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Also In This Issue Part 1: The Arts as Activism Series Ghostbusters' Neil Casey Suds Worth Sipping

Seafood & Summer Brews Which seasonal favorites pair perfectly?

JULY 2016 CO M P L I M E N TA R Y VOL. 29 | NO. 5

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ANOTHER YEAR AND STILL GIVING. Over the last 40 years, we have contributed more than $4.6 billion to Delaware’s General Fund to help support many vital services across the state. That means residents, workers and visitors are all winners, thanks to the Delaware Lottery.

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59 Out & About Magazine Published each month by TSN Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Mailing & business address: 307 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

our staff Publisher Gerald duPhily • jduphily@tsnpub.com Director of Publications Jim Hunter Miller • jmiller@tsnpub.com Contributing Editor Bob Yearick • ryearick@comcast.net Associate Editor Krista Connor • kconnor@tsnpub.com Director of Digital Media & Distribution Marie Graham Poot • mgraham@tsnpub.com Creative Director & Production Manager Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. matt@catvis.biz Graphic Designer Tyler Mitchell, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. tyler@catvis.biz Contributing Designer Ryan Alexander, Catalyst Visuals, LLC

Contributing Writers Mark Fields, Pam George, Paula Goulden, Rob Kalesse, Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Robert Lhulier, Dan Linehan, Karl Malgiero, Allan McKinley, John Murray, Larry Nagengast, Scott Pruden, Eric Ruth, Matt Sullivan Contributing Photographers Joe del Tufo, Tim Hawk, Les Kipp, Anthony Santoro, Javy Diaz, Matt Urban Special Projects Sarah Green, John Holton, David Hallberg Interns Emma Driban, Evie Kortanek

35 75 what’s inside START

DRINK

51 Historic Taverns 7 From the Publisher 55 Sips 9 The War on Words 56 Newark Food & Brew 11 F.Y.I. 15 Part 1: The Arts as Activism

LEARN

59 Ladybug Festival 64 Tuned In

FOCUS

WATCH

19 Matches Made in Heaven 22 Suds Worth Sipping 27 Fruity Beers

67 Chat with Neil Casey 71 The BFG 73 They Might be Giants

EAT

PLAY

30 Fear Not! 35 Q&A With Robbie Jester 39 Bites

75 Snap Shots

41 Art on the Town 44 Theatre N 46 On the Riverfront

19 Matches Made in Heaven Fire up the grill, then crack open these craft beers.

LISTEN

10 Proud to be American

WILMINGTON

FEATURES

By Pam George

22 Suds Worth Sipping Here are a few summer brews we think you may enjoy.

27 Fruity Beers Citrus is dominating. The experts explain why. By Rob Kalesse

30 Fear Not the Home-cooked Fish Follow these tips from area pros and master this daunting culinary task. By Pam George

On the cover: Allagash White & crab cakes on the patio at Harry’s Seafood Grill at the Riverfront. Bird house by Tom Burke. Photo by Joe del Tufo

56

Newark Food & Brew Fest Enjoy craft beers, creative cuisine and live music at the 13th Annual Newark Food & Brew Fest held Saturday, July 23.

Editorial & advertising info: 302.655.6483 • Fax 302.654.0569 Website: outandaboutnow.com Email: contact@tsnpub.com JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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From The Publisher

SIZING UP FIREFLY L

et's face it, Delawareans are sensitive when it comes to discussions about size. Oh, we’ve tried to disguise it with clever taglines like Small Wonder. Tried a little misdirection with It’s Good Being First. But truth is, we're constantly apologizing for being small. No major airport. No top-tier professional sports team. No big city… Often, we’re dismissed as a mere rest stop by those on their way to “real cities” like Philadelphia, New York, D.C., Baltimore. Delaware, yeah, I drove through it once on my way to… How many times have you heard that? Which is why the emergence of Firefly is so cool. This music festival didn’t just put Delaware on the map. For four days in June, Delaware is the center of the alternative music universe. And it’s in Dover, no less, a community whose musical taste probably skews more toward country western. But that contradiction fits nicely into the storyline when you consider the strange bedfellows who made Firefly a reality. First there’s Red Frog Events, a Chicago-based company that had never put on a music festival prior to Firefly. Then there’s Dover International Speedway, an aging race track looking to reinvent itself as the appeal of NASCAR fades. And, of course, Delaware, a state with an inferiority complex when it comes to big-league entertaining. Yep, it was a match made in heaven. Year one (2012): 35,000 attendees. Last year: A sell-out at 90,000. This year: 90,000 again. How poetic that a Firefly helps Delaware catch lightning in a bottle. For my wife and me, this year was our second visit. My kids (18 and 21) have made it every year but one. And while Out & About has been a part of many memorable events in this state over the past three decades, I can honestly say this may be the

best Delaware event I’ve attended. In fact, it’s one of the best events I’ve attended anywhere. Why? Because it’s wholesome without being corny. Because the music is cutting edge without being incendiary. Because it’s invigorating to be in the midst of so much young, positive energy. Especially when you feel welcomed. Name the last event you attended where the security guards were high-fiving guests as they came in and asking who you were there to see? When have you ever gone through the annoying scanning process at the entrance then been apologized to for the necessary inconvenience? Can you remember any concert you’ve attended where even the slightest bump or nudge is followed immediately with “excuse me”? Perhaps O&A’s director of publications, Jim Miller, put it best: “It’s like Disney putting on a music festival.” But it’s not. It’s Red Frog, and Dover International Speedway, and the State of Delaware. In fact, the state’s tourism office got into the act this year by sponsoring beach volleyball courts. The message: “Glad you’re here for Firefly, but you know we have some pretty nice beaches just an hour from here.” That’s good thinking. Delawareans should embrace Firefly. It reflects well on us. People define a place by the experience they had there (Anyone hear of Woodstock, N.Y., before the festival?). You remember where you had a good time. Where you were welcomed. Where you were invited back. That security guard who high-fived you, he was from Delaware. Yes, we certainly are within a couple hours of some bigtime cities. But for the fifth year in a row, tens of thousands drove past those cities to get here. Congratulations, Firefly. That’s no small achievement. — Jerry duPhily

Panoramic of Firefly 2016. Photo Joe del Tufo JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

THE WAR ON WORDS A monthly column in which we attempt, however futilely, to defend the English language against misuse and abuse

Misplaced Quotation Marks Here, hands down, is the most common punctuation mistake: misplaced quotation marks. Or, put another way, misplaced commas and periods. Commas and periods go inside quotation marks, and that rule applies whether the quotation appears at the end of a sentence, after a phrase, or after a single word. Examples: • “My biggest fear is failure.” • Calling failure his “biggest fear,” Smith nevertheless accepted the challenge. • The mayor claimed the story was “preposterous.” Yes, I know this seems and looks counter-intuitive, and it’s not done this way in other English-speaking countries. For those reasons, most people get it wrong (even some of my most learned readers). Don’t think you’re making this mistake? Go back over your emails or your posts on Facebook. You just may find that you’re putting periods and commas outside quotation marks. Check on it. Report back. Miss-Addressed: The Missing Comma Another common punctuation error is the missing comma in sentences where someone or something is being addressed. A comma should be inserted immediately before that person or thing. Take this example from a News Journal editorial: “So have at it Delaware, it’s your Constitutional right.” There should be a comma after “it.” The same applies if the addressee appears at the beginning of the sentence: “Mary, you always have a positive attitude.” The missing comma can change the meaning of a sentence. E.g., The father said, “Your grades are disappointing, my boy” is correct, but it you delete the comma—“Your grades are disappointing my boy”—it reads as if the boy is being disappointed. Facebook is full of these missing commas/confusing messages. Here are actual examples: “I want one Eddie.” (The writer apparently wants one Eddie.) “Good morning bright eyes.” (Bright eyes are good in the morning.) “What a beautiful photo of you Mary.” (Is the woman’s name “you Mary”?)

By Bob Yearick

Awash in Iconic Icons Word Warrior Walt DelGiorno has convinced us that “iconic” and, to a lesser extent, “icon,” are currently the most overused words in American media. This applies especially to the sport of golf. Walt, a dedicated golf-watcher, has accumulated several examples. Among them: • Announcer Gary Koch described the 17th hole at The Players Championship as “an iconic hole.” • Golf magazine referred to “Johnny Miller’s iconic round at Oakmont.” • An AP story called the Oakmont Country Club “an iconic test.” The phenomenon isn’t limited to golf. Mercedes Benz ads refer to the “iconic design” of its early models, which delivered “icon after icon.” The Beatles have been described as having conducted “iconic recording sessions.” And The News Journal recently called the DuPont buildings “iconic on the Wilmington skyline.” The media is apparently averse to the words “legendary,” “fabled,” “famous,” or “well-known.” Media Watch • Speaking of “averse,” it’s often confused with “adverse,” as in this excerpt from a recent Jeff Zillgitt story in USA Today: “Crawford . . . was not adverse to confrontation.” Adverse means “unfavorable,” as in adverse weather. Averse means “opposed to.” • From the Newark Post, courtesy of reader Jane Buck: “A sign inside the restaurant on Monday eluding to the delay . . .” The sign was alluding (referring) to the delay, it wasn’t eluding (escaping from) anything. • Reader Rob Beatson submits this from CBS Sports Online: “The Philadelphia Phillies keep finding ways to eek out victories.” The correct word is eke. Adds Rob: “And it’s the lead, of course. Eek!”

Follow me on Twitter: @thewaronwords

Seen a good (bad) one lately? Send your candidates to ryearick@comcast.net

Word of the Month

rectitude Pronounced rek-ta-tood, it’s a noun meaning morally correct behavior or thinking; righteousness.

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NEED A SPEAKER FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION? Contact me for a fun power point presentation on grammar: ryearick@comcast.net.

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LEARN

WilmU alumna, Lucie Stairs.

PROUD TO BE AN AMERICAN W

hen Lucie Jeneske came to America from the Czech Republic in 2000, she barely spoke English. She had earned an accounting certification from the Czech Republic—similar to a CPA here—but when she got to Delaware, she had to start over. She landed at Delaware Technical Community College as an accounting major, where she met tutor Kathy Stuhlman, who happens to be married to Don Stuhlman, WilmU’s chair of finance programs in the College of Business. Kathy suggested to Jeneske that she consider finishing her four-year degree at WilmU. Jeneske thrived at WilmU, earning the Award for Academic Excellence. “There were 126 graduates from the business division in that January 2006 graduation,” says Don Stuhlman, who wrote Jeneske’s nomination in 2005. It included the following thoughts: “While not all of her grades have been A’s, I can speak to the two demanding classes that I had Lucie as a student: FIN 305: Financial Management, and BBM 402: Strategic Management, the Division of Business capstone course. Her course average in FIN 305, 104.2 percent (with bonus material), is the highest grade in that course in recent memory (10-plus years). Her major case project in BBM 402 is not only

the best I have seen in the 16-plus years I have taught the course, but it is so comprehensive that I am hesitant to show her project to future classes, afraid that it would intimidate them.” Jeneske, whose married name is now Stairs, landed a job at Chesapeake Utilities as an accounting assistant but left to pursue a financial administrator post at Delaware State University. There, she teaches the same accounting course that terrified her years back. She’s an adjunct for WilmU as well. The WilmU alumna credits Don Stuhlman for her academic success, and will be forever thankful for his support. “Don encouraged me to reach out to him if I needed any help with looking for a job or professional references,” she says. “I can’t tell you how encouraging this was. It was the first time someone truly offered to help me—someone truly believed in me and my work.” On Dec. 22, Stairs was sworn in as a United States citizen. “The decision to do that was not about forgetting where I came from,” she says. “It was about where I want to live, my new family and friends, and where I want to work and grow professionally. The United States is a great country with people from all over the world. It’s a place where I always felt I belonged.”

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F.Y.I. Things worth knowing Compiled by Emma Driban

HOWARD PYLE MURALS

N

ine murals painted by Howard Pyle are now on display at The Delaware Art Museum. The panels were designed by Pyle for the drawing room of his home in Wilmington. He began work on the panels in 1903, and those on display represent his earliest attempt at mural painting. The murals will remain on display there until December 2020. Prior to the opening of this exhibit last August, the complete set of nine had not been on view since the 1930s.

MASTERS ROWING EVENT SET FOR NOXONTOWN SICKLE CELL TENNIS CLASSIC

F

or two weekends in August, the Zeta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and the Pearls of Hope Foundation will team up to bring the 39th Annual Sickle Cell Tennis Classic to the Rodney Courts in Wilmington. The goal is to raise funds to support sickle cell research at the A.I. DuPont Children’s Hospital. Sickle cell is a disorder that affects hemoglobin, the part of red blood cells that carries oxygen from the respiratory organs to the rest of the body. The tournament is set for 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Aug. 6, 7, 13, and 14. To sign up for one of the 150 planned matches or to make a financial donation, visit sctennistournament.org.

DELAWARE CITY BRANCH CANAL TRAIL OPENS

I

n a ribbon-cutting ceremony on June 15, the Branch Canal Trail, a connection to the Michael N. Castle Trail, was officially opened by Gov. Jack Markell and Delaware City Mayor Stanley Green. The entire project, which started in 2011, has helped Delaware rocket from 10th most bicycle-friendly state in 2012 to third in 2015, according to the League of American Bicyclists. The entire Castle Trail will connect Delaware City and Chesapeake City, Md., a total of 15.2 miles, when it's completed later this summer. The Branch Canal Trail is open to pedestrians and bicyclists every day from 8 a.m. to sunset.

WILMINGTON GREEN BOX IS AWARD FINALIST

A

rtPlace America has announced that initiative Wilmington Green Box is a finalist for its 2016 National Creative Placemaking Fund. Wilmington Green Box has proposed an idea that will make fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as other nutritious foods, more accessible to residents of the city. Eighty projects are being considered for funding and, after the final projects are chosen in December, ArtPlace America will invest a total of $10.5 million in them. It involves using recycled shipping containers to build a community commercial structure in the city. Winners will be announced later this year.

O

n Saturday and Sunday, July 23 and 24, the Wilmington Rowing Center will sponsor the 26th Howard M. Smith Diamond State Masters Regatta at Noxontown Pond in Middletown. The event was founded in 1990 by Howard Smith and John Schoonover. Smith’s name was added to the title in 2000 after his death. The regatta is Masters only, meaning all rowers must be 21 or older in the current calendar year. Both clubs and individuals may enter, though clubs are limited to two entries per age category in each event. Registration forms and prices, as well as required waivers, can be found at diamondstatemasters.com/dsmr.

HOCKESSIN BOOK SHELF SETS BOOK LAUNCH

O

n Wednesday, July 13, the Hockessin Book Shelf will host a book launch for The Prisoner of Hell Gate by J.E. Fishman (aka Dana I. Wolff), from 6 to 8 p.m. The event provides a chance to meet the author and have the book signed. The Prisoner of Hell Gate is a supernatural thriller by the same author who writes the only book series based in the real world of the NYPD Bomb Squad. For information about the event, call 235-7665.

