unite, grow, dream, plan and have meaningful fun together. Throughout the month attend free motivational workshops and group gatherings, or simply drop in and participate in ongoing projects such as the Starfish Exchange, group murals and collective song.

Nature Photography Wall Art on display by Melissa Fague of Pi Photgraphy and Fine Arts.

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Jack Michael’s Hair Salon 418 N Union Street, Wilmington, DE

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Marylea Madiman will display her work in the vibrant environment of J. Stanley Salon.

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View and enjoy the 40 Union Park Gardens Historical Display Boards to learn about John Nolen, our Town Planner and what was happening in Wilmington when Union Park Gardens was built in 1918. Residents of all ages will display their drawings, paintings, or photographs of their homes. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome! Plenty of free parking available. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

10/24/16 10:04 AM


T H I S M O N T H AT

Nemours Building | 1007 N. Orange Street

November 4-6

King Cobra

The Beatles: 8 Days A Week

91 minutes, NR

141 minutes, NR

FRI 5:30 | SAT 1, 7:30 | SUN 3

FRI 2, 8:30 | SAT 4 | SUN 12, 6

November 11-13

A Man Called Ove

A Family Affair

Swedish with subtitles 118 minutes, PG-13

English & Danish with subtitles 110 minutes, NR

FRI 2, 8:30 | SAT 4 | SUN 12, 6

FRI 5:30 | SAT 1, 7:30 | SUN 3

November 18-20 JOE RUNYIRI MUSICIAN & MC

Harry & Snowman

The Handmaiden

84 minutes, NR

Japanese & Chinese with subtitles 144 minutes, NR FRI 5:30 | SAT 12:30, 7:30 | SUN 2:30

FRI 2, 8:30 | SAT 4:30 | SUN 12, 6

WHAT’S #INTUNE THIS MONTH

November 25-27

Christine

All In Time

119 minutes, R

96 minutes, NR

FRI 2, 8:30 | SAT 4 | SUN 3

FRI 5:30 | SAT 1, 7:30 | SUN 6

For more information and tickets, visit

TheatreN.com

La Yegros Saturday, November 12

Straight No Chaser Sunday, November 13

Funksgiving Eve Wednesday, November 23

Black Friday w/ DMX Friday, November 25

Full details for these events, plus hundreds more at:

inWilmingtonDE.com

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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1. Amtrak Station 2. Opera Delaware Studios/City Theater Co. 3. Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn., WYRA.ORG 4. Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park 5. Residences at Christina Landing 6. Harry’s Seafood Grill / Riverfront Market, HARRYS-SAVOY.COM 7. Delaware Theatre Co., DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG 8. FireStone Roasting House, FIRESTONERIVERFRONT.COM 9. Cosi at the Barclays Crescent Building, GETCOSI.COM 10. Hare Pavilion/Riverwalk 11. AAA Mid-Atlantic Travel Center, AAAMIDATLANTIC.COM 12. The Delaware Contemporary, THEDCCA.ORG

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13. Justison Landing, Currie Hair, Skin & Nails, CURRIEDAYSPA.COM Veritas Wine & Spirits, VERITASWINESHOP.COM Starbucks on the Riverfront 14. Kooma, KOOMASUSHI.COM Goju Training Center, GOJUROBICS.COM 15. Delaware Children’s Museum, DELAWARECHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG Riverwalk Mini Golf, RIVERWALKMINIGOLF.COM 16. Joe’s Crab Shack, JOESCRABSHACK.COM 17. Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant, IRONHILLBREWERY.COM 18. Public Docks 19. Big Fish Grill, BIGFISHRIVERFRONT.COM

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Visit RiverfrontWilm.com for info on events happening at the Riverfront! 20. Frawley Stadium, BLUEROCKS.COM Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame 21. Chase Center on the Riverfront, CENTERONTHERIVERFRONT.COM 22. Dravo Plaza & Dock 23. Shipyard Center Planet Fitness, PLANETFITNESS.COM 24. Timothy’s Restaurant, TIMOTHYSONTHERIVERFRONT.COM Molly’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream, MOLLYSICECREAM.COM Ubon Thai Restaurant 25. Wilmington Rowing Center, WILMINGTONROWING.ORG 26. Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge/ DuPont Environmental Education Center, DUPONTEEC.ORG

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27 Riverfront Commuter Lot, RIVERFRONTWILM.COM/PARKING 28. Penn Cinema Riverfront IMAX, PENNCINEMARIVERFRONT.COM 29. CrossFit Riverfront, CFRIVERFRONT.COM 30. The Residences at Harlan Flats, HARLANFLATS.THERESIDENCES.NET 31. Stratosphere Trampoline Park, WILMINGTONTRAMPOLINEPARK.COM 32. The Westin Wilmington, WESTINWILMINGTON.COM River Rock Kitchen, RIVERROCKKITCHEN.COM 33. Delaware Humane Association, DEHUMANE.ORG Photo by Joe del Tufo

10/24/16 10:16 AM


O P EN I N G NOVEMBER 25 RIVERFRONTRINK.COM

302-425-4890

FOLLOW US

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10/12/16 9:26 AM 10/24/16 10:17 AM


Women in

BUSINESS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8 The Chase Center on the Riverfront | Wilmington, DE KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Tanya Bakalov, Founder, SevOne Presented by For tickets and information, visit DelawareToday.com

Custom Sponsorships available at a variety of price points: Sales@DelawareToday.com | 302.504.1326

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

FRESHER THAN EVER

Baker Lupe Torres sorts PureBread's freshly made muffins, which go to all five locations. Photo Joe del Tufo/Moonloop Photography

After 15 years and five stores, PureBread is running with the big dogs, and its commissary is keeping it near the head of the pack By Rob Kalesse

D

rive along most major roads in the Delaware Valley and you’re likely to be inundated with lunchtime options, ranging from sit-down restaurant to fast food joint. If you’re in the mood for a sandwich, the choices are virtually unlimited; it’s hard to blink without seeing a spot that proudly claims it serves the best subs, steaks, hoagies, hot dogs, burgers, etc. It appears, however, that some of the classic, familyowned sandwich shops are becoming harder and harder to come by, what with the onslaught of national chains like Panera and Quiznos, and regional behemoths like Wawa.

Multiple locations, kiosks for quick service, and even the addition of fuel service (particularly at Wawa) make them difficult to resist. In 2001, when Mike Nardozzi opened his first PureBread location, he knew the battle against “Big Sandwich” would be uphill. Fifteen years later, he’s quietly challenging the chain locations with his five stores (Pike Creek, Greenville, Christiana, Wilmington, and Glen Mills, Pa.). His recipe for success calls for fresh-baked breads and house-roasted meats, all served with a friendly smile and a connection with customers that keeps ‘em coming back. ►

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

Photos courtesy of PureBread

FRESHER THAN EVER continued from previous page

Mike Nardozzi, far right, with the commissary crew (lefto to right): Victor Arquello, John Gray, Jennifer McSweeney, Lupe Torres, Dan Saksa, Alejandra Tapia.

BUILDING A LOYAL ‘BREAD BASE’

HOLIDAYS MADE SIMPLE. REALLY. We know you have a full plate for the holiday season. So we’ve made it easier. Indulge in one of our complete holiday meals with all the trimmings. Or, if you’re planning a holiday party, relax and let Janssen’s catering do all the work!