NIGHTSCAPE RETURNS TO LONGWOOD

T

his summer, Longwood Gardens is bringing back Nightscape, a popular nighttime exhibition, and adding a few surprises. The show, produced by the Klip Collective, is a riveting garden-wide installation using light, color and sound to create an unforgettable experience. Returning on Wednesday, Aug. 3, and running through Oct. 29, Nightscape brings different areas of the gardens to life, including the Flower Garden Walk, Topiary Garden, and the grand Conservatory. Tickets are $17 for ages 5-18 and $27 for those 19 and older. JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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THE ARTS AS ACTIVISM:

START

This is the first in a series of profiles about creating social change through artistic expression.

#BLACKJOBSMATTER: A Wilmington Experiment Local playwright Gregory Lloyd Morris tackles unemployment and crime in a returning one-act play July 13 at World Cafe Live at The Queen By Krista Connor

W

hen Wilmington playwright Gregory Lloyd Morris and director Andre Jones debuted #BlackJobsMatter: A Wilmington Experiment at the baby grand in February, it was supposed to be a one-time show. The single-act performance, highlighting three disparate stories about the issues of unemployment, job discrimination and felon re-entry, was hard-hitting. Written with the city of Wilmington in mind — upwards of 9,000 African American males in the city are jobless — Morris wanted to utilize his artistic skill to help create awareness and promote social change. “#BlackJobsMatter sent shockwaves through the city,” says Morris. “Those we have criminalized in our minds are really some of the brightest people in the community. But those are the stories that don’t get in the newspaper.” Morris believes the play presents one possible solution to the city’s issues: the introduction of enterprise zones—government tax

incentives offered to businesses to provide jobs for underserved residents—that would help reduce crime and unemployment in some of the area’s most criminalized zip codes. After receiving positive feedback from the February performance, Morris and crew are offering a second opportunity to witness the free-of-charge theater experience on Wednesday, July 13, at World Cafe Live at The Queen. Doors open at 6 and the 45-minute show starts at 7 p.m., after keynote speakers from Buccini/Pollin Group and the Twin Poets—the state’s poet laureates—take the stage. The three stories in #BlackJobsMatter include one male character in his mid-50s who has a criminal record and can’t seem to land a job; a Hispanic single mother who tries to safely guide her biracial daughter through high school, and a young drug dealer who is caught between worlds and searching for a job. ► ▲Gregory Lloyd Morris. Photo Ivan Christopher Thomas/DeTV JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Safiya Davis is a UD alumna and a graduate of the Project Management Certificate.

Join us to learn how UD certificates can help you build your career! INFORMATION SESSION

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We’re open until 8 pm on Thursdays! Stop by after work, meet a friend, take a stroll in the galleries, or enjoy dinner and drinks by Toscana in the Thronson Café. Admission is free from 4 pm – 8 pm every Thursday.

2301 Kentmere Parkway | Wilmington, DE 19806 | 302.571.9590 | delart.org

Photograph by Alessandra Nicole

16 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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The play asks two basic questions: What are some of the challenges in underserved neighborhoods, and what are some of the challenges people are confronted with while they are unemployed? “This is where people fall back into criminal behavior,” Morris says. He describes the performance as unapologetic, saying it includes heavy language and profanity, enlivened by the group of actors who each had a past living in underserved communities like the characters they portray. “They have their own reservoir of emotions to make this a genuine performance,” Morris says. A strong argument Morris presents is the need for such performances to be given “high art” profiles. For example, in order for art and activism to be fully realized as a powerful entity, he believes it needs to be “presented, cultured and housed in regional theaters.” “We need to hear more stories come off the bigger stages like these at The Queen or Grand,” he says. “Art and advocacy would benefit from the doors being open to regional theater, not just plays held in smaller venues like churches and schools.” While it’s inspired by Wilmington, the character-driven play is also autobiographical, says Morris. He has a master’s degree in fine arts—and is now adjunct professor of English at Wilmington University and chief creative director of his awareness organization, the Morris Project—but last winter, to his horror, Morris found himself unemployed. “When I was commissioned in December to write this play, I was writing it about myself. I was experiencing what life is like when you don’t have enough resources—trying to pay child support, keep bills paid, as an artist,” he says. His predicament spurred his creativity. “It didn’t even take me a week to write that play.” Morris writes solely about “the streets, the underbelly” of the community. In fact, his oeuvre includes The Belly, which was produced by Temple University for 14 shows to sellout crowds in 2010, and November 2014’s Second Chances, which centered on a gifted young man’s struggle to find his purpose after being released from prison. A play Morris hadn’t previously announced is These Three Things. With a TBA release date, it was written in response to the tragic Howard High School killing of student Amy Inita JoynerFrancis in April. While the play isn’t about that specific case, Morris explores the harrowing concept of what a young person’s life could have been if it hadn’t been cut short. Since the February performance of #BlackJobsMatter, Morris has noticed the beginnings of social movement. “I was commended by the banking community and the governor for taking art and using it as activism, and we collected 300 names on a petition to give to the governor to encourage enterprise zones,” he says. He encourages all city residents to do the same—write to city and state officials to encourage enterprise zones. “My offering is a solution, not the solution,” Morris says. “I challenge other visionaries in the community, whether artists, activists, or a combo, to come up with their version of a solution. That’s the power of art speaking towards activism—art is the most powerful voice. We can say things the politicians can’t.”

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#BLACKJOBSMATTER: A WILMINGTON EXPERIMENT continued from previous page

Donate throughout the challenge and be entered into a drawing for either:

GranD Prize: Firefly Festival at Woodland of Dover 2017 Two 4 day passes plus a $1000 gift card

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JULY MAY 2016 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS

A perfect summer pairing: brats and craft beer.

Matches Made in Heaven Fire up the grill, then crack open these craft beers By Pam George

B

e it a barbecue, picnic, or crab feast, nothing goes with our favorite summer foods like beer. And why settle for a pedestrian selection when there are so many craft beers that can enhance the experience? We went to the experts to get pairing tips for some popular summer staples.

Backyard Burgers

Burgers and dogs dominate most outdoor festivities. For a grilled beef burger, try Dogfish Head Indian Brown Ale, suggests Aimee Garlit, the “off-centered” microbiologist at the Milton-based brewery. “The chocolate notes in the malt profile stand up well to the rich meatiness of a cheeseburger, while the prominent hop character balances these two assertive flavors for a refreshing finish,” says Garlit, who spends the bulk of her workday in the brewery’s quality lab. ► JUNE JULY 2016 2016 || OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Edward Mulvihill, owner of Peco’s Liquor Store in the Bellefonte area, which is known for its craft beer selection, would go with Dogfish Head 60 Minute IPA. “Just like when pairing a burger with wine, you need something big and bold to cut through the grease of a good burger,” he says. “I like a nice IPA, preferably one that is less citrus and more hops.” But not just any IPA (India pale ale) will do. He prefers one with a higher alcohol by volume (ABV); anywhere from 6.5 to 7.5 percent is ideal, he says. Robbie Jester, executive chef at the Stone Balloon in Newark, likes 16 Mile Brewing Company Amber Sun with his burger. Named for the amber-colored sunsets around the East End Lighthouse on the Delaware Breakwater, the beer has caramel, roasted and earthy notes. For a turkey burger, which has a milder flavor than its beefy counterpart, Garlit recommends a light, tart beer like Dogfish Head Festina Peche. “The peach featured in this brew provides a little sweetness to complement the savory burger,” she says. To add oomph to what can be a lean turkey patty, many people add barbecue sauce, grilled jalapeños, and fried onions. If that’s the way you like it, give Bellefonte Brewing Company Pennyhill Porter a try, says John Medkeff, author of Brewing in Delaware. True, it’s a porter, which is usually more palatable in cooler weather, but it has perceptible chocolate and coffee overtones without being an excessively heavy-bodied ale, he explains. (Bellefonte Brewing Company recently opened a taproom at 3605 Old Capitol Trail in Wilmington.) Along those lines, Ben “Gumbo” Muse, operating partner and craft beer coordinator of the Two Stones Pub restaurants, recommends Evolution Lot #3 IPA with the Two Stones turkey burger: two patties topped with applewood-smoked bacon, sharp cheddar cheese, fresh guacamole, and roasted garlic mayonnaise. “It delivers a punch with a blast of citrus that ties the whole burger together,” he says. MATCHES MADE IN HEAVEN continued from previous page

Wonderful Weiner Roasts

Hot dogs are as much a mainstay as burgers—but you can eat a lot more of them. To go with them, try Stone Brewing Stone Go To, a 4.5-percent ABV IPA. “It’s an awesome way to brighten them up, wash them down and get you ready for round two,” Muse says. For grilled sausages, which have more heft flavor-wise, consider Dogfish Head Chicory Stout—particularly if you’re eating a Spicy Espresso Brat, a collaboration between Dogfish Head and Hans All-Natural, says Lindsey Timberman of Wilmington, who with Eric Roberts writes a blog on delawarehopscene.com. Or, choose a German lager. Muse suggests Victory Prima Pils, a pilsner. “It’s another fool-proof classic,” he says. “Sharp hops don’t linger. It has super clean malts. It’s really hard to go wrong with those two together.”

Summer Steaks

When you think steak, you think red wine. In the heat, however, red wine can weigh heavy on the palate. Iron Hill’s Kevin Davies, director of culinary operations, and head brewer Tim Stumpf vote for Iron Hill Pig Iron Porter. (Bring your growler to any of the Iron Hill locations.)

Crab and Lobster Pickin’s

Steamed crabs are a summer mainstay. “When our family does crabs, the table gets loaded with Old Bay, drawn butter, and lots of corn on the cob,” Muse says. Understandably, he likes 2SP Weiss Wit, made by the 2SP Brewing Company, an offshoot of Two Stones Pub. “It gives you a tart counterpoint to the richness of the butter and sweetness of crab,” he says. “Plus, it’s an incredibly refreshing beer for outdoor drinking.” (The AVB is 4 percent.) Since steamed crabs are the state dish in Maryland, Jester would reach for National Bohemian Beer, better known as Natty Boh. It’s light, but anything you drink will wind up tasting like Old Bay anyway, he says. Mulvihill is excited about the new Flying Dog Dead Rise Old Bay Summer Ale. “A fantastic ale brewed with Old Bay spices,” he says. “What could pair better?”

34 OCTOBER | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM 20 JULY 2016 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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SAVE THE DATE!

1

Always

Photo Joe del Tufo

FRESH

Allagash White paired with crab cakes on Harry's Seafood Grill patio, overlooking Wilmington's Riverfront.

With an ABV of 6 percent, Mispillion River Brewing Company Reach Around IPA goes down well with crabs. “It’s a nicely balanced, sessionable American IPA that pairs well with spicy Delaware Bay crabs,” Medkeff says. (Session beers are clean-tasting loweralcohol beers that are highly drinkable. You can have multiple beers within a reasonable time with a much lower risk of getting drunk.) “Reach Around is malty enough to cleanse the palate with the crisp taste of malt and floral hops,” he says. Eric Williams, one of the owners of Mispillion River Brewing Company, also suggests Mispillion River Brewing Company Space Otter Ale, an American pale ale. “It’s light; it’s 5 percent ABV.” Brett McCrea, founder of 16 Mile Brewing Company, likes to pop the top of 16 Mile Blues’ Golden Ale. “It’s very light and very easy to drink, and there are very refreshing citrus notes,” he says. “It pairs well with seafood.” As for lobster, Dogfish Head recently opened Chesapeake & Maine next to its brewpub, and lobster is the star. Garlit says Dogfish Head Namaste, one of the brewery’s lighter offerings, has notes of clove, lemongrass, and orange peel, which provide a nice counterbalance to the richness of lobster with drawn butter. Muse and Mulvihill like Allagash White, a low-alcohol witbier with citrus and spice. Other options include the super hoppy Dogfish Head Hellhound on My Ale, especially if you like lemon on your lobster, Medkeff says.

Picnic Poultry

Grilled, fried or mixed with mayo, chicken is versatile because it can be served warm or cold. For grilled chicken, Garlit likes Dogfish Head Biere de Provence. “This Belgian saison was brewed with boatloads of culinary spices that are often used to season poultry and fish – bay leaf, marjoram, chervil, and lavender,” she says. “It’s a natural choice to pair with grilled chicken. Its floral nose and thirst-quenching qualities complement this dish.” Fried chicken requires a libation that can cut through the dominant flavor of the crisp skin yet still complements the meat. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is a “no-brainer,” Muse says. “It’s sharp and grassy, but super clean and approachable.” For chicken salad, try Iron Hill Crusher, a session IPA that the brewpub offers in 16-ounce cans. With all the choices out there, pairing beer with food is fun. Offer guests a flight with small glasses of these suggested beers and vote for your favorite. But in the end, the rule is the same as it is with wine and food pairings: Drink what you like.

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SUDS WORTH SIPPING A few summer brews we think you may enjoy EVIL GENIUS SHUT UP, MEG! FARMHOUSE IPA Dang those evil geniuses at...Evil Genius. Time and again they churn out great beers with popculture references, and Shut Up, Meg! is another prime example of the brewer’s sense of humor. A Farmhouse IPA with American hops and plenty of rye, this 6-percent brew is a nice summertime refresher with a clean, dry finish. Get it for about $10.99 a six-pack at your local liquor store. —Rob Kalesse, Contributing Writer

DESCHUTES FRESH SQUEEZED IPA My introduction to this Bend, Ore.based brewery was, logically enough, during a visit to Bend. Talk about a craft beer mecca. This American IPA is one of the most aromatic, refreshing beers I’ve tasted and remains a personal favorite—especially during the summer. — Jerry duPhily, Publisher

RAR GROOVE CITY HEFEWEIZEN I'll admit it, being from Maryland's Eastern Shore, I'm sort of biased toward breweries from my homeland. Nevertheless, this relatively new brewery, now distributing in Delaware, makes some fantastic beer. Groove City is a great summer option and a great example of the style. It's a hazy, golden-yellow beer, with a distinctive wheat flavor with hints of lemon, banana and cloves and comes in at a sessionable 5.2 percent ABV. — Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer

TWO ROADS LIL’ HEAVEN SESSION IPA I picked up this beer last summer when we were out of state on a camping trip, and really enjoyed it, so I was excited when it came to Delaware this past spring. The Lil’ Heaven is a light, citrusy, session IPA that is perfect for summer sipping. — Marie Graham Poot, Director of Digital Media and Distribution

HEAVY SEAS TROPICANNON CITRUS IPA This is great summer beer. With a slight grapefruit flavor, it’s so refreshing. Make sure to enjoy one at your next BBQ. — Kelly Loeb, SEO Accounts Manager, Catalyst Visuals

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ALLAGASH SAISON This Belgian farmhousestyle ale embodies summery goodness: citrus notes, tropical fruits and a little spice. Brewed in Portland, Maine, the Allagash Brewing Co. ale is light yet full-bodied and flavorful—and definitely refreshing. At 6.1 percent ABV with a golden-yellow hue, it’s nicely balanced, earthy, with a surprising but appropriate dry finish. — Krista Connor, Associate Editor

NEW BELGIUM HOP TART Graduation season has gifted me with some great pours for days outside. New Belgium seems to know what it’s doing with its sours. Hop Tart offers a fruit-filled flavor and tame aftertaste, with a light body. You won’t be able to find this beer in bottles or cans, but State Line Liquors is currently pouring growlers of it. — Ryan Alexander, Contributing Designer

SPOETZL SHINER RUBY REDBIRD Go "juicing" this summer with a brew—made with ruby red grapefruit juice and ginger flavors—from the Spoetzl Brewery in Shiner, Texas. These snappy, refreshing and light suds are a summer go-to for hubby and me—and you know I'm not normally a brew gal. — Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Contributing Writer

MISPILLION RIVER SPACE OTTER AMERICAN PALE ALE My newest discovery comes from a local (underrated) brewery from Milford. Mispillion River Brewing's Space Otter American Pale Ale has a taste that is well-balanced with malts and hops, pine, and some citrus. This low-ABV (5 percent) is highly drinkable and perfect while I'm working the grill. — Matthew Loeb, Creative Director/ Production Manager

MANOR HILL IPA This IPA uses three different hops to enrich the flavors: Mosaic, Centennial and El Dorado. They provide ample tropical, bitter-sweet flavors. A refreshing, clean and delightful brew worthy of your enjoyment from family-owned Manor Hill in Ellicott City, Md. — John Murray, Contributing Writer and Proprietor, State Line Liquors

2SP DELCO LAGER There’s been considerable fanfare surrounding the release of 2SP’s first beer in a can. For good reason: The Delco is a smooth, easy-drinking brew that lives up to its billing as an “all-weather American amber lager.” Now that it’s cooler-ready for your next beach trip or mountain getaway, you can enjoy on-thego what beer critic Joe Sixpack, of the Philadelphia Daily News, rated his runnerup for “Beer of the Year” in 2015. — Jim Miller, Director of Publications

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Fruity Beers: Fun Summer Drinking Citrus is dominating. The experts explain why. By Rob Kalesse

T

he idea of adding fruit to beer—whether in the mash, during secondary fermentation, or right down the neck of the bottle after cracking a cold one—is nothing new. The Germans and Belgians have been making fruit-infused beer for centuries, Sam Adams has produced its Cherry Wheat since the late 1980s, and even the most milquetoast beer drinkers like a little lime in their Corona. But more recently, particularly during the American IPA explosion the craft industry has experienced over the last decade, citrus has begun to separate itself from the bunch. Bananas, cherries and even the beloved pumpkins have taken a back seat to grapefruit, lemon and tangerine. Citrus is especially noticeable in craft cans and bottles, and that’s because, according to most professionals, certain American hops—most notably Amarillo, Cascade, Citra and Willamette— have a more citrus-like flavor and aroma than some of their piney cousins. We caught up with those professionals to talk about their favorite citrus-centric beers in anticipation of the sweltering summer months ahead.

Grapefruit at Grain Jim O’Donoghue, co-owner at Grain Craft Bar + Kitchen in Newark, has long been a fan of fruit-infused beers. He believes part of the reason for the steady success of craft beer is the approachable nature and flavors of fruit beers. “I’m a fan of anything that allows people to try different beers and get out of their comfort zone a little,” says O’Donoghue. “The IPA makers are really going all in on fruit, especially citrus, and I think people are more willing to try something new when there’s some familiarity there. They might not understand the difference between one hop varietal and another, but mention orange and lemon, and they take notice.” One of O’Donoghue’s favorite citrus-flavored IPAs is the Evil Genius Turtle Power, which goes heavy on the grapefruit, but is balanced with some sweetness and tart flavors. The dry finish is refreshing, he says, and the citrus helps keep drinkers somewhat hydrated during the warm months. ► MARCH JULY 2016 2016 || OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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“I feel like lemon can be a little tart and orange can be a FRUITY BEERS: little sweet, but grapefruit is just FUN SUMMER DRINKING right,” says O’Donoghue. Later continued from previous page this summer, Grain will feature the Turtle Power on tap, as well as Otter Creek’s Citra Mantra, and the Green Flash Passion Fruit Kicker, with notes of passion fruit, grapefruit and clementine. O’Donoghue is looking forward to having an influx of citrus beers on tap and in cans and bottles to complement summer menu items like Grain’s tempura lobster, crab and watermelon arugula salad, and the citrus avocado salad, which O’Donoghue says “couldn’t make more sense to pair with a citrus beer.”

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Matt Foran, a manager at Chelsea Tavern on Market Street in Wilmington, loves the citrusy IPAs because they’re basically the opposite of the popular piney, sometimes bitter IPAs on the market. While hopheads might debate that bitter is better, Foran believes citrus pairs more naturally with food. “In general, citrus-noted hops accentuate the flavors in food, if paired correctly,” he says. “It’s definitely a market that has been growing, and I think it’s because fruit-forward beers tend to be more appealing as palates change. It’s a more enjoyable flavor profile than the ultra-bitter beer.” Foran cites New Belgium’s Citradelic as a prime example of an IPA with citrus appeal, with its blend of hoppy bite and tangerine sweetness. He is also a big fan of the Belgian witbiers (white ales), with notes of orange and coriander, including Harpoon’s UFO White and Otter Creek’s Fresh Slice. And although it’s not a citrus fruit, Foran also loves the wheat beers, blonde ales and IPAs infused with watermelon. “21st Amendment really started the movement with their Hell or High Watermelon Wheat, but now watermelon is everywhere,” he says. His current favorites include the New Belgium Heavy Melon, a blonde ale with watermelon and lime, and the 16 Mile Seed-Free & Joy, both of which he plans on having at Chelsea this summer. “That 16 Mile beer is great; they add 200 pounds of fresh watermelon to the boil. You get the full flavor of the rinds and the fruit. It’s a delicious beer,” says Foran. Orange-ish beers like the Uinta Hop Nosh Tangerine IPA, another one of his favorites, will also be on tap.

Don’t Be Afraid of the Gose

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Get Greg Safian started on fruit beers—from citrus IPAs to Belgian sours—and he can spend an evening or afternoon discussing them at Trolley Tap House in Wilmington. In fact, the craft beer specialist can talk your ear off about nearly any style. As for the “fruity beers,” he’s appreciative—if they’re done right. “We’ve come a long way since Seadog Blueberry wheat ale and Leinenkugel shandys,” Safian says. “Those are decent beers, but the options we have now are much better. There are certainly styles that warrant it, and some breweries stretch it. Sometimes it doesn’t work.” One that Safian says works is the TropiCannon from Heavy Seas in Baltimore. A very fruit-forward IPA at 7.2 percent, it features notes of grapefruit, orange and lemon peel. “It tastes like candied orange and grapefruit right up front,” he says. “They really went for it on this one and didn’t tiptoe around the citrus.”

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He is also a big fan of a style of beer called the “gose” (pronounced, go-suh), which originated in 16th century Germany and has seen a recent renaissance. Safian says the style traditionally has a lemony tartness and slightly sour aftertaste, and sometimes contains a bit of salt. “The Kirsch Gose, from Victory, is a solid one,” he says. “It has a kind of sour cherry punch to it, and I think the style is going to be one of the more popular beers this summer. The gose’s popularity has turned into quite the movement. It’s a versatile beer, in terms of food pairing, and is quite refreshing.”

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The Brewers Weigh In Brian Finn, senior head brewer for Iron Hill, could see the fruited IPA trend coming a mile away, calling it “an explosion of fruited and spiced IPAs, with grapefruit being the biggest fruit flavor to be used.” He even brewed a grapefruit Hefeweizen, or wheat beer, last summer. “Our Summer Crush was amazingly well received last year,” says Finn. “There are a ton out there, though, with Ballast Point’s Grapefruit Sculpin being one of the best sellers, I imagine. With all the flavors in the citrusy American hops, it was only a matter of time.” Finn says Iron Hill is planning to take another stab at the citrus market this summer, with the release of their Grapefruit Riverfront IPA in late June. The 6.7 percent ABV ale will feature fresh grapefruit juice in the recipe, and is essentially a fruity take on Iron Hill’s Riverfront IPA, a house beer available at all locations. Down at Stewart’s Brewing Company in Bear, Head Brewer Ric Hoffman is generally not a huge fan of the fruited beers, and hence doesn’t brew many of them. He knows they’re “all the rage these days,” and does annually brew one cult favorite, Monkey Love. “It’s basically our very popular Stumblin' Monk (a Belgian strong ale) that’s re-fermented with raspberries,” says Hoffman. “It’s bright red, with over a pound-and-a-half of fruit per barrel, and an ABV of 9.2 percent. We’ve probably been making it for a decade and people really like it.” While the 9.2 ABV falls on the higher side and might prohibit long stints of summertime drinking, most fruited IPAs fall in the 4 to 7 percent range. The combination of a lower alcohol content and hydration and vitamin properties of the citrus make for some perfect warm weather imbibing.

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FEAR NOT THE

HOME-COOKED FISH Follow these tips from area pros and master this daunting culinary task By Pam George

P

atrick D’Amico, chef-owner of Metro Pub & Grille in Middletown, hears it all the time: Customers will only eat fish in a restaurant because they have no idea what to do with it at home. “The majority get intimidated,” he says. “Which fish do they throw on the grill? If they do cook it, it’s always well done. ‘What did I do wrong?’ they ask. ‘I did what you said to do and it didn’t turn out.’” Chad DiFebo, an owner of Feby’s Fishery in Wilmington, has heard similar complaints from customers. “The average person has a heart attack trying to boil water,” he jokes. Fish is cause for a major meltdown. But if you want to prepare a healthy meal for your family, it’s hard to beat fish. A protein with a flavorful punch, it’s loaded with nutrients, including vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, magnesium and zinc. Here’s a primer from the pros to help you feel more confident at the seafood counter and in the kitchen.

LEAN, FAT AND FIRM

In general, you can break fish into three categories: lean, fat and firm. Lean fish, which is typically white-fleshed, falls apart easily when it’s over-handled. Think flounder, trout, tilapia and cod. Fatty fish has a higher oil content and holds together well during the cooking process. Picture tuna, salmon and Chilean sea bass. Despite the “fatty” moniker, these fish are full of nutrients. Firm “steak-like” fish includes swordfish, cobia and wahoo. “They are very dense, large-flaked fish,” says Kate Applebaum, owner of Cajun Kate’s Cajun & Creole Restaurant in the Booths Corner Farmers Market. “There’s not a lot of fat in them. These are fish you don’t want to overcook.” Grouping fish into categories helps you find recipes. A preparation for flounder will likely complement another lean fish. It can also suit a fatty fish, such as Chilean sea bass. A recipe designed for the bass, however, might overwhelm the lean, delicate flounder.

Fish with a high oil content, such as salmon, and some firm fish can also stand up to recipes for hearty proteins—even red meat. “Depending on the texture and the fat content, you can do some of those heavier fall-like preparations,” says Applebaum, the former chef at Harry’s Seafood Grill on the Wilmington Riverfront. She’s comfortable braising swordfish with red wine, shallots, and peppercorns.

FISHING FOR FISH

When it comes to finding the freshest fish, cultivate a relationship with the man or woman behind the seafood counter. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Whole fish—which are often a great value—should be smooth to the touch. Avoid fish with sunken, cloudy eyes. The area under the gills should be bright red. While a whole fish might make some people squeamish, it’s often a good deal, and the counterperson will clean it for you. When you push on the flesh of any fish, it should lightly spring back with no sign of your fingertip’s impression. If the fillet seems broken and unattractive, you’re better off passing. “Number one is smell: If it smells fresh like the ocean, you probably have a good piece of fish,” Applebaum says. Don’t be afraid to be adventurous. “There are so many fish out there, it’s unbelievable,” says Timothy Drozdowski, the chef de cuisine at Harry’s Seafood Grill. “People don’t explore enough.”

THE RIGHT APPROACH

For newbies, one foolproof way to prepare fish is to make a stew, bouillabaisse, or chowder. “Swordfish and mahi are really good stewing fishes,” Applebaum says. “We put mahi into our seafood gumbo and it holds up well.” Simply cut the raw fish into cubes and toss it in the broth. “You’re getting the flavor of the fish in the stew and your fish is absorbing the flavors of the stew,” she says. Needless to say, there’s no risk of the fish getting dry. Be careful, however, with lean fish like cod, which will break into bits if cooked too long. ►

◄ Grilled swordfish with fingerling potatoes, roasted farm fresh asparagus, blistered grape tomatoes in a red pepper puree, as prepared by Chef Chad DiFebo at Feby's Fishery. Photo Joe del Tufo

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Swordfish with spicy jalapeño pea puree, asparagus and polenta at Harry's Seafood Grill.

Grilling, particularly at this time of year, is another option. First, make sure your grill is clean, D’Amico says. Then choose the right kind of fish. Drozdowski likes to grill fish with a high oil content, such as salmon. “The heat melts the fat, so the fish basically bastes itself as it’s cooking,” he says. D’Amico says tuna, swordfish, and wahoo, which are flaky and dense, are also great for the grill. “You get into snapper—even some of the rockfish—and it might seem dense but it’s more delicate,” he warns. “They’re better in a pan. Your flounder and flat fish – forget about the grill.” The broiler, oven, and a good cast-iron pan are fallback tools for most types of fish. As for the preparation, lemon, butter or oil, salt, and pepper can be enough. “When I get a fish that I’ve never had before, I just cook the fish—a minimal amount of salt and pepper just to taste the nuances,” Drozdowski says. Like wine grapes, the flavor of fish is influenced by its habitat. No matter the cooking method, adjust the cooking time to a particular piece’s density and thickness, DiFebo says. Also note that two fillets might require different cooking durations, even if they come from the same fish. A flounder has a thick and thin side, he explains. Of course, you’ll also need to know how the diner likes his or her fish. Like red meat, many types of fatty fish can be cooked to your preferred “temperature,” from rare to well done. “Tuna? Rare? Perfect!” D’Amico says. If you’re opting for rare, make sure you trust your seafood vendor, the experts agree. Don’t opt for rare fish if you doubt the fish’s freshness or quality. Avoid flipping the fish frequently or moving it around in the pan. “It’s maybe one turn for me and then again on the presentation side” before plating, Drozdowski says. “With a thinner fish, I may cook it only one side with basting at the end. Some fresh herbs dropped in, and you’re good to go.” Realize that you’re going to overcook some fish. If that happens, make a tuna fish-like salad out of the overcooked—but not burned —fish. Or, make fish cakes. Like any culinary skill, practice makes perfect, DiFebo says. “The more you cook fish, the more you’ll know how to cook it. After you get it right a few times, trust your instincts.”

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Daily Specials! LuncH

Monday – ½ Price Crab Cakes Tuesday – $4.95 Tacos Wednesday – Happy Hour Noon – 7pm Thursday – ½ Price Burgers Friday – $4.95 Hot Dogs

DInner Monday – Turf & Free Surf Thursday – ½ Price Burgers Friday – Turf & Free Surf Saturday – $19.95 Filet Mignon Sunday – $22.95 Beef Wellington

Annual

Outdoor Dining! Summer IS Here!

Saturday, August 27

And so is Tonic’s NEW outdoor lounge and dining area. Join us July 8th for our first official “Summer is Here” Patio Party Extended Happy Hour Specials 4-10pm plus Brixton St. Duo live!