WWW.JANSSENSMARKET.COM 3801 KENNETT PIKE, GREENVILLE, DE 302.654.9941

54 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Nardozzi opened the first PureBread location in September of 2001, but his love for working in the front of the house at restaurants goes back to his post-college days in the mid-1990s. After graduating from Clemson University in 1995, he went to work at a southern dining institution: Waffle House. “Waffle House was one of my first jobs out of college, when I was living in Marietta, Ga.,” Nardozzi says. “I learned so much about the great system they have in place there; it really made an impact. Then I wound up playing in a golf outing with the CFO, and after that day, I was hooked.” He soon moved home to Delaware, where he found work with the Shemp Restaurant Group (Scratch Magoo’s, Tyler’s). Shortly thereafter, he and a co-worker began brainstorming a new business. A dog lover at heart, Nardozzi wanted to use man’s best friend in the name and marketing for the restaurant, and thus, “PureBread” was born. He quit his job in April of 2001, worked on a business plan, and opened the doors to the first PureBread in Pike Creek just five months later. Ever since, the menu and restaurants have featured a dog theme, with sandwiches named after breeds and photos of regular customers’ dogs decorating the walls. “Our fall menu, which we just revamped, has 25 different dog-named sandwiches, and even our culture follows the notion of being friendly and loyal, a lot like dogs are,” Nardozzi says. “When we hire people, we expect them to adhere to our values. I really think it’s our friendly service and the smiles you see on our employees’ faces that brings customers back again and again.” While most restaurants might save their mission or keys to satisfying guests for the employee training manual, PureBread features it proudly on posters and table tents. Five rules, covering quality products, accurate orders, legendary service, pure hospitality, and cleanliness, are posted throughout the restaurants. As Nardozzi says, “Our values and keys to guest delight are right there in plain sight. If we don’t fulfill them all, the customers will know it.” Greenville resident Beth Friedman has visited all five restaurants, but frequents the PureBread closest to her house several times a week. She’s been going since it opened, mostly for the consistent product and cheerful employees behind the counter. Even a slight mix-up in her order years ago impressed her. “They used to put a pickle on every sandwich and, well, I hate pickles,” Friedman says. “There was a pickle on my platter, and it was not good. I barely mentioned it, and they didn’t even blink. They insisted on making it right, immediately. No roll of the eyes, no attitude. Within a minute, I had a new sandwich. I’m not sure you get that kind of service at a lot of places.” Commitment to service and making each store “achieve excellence” is a big reason Nardozzi hasn’t considered offers to expand downstate or farther north along the Main Line. He says he’s too focused on the five stores he already has, and with a newly built, halfmillion-dollar commissary in Newport, proximity to the five PureBread locations is key. OCTOBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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THAI SELECT 2016 & READERS CHOICE ‘16

Photo Joe del Tufo/Moonloop Photography

Serving the Good Heat Since 1982

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY WITH US TODAY!

Bread, made with homemade dough, is delivered to each store by midnight for use the following day.

FOOD FOR 15,000 Plenty of sandwich shops rely on Boar’s Head or Sysco to provide their meats, cheeses and other delicatessen side dishes, but Nardozzi wanted to go the proprietary route with PureBread’s own recipes, roasting techniques, and homemade dough. While other places are figuring out how to cut costs, he says, PureBread added the commissary and is using better ingredients. “Quality is everything to us, so we spent $500,000 on this new commissary that opened in January,” Nardozzi says. “We used to have bakers at all the stores, but it just got inconsistent. Everything is now from scratch, and is delivered to each store by midnight for service the following day, including our house-roasted chicken.” Director of Operations Linda Morel says the Newport facility is a well-oiled machine despite less than a year of operation. Between five and seven employees are on hand at any time, making the dough from scratch and hand-chopping and mixing side salads like the popular coleslaw. “Our delivery drivers—who work as mailmen during the day— come to the commissary every evening,” Morel says. “By midnight, all five stores are stocked with all the supplies they need for the next day. It’s the best solution for guaranteeing that everything is always fresh at each store.” Nardozzi says the bakers typically churn out between 400 and 500 muffins a day, in addition to all the loaves of bread and bagels they make. On average, all the meat, vegetables and bread the commissary pumps out is enough to fully stock the five stores with food for about 3,000 guests, or 15,000 people a week.

SMILE. BE KIND. DO GOOD. Just as commuters might see hundreds of dining options out on the local roads, it’s also easy to spot one of PureBread’s best marketing tools. Any time you see a “Lend a Paw” car magnet, look a little closer while at the next stop light, and you’ll see the PureBread lettering in fine print. ►

Try Our HAWAIIAN

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Poached in Green Tea

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Tue-Sun 4-7pm Bar Only Tapas & Daily Drink Specials

Live Music

Wed & Sun Nights

with Rob Zinn Quartet LIVE! CD Release Party, Sunday, Nov. 13, 5-8pm

www.ubonthaicusine.com

302-656-1706 936 Justison Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Spicy garlic stir fry with chicken is a popular Honeygrow dish.

EAT FRESHER THAN EVER continued from previous page

DELIVERY AVAILABLE!

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

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late-night menu 10pm-Close

“It’s part of a program we’ve had here for years, where we set money aside for employees who have fallen on hard times, and allot that money to a deserving Product # 2997 individual,” Nardozzi says. “We’ve bought Outdoor Magnet - 5.75" x 3.375" cars, furniture, helped pay bills, you name it. We see it as part of that whole pay-itforward philosophy we impart.” While the Lend a Paw magnets are still popular, the company’s mantra has changed to something just as meaningful, according to Nardozzi: “Smile. Be Kind. Do Good.” The change was implemented about two years ago, when former employee Phillip Bishop died as a result of a hit-and-run accident on Brackenville Road near Hockessin. The 27-year-old was pedaling his bicycle home from a shift at the Greenville location when he was struck and killed. “You probably remember reading the story in the paper, but it was devastating,” Nardozzi says. “Phil had worked for us for about two years and was so genuine, so full of life, so willing to listen and take time with each guest; when we lost him, we felt it was necessary to keep his spirit going.” Nardozzi says Bishop’s mother, Johanna Bishop, was quoted after the funeral as saying, “We have to live life now … according to Phillip’s principles, which was just to be kind and do good.” That motto has been featured on PureBread posters and in their corporate email response since soon after the funeral, and is now part of the company’s mission. “We just want to be positive and genuine, like Phil was, and hope our customers see and feel that when they walk in our doors,” Nardozzi says. The Lend a Paw program still exists, as does PureBread’s Pups Calendar, featuring photos of customers’ dogs, for $25. Proceeds from the sale of the calendar go toward the fund that helps employees overcome financial hardships. The calendar includes $175 in PureBread coupons, and will be available at www.PureBread.com and in stores by early November, in conjunction with the new menu roll-out. Cut Margin; Represents area in which all copy should be placed. Cut Line/Die Line; Represents the edge of the product.

Bleed Line; Represents how far the image or color should go beyond the cut/die line.

56 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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302.482.3333 • ChelseaTavern.com 821 N. Market St., Wilmington

302.384.8113, ErnestAndScott.com 902 N. Market St., Wilmington

OUR KITCHEN IS

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15 Build-UR-Own Bucket any 4 12oz bottles

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KICKOFF DRAFT SPECIALS During all regular NFL Games HALF-PRICED WINGS* During evening regular NFL Games THURSDAYS 30% OFF TACOS* Ask About our NFL LoyALty CArd ProgrAm

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Come Try Our Seasonal Craft Beers Over 22 Beers on Tap at the Polly Drummond and Peoples Plaza Locations!

Polly Drummond Location Only THURSDAYS

MONDAYS

½ Price Appetizers All Day

TUESDAYS

½ Price Burgers All Day $1.50 Domestic Drafts after 7pm

WEDNESDAYS

All You Can Eat Wings $11.99 after 5pm

THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: 108 Peoples Plaza (Corner of Rtes. 40 & 896) | Newark, DE | 302-834-6661 8 Polly Drummond Shopping Center | Newark, DE | 302-738-7814 800 North State Street | Dover, DE | 302-674-0144

Be our friend on Facebook!

All You Can Eat Shrimp $12.99 after 5pm, Prime Rib $18.99 SHOWTIME TRIVIA All Locations!

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTIES TODAY!

www.mcglynnspub.com

FRIDAYS

Prime Rib $22.99, $2.50 Taylor’s Grog 7pm-close DJ DANCE PARTY

SATURDAYS

$1.00 Off Craft Bottles All Day

SUNDAYS

Beef and Beer $8.99, Steak Night $12.99

All Locations!

Enjoy These Specials All Day Sunday & 4pm to Close During Any Football Game $6 Buffalo Wings • $7 Nachos • $5 Old Bay Tots $10 Pitchers of ShockTop • $8 Pitchers of Bud & Bud Light

58 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/24/16 11:26 AM


EAT

BITES

EATERIES & CHEFS WIN TOP STATE AWARDS

Tasty things worth knowing DEL PEZ COMES TO THE RIVERFRONT

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akuna Hospitality Group’s Mexican gastropub Del Pez, with an original location on Main Street in Newark, is expanding to the Riverfront on Wednesday, Dec. 7, at 400 Justison St. Hakuna founder Javier Acuna, who also piloted both Newark and Wilmington Santa Fe restaurants and the to-go La Taqueria at the Riverfront Market, among other endeavors, says relocating Del Pez from Newark was not an option because of loyal regulars. “So expanding to another location is the right thing to do for our development,” he says. Acuna says the Wilmington location will offer some of the “same beloved” modern Mexican dishes and award-winning cocktails, all in a vibrant, fun atmosphere. The new space is larger, too, and Acuna anticipates it becoming the community staple in Wilmington that it already is in Newark.

HELP THE FOOD BANK

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he Food Bank of Delaware needs your help this holiday season. Help collect needed items to fill 2,500 Thanksgiving meal boxes for Delaware families. Food for the boxes is needed by Friday, Nov. 4. Food received after Nov. 4 will be distributed through the Food Bank of Delaware’s network of partner organizations. Needed items include canned peas, corn, pumpkin and gravy, evaporated milk, applesauce, coffee and tea, corn muffin mix, mashed potatoes, graham cracker crusts and turkey pans. Frozen turkeys are accepted at the Newark and Milford warehouses. Visit the website— fbd.org—for drop-off addresses and times, instructions and more.

T BOURBON AND BACON BRUNCH AT STONE BALLOON

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n Saturday, Nov. 5, Newark’s Stone Balloon’s next chef-inspired meal, Bourbon and Bacon Brunch, will offer brunch stations paired with some of the best bourbons around, plus a beer or two. The restaurant encourages guests to wear pajamas if they’re feeling daring, or just want to make sure their pants fit afterwards. Check out stoneballoon.com for more information.

MRS. SNYDER’S CAFE & MARKET

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rs. Snyder’s Cafe and Market, which opened last month at 414 Delaware St. in historic New Castle, offers fresh treats made daily in the kitchen and bakery. With a full coffee and espresso bar—from Brandywine Coffee Roasters—warm house-baked breads, sweet and savory pies, muffins, scones and more, the café offers a cozy atmosphere. Fresh sandwiches and sides, salads and locally-sourced dairy are ready to grab and go for those in a hurry. For sit-down dining options, enjoy homestyle meals such as cedar plank salmon, oven roasted chicken, grilled vegetables and daily pasta dishes available to eat in or take out. The cafe is also the new home for Mrs. Snyder’s award-winning, full-service catering, including custom cheese boards and made-to-order picnic baskets. For more information, visit facebook.com/mrssnyders.

he Delaware Restaurant Association (DRA) will host its 15th Annual Restaurant Industry Cornerstone Awards on Monday, Nov. 7, at World Cafe Live at The Queen in Wilmington from 6-9 p.m. The Cornerstone Awards serve as Delaware's restaurant industry's biggest night of the year—a time to come together and celebrate industry camaraderie, as well as recognize the Restaurateur of the Year and Cornerstone Award winners. These awards honor restaurateurs that stand as benchmarks for innovation, creativity, excellence in service and commitment to the community. This year’s Restaurateurs of the Year are Chris Baker and Joe Bisaha of Henlopen City Oyster House. Both Baker and Bisaha have worked many avenues of the restaurant trade since their teenage years, from bussing tables to washing dishes. They both envisioned a particular type of food destination they wanted to bring to the beach. They created Henlopen City Oyster House, which opened in 2010 on Wilmington Avenue in downtown Rehoboth Beach. The pair plans to bring the same enthusiasm to a second culinary endeavor—The Blue Hen—scheduled to open this winter down the street from Henlopen City. Meanwhile, the Cornerstone Award Winner is Scott Kammerer of SoDel Cares/SoDel Concepts, based in Rehoboth. Kammerer is President of SoDel Concepts, which owns 10 coastal restaurants including Catch 54 and Fish On. The group also runs a catering company and a food truck. The Nov. 7 celebration will feature fine food and drink tastings from Delaware’s top restaurants, and live music from Joe Baione and The Blue Cats Blues Band. Tickets for the event can be purchased online at delawarerestaurant.org/events or by contacting the DRA at 738-2545. NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Celebrating

80 Years!

family Join the Peco’s Liquor Store for our annual

Holiday Open House! Sunday, November 20th 5:30 - 8:00 pm sive offerings! Showcasing some of our most exclu with hors d’oeuvres! Hosting complimentary tastings custom gift basket creation! Featuring live music and on-site

personal shoppers Be sure to take advantage of our free & special pricing! & menu planners as well as giveaways

Don’t miss this a great opportunity to stock up for the holidays early!

Happy Holidays from Our Family to Yours! wilmington 522 Philadelphia pike -

uors.com 302.764.0377 - pecosliq 60 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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GET YOUR PASSPORT FOR

TWIN LAKES

TROLLEY SQUARE PUB CRAWL

WED., NOV. 16, 4-9PM At the following destinations: • Anejo

• Catherine Rooney’s

• Gallucio’s

• Kid Shelleen’s

• Oldbanks Craft Bistro

• Piccolina Toscana

• Scratch Magoo’s

• Trolley Square Oyster House

• Trolley Tap House

WIN COOL PRIZES!

Get your “passport” stamped at four pub crawl venues and get automatically entered in Twin Lakes Prize Raffle!

For More information Go to our Website: www.TwinLakesBrewery.com Phone: (302) 658-1826

APRIL 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS

choosing wine for your table Here’s a primer on picking wines, along with a guide to sparkling additions to that uniquely American feast coming late this month By John Murray

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3. Wine is either dry, fruity or sweet 4. You like the wine or dislike it. And now for the hard part . . . 5. The reasons behind No. 4 will always have something to do with flavors of fruit, vegetable, herb, spice or mineral.

HERE IS MY BASIC WINE 101 COURSE: 1. Features presented by or through wine are: color; smell or nose (the aromas that awaken the senses); taste (flavors that are tasted and enhanced through the aroma). 2. Wine is red, white, rosé or bubbly

Once you have figured out what you smell or taste, find a credible wine shop and ask for guidance. I suggest you begin with a simple statement, such as, “I liked this particular wine because of this flavor,” or “I disliked this wine because of that flavor.” Based on that, the staff should be able to point out wines that would interest you. There is not a right or wrong in wine selection. Drink what you like. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different wines. Trust yourself or a wine specialist who has given you advice. But by all means, do not let some pretentious wine snob ruin your quest for learning about wine. Like you, he or she also had to start from the beginning. ►

hoosing a wine for dinner, a party or general consumption is not that difficult. Whether you are budget conscious or not, trust yourself, but don’t be afraid to ask for advice from your friends or a reputable wine shop. Generally, of course, you will serve red wine with meat and white with chicken or fish. However, I find myself deviating from that rule and serving red with fish and some whites with meat. After all, the Greeks have been doing this for centuries. Certain wines do accentuate the flavors of food. The combinations of spices used in cooking can and will influence the flavor profiles of wines.