Includes All Burger Samples and Beverages.

Entertainment FrIDayS In JuLy:

July 8th - Brixton St. Duo/Patio Party! Benefits Emmanuel Dining Benefitsthe ofCaring’S Carig’s Emmanuel the Ministry Ministry of of Caring’S EmmanuelDining Room, Room,which over180,000 180,000nutritious nutritiousmeals meals which feeds feeds over over 180,000 nutritious aayear yearto hungryat atno nocost, cost,and andwith with to Delaware’s Delaware’s hungry hungry at no no noquestions questions askeD. askeD.

July 15th - Tony Capella & Kurt Houff of Montana Wild X with Greg Hudson July 29th - Betty and the Bullet return!

BUY NOW!

TICKeTS

deburgeRbattle.com CaufFiel House, 1016 PhiladelphiA PikE, Wilmington, DE

Fill your place your Emmanuel vote Benefits thebelly, Ministry of Caring’s and raise money to alleviate hunger. Dining Room, which feeds over 180,000

nutritious meals a year to Delaware’s hungry All

Ages

at no cost, and with no questions askeD.

MFG Wilm. DE | 2016

Designed by

302.777.2040 | TonicBarGrille.com 111 West 11th Street | Downtown Wilmington

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Photo courtesy of Food Network

TALKING TV WITH CHEF ROBBIE JESTER Chef Robbie Jester

The Stone Balloon executive chef reflects on his Triple G stint and looks forward to an appearance on another food show this month By Emma Driban

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obbie Jester has had a busy year, with multiple appearances on the Food Network show Guy’s Grocery Games. After being eliminated in the final round of the show in November 2015, the 31-year-old executive chef of Stone Balloon Ale House was part of Triple G’s Redemption Tournament in May. He won the first part of the competition and took home $16,000. Unfortunately, Jester was eliminated in the final round because he overcooked his duck, which he chose in honor of his father, who passed away in January. O&A caught up with the Newark resident via e-mail to learn more about his experiences and influences as a chef, what he learned on Guy’s Grocery Games, and possible future appearances on the Food Network.

1. What got you into cooking professionally? Are there any other chefs who have influenced your take on food? I got into cooking professionally by growing up in a family restaurant called the Harbor House in Worton Creek Marina in Chestertown, Md. I started out at 12 years old making soups, salads, and desserts in the kitchen working for my father. From there I watched the older cooks, as they were cool and I wanted to be like them. I started working the line at 14 and running the line at 15. Chefs that have influenced my take on food are my father and local Chefs Pat D’Amico, Dan Butler and Bill Hoffman. I love Alfred Portale from Gotham Bar and Grill and have tons of cookbooks that I gather influence from. I’m a huge fan of Eric Ripert as well, but more for what he represents as a human than as a chef. ► JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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2. You’ve become something of a veteran regarding food competitions on TV. What have you learned? TALKING TV WITH I’ve learned that what you put on the plate isn’t nearly CHEF ROBBIE JESTER as important as what you leave off. As a young chef you continued from previous page have a tendency to try and cram too much onto one plate. Learning to leave off items takes focus and confidence. I’ve learned to be confident in my cooking and also gained phenomenal momentum as a person in charge of my own decisions. Oh… and commit! Too often, we are wishy-washy in our decision-making and it makes for poor results. Decide on something. Commit to action. Then assess the results. 3. In what ways do you feel these Food Network competition shows help the restaurant and food industries? I believe that education is the key to the future of the restaurant and hospitality industry. I do feel like there was a long period in recent history where guests began to accept a quality of experience much below expectations. That is both in regards to “standard fare” and the quality of service provided. These food competition shows have helped to educate people on ingredients and the personalities that prepare them. I also think there is a higher respect for what we do now than ever before. 4. Have these shows influenced your approach to preparing food in the restaurant? I would say yes and no. Yes in the respect that all experiences shape us and the way we lead our lives from that moment forward. And no because at the end of the day TV is understandably different than a working restaurant. I do think that the TV competition shows have allowed the Stone Balloon to be bolder in its features and menu because now people trust me. They are more willing to experiment and take chances.

LET US CATER TO YOU. From dinner parties to office get-togethers to weddings, let Janssen’s make your event special. We offer full-service catering, event planning, party rentals, floral arrangements, and more. Contact our catering director today at (302) 654-9941 x3.

5. Did your father’s illness impact you as a chef? With Dad passing away in January, I would say the biggest change for me as a chef has been in the way I lead people. I believe that I am a bit more strict now than I ever have been but with an eye toward enhancing people’s abilities and expectations of themselves. My father was a hard man to work for but he always wanted every ounce of the best out of people and he would do everything in his power to extract that. My motto is still leading with compassion but I think sometimes the kindest thing you can do for someone is tell them something they don’t want to hear. Also, I’m more health conscious now and have an eye toward creating a healthy and balanced lifestyle. I’m losing weight, which is not easy for a chef, but it is damn rewarding. 6. Now that Guy’s Grocery Games is over, what can you tell us that you couldn’t before? There’s not a ton of behind-the-scenes stuff to tell. Guy’s Grocery Games is pretty transparent in the way that it operates and showcases chefs. I will tell you that when you tour the store, the first aisle has a few snack foods on one end. They coach you: “Those are Guy’s snacks. Don’t touch!” It’s a very eclectic variety from Takis to Sriracha chips. Other than that, Guy is an absolutely incredible human being who is very generous with his time and resources. He remembers almost everyone and their individual stories, which tells you that he’s a people person at heart. A note that I would say to all professional chefs about the chefs on TV is that they are much more knowledgeable than we give them credit for. They are, in general, technically sound and just because the more technical critiques get edited out doesn’t mean they don’t exist. 7. Can you tell us anything about possible appearances on other Food Network shows in the future? I do have another appearance coming in July, but I’m not yet allowed to talk about it. It’s a different show and a whole ton of fun!

WWW.JANSSENSMARKET.COM 3801 KENNETT PIKE, GREENVILLE, DE 302.654.9941

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8. What’s your favorite dish? My two favorite things are lukewarm, shitty pizza and my mom’s spaghetti and meat sauce. Particularly the meat sauce itself, which I will still just sit and eat with a spoon.

APRIL 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Spicy garlic stir fry with chicken is a popular Honeygrow dish.

SUMMER IS HERE! COME COOL OFF AT THE MEXICAN POST!

We have Margaritas

The finest Mexican food, award-winning margaritas, and over 65 kinds of tequila.

HAPPY HOUR

On Tap!

Mon-Fri 4:30-7pm

IN THE BIZ SPECIALS! Wed-Sat 10PM-1AM!

TEQUILA TASTING

Thursday Nights!

$9.95 LUNCH SPECIALS!

Largest selection of Mexican beers in Delaware! 11 bottles & 3 drafts!

LATE NIGHT MENU

7 days a week til 1AM Come Visit Delaware’s Friendliest Staff! 302.478.3939 | 3100 Naamans road | MexicanPost.com | facebook.com/Mex.Post

Mon-Fri 11AM-3PM

Celebrating the 33rd Anniversary of Our Polly Drummond Location!

Come Try Our Seasonal Craft Beers Over 22 Beers on Tap at the Polly Drummond and Peoples Plaza Locations!

Filet Mignon for just $19.83 • July 18-July 31! MONDAYS

½ Price Appetizers All Day

TUESDAYS

½ Price Burgers All Day $1.50 Domestic Drafts after 7pm

WEDNESDAYS

All You Can Eat Wings $11.99 after 5pm

THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: 108 Peoples Plaza (Corner of Rtes. 40 & 896) | Newark, DE | 302-834-6661 8 Polly Drummond Shopping Center | Newark, DE | 302-738-7814 800 North State Street | Dover, DE | 302-674-0144

THURSDAYS

FRIDAYS

All You Can Eat Shrimp $12.99 after 5pm, Prime Rib $18.99

Prime Rib $22.99, $2.50 Taylor’s Grog 7pm-close

SHOWTIME TRIVIA

DJ DANCE PARTY

All Locations!

All Locations!

Be our friend on Facebook!

ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL OFFER! At All Locations!

Including Deer Park & Cantwell’s Tavern SATURDAYS

$1.00 Off Craft Bottles All Day

SUNDAYS

Beef and Beer $8.99, Steak Night $12.99

www.mcglynnspub.com

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EAT CHANGES AT GALLUCIO’S

G BITES Tasty things worth knowing

Compiled by Emma Driban

SUMMER SUNSET CRUISES

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elp the Food Bank of Delaware benefit the Culinary School at its Milford Branch. On Friday, July 29, and Friday, Aug. 26, at 213 Wyatt Avenue, Bowers Beach, the Captain’s Lady Charters will conduct fundraising sunset cruises from 7 to 10 p.m. at the price of $30 per person per ride. To purchase tickets, call 276-6038.

FOOD TRUCK FRIDAY IN NEWARK

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alling all food truck lovers! Once a month, downtown Newark businesses are coordinating Food Truck Fridays. The events will feature several trucks, and proceeds from wine and beer sales will benefit the Newark Arts Alliance. The next two are scheduled for July 22 and Aug. 19. Check Captain Blue Hen Comics’ Facebook page for more details.

CHILDREN’S STORY TIME AT WOODSIDE CREAMERY

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oodside Creamery has teamed up with the Hockessin Book Shelf to create a children’s story time. There is no fee to attend this event, which runs every Tuesday until Aug. 30 beginning at 1 p.m. under the big tree at the creamery. At each story time, the Hockessin Book Shelf raffles off books for children and adults, and Woodside Creamery raffles off tokens for free ice cream. Once a month the special guest reader will be a nationally- published author. Visit the Hockessin Book Shelf’s Facebook page a week before to see which guest reader will be making an appearance. The event is shine-only.

allucio’s Italian Restaurant has announced two changes to its weekend schedule. From 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Sundays, the Wilmington restaurant now offers brunch. The menu includes classic breakfast food like pancakes and omelets to order, some specialties such as croquet monsieur and croquet madam on a brioche bun, as well as Gallucio’s signature breakfast pizza. In addition, it now features a country western jam session with local musicians every Sunday from 6 until 9 p.m.

INDIAN RESTAURANT OPENS

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f you are looking for a bit of spice in your meal, try Godavari, a south Indian restaurant that recently opened on Kirkwood Highway. It offers authentic Indian dishes such as butter chicken, tikka masala, Punjabi lamb curry, various tandoor dishes, along with a large variety of vegetarian options. The restaurant also caters and will soon be opening a food truck called Godavari Express. Hours are 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5:30 to 10 p.m. on weekdays, and noon to 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 to 10:30 p.m. on weekends.

PHILLY’S BBQ FEST 2016

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arbecue fans won’t want to miss the BBQ Festival coming to Citizens Bank Park in Philly on Saturday, July 30. Attendees will be able to sample from 45 vendors, who offer classic BBQ items as well as more inventive foods like BBQinspired donuts. Guests have two options if they are looking to order their tickets beforehand. The half rack option is $50 per person and includes 10 samples, two Phillies game tickets and an apron. The $75 full rack choice has added one-hour early entry and access to the VIP rooftop, where there will be a cooking demonstration and guest appearances from the Phillie Phanatic and 2008 World Champion Manager Charlie Manuel. Guests can also buy $2 sample vouchers at the event to eat more BBQ. The festival will also have craft beers available for purchase and a carnival game section. Visit phillybbqfest.com to purchase tickets and for more information.

CHOCOLATE MOONSHINE: ‘ILLEGALLY GOOD’

W

ith a slogan like “Illegally good,” how could you not want to try Chocolate Moonshine? The family-owned company, based in Grove City, Pa., started producing hand-made fudge in 1989, but only just made its way to Delaware recently. Though the full recipe is a family secret, like any good moonshine, the company uses pure chocolate liquor, fresh cream, organic cane sugar and other natural ingredients. These artisanal fudge bars are also gluten-free and do not contain alcohol, despite the name. Mocha Madness, Cranberry Pomegranate, Dark Pistachio, Big Bacon and Pina Colada are among more than 40 flavors now available at select breweries and wineries.

DELAWARE ART MUSEUM PARTNERS WITH TOSCANA

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he Delaware Art Museum recently announced its partnership with Chef Dan Butler’s Toscana Catering to operate the museum’s Thronson Café and act as the exclusive caterer for all museum events and rentals. The Café is already serving items from the updated menu and is working on menus for daytime visitors, weddings, rentals and museum-led events and programs. The Thronson Café is open Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Customers can enjoy the Thronson Café without paying admission to the museum. Visit delart.org for more information and updates to the menus. JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Get full details for hundreds of events going on around town!

inWilmingtonDE.com

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CITY OF WILMINGTON

On the Town

Leo Lynch at Zaikka Indian Grill.

w

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE REFRESHMENTS

K

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

DT

DOWNTOWN LOOP

WE

WEST END LOOP

NW

NORTH WILMINGTON LOOP

NC

NEW CASTLE LOOP

THE WILMINGTON ART LOOP FRIDAY, JULY 8 5 - 9 p.m. artloopwilm.org

ALSO IN THIS SECTION: This Month at Theatre N

cityfest

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Downtown Loop

artloopwilm.org

THE WILMINGTON ART LOOP FRIDAY, JULY 8 5 - 9 p.m. On the Town

cityfestwilm.com/artloopwilmington cityfest

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO THE ART LOOP. STEP 1: Select exhibitions that interest you. STEP 2: Map out your choices and select transportation. You may want to walk, drive or take the downtown DART Trolley. A limited number of seats are available on the Art Loop shuttle. Please reserve your seat by calling 302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov.

STEP 3: Meet local and regional artists while enjoying the newest exhibitions to open in Wilmington and the surrounding areas.

STEP 4: Enjoy one of Wilmington’s excellent restaraunt or nightlife locations. Please visit the food and drink section of inwilmingtonde.com.

The Delaware Contemporary 200 S. Madison Street Wilmington, DE 302.656.6466 • thedcca.org

6:00 pm and 7:30 pm screenings of “Slavery’s Children” (30 min) by Delaware filmmaker Michaelangelo Rodriguez and Film Brothers, followed by Q&A with the filmmaker. Opening receptions for Vesna Jovanovic, Jessie & Katey, and studio artist Carson Zullinger. Live music, henna art, Rolling Revolution food trucks, and cash bar. Art Loop is FREE; film admission is $10/person. Art Loop reception 5-9 PM. On view Tues, Thurs, Fri, Sat - 10 am-5 PM; Wed, Sun - 12 - 5 PM through July 31st.

Zaikka Indian Grill 209 N Market Street Wilmington, DE www.zaikka.com Drama in Familiar Places The landscape in black and white. Presenting the work of photographer Leo Lynch. Art Loop Reception 5 – 8PM. On view Monday – Friday 11A – 8 P through July 30th.

STEP 5: Repeat the first Friday of every month!

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS WHERE DOES THE ART LOOP START? The Art Loop is a self-guided, go-at-your-own pace tour that can start at any of the locations listed in this guide. There is no designated route for the Art Loop.

HOW DO I APPLY TO EXHIBIT ON THE ART LOOP? Participating galleries book and curate the exhi-

bitions and should be contacted directly at the contact information provided in this guide.