NOVEMBER MARCH 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS OVER 30 DIFFERENT SIXTELS IN STOCK!

CHOOSING A WINE FOR YOUR TABLE continued from previous page

thanksgiving wines Join Us For...

Winterfest

Saturday, Nov. 12th • 12-4pm Enjoy a complimentary beer tasting featuring over 20 breweries! 21+ Only

Coming Soon...

CHRISTMAS TREES!!!

I believe in serving only American wines for this uniquely American feast, which includes a great variety of food. Bubbles are always a great start for this festive occasion. Here are three handcrafted sparkling wines from Washington state: TREVERI CELLARS Blanc de Blanc Extra Brut is 100 percent chardonnay. This delicate, creamy wine offers hints of melon and citrus. Sparkling Rosé is a blend of Syrah and chardonnay that gives a rich mouth feel of berries and citrus essence with a dry finish. Sparkling Gewurztraminer has a light pepper spice and exotic fruits blended together in a rich, creamy finish. WESTSIDE CROSSING PINOT NOIR 2014 Rick Moshin is renowned for his elegant, non-extracted, rich and early pinot noirs, grown in a very cool area within the Russian River appellation, not far from the historic Wohler Westside Bridge. The wine shows hints of roses and earth with black currants that give a rich, elegant, silky, soft flavor. This makes a perfect complement to turkey and all of its accompaniments.

be gifted. Give the gift that gives back with the IRON HILL GIFT CARD.

LIMITED OFFER

November 25 until December 31, 2016 Receive a BONUS $20 Snowflake Card*

for every $75.00 worth of Gift Cards purchased! *Bonus Card is redeemable between January 1st -March 31st, 2017.

THE BOATMAN RED 2014 Barack Mountain Winery has crafted an interesting blend of grapes harvested from Lodi, Mendocino County, the Sierra Foothills and Amador County. This medium-bodied, spicy wine shows flavors of black cherry and rhubarb. The blend consists of Alicante Bouschet 40 percent, merlot 26 percent, Malbec 23 percent, cabernet sauvignon 7 percent, and Petit Sirah 4 percent. MONTINORE ESTATE 2015 BOREALIS WHITE This multi-dimensional blend features several grapes. Gewurztraminer, Muller Thurgau, Pinot Gris and Riesling combine to show mouthwatering flavors of kiwi, melon, mango and nectarines. It is an instant crowd pleaser. TABLAS CREEK COTES DE TABLAS BLANC 2013 The year 2013 was a classic California growing season. This openly rich traditional Rhone blend displays beautiful scents of peaches and cream. Viognier, Grenache Blanc, Marsanne and Raussanne add a depth of flavor. Minerals, with melon stone fruit overtones, give this wine rich textures—perfect with turkey. John Murray is the proprietor of State Line Liquors, Inc.

62 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

Beer Grainiac

Craft beer reviews from Grain’s Jim O’Donoghue

THIS MONTH:

Evolution Lucky 7 Porter

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volution’s Lucky 7 Porter is a great way to bring in the winter. Lucky 7 is a great fit for those that are looking to break into the stout/porter style. This rich porter is full flavored with chocolate, coffee, and smoke; followed up with toffee and dark dried fruit tones to give it an almost sweet taste. Definitely gives you a warm sit by the fireplace feel. If you like Founders Porter or Ballast Point's Black Marlin you should definitely give Lucky 7 a try.

Gift Cards

– Jim O’Donoghue

OFFIC

IAL PIZ

tt o | G ro ARD G IF T C

ZA

P iz za .c

10 CARD

$ om

BONUS

Valid January 1 - March 31, 2017 GrottoPizza.com |

Receive a FREE

$10 Bonus Card for every $50 in gift cards purchased between November 11 & December 31 *Bonus card has a value of $10 to be used for food and beverages after it is activated. The card is valid from January 1 to March 31, 2017. Guests will receive one $10 bonus card for every $50 in gift cards purchased. Visit any Grotto Pizza location or GrottoPizza.com for details. For a full location listing visit GrottoPizza.com |

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/25/16 10:33 AM


at Stanley’s is Back! Watch Every Game in HD, Every Week On Our 25 HDTVs

During All NFL Games, Enjoy: 2 for 1 Wings • $2.75 Pints of Miller Lite & Coors Light • $3 Pints of Yuengling Lager

Monday Night Football: Hosted by Bill Bergey!

PLACE YOUR PRO FOOTBALL WAGERS AT STANLEY’S EVERY WEEK.

Great Raffle Prizes like coolers, chairs, windshirts, hats, t-shirts and the WEEKLY GRAND PRIZE: 2 Lowel Level 35 Yard Line Tickets to an Eagles Home Game w/ Limo Transportation!

•You must be 21 to play. •Delaware Gambling Hotline: 888-850-8888. •The Delaware Sports Lottery is sponsored by the Delaware State Lottery and is not associated with or authorized by any professional or collegiate sports organization.

11th Annual

SHERIDAN GREAT CAR GIVEAWAY Win a 2 year lease on a NEW Ford Fusion or Nissan Altima Courtesy of the Sheridan Auto Group Join our Frequent Fan Club (it’s free to join). Every visit you make to Stanley’s from Sept. 1, 2016 until Jan 1, 2017 gives you a chance to be one of the 4 weekly finalists. Drawing will be during half-time of the Pro-Football Championship Game. (After Jan.)

You must be present to win. Must be at least 21 years of age. Must qualify for lease & supply your own insurance for the car lease.

Stanley’s Tavern 2038 Foulk Road | Wilmington, DE 19810

302.475.1887 | Stanleys-Tavern.com

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BEST RIBS UPSTATE BEST SPORTS BAR

10/24/16 11:52 AM


DRINK

SIPS

Here's what's pouring PECO’S HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE

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oin the Peco’s Liquor Store family for their annual Holiday Open House on Sunday, Nov. 20. It showcases some of the most exclusive offerings and complimentary tastings with hors d’oeuvres. From 5:30-8 p.m., the event also features live music, on-site custom gift basket creations, personal shoppers and menu planners, as well as giveaways and specials. For more information, go to pecosliquors.com.

SPACEBALLS AND 16 MILE

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he Movies On Tap series continues at Penn Cinema on the Riverfront on Thursday, Nov. 10, featuring tastings from 16 Mile Brewery and the Mel Brooks classic Star Wars spoof, Spaceballs. Once a month, join Premier Wine & Spirits at the theater for this interactive tasting series. For $20, attendees get to taste samples and learn about a beer from a local brewing company. The ticket also covers the price of popcorn and a cult-classic film on the big screen. Proceeds will go to a charity of the brewer’s choice. Visit penncinema.com for a list of additional upcoming movies and to purchase tickets.

INAUGURAL BEACH BASH BEER FESTIVAL

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here’s no time like the dead of winter to celebrate Delmarva’s beach culture, right? That’s what the folks at World Cafe Live at The Queen believe – so much so that they’re hosting an Inaugural Beach Bash Beer Festival on Wednesday, Dec. 28, at 5:30 p.m. The event pays tribute to the Delmarva beach culture by offering 50 beers in a beach-themed setting, with boardwalk games, limbo, live music and a buffet. Beach attire for the $45, 21-and-older event is strongly encouraged. Beers from 2SP, Dogfish, Evolution, Mispillion, Burley Oak, Heavy Seas, Twin Lakes, Dominion and more will be featured. For more information, visit worldcafelive.com.

GIVING ON TAP FUNDRAISER

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njoy craft beers so that hungry seniors can have warm meals through Meals on Wheels Delaware at Two Stones Pub’s 5th annual Giving on Tap fundraiser at the Hockessin location on Wednesday, Nov. 16, from 6-8:30 p.m. The event will be on the outdoor heated patio, and will include a raw bar and vodka pairing, aged smokehouse meats, artisanal cheeses and much more. Rare and vintage beers from Two Stones’ cellar will be available. Meals on Wheels Delaware’s Regina Dodds says, “The craft beer provided by Two Stones Pub and food are always wonderful, and it’s a great night out.” Seating is limited. Tickets are $55. All proceeds from this event will directly support Meals on Wheels Delaware and its mission to support the five agencies throughout Delaware that deliver meals to 4,000 homebound seniors. For more information, visit mealsonwheelsde.org/giving-on-tap.

THE INAUGURAL

BEACH BASH BEER FEST WORLD CAFE LIVE AT THE QUEEN

TIS THE SEASON FOR HEAVY SEAS

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eavy Seas’ Winter Storm, an imperial ESB (extra special bitter) is back this fall and winter, available now through December in all 18 states where Heavy Seas is distributed. The Baltimore brewery’s first international gold medalwinning beer, the brew draws on hops from both the West Coast and the UK for its elegant bitterness. A ruddy-hued, richly flavored ale, 7.5 percent ABV Winter Storm has subtle aromas of nutty malts, earthy hops and a trace of cocoa. Additionally, help Heavy Seas celebrate its 21st birthday with the new anniversary ale, appropriately titled “21.” This Imperial Rye bitter, aged in local Sagamore Spirit rye whiskey barrels, will be released in early December in the “Uncharted Waters” Series. “To celebrate our 21st anniversary, we have fashioned an Imperial Rye ESB brewed with imported UK Marris Otter malt, Crystal Rye malt, local Domino brown sugar, and a blend of spicy, herbaceous British and American hops,” says Heavy Seas Brewmaster Christopher Leonard. At 10.5 percent ABV, this is the perfect slow-sipper by a fire. For more information, visit hsbeer.com.

TICKETS AT WORLDCAFELIVE.COM 500 N MARKET ST W I L M I N G TO N , D E (302)994.1400 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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GALLUCIO’S DAILY SPECIALS Mondays

3 Course Meal $25 includes App, Soup or Salad, and Entrée (5-9pm) Anthony Gallucio & The Retreads 10-1am

Tuesdays

Family Night Kids under 10 eat FREE (Kids Menu) ”Q’s” Day Open Mic w/ Shawn Qaissaunee. 8-11pm

Fridays

½ Price Bottle of Wine (5-10pm) With purchase of 2 Dinner Entrees Open Mic w/ Anthony Gallucio Acoustic 6-9pm

Saturdays

All-Star Karaoke 9-1am

Wednesdays

½ Price Pizza (5-10pm) Quizzo w/Keith 8-11pm

Thursdays

½ Price Burgers All Day! Live Jazz Series 8-11pm

Sundays

Eagles Game Day! 23oz. Yuenglings and Miller Lite Drafts

Large Cheese Pizza & 1 Pound of Wings Only $15 Eat In or Take Out

Happy Hour M-F 2-6pm

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY! WINE TASTING November 4th • 6-8pm $30/person • $50/couple

Packages starting at $13/ person. Catering trays also available for take out. Check our website for details!

$4 Craft Beers $2.25 Domestics

Neighborhood Italian and So Much More! 1709 Lovering Ave • Wilmington • (302) 655-3689 • Gallucios-de.com

w

NOVEMBER

The Deer Park Tavern

Entertainment Schedule EVERY MONDAY:

Showtime Trivia

EVERY TUESDAY:

Jefe & DJ Andrew Hugh

Open at 7pm on Thanksgiving!

FRIDAYS:

SATURDAYS:

11/4-Universal Funk Order 11/11-PhilBilly 11/18-Cherry Crush 11/25-Come Together (Beatles Tribute)

11/5-Photoshop Hotties 11/12-As If 11/19- JJ Rupp Band 11/26-Click

SUNDAY NIGHT: Chorduroy

FOOTBALL SPECIALS! $10 Shock Top Pitchers • $8 Bud and Bud Light Pitchers • $7 Nachos • $6 Wings • $5 Old Bay Tots MONDAYS ½ Price Appetizers (5pm-Close)

TUESDAYS ½ Price Burgers ALL DAY! $4 Double LIT’s

302.369.9414 | 108 West Main Street, Newark www.deerparktavern.com

WEDNESDAYS - MEXICAN NIGHT! ½ Price Nachos & Quesadillas ALL DAY! $3 Coronas & Margaritas • $1.50 Tacos

THURSDAYS ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Wings (5pm-Close) ½ Price Burgers (11:30am-3pm) • $2 Rail Drinks

Be our friend on Facebook!

66 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

Susquehanna Floods peforming at this year’s Musikarmageddon finals. Photo Dan Williams Photography

CHANGING TIDES FOR THE SUSQUEHANNA FLOODS The Perryville, Md.-based band won the 10th annual Musikarmageddon after getting a drummer from Craigslist and switching from covers to all-original music By Krista Connor

I

t wasn’t just hard work that carried The Susquehanna Floods to the championship of this year’s 10th Musikarmageddon—the annual Wilmington-based battle of the bands open to regional artists. For the Perryville, Md.-based foursome, it was a meld of specifics like pre-practice outlining of what would be accomplished during weekly practice, articulate shaping, polishing and reflection, and discussing and immediately implementing needed improvements. And talent, of course. It all came together at the Oct. 15 finals at the baby grand when the band scored unanimous victories in both audience votes and by judges’ scores over the other three finalists, TreeWalker, Hoochi Coochi and Arden Kind. “Phew, man,” says lead guitarist Zach Crouch. “To be honest, we were kind of shocked, although we were working really hard to fine-craft our set for that specific event.”

▲ Hot Breakfast! Photo Joe del Tufo

Surprisingly, the Musikarmageddon shows were some of their first gigs, Crouch says. Well, kind of. The band—Trevor Biggers (lead vocalist, guitar), Brett Pearson (bass, vocals), Crouch and drummer Eric Picard—blends rock, blues and folk. It’s a tightly-knit crew, not least because Biggers and Pearson went to high school together and Crouch and Biggers are cousins. “Eric we found last year on Craigslist,” Crouch says. Picard, a 50-something thrown in with a group of guys in their late 20s, was a catalyst for total overhaul. Crouch, Biggers and Pearson had actually been a cover band for the last four or five years, Crouch explains, but that got old. They were exhausted by the local circuit and felt creatively unfulfilled, although they did make some money. Like a 1970s near-flooding of the Susquehanna River between the two Maryland towns of Havre de Grace (Crouch’s hometown) and Perryville (Pearson and Biggers’ hometown), they were about to burst. (That’s how they got their name, by the way; it gives a sense of the band’s roots, says Crouch.) ► NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