HOW DO I TAKE THE ART LOOP SHUTTLE? Reserve one of the limited number of seats by calling 302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov. The bus will pick-up and drop-off at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts.

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LaFate Gallery 227 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE arteun@aol.com www.lafategallery.com Eunice LaFate’s new Ladybugs series was inspired by her visit to to the 2015 Ladybug Music Festival in LOMA. In celebration of LaFate Gallery location to LOMA, LaFate created for the 2016 Festival, an array of ladybugs in vibrant acrylic on canvas. Art Loop reception 5-8 pm. On view Tue - Thurs. 11am – 5 pm, Fri-Sat 10 am – 6 pm through July 30th.

LOMA Coffee 239 Market Street Wilmington, DE 302.893.2000 • lomacoffee.com The Sierras, by Rachel Briggs. Inspired by her road trip through California in the Summer of 2015, Rachel creates paintings to evoke the landscapes she explored; working from photographs and memory, Rachel depicts moments from her journey through the breathtaking Sierra Nevada mountain range. Art Loop Reception 5-8 PM. On view Monday – Friday 6AM – 5PM; Saturday 7AM – 2PM through July 30th. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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Downtown Loop

West End Loop

artloopwilm.org Cherne’ Altovise 316 N Market Street Wilmington, DE 302.565.7710 chernealtovise.com Derogatory Teen Trendy X Isabel JeanLouis Jasmine Husser Zelda William Marrero An exhibit about emotion, selfimage, and the development one needs to take in order to be their true self. Art Loop Reception 5-9 PM. On view Monday thru Saturday 10 A – 6PM through July 1st.

Mezzanine Gallery 820 N. French Street Wilmington, DE artsdel.org Just Above Water, Mark Houlday. A series of low angle photographs of ponds, rivers, and bays in Sussex County captured by Houlday from his kayak. Art Loop reception 5 – 7 pm. On view Mon – Fri 8:30 am – 4:30 pm through July 29th.

Creative Vision Factory 617 Shipley Street Wilmington, DE www.creativevisionfactory.org

The Mill Space 1007 N. Orange Street Wilmington, DE www.themillspace.com

CVF Presents: Silas Harrison and Robert Horton, The Creative Vision Factory presents the work of two new members, Silas Harrison and Robert Horton. Loop Reception 5-8 PM. On view Monday thru Friday, 10 AM – 5PM, weekends subject to staff availability through July 29th.

Spiker Exhibit, William Spiker. William makes abstract steel sculptures. Art Loop

Jerry’s Artarama 704 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE 302.268.1238 wilmingtonde-jerrys.com

The 3rd Place Gallery 1139 W 7th Street Wilmington, DE 302.425.4900 www.facebook.com/TiltonCool

With a background in graphic design and architecture, M.A.Prosceno displays his ability to work with different mediums. Art Loop reception 5:30 – 8:00 PM. On view 9 AM – 6PM through July 31st.

Art Move of Transportation” Geraldo Gonzalez Vibrant and surreal colored pencil drawings of public transportation by local Wilmington artist. Art Loop Reception 5-8 PM. On view Wed – Sat 8AM – 12 PM through July 30th.

reception 5-9 PM.

The Grand Opera House – Mainstage 818 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE thegrandwilmington.org/grand-galleries

Nicole Lenzi takes a multidimensional approach that includes installations, 3D constructions, 2D relief, and works on paper. Recent relief works explore how drawing, time, and thought can effect and redevelop each other. For more on Nicole Lenzi’s work, see www.nicolelenzi.com. Art Loop Reception 5-8 PM. On view Monday thru Friday, 10 AM – 5PM, weekends subject to staff availability through August 2nd.

The Grand Opera House – Baby Grand Gallery 818 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE thegrandwilmington.org/grand-galleries DANCE4LIFE presents “Strength In Grace”. A collection of images, featuring dancers and the power of dance movement, captured through the lens of photographer Brian Mengini and under the direction of DANCE4LIFE executive/ artistic director Chauntee D. Andrews. Art Loop Reception 5-8 PM. On view Monday thru Friday, 10 AM – 5PM, weekends subject to staff availability through August 2nd. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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Theatre N at Nemours

theatren.org

PRICES: $8 | general admission $6 | seniors and children

*Theatre N reserves the right to change the film schedule at any time. Please visit our website at www.theatren.org for the most up to date information for all film and events at Theatre N.

302.576.2565 Monday - Friday 302.571.4075 Nights & Weekends theatren.org

1007 N. Orange Street Wilmington, DE 19801

WEINER

July 1-7 Fri. 2pm, 8pm | Sat. 5pm | Sun. 1pm, 7pm Tues. 4pm | Wed. 7pm | Thurs. 4pm An examination of disgraced New York Congressman Anthony Weiner’s mayoral campaign and the landscape of today’s political landscape.

I SAW THE LIGHT

July 1-7 Fri. 5pm | Sat. 2pm, 8pm | Sun. 4pm Tues. 7pm | Wed. 4pm | Thurs. 7pm I Saw the Light is a biography of country-western singer Hank Williams. Starring Elizabeth Olsen and Tom Hiddleston as Williams I Saw the Light follows Williams rise in country music and the struggles he faced in his personal life.

PELE

July 8-14 Fri. 8pm | Sat. 5pm | Tues. 4pm Wed. 7pm | Thurs. 4pm Pele’s meteoric rise from the slums of Sao Paulo to leading Brazil to its first World Cup victory at the age of 17 is chronicled in this biographical drama.

MILES DAVIS

July 8-14 Fri. 5pm | Sat. 8pm | Sun. 1pm | Tues. 7pm Wed. 4pm | Thurs. 7pm An exploration of the life and music of Miles Davis.

L’ATTESA

July 15-21 Fri. 1pm | Sat. 5pm | Sun. 1pm, 7pm Tues. 7pm | Wed. 4pm | Thurs. 4pm A mother unexpectedly meets her son’s fiancée at a villa in Sicily and gets to know her as she waits for her son to arrive.

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HOW HE FELL IN LOVE

July 15-21 Fri. 4pm | Sat. 2pm, 8pm | Sun. 4 Tues. 4pm | Wed. 7pm | Thurs. 7pm A casual affair between a young musician and a married woman turns into an intimate and profound connection that threatens to derail their lives.

MAGGIE’S PLAN

July 22-28 Fri. 5pm | Sat. 2pm, 8pm | Sun. 4pm Wed. 7pm Maggie’s plan to have a baby on her own is derailed when she falls in love with John, a married man, destroying his volatile marriage to the brilliant Georgette.

T-REX

July 22-28 Fri. 2pm, 8pm | Sat. 5pm | Sun. 1pm, 7pm Tues. 7pm | Thurs. 7pm For the first time ever, women’s boxing is included in the 2012 Olympics. Fighting for gold from the U.S. is Claressa “T-Rex” Shields, just 17 years old, and by far the youngest competitor. From the hard knock streets of Flint, Michigan, Claressa is undefeated and utterly confident. She protects her family at any cost, even when their instability and addictions threaten to derail her dream.

UNDER THE SUN

July 29 – August 4 Fri. 2pm, 8pm | Sat. 5pm | Sun. 1pm, 7pm Tues. 4pm | Wed. 7pm | Thurs. 4pm Despite continuous interference by government handlers, who are frequently captured on camera though they prefer to remain unseen, director Vitaly Mansky documents life in North Korea’s capital of Pyongyang, and one family’s training to be ideal patriots.

YOU’VE BEEN TRUMPED

July 29 – August 4 Fri. 5pm | Sat. 2pm, 8pm | Sun. 4pm Tues. 7pm | Wed. 4pm | Thurs. 7pm In this David and Goliath story for the 21st century, a group of proud Scottish homeowners take on celebrity tycoon Donald Trump as he buys up one of Scotland’s last wilderness areas to build a golf resort. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

6/24/16 9:49 AM


SIP. SAMPLE. SHOP. STROLL.

TasteOfTrolley.com JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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1. Amtrak Station 2. Opera Delaware Studios/City Theater Co. 3. Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn., WYRA.ORG 4. Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park 5. Residences at Christina Landing 6. Harry’s Seafood Grill / Riverfront Market, HARRYS-SAVOY.COM 7. Delaware Theatre Co., DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG 8. FireStone Roasting House, FIRESTONERIVERFRONT.COM 9. Cosi at the Barclays Crescent Building, GETCOSI.COM 10. Hare Pavilion/Riverwalk 11. AAA Mid-Atlantic Travel Center, AAAMIDATLANTIC.COM 12. The Delaware Contemporary, THEDCCA.ORG

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13. Justison Landing, Currie Hair, Skin & Nails, CURRIEDAYSPA.COM Veritas Wine & Spirits, VERITASWINESHOP.COM Starbucks on the Riverfront 14. Kooma, KOOMASUSHI.COM Goju Training Center, GOJUROBICS.COM 15. Delaware Children’s Museum, DELAWARECHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG Riverwalk Mini Golf, RIVERWALKMINIGOLF.COM 16. Joe’s Crab Shack, JOESCRABSHACK.COM 17. Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant, IRONHILLBREWERY.COM 18. Public Docks 19. Big Fish Grill, BIGFISHRIVERFRONT.COM

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Visit RiverfrontWilm.com for info on events happening at the Riverfront! 20. Frawley Stadium, BLUEROCKS.COM Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame 21. Chase Center on the Riverfront, CENTERONTHERIVERFRONT.COM 22. Dravo Plaza & Dock 23. Shipyard Center Planet Fitness, PLANETFITNESS.COM 24. Timothy’s Restaurant, TIMOTHYSONTHERIVERFRONT.COM Molly’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream, MOLLYSICECREAM.COM Ubon Thai Restaurant 25. Wilmington Rowing Center, WILMINGTONROWING.ORG 26. Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge/ DuPont Environmental Education Center, DUPONTEEC.ORG

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27 Riverfront Commuter Lot, RIVERFRONTWILM.COM/PARKING 28. Penn Cinema Riverfront IMAX, PENNCINEMARIVERFRONT.COM 29. CrossFit Riverfront, CFRIVERFRONT.COM 30. The Residences at Harlan Flats, HARLANFLATS.THERESIDENCES.NET 31. Stratosphere Trampoline Park, WILMINGTONTRAMPOLINEPARK.COM 32. The Westin Wilmington, WESTINWILMINGTON.COM River Rock Kitchen, RIVERROCKKITCHEN.COM 33. Delaware Humane Association, DEHUMANE.ORG Photo by Joe del Tufo

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THURSDAY EVENINGS 7-8:30 P.M. | DRAVO PLAZA | SHIPYARD CENTER JULY 7 JULY 14 JULY 21 JULY 28 AUGUST 4 AUGUST 11 AUGUST 18 AUGUST 25

CHESAPEAKE BRASS BAND GERALD CHAVIS QUINTET TIMLIN & KANE KAREN RODRIGUEZ LATIN JAZZ ENSEMBLE VOODOO DEVILLE THE CRAWDADDIES ELIZABETH KNECHT BEST KEPT SOUL

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T U E S D AY - T H U R S D AY : 1 0 A M - 3 P M F R I D AY : 1 0 A M - 8 P M S A T U R D AY & S U N D AY : 1 0 A M - 5 P M

D E L AWA R E CH I L D R E N S M U S E U M . O RG

DE RI

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Round-trip service on the taxi is $7 for adults and $5 for children. Board at one of six taxi stops located within walking distance to nearby attractions and restaurants.

FA M I LY N I G H T S

Bring the family every Tuesday & Thursday night during June, July and August for a fun experience.

W E D N E S D AY S O N T H E WAT E R

Enjoy a 1 hour wine tasting on the river, Wednesdays in July and August. 50 MARCH 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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W I L M I N GT O N R I V E R TA X I . CO M

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AT THE QUEEN

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OCT 9 WORLDCAFELIVE.COM 302 994 1400 5 0 0 N M A R K E T ST WILM I N G TON , DE JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KRESTON WINE & SPIRITS

Celebrating 84 Years

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trauger pilsner and j.a.w.n. (juicy ale with nuggets) 302.654.8001

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50 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

Chuck Sullivan in front of Sully's Irish Pub's iconic brick and stucco wall. Photo Anthony Santoro

HISTORIC TAVERNS SEEK MODERN NICHE Sully's, Cantwell's offer authenticity with their food and drinks By Dan Linehan

C

huck Sullivan knew that underneath the 1970s decor, the Colonial-era architecture of his Irish pub was waiting to shine. So he tore out the fake walls to reveal the more than 250-year-old brick beneath. But what he found under the stucco was, in some ways, worse. Much of the brick, laid down in 1761, was rotting away. His simple compromise mixed old and new. Sullivan, who reopened the historic Middletown tavern in 2010 as Sully’s Irish Pub at the Witherspoon, decided to remove the plaster where the brick was intact and leave it in place elsewhere. The look, of stucco weaving around brick, become a brand; it’s the image that appears on his business cards, for example. Just a few miles to the east, in Odessa, Cantwell’s Tavern had been making trade-offs, too – trade-offs meant to preserve history while doing business. Also in 2010, it finished a transition from art museum to restaurant in a move that was intended by its nonprofit owners, in essence, as a preservation tool.

But fitting in a sufficient number of seats was a major challenge, says Bob Ashby, one of the proprietors. Modern restaurants use wide-open floor plans to maximize seating, but knocking down walls at Cantwell’s, built as the Brick Hotel in 1822, was out of the question. With the help of booth seating, Ashby and his team managed to leave Cantwell’s charm intact while making it viable as a restaurant. They found value, too, in historic integrity. “When you put (a restaurant) in a historic building, you have character that’s already there,” Ashby says. One is an Irish pub and the other an upscale casual restaurant. Though Cantwell’s and Sully’s occupy different food niches, these taverns are being revived by owners who care about their history. And they’re standing out in a crowded marketplace by taking advantage of a simple fact: No one is making new Colonial taverns. ► JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

Photo courtesy of Cantwell's Tavern

HISTORICAL TAVERNS SEEK MODERN NICHE continued from previous page

Historical photos line the wall at Cantwell's Tavern in Odessa.

THE WITHERSPOON BECOMES SULLY’S

JOIN WITH A FRIEND THIS SUMMER AND YOU BOTH GET A MONTH FREE! JOIN TODAY!

www.ymcade.org Financial assistance is available.

Built in 1761 by David Witherspoon, the tavern was one of Middletown’s first buildings and a popular waypoint for travelers. Caesar Rodney, the revolutionary luminary whose midnight ride to sign the Declaration of Independence gave patriots the deciding vote, stopped by in 1777. Gen. George Washington recorded his 1783 visit to the tavern in his diary, and Sullivan has found strong evidence that Thomas Jefferson was there, too. The inn also has a fascinating Civil War history as a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers, says George Contant, a historian at the Middletown Historical Society. Johnny Reb, it was generally known, could find a friend—and, in mixed company, a fight—at the Witherspoon. “You knew that if you could escape from Fort Delaware and get to the Delaware side you had a very ready, willing and able reverse Underground Railroad to get you back to Virginia,” Contant says. Prohibition and then the Depression brought hard times for the Witherspoon. Then, tragedy. On Valentine’s Day, 1946, a fire that started nearby devastated the building, more or less destroying its upper levels. It was rebuilt, and continued as a pub until Sullivan took over.