FEED YOUR FOOTBALL FEVER

BEAR // NEWARK // LIMESTONE ROAD MIDDLETOWN // DOVER // REHOBOTH BEACH ©2016 BUFFALO WILD WINGS, INC. BWW2016-3799

tickets available now at city-theater.org

CHANGING TIDES FOR THE SUSQUEHANNA FLOODS continued from previous page

A Bold Move

“We finally decided to do originals, and wanted a drummer for that,” says Crouch. “Trevor and I wrote two songs and we all shared them with Eric one night, and before we officially decided if he was going to be in the band, he got up and said, ‘See you guys at practice next Thursday,’ and then left. It was kind of a bold move, but there was no discussion after that—he was in.” Counting a handful of shows prior to Musikarmageddon, they’ve been playing originals for just over six months now. Crouch points out that, despite years of dedicating themselves to learning other peoples’ music, switching from cover band to original wasn’t too difficult. The Susquehanna Floods had a general idea of what they wanted to sound like, with folksy influences like Crosby, Stills, Nash and Jones, CCR, Eric Clapton and Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats. “We spend a lot of time around the kitchen table practicing harmonies,” Crouch says. These harmonies, along with strong vocal focuses like catchy choruses or synced guitar solos, are specific musical aspects the band loved, and it’s probably these details that helped win over the Musikarmageddon crowd. Says Pam Manocchio, the Grand Opera House’s director of community engagement: “Their songs were memorable, their voices and instruments balanced well, and their music had variety throughout the set. Smiling at the audience makes a big difference—you knew they were having a good time and that made us respond positively.” The younger guys’ music experience traces back to high school theater productions and marching band, but Picard has been in touring bands and playing music, as Crouch puts it, “longer than the rest of us have been alive.” “He has a level of wisdom, and it’s a good feeling ‘cause it comes from respect, to be like ‘I’m gonna come out of my musical retirement to play with these kids,’” says Crouch.

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10/25/16 9:02 AM


Serious Musicians

The band is clearly serious about their music, which they juggle around their day jobs for now. Crouch, who serves at Granite Run Taproom in Port Deposit, Md., says his managers are good at keeping his schedule open for the band, so he’s become the Floods’ designated social media manager/PR guy. Biggers works at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Pearson works at State Farm Insurance and Picard is at Capital One in Wilmington. They manage to squeeze in about one practice session a week, meeting centrally in Newark—Picard lives in Middletown, the other guys in the Perryville area—at a rented practice space. And as we already know, they are anything but slackers. “We practice our tails off every time we’re in there,” Crouch says. “When we first go into practice, we will have already decided what exactly we’ll be working on—we’ll listen to soundbites ahead of time and discuss what our strengths and weakness are, then shape it up, down to enunciating vowels, vocal harmonies, everything. Most people are driven toward a career, and we’re driven toward ours—we treat it as such. Playing music is our ultimate goal, so if we have to take it seriously to get there, so be it, we will.” Aside from the winners’ perks of free t-shirt designs at Spaceboy Clothing on Market Street, a photo session with Wilmington-based Moonloop Photography and a recording with West Chester’s TribeSound Records, the Musikarmageddon win has put them in the regional spotlight. Last month they were interviewed on WSTW’s Hometown Heroes, and experienced a surge of social media buzz. But they remain modest. “Once all this blows over, hopefully we’ll have been a local model for other up-and-coming bands like us to follow, and if not a model, at least a friend to them,” says Crouch. He hopes that’s true especially in Wilmington, which he admires as a tight-knit, supportive music scene—a scene Musikarmageddon has highlighted and celebrated in the past decade. “It’s hard to believe we’ve presented 10 years of Musikarmageddon competitions,” says Manocchio. “It has nurtured a spirit of cooperation. Musicians support each other. It’s nice to see the finalists representing different geographic areas, musical styles and even experience.” Crouch concurs. He says Kirby Moore of competing band TreeWalker—whose members have been friends with The Susquehanna Floods for years—was the first to encourage the band to branch from covers to original music. Other competitors, like Hoochi Coochi, had shared the stage at a show in Elkton, Md., with The Susquehanna Floods a few weeks prior to the competition, and when Crouch and crew met Arden Kind back stage at the competition itself, everyone hit it off. Camaraderie, if not already existing, was inevitable. That naturally made the win bittersweet. “The hardest part of the entire thing was being in a competition with our friends and not really wanting to win, because we wanted to see them win,” says Crouch. Catch The Susquehanna Floods at Gable Music Ventures’ Wilmo Wednesdays at World Cafe Live at The Queen on Wednesday, Nov. 16, and again at The Queen on Nov. 18. For other shows and updates, visit facebook.com/thesusquehannafloods.

A J’s

JOIN US FOR, LIVE MUSIC, HOMEMADE BURGERS, & AWARD-WINNING WINGS!

RE STA U RA N T & TA VE RN

NO VEM BER

AR: END L A C D EVENTS & BAN

Nov. 19th...............................Skinny B (Dos XX Party) Nov. 23rd............................thanksgiving EVE party! ( Biggest Party of the Year with DJ Rockin Ray) Nov. 25th...........................Small Town Throw down Nov. 26th.............Civil Holdup and Night windows Dec. 10th.................................................Toys for Tots

NFL FOOTBALL SPECIALS!

$2.75 Bud light aluminum bottles • prizes & GIVEAWAYS! 50¢ wings on sunday! • $1.75 Bud Light Drafts • 10 tvs!

DECK OPEN YEAR ‘ROUND! OPEN UNTIL 2AM!

1 1 4 N . B R O A D WAY, P E N N S V I L L E , N J – ( 8 56 ) 678 - 2306

Think of Us For Your

Holiday Party Catering! Celebrating 60 Years!

Casapulla’s SUB SHOP “Home of the Classic Italian Sub” 3rd Generation Owned & Operated!

HEAT & EAT

Our Party Trays & Lunch-Meat Trays Are GREAT For Family Reunions, Parties & Special Events

Featuring: MEATBALLS, SAUSAGE & PEPPERS, And STUFFED SHELL TRAYS SUBS • STEAKS • BURGERS MEATBALLS • SAUSAGES NAPOLETAN AND MORE!

514 CASAPULLA AVE. • ELSMERE

(302) 994-5934

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

TUNED IN Not-to-be-missed music news THE ‘80S BABY!

Dust off your double belts and Adidas and rock on down memory lane on Saturday, Nov. 5, at “The ‘80s Baby!” at World Cafe Live at The Queen. It’s a journey through the music of top ‘80s recording artists such as Anita Baker, Prince, Tina Marie, Chaka Khan, Angela Winbush and Glen Jones. Starting at 9 p.m., the show will feature Tracey A., Paul Black, Joey Gallagher and CHAR, to name a few. Tickets are $20. For more information, visit worldcafelive.com.

SINATRA TRIBUTE SET FOR NOV. 6

Wilmington native Sean Reilly returns to the baby grand on Sunday, Nov. 6, from 2-7 p.m. to transport his audience back in time with a performance of Frank Sinatra’s classic songbook, supported by a seven-piece horn band. An in-demand Sinatra interpreter who performs up and down the East Coast, Reilly’s classic style makes him reminiscent of his idol. For more information, visit thegrandwilmington.org.

JIM BRICKMAN COMES TO THE PLAYHOUSE

On Sunday, Dec. 11, holiday classics will be performed by Grammy-nominated songwriter and pianist Jim Brickman at the Playhouse on Rodney Square in Wilmington. For his 20th annual Comfort and Joy Tour, Brickman will debut original songs along with the sounds and stories of the season. Joining him will be special guests Anne Cochran and Season 8 American Idol winner Kris Allen. The show, with tickets starting at $35, is from 2-7 p.m. For more information, visit theplayhousede.org.