FROM BRICK HOTEL TO CANTWELL’S

Cantwell’s Tavern, though it does not have as colorful a past, shares in the region’s boom-and-bust history. Its 19th-century prosperity as the Brick Hotel was a result of the town’s position astride the regional grain trade on the Appoquinimink River. But as the railroad displaced river travel, Odessa languished. For preservation purposes, that turned out to be a blessing, says Deborah Buckson, executive director of the Historic Odessa Foundation (HOF), which counts Cantwell’s among its historic holdings. Though the town was in decay, she says, the lack of encroaching development meant it stayed essentially unchanged, a process called “preservation by neglect.” “You’re looking at a Colonial streetscape,” she says of Odessa’s Main Street. Along with much of Odessa, the hotel was restored in the mid-20th century by H. Rodney Sharp, who was married to Isabella Mathieu du Pont. It was through those family connections that the hotel would pass into the hands of the du Pont family, which most recently used it as an art museum under Winterthur’s auspices. Both Sully’s and Cantwell’s have adopted modern uses while staying true to the past.

52 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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At Cantwell’s, mothballed by Winterthur in 2003, the HOF had plenty of modernization to reverse when it took control two years later. The building’s first use was its best use, Buckson says, and the HOF spent $1.2 million turning it back into a tavern. The business now generates about a third of the foundation's operating income. Today, the 165-seat restaurant also serves as an introduction to Odessa’s history, with walls covered with maps and other documents from the foundation’s collection. Cantwell’s customers come for the charm, says Carolyn Davis, the general manager. Brunch is popular with locals; the extensive menu features hearty fare as well as sampler boards. The restaurant makes its own peanut butter and jam and does its own pickling. Signature dinner entrees include crab cakes ($24) and filet mignon ($31). Cantwell’s also caters, both to off-site events and weddings held in the nearby gardens.

MIDDLETOWN VITALITY

In Sullivan’s case, Middletown’s economic vitality, fueled by newcomers like him, made it a natural choice. But he wanted to make a place that the city’s old guard could enjoy, too. A New Jersey native who most recently operated restaurants in Ohio, Sullivan knew he had to pay homage to the town’s history, so he appended “at the Witherspoon” to the Irish pub’s name, and filled the restaurant with nods to town history. You can, for instance, order an Odie Walker. Made up of a shot of Irish whiskey and a draft of your choice (at a reduced price) it’s named after a firefighter who etched his name on the rafters after the 1946 fire. The walls are dotted with local history, including a snippet from Sports Illustrated about an area football player and an American flag flown in Iraq by a Delaware National Guard unit. The pub has a full menu, and Sullivan says the home-made Reuben, cooked from raw brisket and paired with sweet peppers, and the boxty, an Irish potato pancake, are among the highlights. He wants to learn more about his bar’s history. The anecdote about Jefferson’s visit, which was unknown to the historical society until just a few months ago, appears to have only whetted his appetite. “I don’t own this tavern,” he says. “I am merely the present-day caretaker.”

Flavor seekers

inquire within.

WINE EVENTS • PRIVATE DINING • HAPPY HOUR • SIGNATURE COCKTAILS 1314 N. Washington St., Wilmington, DE 19801 (302) 655-9463 | www.domainehudson.com

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JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

Come EnjoyOur Patio! Warmer Weather is Here!

Beer Grainiac

Craft beer reviews from Grain’s Jim O’Donoghue

THIS MONTH:

Every Saturday:

Tröegs Sunshine Pils

T

he heat of the summer is upon us and people are turning to lighter beer styles to quench their thirst. Tröegs Sunshine Pils out of Hershey, Pa., is a great example of a Bohemianstyle Pilsner that does just that. It is crisp, light bodied, and doesn’t have any out of character aftertastes. Tröegs did a great job combining a fresh pilsner with a slight hop character. At 4.5 percent ABV this is a perfect summer beer to bring along on any outdoor summer activity. If you like Victory Prima Pils or Sierra Nevada Nooner, you should definitely give Sunshine Pils a try. – Jim O’Donoghue

Live Music on the Patio! 2nd- Ron Settle 9th- Keli Vale 16th- Boyd Holmes & Marty Lassman 23rd- Abita 30th- Mixx Unplugged Sunday Brunch 10am-2pm $4 Make Your Own Bloody Mary Bar

302.376.0600 109 Main Street, Odessa, DE 19730 Mon: 11:30am-9pm • Tues - Thurs: 11:30am-10pm Fri-Sat:11:30am-11pm • Sun: 10am-9pm

www.cantwells-tavern.com 54 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

SIPS

Here's what's pouring Compiled by Emma Driban

GRAIN’S ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY

O

n Saturday, July 30, Grain Craft Bar + Kitchen in Newark will hold an all day celebration of its first anniversary. The event features musical performances from Nate McCormick, Kyle Herring and Apache Trails. Drink specials will be available, including a custom created Tito’s drink and a special beer brewed just for Grain by Mispillion River Brewing, as well as one-year anniversary shirts designed and printed by Wilmington screen printing company Spaceboy Clothing.

2SP’S CANNED BEER RELEASE

2

SP, the true-to-itself local brewing company that opened just under a year ago, has released its popular Delco Lager in cans. In its new form, the beer is great for tailgaiting, parties and chill nights. 2SP is selling cases and six-packs out of the brewery, and the American amber lager can also be found at area bars and distributors.

GREENVILLE BREW HAHA! OPENS

L

ocal espresso café Brew HaHa! has opened a new location in the Powder Mill Square shopping center in Greenville. The coffeehouse has undergone some changes, such as the expanded menu, which now includes brunch items like masa pancakes and chilaquiles. The new location offers local craft beers, wine by the glass or bottle and $10 cocktails like coffee g&t and campfire hot chocolate. The café, now celebrating 20 consecutive years of being voted Best of Delaware, also has an updated European-style décor. Visit brewhaha.com for the full menu.

KENNETT WELCOMES POP-UP BEER GARDEN

I

f you are looking for something to do in Kennett Square, try visiting the new popup beer garden, The Creamery. Owner Mike Bontrager wanted to create a place where people of all ages could come together, and he did exactly that at the site that used to be the Eastern Condensed Milk Co. The Creamery features food and drink from Charlie Collazo of the Institute Bar and Doug Hager of Whetstone Tavern and Brauhaus Schmitz in Philadelphia. It also offers games, including table games and corn hole, and hopes to bring in local bands and artists to perform. Visit kennettcreamery.com for more information about events and the menu.

TOSCANA PATIO PARTIES

‘80s Era Video Games Classic Pinball • Skeeball 21 Beers on Tap • Area Craft Brews

COMING AUGUST 11: MUSIKARMAGEDDON!

WE

LIVE MUSIC!

T

his summer, join Piccolina Toscana for its Patio Party series. Every other Sunday in July and August the Trolley Square restaurant will have free snacks and assorted giveaways at the events, which run from 2 to 7 p.m., with live music starting around 3 p.m. Here’s the schedule: July 10 – $5 Milagro tequila (silver, anejo and reposado) with fresh-squeezed citrus, watermelon and berry juices. July 24 – $4 cans of beer from Neshaminy Creek Brewing Co. The lineup currently features Churchill Lager, County Line IPA, Croydon Cream Ale, Trauger Pilsner and J.A.W.N. (juicy ale with nuggets), but is subject to change depending on availability and seasonal selections. Aug. 7 – Italian Aperitivo Party with $5 Aperol Spritzes (Aperol, Prosecco and club soda served on ice), Negronis and Negroni Sbagliatos (Campari, sweet vermouth and Prosecco served on ice). Aug. 21 – BYOM (Bring Your Own Mint) $5 Mojito and Rum Punch Party. There also will be assorted rum cocktails.

IRON HILL CANNED BEER RELEASE

I

ron Hill Brewery and Restaurant’s summer can release trend continues with The Cannibal. The beer is now available in fourpacks of 16-oz. cans at all 11 Iron Hill locations. It pairs well with barbecue and other popular summertime standards. With Gold (2005) and Silver (2015) medals from the Great American Beer Festival, this Belgian-style golden ale is a hot commodity, so be sure to get it before supplies run out. Iron Hill also has announced that it will release Bedotter, another seasonal Belgian-style ale, in cans on Tuesday, Aug. 2.

TAP TAKEOVER / KARAOKE SPECTACULAR! Thurs, July 7, 7pm-1am 2511 W. 4th Street, Wilmington 302-384-6479 • 1984wilmington.com

JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

SPECIAL GUESTS: Hugh Sisson owner Chris Leonard brewmaster

Join Out & About for the

Smooth Sail on the Riverboat Queen Featuring: Heavy Seas Beer Thursday, August 11, 7-10pm Featuring fresh pours of the Smooth Sail Summer Ale plus Pounder Pils and Loose Cannon IPA. $50 Admission Includes Appetizers, Beer, and two-hour cruise aboard the Riverboat Queen. 21 & Over Event Proceeds to benefit the Delaware Children’s Museum

LIMITED SEATING! Order your tickets today at RiverfrontWilm.com

CRAFT BEER

16 drafts, 60+cans/bottles

LOCAL BANDS (WED-sat)

local produce CRAFT COCKTAILS

RITE OF SUMMER 13th annual Newark Food & Brew Fest set for July 23 The Downtown Newark Partnership and Out & About Magazine team again to present the Newark Food & Brew Festival, one of the area’s top summer traditions. This year’s event, set for Saturday, July 23 (2-9p.m.), features 18 restaurants and more than 40 craft beers along with live music and street activities. Founded in 2003, this festival was the first Newark event to embrace craft beer as a central element. It also helped foster a spirit of cooperation among local businesses as well as provide a boost to business during the slower summer months. “We definitely sell more beer on Food & Brew day than other day of the year,” said Ryan German, owner and operator of Caffé Gelato. The first 2,500 guests will receive a commemorative five-ounce tasting mug. Tickets are not required; just pay as you go and bring your ID for beer tastings. Guests can sample a restaurant’s featured brews for $1-$3. Area craft brewers will be well represented as Third Wave, 16 Mile, Dogfish Head, Flying Fish, Heavy Seas, Neshaminy Creek, RAR, Tröegs, Twin Lakes, Victory and 2SP will be on hand. On the food side, restaurants will be creating small-plate menus to pair with the craft beers they are featuring. This is definitely a stroll-and-sample event. A day-of-event program will be available at restaurants and an information booth will be located on the Academy Lawn. O&A Magazine will be hosting a root beer tasting stand for kids on the Academy Lawn until 5 p.m. or supplies run out. Participating venues as well as the beer-food menus will be posted at newarkfoodandbrewfest.com —Out & About

56 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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302.482.3333 | ChelseaTavern.com 821 N. Market St., Wilmington

302.384.8113 | ErnestAndScott.com 902 N. Market St., Wilmington A SMOKIN’ JOE CIGAR DINNER of wilmington ernes t & scott taproom + sikar lounge

EVERY Tuesday followin g Flight Club Prizes, Giv e-aways & EVER chan gin g 302.482. 3333 | ChelseaTave rn.com 821D N. Mar riketnSt.,kWilm Singt pe on cials!

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JULY 2016

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| OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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F

WHAT’S #INTUNE THIS MONTH

ZACK HUMENIK MUSICIAN

The Beach Boys Wednesday, July 13

Shady Grove Music Festival Saturday, July 16

Ladybug Music Festival Thursday, July 21

People’s Festival Saturday, July 30

Full details for these events & more at: inWilmingtonDE.com

58 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

Pristine Raeign performing on the main stage at last year’s Ladybug Music Festival. Photo Joe del Tufo

FIVE YEARS LATER, BUZZING LOUDER Ladybug Music Festival, the annual downtown block party celebrating women in music, is back July 21 with national headliner, local favorites and more By Krista Connor hursday, July 21, will mark five years since the formation of Market Street’s biggest annual—and notably, free—block party, Ladybug Music Festival, celebrating women in music. Event organizers Jeremy Hebbel and Gayle Dillman, also founders of Wilmington music promotional company Gable Music Ventures, haven’t slowed down, even in this anniversary year. They’re focusing on how they can make the event better, both this year and in the future, while maintaining aspects of its grassroots origins. Says Hebbel: “Ladybug has grown exponentially, but we’re still going to do what we did the first year—walk up and down Market Street passing out thousands of flyers telling people to come out. We’ve grown, but haven’t changed.” In fact, Hebbel has announced that next year Ladybug will be a two-day event, also featuring artist panels along Market Street. And within the next decade or two, Hebbel envisions a city-wide

T

Thursday-to-Sunday festival, stretching from the Riverfront to Market Street, Trolley Square to the West End. The festival, branching outward from 2nd & LOMA, has doubled in attendance each year, according to partnering group Downtown Visions. Hebbel is hoping for a crowd of 4,000 to 6,000 this year, drawn to see Burlington, Vt., headliner Caroline Rose and nearly 50 other female performers. Area artists include Joy Ike, Nalani and Sarina and Alex Voegele, while national jazz favorites — Royal & Toulouse, Sharon Sable and Vanessa Collier — will have their very own jazz stage this year. And back by popular demand are the outdoor stages at 3rd & LOMA and Delaware Technical Community College’s courtyard. An additional stage at new Ladybug venue Bobbi Rhian’s Executive Lounge near 4th Street will also be set up. Other Market Street venues—Extreme Pizza, Zaikka, LOMA Coffee, and others—will host performances for the 5-10 p.m. festival. ► JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN FIVE YEARS LATER, BUZZING LOUDER continued from previous page

=

=

NOW OPEN UNTIL 1AM, MONDAY-SATURDAY

Introducing

Reservations

HALF-PRICE HAPPY HOUR

302-654-9790 8thandUnion.com

Mon- Fri 4-7pm • 11pm-12am

M O N D AY S $ 6 B u rg e r s

T H U R S D AY S

$1.25 Oysters $7 Craft Cocktails

$1.25 Oysters $4 Titos Mixes Half-Price Wines OPEN MIC NIGHT with Joe Daphne

W E D N E S D AY S

Live Acoustic Music

T U E S D AY S

1/2-Price Appetizers one per customer $ 1 O ff C r a f t B e e r s

F R I D AY S

S U N D AY S

E V E RY D AY:

$2.50 Yuenling $2.50 Bud Lights $3 Green Tea $3.50 Vodka $3.50 Captain $4 Fireball $4 Spicy Tequila $5 Bourbon $5 City Wide Can Beer

Brunch • 10am-2pm

801 N. Union St, Wilm • 302-654-9780 • 8thandUnion.com

As always, the event isn’t just a celebration of music. Eight food trucks—KOI on the go, Kapow, I Don’t Give a Fork, Wandering Chef, Wildwich and others—will be stationed throughout the festival. Upwards of 50 vendors will sell crafts, candles, jewelry, and more, and local artist Terrance Vann will do art demonstrations. Like last year, an outdoor bar sponsored by Yards will be in the center of festivities at 3rd Street (Cash only, and this year the bar includes a WSFS ATM). As always, Ladybug flourishes from diversity. Artists ranging in age from 15 to 60 will play hip hop, rock, country and jazz. This will mark the third appearance for area pop-soul-funk artist Joy Ike, and she is impressed by the event’s growth. “It’s continually evolving and getting better—it’s exciting to have conversations with people over the course of the year and to see just how widely anticipated this event has become,” Ike says. She praises Gable Music for doing “a stellar job” in smoothly running a festival, booking quality artists, rallying local businesses and organizations to be a part, and finding new ways to get the word out. “Wilmington may not be considered a destination city by most people, but it is during the Ladybug Music Festival,” says Ike, who will perform at LOMA Coffee on festival day. She is spending the rest of her summer working on her next TBA album and playing the festival circuit. Meanwhile, headliner Caroline Rose, a rockabilly artist backed by her four-piece band, says she’s most excited about one thing: “Seeing all the Ladybugs.” While the fun factor is a no-brainer, Hebbel says economically and culturally the festival has a huge, positive, downtown impact. Last year, eateries saw three times the amount of business they’d typically experience on a busy day, let alone on a regular Thursday, Hebbel says. Restaurants-turned-venues and every food truck ran out of food before the festival was over. Even Upper Market Street establishments like Ernest & Scott and Chelsea Tavern saw more business than usual. “We’re taking an average day that would be slow, a Thursday, to bring thousands of people to shop,” Hebbel says. “At Ladybug, people come into downtown Wilmington to have a fun, safe experience to combat the idea that it’s a dangerous place—it creates another narrative, essentially.” For tickets and more information, visit theladybugfestival.com.