LA YEGROS PERFORMS IN ARDEN

Named “The Queen of Nu Cumbia,” Argentinian singersongwriter Mariana Yegros—whose stage name is La Yegros—hails from the rural rain forests of northeast Argentina, bordering Brazil. Her spirited and eclectic musical point of view will be brought to Arden Gild Hall on Saturday, Nov. 12, at 8 p.m. New songs she’ll perform were born out of life on the road, from Hungary to Morocco to Washington, D.C. Tickets are $20 for members and $25 for general admission. For more information, visit ardenconcerts.com.

70 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/24/16 11:45 AM


ROB ZINN QUARTET’S CD RELEASE EVENT

Wilmington’s RZQ—Rob Zinn Quartet—is celebrating a release event for their debut album, Yesterday Again, at Ubon Thai Cuisine on the Riverfront on Friday, Nov. 13. The CD collection of nine original compositions and one cover song features several national recording artists along with the best jazz musicians in Delaware, says trumpet player, flugelhornist and band lead Rob Zinn. “Yesterday Again takes the listener on a journey through jazz, blues, funk, Latin and pop, sometimes with a distinct electronic trumpet solo,” Zinn says. In addition to musicians from Delaware—and some from California—the album features national recording artists Andrew Neu on sax, Gerald Veasley on bass, Lawrence Young on vocals and Rafael Padilla on percussion. The inspiration for the band, comprising Tom Palmer, keyboards; Samuel Nobles, bass; Wes Morton, drums; Kevin Lyons, sax/vocals—started as a tribute to some of the greatest trumpet players to ever record jazz, including Miles Davis, Freddie Hubbard, Chet Baker, Woody Shaw, Kenny Dorham, Rick Braun, Chris Botti and Clifford Brown. Zinn has been playing trumpet since he was nine and professionally since 17. He has shared the stage with Average White Band, Tower of Power, The Spinners, The Guess Who and Kool and the Gang. When not playing with RZQ, he can be seen in the tri-state area with Special Delivery and Sinatra Tribute artist Sean Reilly. No matter how far Zinn and crew may branch out, though he continues to emphasize the importance of his local roots. “It’s very important for me to be known as an artist from Delaware,” he says. “I’ve spent most of my life here, and Delaware has a rich jazz history.” For show times and more information, visit robzinn.com.

BROADWAY CHRISTMAS WONDERLAND

A holiday show at the Playhouse in Wilmington—Broadway Christmas Wonderland—features glittering costumes, a dazzling cast and the highest kicking chorus girls this side of the North Pole. From Nov. 25-27, let Santa and his merry helpers take you on a nostalgic Christmas journey. Songs include “White Christmas,” “Winter Wonderland,” “Have Yourself A Very Merry Christmas,” “Chestnuts Roasting,” “Jingle Bells” and more. For show times and ticket prices, visit duponttheatre.com.

COMING SOON TO

UPSTAIRS LIVE

GABLE MUSIC VENTURES PRESENTS FREE!

NOV 2, 9, 23

. 7PM

NOV 3 SUITEFRANCHON PRESENTS EL-ROD BRIA NOEL, DRECE, BIG D 4 JONATHAN TYLER THE DOVE AND THE WOLF

5 CHARLII BLUU EVENTS AND ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS

REMEMBER THE TIME: THE 80’s BABY 10 WE KIDS ROCK GUITAR LESSON SHOWCASE (5:30PM) 10 SPECIAL DELIVERY BAND 11 JAMIE LIN WILSON AND COURTNEY PATTON 13 LIGHT UP THE QUEEN FOUNDATION ON SCREEN / IN PERSON: LOVE THY NATURE (2PM) 13 TINSLEY ELLIS 17 GINNY WILDER “ALL CLEAR” CD RELEASE PARTY 19 GRILLED CHEESE & CRAFT BEER TASTING (3PM) 25 XTRA ALLTRA DEC 3 GREG JONES PROJECT

PEANUT BUTTER & JAMS FAMILY CONCERT SERIES SATURDAYS AT 11AM

NOV 12 LOLLY & YOYO DEC 17 WE KIDS ROCK BAND’S HOLIDAY SHOW JAN 7 THE HUMAN LARD D OG & THE BAnD OF SHY 500 N MARKET ST W I L M I N G TO N , D E (302)994.1400 WORLDCAFELIVE.COM

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/24/16 12:57 PM


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72 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/25/16 10:19 AM


WATCH

American Pastoral

4

STARS µµµµµ Ewan McGregor and Dakota Fanning in American Pastoral. Photo 2016 Lions Gate Entertainment

PALL IN THE FAMILY Lofty beginnings come undone in adaptation of a Philip Roth novel By Mark Fields

A

lbeit a cliché, there are few things more incalculably painful to a parent than the loss of a child. Imagine then the particular anguish of losing a child not to death but to irresolvable conflict. That is the burning ember at the core of American Pastoral, a challenging film adaptation of Philip Roth’s 1997 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, directed by and starring actor Ewan McGregor. McGregor plays Seymour “Swede” Levov, a sandy-haired Jewish athlete and all-around high school star in 1950s New Jersey. We all went to school with one of these people, whose innate talent, competence, and charm radiated from them like an essential oil. Everyone knew these hometown

paragons were destined for greatness of some kind or another: success in business, a beautiful and devoted spouse, an envyinducing manor house in the country. And indeed, Swede’s adulthood starts with every indication of fulfilling those lofty expectations. But life, and Lyndon Johnson’s Vietnam War, harshly intervene. Swede’s only child, a winsome daughter aptly named Merry, grows into a fierce and violent protester of the war, going so far as to blow up a local business, unintentionally killing a man inside. As this incredible new reality comes crashing down on Swede and his beauty queen (literally) wife, Dawn ( Jennifer Connelly), their lives slowly, inexorably come undone. ► NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

the folks at Magic Hat Brewing Company would like to congratulate

The Susquehanna Floods on their victory in Musikarmageddon X.

The Birth Of A Nation

3

STARS µµµµµ

Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

From one creative group to another,

American Pastoral is a powerful and heart-wrenching PALL IN THE FAMILY story. McGregor’s work as an continued from previoius page actor is commendable, and he is supported by an equally talented cast that, in addition to Connelly, includes Dakota Fanning as the young adult Merry, Peter Reigert, Uzo Aduba and Molly Parker. As a director, McGregor wisely knows to stay out of the story’s way and let it carry the film, which it does. John Romano’s screenplay keeps the focus on Roth’s compelling central theme. In fact, the only unsatisfying distraction is the retention of the novel’s framing device, which inserts Nathan Zuckerman, Roth’s recurring alter-ego character, as an unnecessary narrator for the story. Despite the best efforts of David Strathairn in the role, Zuckerman is superfluous. This is certainly not a film for every moviegoer. For some, it will cut a little too close to home. For others, it will lack the anticipated fireworks—either of the explosive special effect type or of the Oscar-bait performance variety—that attract most of us to the movies. But for this critic, himself the father of a strongwilled, politically-oriented teenage daughter, American Pastoral is a resonant exploration of a family landscape that is best visited through the movies rather than lived.

Writer, Director and star of The Birth Of A Nation, Nate Parker portrays Nat Turner.