60 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Cool Spring Park

E V I L

N Jackson St & West 10th St, Wilmington

Farmers market Thursdays 4-8 p.m.

usic nthly m o m f o A series : TED BY N E S E R P

Fresh Food - Music - Community

parties

local & live

Music at the Market every week 5-8 p.m.

JULY 21: The Nomad

July 7: Joe Trainor Trio

905 N. Orange St. Wilmington

Summer Closing Party

July 14: First State Symphonic Band m N dA

O

County Executive Thomas P. Gordon Department of Community Services Division of Community Resources

n utA

Cool Spring Farmers Market

t u o b

July 28: Ju Kids’ Day with Nalani & Sarina

AL

.co w o

July 21: King Zimm

LS PBR SPECIA ! L NIGHT

JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Celebrating Years!

80

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Online

Ordering Enjoy these daily specials

ALL MONTH LONG!

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62 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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B U C C I N I / P O L L I N

G R O U P

P R E S E N T S

#BLACKJOBSMATTER A

W I L M I N G T O N

E X P E R I M E N T

A PLAY BY GREGORY LLOYD MORRIS | DIRECTED BY ANDRE JONES

JULY 13TH T

W

E

N

T

Y

S

I

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T

E

E

N

THE QUEEN THEATER 500 N. MARKET ST. WILMINGTON DE 19801

DOORS OPEN AT 6PM: SHOW STARTS AT 7PM - COMPLIMENTARY ENTRY-

T O R S V P V I S I T W W W . A W I L M I N G T O N E X P E R I M E N T . C OM THE WORLD LIVE CAFE RESTAURANT WILL BE OPEN BEFORE & AFTER THE SHOW CAS H BAR AN D R E S E R VATI O N S F O R TH E R E STAU RANT AR E R E C O M M E N D E D SPECIAL GUEST PERFORMANCE BY THE TWIN POETS

NEWDY FELTON M A R K E T I N G

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ONLY 4 BANDS WILL MAKE IT TO THE OCT. 15 FINALS

12 12 OF OF THE THE AREA’S AREA’S BEST BEST ORIGINAL ORIGINAL BANDS BANDS COMPETE COMPETE IN IN 44 SHOWS SHOWS

live @ the baby grand

JOIN US THIS MONTH FOR THESE SHOWS AND VOTE! Go to Musikarmageddon.com for updates & set times!

Friday, July 8th, 10pm-1am At Kelly’s Logan House

Wild Virtu

Magnetic North

The Susquehanna Floods

Saturday, July 16th, 10pm-1am At Oddity Bar

The Fuzzy Snakefoot

TreeWalker

Chill and the Rabbits

Additional Partnerships with:

1984,Gable Music Ventures, Kelly’s Logan House, Oddity Bar, Rainbow Records, Spaceboy Clothing, TribeSound Studios, World Cafe Live at The Queen, WSTW’s Hometown Heroes

JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

TUNED IN Not-to-be-missed music news SHADY GROVE MUSIC FEST Arden music bash is slated for July 16 The annual day of outdoor fun in Arden, Shady Grove Music Fest, on Saturday, July 16, features Newark headliners fiancé and Philadelphia’s Three Man Cannon. The festival starts at noon with Frisco, followed by E.B. Hawkins, Little Strike, Maiden Names, Camp Candle, The Limits, Universal Funk Order and headliners. Gates open at 11 a.m. Food trucks, beer, wine and live art will add to the festivities. Proceeds form tickets, $15 in advance and $20 at the gate, benefit the Arden Gild Hall Restoration Fund. For more information, visit the festival’s Facebook page.

SUMMER IN THE PARKS Free arts activities and fun for kids through Aug. 19 Wilmington’s Grand Opera House is soaring through the warmer months with its Summer in the Parks series, which kicked off in June. Every weekday from 9:30-10:30 a.m. will look like this: Mondays at Prices Run (BBW Park at N. Locust & E. 23rd St.); Tuesdays at Woodlawn Park (4th & Ferris St.); Wednesdays at Tilton Park (N. Franklin – W. 7th & 8th St.); Thursdays at Madison Street Tot-Lot (504-506 N. Madison St.) and Fridays at Holloway/ Compton Park (N. Lombard & E. 7th St.). Weekdays from noon-1 p.m. are as follows: Mondays at One Love Park (N. Tatnall & W. 24th St.); Tuesdays at Barbara Hicks Park (Bradford & B St.); Wednesdays at Kosciuszko Park (Sycamore & S. Broom St.); Thursdays at Judy Johnson Park (N. Dupont & W. 3rd St.) and Fridays at Haynes Park (N. Franklin – W. 30th & 32nd St.). July evenings, all from 6-7:30 p.m., include Wednesday, July 6, at Haynes Park with Suzzette Ortiz Latin Jazz Ensemble; Thursday, July 14, at Tilton Park with Richard Raw; Thursday, July 21, at Union Park Gardens with Diamond State Chorus and Simple Gifts, and Wednesday, July 27, at Stapler Park with Diamond State Concert Band.

OUT & ABOUT LIVE SUMMER SHOW July 21 party is at The Nomad The once-monthly Out & About Live series of music performances featuring local bands continues Thursday, July 21, with the Summer Closing Party at the Nomad (905 N. Orange St., Wilmington). The series is sponsored by PBR Music and will feature Pabst Blue Ribbon beer specials. Out & About Live will continue through December. Visit outandaboutnow.com for updates. 64 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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COOL SPRING FARMERS MARKET Live music adds to summer fun Every Thursday this summer, the sound of local music at Cool Spring Farmers Market (10th and N. Van Buren St.), amid vendor stalls and food trucks, will fill the air. July performances include First State Symphonic Band, a community group dedicated to the education and performance of contemporary and classical music, on July 14. July 21 brings the soulful, toe-tapping tunes of King Zimm, and July 28 is Kids’ Day, featuring music and activities for families. For more information, visit the market’s Facebook page.

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One-week music production camp for girls Held at World Cafe Live at The Queen, SoundGirls.Org Live’s Sound Camp for Girls is a one-week camp for girls ages 12-18 who want to learn about live music production. The camp curriculum was designed by industry veterans and teaches the skills and technology needed to run live sound. Working in small, collaborative and hands-on groups, the girls learn: live event safety, stage and audio terminology, signal flow, setup and wiring of PA systems and stages, input lists and stage plots, microphone techniques, line check, sound check and mixing. Each afternoon, the girls will set up and mix local bands’ music, and the week will end with them producing and running a live show at a local venue. Lunch will be provided each day, and the program runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. Financial assistance is available. For more information, visit queentickets.worldcafelive.com.

COWBOY JUNKIES Canadian band hits Wilmington July 12 Hailing from Toronto, roots-rock foursome Cowboy Junkies will play at World Cafe Live at The Queen on Tuesday, July 12, in support of their latest release, Notes Falling Slow. After an 18-month break from the road, the band will perform two sets each night during their Mid-Atlantic circuit, with the first set focusing on the material from their Notes Falling Slow box set. The second set will reach back through the 1980s to the group’s extensive catalog. For more information, visit queen.worldcafelive.com.

XPONENTIAL MUSIC FESTIVAL WXPN’s three-day music showcase is July 22-24 Philadelphia’s award-winning radio station WXPN has teamed with Subaru for its annual XPoNential Music Festival, which presents both well-known and up-andcoming artists on the weekend of July 22- 24. Its location on the Camden waterfront, at Wiggins Park and BB&T Pavilion, will complement the festival’s meld of talented new musicians along with spirited performances by established musicians. Artists include Grammy-winning Alabama Shakes, former guitarist for Guns N’ Roses Tommy Stinson, and dozens of promising new artists. With an estimated 30+ performers and 30,000 attendees, the XPoNential Music Festival should be a weekend to remember. Ticket prices range from $15 to $165 for a single day ticket and $140 to $298 for a 3-Day Go Everywhere Pass, depending on lawn access or reserved seats. For more information, visit xpnfest.org.

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9th Annual

MIKE CLARK MEMORIAL RIDE

Sat, Aug. 13 • Ride starts at 8am (Registration opens 7am)

Start/Finish: Alexis I. duPont High School • Greenville, DE Course options for all ability levels

Conquer The Hills: 100k & 80 miles Ride The Rollers: 25 miles & 50 miles Proceeds benefit Mike Clark Legacy Foundation Register Online at

66 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

Ghostbusters Abby (Melissa McCarthy), Holtzmann (Kate McKinnon), Erin (Kristen Wiig) and Patty (Leslie Jones) in action. Neil Casey plays the villian, Rowan. Photo courtesy of ©2016 CTMG, Inc./Sony Pictures Entertainment, Inc.

Wilmington native Neil Casey discusses his UD beginnings, what it’s like to write for Amy Schumer, and the IMDb credit that every interviewer asks about By Bob Yearick he Upright Citizens Brigade, an improvisational and sketch comedy group that originated in Chicago in 1990, has become a comedic Petri dish with a lengthy roll-call of gifted graduates. The list starts with Amy Poehler, one of the founders, and includes Rob Corddry, Ed Helms, Nick Kroll, Kate McKinnon, Aubrey Plaza and Rob Riggle. Some insiders would argue that Neil Casey, while not the most well-known, is among the most talented of this group. Like Plaza, he’s a native of Wilmington. After graduating from Salesianum School in 2000, he enrolled at the University of Delaware, where he majored in computer science. At UD, Casey joined Rubber Chickens, the school’s improv group, and that set him on the comedy path.

After several years in New York, he now lives in Los Angeles and performs at both the L. A. and New York UCB locations—when he has time. Since his UD days, Casey has established a reputation as a comedian’s comedian, writing, acting, performing and directing. He received Emmy nominations for his writing on Saturday Night Live and Inside Amy Schumer, and he was named one of “50 Comedians to Watch in 2015” by Vulture, the online entertainment magazine. Last year the 34-year-old Casey landed the coveted role of the villain in the reboot of Ghostbusters, scheduled to hit theaters this month. While contractually obligated not to reveal much about that character, he did cover a range of topics during a recent phone interview from his L. A. home. ► JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Out & About: From computer science major to the world of comedy. Did you always have the comedy gene? Neil Casey: I had always done theater in middle school and at Sallies, and at UD I got involved with Rubber Chickens. I wound up going up to New York with some of the guys to see comedy shows, and that’s where I saw Upright Citizens Brigade, who were doing long-form improv. I was hooked. We even got some of them to come down and perform on campus. O&A: Describe your character in Ghostbusters—“Rowan.” NC: I’m not allowed to talk about it much, but I can tell you he is a nefarious character. O&A: What was that audition process like? NC: I had worked with (Director) Paul (Feig) as a writer on Heat, and based on my work on that, and the work I did on Other Space, his show on Yahoo, he thought I would make a good villain. He runs a very collaborative set, and he likes people who pitch jokes in the moment. O&A: Your first major writing gig was on Saturday Night Live. How did that come about? NC: I had screen-tested to be a cast member a few years before, and I knew a lot of the people who worked there, and I knew they were looking for writers, so I just submitted as a writer and eventually they hired me. I was there for season 38, then I went to Amy Schumer after that. O&A: I can only imagine the Schumer writers room. NC: It’s fun, very professional. As opposed to SNL, where it’s all hours and you’re basically living at the office just trying to knock out a show, on Amy Schumer you have more time. It’s more normal, and you have longer than a week to write a show. O&A: How many writers did they have? NC: Let’s see, I was there for Season Two and then this last season—Four. Let’s see (he starts naming writers, including Amy’s sister, Kim Caramele), about 10. It broke down 50-50 male-female. Amy sits in; it’s very much her show, her voice, and she wants involvement. O&A: What is she like? NC: She knows she’s the funniest person in the world, but she’s a great boss. She is really great to her employees, writers especially. I worked for her on the MTV Movie Awards too. I was head writer for

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that. First thing she did after the show was take a picture with everyone who wrote for the show. She knows that the show depends on collaboration between the writing and the talent. Her show is a good place to work and a good place to do good work. O&A: I see that among your credits is Secret Santa Buttplugs. I must ask, what is that? NC: That was like a web video we made 15 years ago. I don’t know why it wound up on my IMDb, but it was a silly video that me and some others put together about a corporate Secret Santa party where everybody gives sex toys, but nobody knows who gave who what. Every interviewer asks about that, for some reason. O&A: You are a writer, an actor, director, producer. Which do you enjoy most? NC: Any time I’m acting and sitting in a trailer going over lines, I always wish I was in a writers room. And any time I’m in a writers room looking at a blank piece of paper, I often wish I was on set saying someone else’s lines. It’s one of those “the grass is always greener” things. I think working on Schumer was the best. I think it’s where I came into my own as a writer. Working on SNL was exciting too, with 15 million people watching at that moment. Working on Ghostbusters with Kate (McKinnon) and everybody was incredible and just having fun doing something that everybody knows. It was really a thrill, and working with Paul is always a pleasure. And spending the summer in Boston filming the movie was fun. It premiers nationally on July 15. O&A: But long-term, what do you see yourself doing more of? NC: People who come out of the comedy world are usually versatile and like to do either (acting or writing), and they just follow the work. I’m always happy to go in and write for any show, and writing

is a more stable, long-term career. And you have less control in acting. I am certainly grateful that people want to put my face in things, but you have a lot less control. But as long as people want to put me in front of the camera, I’ll be there. O&A: When you get back to Delaware, what’s your usual routine? Do you still have family here? NC: When I lived in New York I got back a lot. My parents still live there, and we get back for the holidays and we were just there in February. My one brother lives in Philly and the other one lives in New York, so they’re all on the East Coast. O&A: Any favorite restaurants or other establishments? NC: When I’m home, my parents and I go to Eclipse on Union Street. I took my fiancé to Kozy Korner for breakfast, and . . . let’s see... I go to Dead Presidents sometimes in the evening. My fiancé and I also got subs at Capriotti’s. And we also go to Kid Shelleen’s. And, oh, Scratch Magoo’s. O&A: So you’re engaged? NC: Yes, she’s from Bell Mead, N.J., outside Princeton. She’s a standup and actress—Meredith Knesevitch. O&A: What are you working on currently? NC: I’m shooting a movie for Netflix about National Lampoon. Will Forte is starring, Matt Walsh is in it. Really a great cast. We’re shooting in East L.A. I’m also working on Nick Kroll’s animated show. But it will be a while, because it has to be drawn. O&A: With all of the controversy in the current election campaign, does that give you fodder for your writing? NC: That’s where you miss SNL; they can have a reaction to current things. On Fusion, James Adomian and Anthony Atamanuik do a great Trump vs. Bernie. I sat in and moderated. If you want to see some sharp political satire, check that out on Fusion: Trump Vs. Bernie.

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WATCH

The BFG

2½ STARS

µµµµµ In Disney's fantasy-adventure The BFG, directed by Steven Spielberg and based on Roald Dahl's beloved classic, a precocious 10-year-old named Sophie (Ruby Barnhill) befriends the BFG (Oscar winner Mark Rylance). Photo courtesy of 2016 Storyteller Distributuion Co., LLC.

BFG IS A-OK—FOR KIDS They’ll be enthralled. Adults, meanwhile, will have to make do with some charming moments and winning performances from two of the stars. By Bob Yearick

T

he BFG, the new 3-D fantasy live-action adventure from Disney, arrives in theaters dripping with Academy Award gravitas. The director and co-producer is Steven Spielberg (multiple winner); the music is by John Williams (multiple winner), and the star is Mark Rylance (winner, Best Supporting Actor, 2016). Then there is the story’s impressive provenance: it’s based on the 1982 children’s novel of the same name by the late Roald Dahl, a famous and fascinating man in his own right. (He authored Charlie And The Chocolate Factory, was a World War II ace with the Royal Air Force, husband of American actress Patricia Neal, and a world-class philanderer. Check his bio; it’s fascinating reading.) Rylance plays an elderly giant who is spotted one night by the orphan Sophie (young Ruby Barnhill, part of an outstanding all-English cast) while he is wandering the streets of London blowing dreams into bedroom windows with a huge, trumpet-like instrument. Fearing Sophie will alert authorities of his existence, he

kidnaps her and takes her back to his home in Giant Country, where he creates dreams and captures them in glass bowls. In the quickest onset of the Stockholm syndrome on record, captive and captor fall into a loving niece-and-uncle-like relationship, and Sophie names him, redundantly, Big Friendly Giant, or BFG for short. His home is a ramshackle cave hideaway, and his diet consists of a foul-tasting and -looking vegetable known as a snozzcumber, which BFG subsists on because he refuses to eat people or steal food from humans, like the other giants. Sophie and BFG are soon engaged in an ongoing cat-andmouse game with the fearsome but dim-witted giants, as BFG keeps Sophie from their view, lest they eat her. While she hides, the giants make the much smaller BGF their toy, using him as a football and making him a passenger in their version of Demolition Derby. Later, for good measure, they trash his home and his workshop. ► JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

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Sophie subsequently persuades BFG to accompany her to Buckingham Palace and seek the queen’s help in eradicating the child-eating giants. It’s here that the film picks up, with scenes that compensate adults in the audience for a few earlier sleep-inducing moments. Much of this uptick can be credited to Penelope Wilton, the 70-year-old actress who plays the queen and whom American audiences will recognize as Isobel Crawley from Downton Abbey. She is a sprightly, humorous, yet authoritative monarch who invites first Sophie, and then BFG, into her home. She is abetted by the always-welcome Rebecca Hall, luminous as her assistant. A grand and comic dinner ensues, and the ingenuity of the royal staff is put to the test to find seating, utensils and food for the BFG. He brings his own addition to the meal: a fizzy drink called frobscottle, whose bubbles move downward instead of up, causing epic flatulence (“whizpopping” in BFG-speak) among all who imbibe it. The result is a farting fusillade that includes the queen and rivals the beansand-campfire scene from Blazing Saddles. After the air-clearing repast, the queen orders the Royal Air Force to help Sophie and BFG subdue the giants. Following some scary moments, the bad guys are captured and helicoptered off to an isolated island, where they are safely (this is a children’s story, after all) deposited and left with a lifetime supply of the loathsome snozzcumbers. As usual, Disney animation and graphics are superb, especially the meaty and comical giants, and the BFG in particular. Rendered as a spindly, galumphing oaf with huge ears, he has Rylance’s facial features. The Royal Academy product, winner of three Tonys and two Olivier awards, delivers the giant’s lines with pathos or humor, as the occasion demands. As the BFG, he utters nonsense words because, like many in today’s media, he has only a rudimentary grasp of English (sorry, couldn’t resist). Such expressions as “strawbunkles and cream,” “snapper whipper,” “spitzwoggler” and “codswallop” are part of his vernacular, and Rylance speaks the words with his typically laconic authenticity. Except for a tedious scene where Sophie chases the glowing, Tinker Bell-like dreams, the movie will hold most children rapt. Adults will have to make do with strawbunkles and the like, and winning performances by Rylance and Wilton.

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SIX-PACK CINEMA

WATCH

THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS

Six films with characters that are larger than life By Paula Goulden and Mark Fields The BFG continues a long tradition of movies with extra-large characters. Enjoy one of these half-dozen films that feature giants of one sort or another, arranged in descending order of magnitude.

The Iron Giant

(1999)

This charming animated buddy film, directed by Brad Bird (The Incredibles, Ratatouille), is, in essence, Gentle Ben for the sci-fi set. A lonely boy befriends a huge mechanical giant, neither of them aware that the behemoth is a powerful weapon sent from outer space. Voiced by Jennifer Aniston, Harry Connick Jr. and John Mahoney, with Vin Diesel as the titular giant, this has become a cult film because of its high-tech lyricism and painterly cinematography. —MF Jack the Giant Slayer

(2013)

Bryan Singer, high-octane director of many X-Men movies, goes medieval in this effects-driven telling of a classic fairy tale. Jack, a poor yet plucky adventurer, seeks to make his mark by undertaking a quest to rescue a princess from the land of giants. The fantasy setting, especially the particularly grotesque ogres, is thrillingly captured. But, the coherence of the story and the conviction of the characters suffer from Singer’s focus on the slam-bang CGI action sequences. Stars Ewan McGregor, Stanley Tucci and Eleanor Tomlinson. —MF Into the Woods

(2014)

A modern musical take on the fairy tales "Cinderella," "Little Red Riding Hood," "Rapunzel," and "Jack and the Beanstalk," together by a convoluted plot in which a baker and his wife try to fulfill a witch’s wishes so she will lift the curse that keeps them childless. This story’s giants, mister and missus, wreak havoc on our beloved characters’ lives and yet are strangely sympathetic. Stephen Sondheim’s sophisticated music and deft lyrics, which thoroughly dispel all romanticized aspects of these fairy tales, make it all worthwhile. So does the stellar cast that includes Meryl Streep, Anna Kendrick and Emily Blunt. —PG Deadpool

(2016)

Ryan Reynolds redeems himself for the travesty that was Green Lantern as Marvel’s snarkiest, most profane superhero, Deadpool, in a film that is both shockingly funny and gorily destructive. Reynolds, hidden under either a mask or disfiguring makeup, is freed to set aside his pretty-boy looks and concentrate his energy on this motormouthed alter ego whose persona fits the actor like a skintight superhero suit. The action is predictably overblown in director Tim Miller’s adventure, but the mockingly self-aware screenplay captures the unique corner of the Marvel-verse that is Deadpool. The credits alone are worth the rental price. —MF The Princess Bride

(1987)

This classic shows us storybook romance in all its forms, from the lovely farm girl Buttercup, chosen to marry the evil Prince Humperdinck while her true love Westley (an orphan farm boy whom she thinks was killed by pirates) is making his way back to her; to the dashing Inigo Montoya, training himself to be an expert swordsman so he can avenge the murder of his father. The giant is Fezzik, whose good heart and ability to improvise silly rhymes compensates for what he lacks in brains. William Goldman’s screenplay is a trove of movie quotables. —PG James and the Giant Peach

(1996)

The giant in question here is overly large flora rather than fantastical fauna. James, a lonely orphan (are we seeing a trend here?), lives a miserable life with his cruel aunts until he magically sparks the growth of a giant peach that he climbs inside of to discover a menagerie of helpful, talking bugs. Directed by Henry Selick (The Nightmare Before Christmas) in his stock-in-trade stop-motion animation style, the film is a curious blend of whimsy and the macabre that is captivating but ultimately exhausting. Like The BFG, this is based on a Roald Dahl story. —MF JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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PLAY

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1.

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annual festival at the Woodlands at Dover International Speedway. 2. Chelsea Tyler of Kaneholler on the Pavilion Stage.

5. This year’s festival drew more than 90,000 music lovers. 6. M83 brings electronic energy to the festival. 7. Fetty Wap hyping up the crowd during his set.

3. Ryan Miller of alternative rock band Guster on the Lawn Stage.

8. Lauren Mayberry of Scottish CHVRCHES in a cinematic moment of crowd sing-along.

4. A light show adds to Tame Impala’s psychedelic rock set.

9. Kings of Leon closed out Friday night on the Main Stage.

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PLAY

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17. Photos by Joe del Tufo 10. Death Cab For Cutie’s Ben Gibbard on the Main Stage.

11. Rapper and Manhattan-native Rakim Mayers - aka A$AP Rocky. 12. An ethereal glow eminates from the Woodlands. 13. DeadMau5 - Joel Thomas Zimmerman - brings his house-electronic quirk to the Main Stage.

15. A celestial performance by Florence Welch of Florence & The Machine. 16. Genre-spanning Earth, Wind & Fire plays a passion-filled set. 17. Ludacris kicks off Sunday morning on the Porch Stage. 18. Trombone Shorty - Troy Andrews - doing what he does best. 19. London-based mainstays Mumford and Sons closed out the festival Sunday night.

14. Noah Gundersen belting out a tune on the Backyard Stage. JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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TAVERN & GRILL

HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY Mon-Fri • 3-6pm in the Bar

$1 Off All Draught Craft Beers! PLUS! 1/2-price Nachos & 75¢ Wings

Watch Phillies Games At The Bar All Weekend

On Our 8 Large-screen HD TV’s

$3 Miller Lite Drafts & $1 Off Craft Beer Draughts During The Games!

4019 KENNETT PIKE • GREENVILLE, DE 19807

302.655.3785 CHECK OUT WEEKLY LUNCH, DINNER AND DRINK SPECIALS @ BBCTAVERNANDGRILL.COM

78 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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6/24/16 10:04 AM


Save the Date

2016 Best of Delaware Party!

Visit BestofDE.com for tickets and information. Get tickets early and save! Presented by:

THURSDAY

July 21

DOVER DOWNS HOTEL & CASINO DOVER, DE

BENEFITING:

Delaware Guidance Services for Children and Youth

Music by:

Big Brothers Big Sisters of DE

Custom Sponsorships are available at a variety of price points. For sponsorship information, call 302.504.1326

Borsello Landscaping • Kreston Wine & Spirits • Salon by Dominic

THE RED SHOE SOCIETY PRESENTS THE 5TH ANNUAL

232 Polo Road, Toughkenamon, PA

August 21, 2016 1:30 – 6:00 p.m., Polo Match 3:00 – 5:00 p.m. Auction 5:00 - 6:00 p.m. Fat Ricks Barbeque, Beer, Wine, Auction, Live entertainment $60 per person Must be 21 to attend. www.rmhde.org/special-events

For more info: (302) 428-5330

All proceeds benefit

JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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6/24/16 10:05 AM


Presented by

Historic Odessa Brewfest All Proceeds Benefit Historic Odessa

Saturday, September 10, 2016 202 Main Street I Odessa, DE On the grounds surrounding the Historic Houses of Odessa across the street from Cantwell’s Tavern

Beer from over 40 Breweries • Live music by Spokey Speaky, Rainbow Full of Sound, and more! Locally Sourced Food • Selections and Themed Stations • Boutique Wines • Cigar Rollers • And more...!

Tickets available online: www.odessabrewfest.com VIP Tickets: $70

l General Admission: $50 l Designated Driver Tickets Available at Gate: $15

Participating Breweries* 3rd Wave

Cisco

Flying Dog

Long Trail

Rogue

Sly Fox

Troegs

16 Mile

Dogfish Head

Flying Fish

Mispillion River

Starr Hill

Twin Lakes

21st Amendment

New Belgium

Sea Dog

DuClaw Elysian

Fordham & Dominion Heavy Seas

Shiner

Stewarts

Uinta

Shipyard

Stone

Victory

Oskar Blues

Sierra Nevada

Stoudts

Weyerbacher

Otter Creek

Sixpoint

Tall Tales

Yards

Allagash

Eurobrew Imports

Belukus Imports

Evil Genius

Brooklyn

Evolution

No Li NorthCoast

Lagunitas Lancaster Brewing

*Subject to change

For more information: 302-378-4119 www.odessabrewfest.com www.historicodessa.org

www.cantwells-tavern.com

Event Sponsors:

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6/23/16 5:18 PM


Thursday Specials!

Sunday

2 off All American Whiskey $ 3 Select Craft Bottles Ribs & Tots Specials

$

3 Seasonal Beers $ 5 FireStone Crushes $5 Appetizers $

Monday

Live music outside, Tuesday to Sunday, visit our web site for the full July schedule

3 20oz Domestic Drafts Slider Specials

$

Nacho Average Tuesday

live music

3 Corona & Corona Lights $ 5 House Margaritas $5 Nachos & Tacos

$

THURSDAYS

Wine Down Wednesday

outside, under the tent!

5 Select Wine by the Glass ½ Price Select Bottles of Wine ½ Price Pizzas $

Johnny Phatt Acoustic 6pm - 9pm

All American Thursday

3 Select Craft Bottled Beer 2 off all American Whiskey Rib & Tater Tot Specials

$ $

Friday

3 Miller Lite Bottles $ 5 Absolut Vodka Mixes $

Saturday

Radio Halo 9pm - 12am

3 Miller Lite Bottles $ 5 Captain Mixes

$

daily

SPECIALS

SERVED 4pM – CLOSE

Open 7 Days/Week Starting May 3rd Lunch Served Mon. – Fr. 11:30 Happy Hour Mon. – Sun. 4-7 Weekends Open Sat. & Sun. At 2

BANQUET ROOMS & PATIO LOUNGES

indoor and outdoor

BAR & PATIO

302.658.6626 :: FireStoneRiverfront.com :: 110 West St., Wilmington, DE 19801

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Celebrate Any Occasion Delicious Flexible Menus Group Reservations For All Sizes Contact Sarah: sarah@firestoneriverfront.com facebook.com/FireStoneWilmington

6/23/16 3:11 PM


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6/23/16 12:37 PM

Out & About Magazine July 2016