2016 Champions of

And to ALL the bands and fans out there supporting the music scene:

We Salute You!

www.MagicHat.net

THE BIRTH OF A NATION Another current release that succeeds on the power of its central narrative, The Birth of a Nation recalls the littleremembered biography of Nat Turner, a slave in 1830s Virginia. Written and directed by and starring Nate Parker, the film gives another harrowing but necessary glimpse into the lives of enslaved African Americans in the antebellum South. (In fact, the title is a pointed reference to D.W. Griffith’s 1915 film of the same name, a racist and myopic tribute to the losing side of the Civil War.) However, unlike some other recent dramas, such as Twelve Years a Slave and the TV remake of Roots, this account depicts slaves that don’t persevere against their bondage but rise up in violent, even deadly opposition. Writer-director Parker takes some artistic liberties with historical fact, but his gritty examination of our dishonorable national past has both drive and a ruthless poetry. Parker’s own troubling past (he was accused but acquitted of sexual assault years ago) has created a controversial background for this film. If the viewer can set that issue aside, this is a powerful story, worthy of contemplation.

74 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/24/16 4:47 PM


CINEMA SIX-PACK... FAMILY MATTERS

WATCH

and a shoT

Explore these six films about families in crisis, actual or manufactured. By Paula Goulden and Mark Fields

Running on Empty (1988) Judd Hirsch and Christine Lahti are counterculture parents living on the run, and River Phoenix is their dutiful son aching to live his own, more normal life in this thoughtful drama directed by Sidney Lumet. Scripted by Naomi Foner, Running on Empty makes an interesting complement to American Pastoral, since it also depicts a family riven by a violent political act; in this case, it’s the parents who are at fault, not the child. The strong performances and taut direction combine to create poignant drama. (MF)

Ordinary People

(1980)

The directorial debut of actor Robert Redford, Ordinary People won multiple Oscars (including Best Picture and Best Director) and shows a family coping with the accidental death of their older son. Mary Tyler Moore is the mother who preferred her late son over the son who survives, played by Timothy Hutton. Donald Sutherland is the father caught in the middle of this family stuck in guilt and recrimination. Tyler Moore is especially memorable in a role that is the polar opposite of her breezy TV persona. (PG)

Little Miss Sunshine

(2006)

A stellar cast (Steve Carrell, Toni Collette, Greg Kinnear, Alan Arkin and a very young Abigail Breslin) enliven this observant family comedy. As young Olive aspires to beauty pageant fame against all reason, the movie precisely satires the dual American penchants for idle dreaming and for the self-help movement designed to get us closer to those elusive, even delusional dreams. Confidently directed by Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris, Little Miss Sunshine is quite funny but perhaps too “on the nose” for some audiences. (MF)

The Kids are All Right

(2010)

Two children conceived by artificial insemination, now almost (but not quite) adults, locate their father and invite him to meet their non-traditional two-mother family, with unforeseen consequences. Mia Wasikowska and Josh Hutcherson deliver great performances as the kids. Julianne Moore and Annette Bening play the two moms, each showing her vulnerability in a different way, while Mark Ruffalo is the unknowing dad who creates turmoil in the family into which he has stumbled. (PG)

The Birdcage

(1996)

The late, great Mike Nichols directed this hysterical, unapologetically over-the-top comedy starring Robin Williams and Nathan Lane. Based on the cult French film La Cage Aux Folles, it’s re-set in Miami’s South Beach. A gay couple—drag nightclub owner Armand (Williams) and star performer Albert (Lane)—try to play it straight to win over their son’s right-wing in-lawsto-be. The big payoff is seeing Gene Hackman in full-on drag as a moralistic politician temporarily on the lam. (MF)

Rachel Getting Married

(2008)

Anne Hathaway delivers a disquieting performance as a young woman in rehab who comes home for the weekend of her sister’s wedding. Family secrets are aired and regrets surface even as the bride and groom try to celebrate the union of their families. It’s directed by Oscar-winner Jonathan Demme, who continues his string of films dealing with uncomfortable but worthwhile subjects. (PG) This month we are adding a “shot” to our Cinema Six Pack. Theatre N, downtown Wilmington’s independent movie theater, has re-opened under new management, and is back in full swing with a schedule of the latest indie movies. We will preview one of the month’s highlights in each issue.

The Handmaiden

Screening November 18-20

Surprisingly sexy and ever-so-sly, this Korean film deftly plays on the filmgoer’s preconceived notions of chaste, picturesque Asian cinema…and promptly turns those expectations on their stereotyping ear. A tense romantic thriller at its core, The Handmaiden delights as the viewer uncovers each unexpected layer of sensual intrigue. It’s exquisitely directed by Chan-wook Park (Oldboy) and extremely well-acted by Min-hee Kim, Kim Tae-Ri, and Jungwoo Ha. For a full Theatre N schedule and more information, go to www.theatren.com. NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WHAT’S IN THIS MONTH #INWILM:

Linda Celestian Exhibition Fri, Nov 4 - Wed, Nov 23

Up Front w/ First State Ballet Fri, Nov 11 & Sat, Nov 12

DCT’s Willy Wonka Sat, Nov 19 - Sun, Dec 18

Connected Series Saturday, November 20

DAVID NORBUT PHOTOGRAPHER & ARTS LOVER

Full details for these events, plus hundreds more at:

inWilmingtonDE.com

76 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/24/16 1:55 PM


PLAY

SNAP SHOTS

1.

2.

4.

3.

1.

5.

6.

1. Grain Craft Bar + Kitchen’s inaugural celebration of craft beer and music, Grainfest,

drew approximately 700 people on Oct. 15. Photo Matt Urban 2. From left, Tiffany Wallen, Zac Wallen, Shawn Money and Kristin Tuthill at Grainfest. Photo Matt Urban 3. Newark’s rock-and-rollers Old Baltimore Speedway at Grainfest. Photo Matt Urban

4. Dover’s Hoochi Coochi performing at the 10th annual Musikarmageddon finals at the baby grand on Oct. 15. Photo Dan Williams Photography 5. At the Musikarmageddon Finals, TreeWalker opened the night with a rocking set. Photo Dan Williams Photography 6. Oscar Zappa Compo of Arden Kind performing at the Musikarmageddon finals. Photo Dan Williams Photography

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/25/16 10:50 AM


WE WHALEY CAN’T WAIT TO SEE YOU AT THE

WHALE OF A SALE! Saturday, November 12th, 2016 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

148 Sunset Blvd., New Castle, 19720

(Just off Rt.13/DuPont Hwy, formerly the Pathmark)

New and Gently Used Merchandise Furniture, Antiques, Electronics, Children’s Toys and Equipment, Clothing, Holiday Items & More

For more details, visit: www.facebook.com/WhaleofaSaleJLW

78 NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10/24/16 4:52 PM


le nt an d re sn ar ky r m ou ig ht ly r’s sl ffe s fro al ga r/ ed ito m at ic A wr ite am gr in at e at io ns ic to el im un mm ay co ev er yd

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THE PERFECT GIFT FOR GRAMMAR LOVERS! O&A Editor, Bob Yearick’s paperback compilation of his popular column. (See page 11)

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Enjoy rare and vintage beers from Two Stones own cellar.

All seated event featuring raw bar and vodka pairing, aged smokehouse meats, artisanal cheeses, and so much more.

NOVEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Fri, Dec 9 • 8PM • $5 Cover Wear a Santa Hat or Ugly Sweater and

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10/24/16 1:53 PM


Opens November 17 Tickets On Sale Now

Penn Cinema + Escape to the movies

| www.penncinema.com

Escape to the movies at Wilmington’s only locally-owned and independently operated multiplex, featuring 15 state-of-theart screens including the state’s only IMAX® Theatre. 302.656.4314 | 401 S. Madison Street | Wilmington, DE 19801

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- NOW SERVING -

BEER & WINE! OVER

75 OPTIONS TO CHOOSE FROM

©2016 WARNER BROS. ENT. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. TM & © DC COMICS. IMAX© IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF IMAX CORPORATION.

10/24/16 12:06 PM


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Out & About Magazine November 2016