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April 2021

Feature


CONTENTS THIS MONTH

ON THE COVER

Revealing Hidden Artistic Talent:

The birth of a lifelong dream for the art teacher and artist Gabrielle Turnbull. Page 14

Adventurous Veteran Remembers:

John Russell has lived a full life, including serving in World War II and working in the Antarctic. Page 20

Q&A with Monica Shanahan:

The seven most common questions women ask about their skin. Page 28

How to Prevent Trouble with offLeash Dogs:

Walking your dog is meant to be a nice casual and calming experience. However, sometimes things can go wrong that are out of our hands. Page 34

Hanging Out With Puppies In Training:

It was an experience of a lifetime for Alita Huyton at a Guide Dogs Queensland puppy playdate. Page 36

OUR DISTRIBUTION

"A huge thank you to anyone who loves our little Heelers as much as we do."

Naomi Scutts, Out of the Blue , p12

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April 19, 2021

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Students Secure Coveted Positions at USC

Last month the Royal Australian Navy and the Australian Army mark 120 years of service to the country.

Two aspiring doctors from Moreton Bay are thrilled to have been accepted into USC’s Bachelor of Medical Science, among this year’s intake of just 20 students.

Minister for Defence Personnel Darren Chester congratulated the two Services on this significant milestone and acknowledged the almost two million Australians who had served throughout history, many of who were in the Navy or Army.

Leroy Christian of North Lakes and Connor Stewart of Redcliffe each earned an ATAR of 99.60 in their final year of high school to secure the coveted positions, and they are set to begin their studies on this week on USC’s Sunshine Coast campus. Leroy, who was 2020 Dux of Mueller College, said he knew from an early age that he wanted to study medicine, particularly hearing stories from his mother, Parul, who is a specialist doctor. “She would come home from work and tell me about the amazing and very real impact she was able to have on people’s lives and that made a profound impact on me,” Leroy said. Leroy said despite facing challenges caused by COVID-19 and being in the first Year 12 cohort in Queensland to use the ATAR grading scheme, he has remained highly motivated. “My motto is to keep your eyes on the prize and never look back. This idea of always putting your best foot forward and relentlessly pursuing your goals is something that my father Gary instilled in me from a very young age and is a principle that I continue to live by every day.”

Navy and Army Mark 120 Years

Leroy Christian (L) and Connor Stewart (R) starting their medical careers at USC. Photo courtesy of USC.

made this his number one goal, knowing that USC would soon have a campus at Moreton Bay where he could do some of his study while still balancing his extracurricular and social activities. “I am so grateful for the opportunity. Often, in such a competitive field like medicine, it can feel like you are stuck in the mud – struggling to the take that next step towards becoming a doctor. But now, knowing that I’ve made it into the program, I can rise and shine every day knowing that I am one step closer to realising my dreams.” Connor Stewart, a St Patrick’s College graduate, said he had heard great things about USC’s Medical Science program from a former schoolmate who is currently studying the degree.

When USC introduced its Medical Science degree in 2018, Leroy He decided at a young age that

medicine was the right path for him after experiencing surgery when he was in Year 6 and seeing other family members who had been helped by doctors. While he said completing Year 12 from home was difficult at first during COVID restrictions last year, Connor found that creating his own timetable allowed him to focus more on areas where he needed to work harder.

The Royal Australian Navy and Australian Army formed on 1 March 1901, through the amalgamation of the Australian colonial forces following Federation. At the time, they were known as the Commonwealth Naval Forces and Commonwealth Military Forces. Their current titles were officially granted in 1911 and 1980 respectively. This year also marks an important milestone for the Royal Australian Air Force, which will be celebrating its 100th birthday on 31 March 2021.

He plans to live at home with his parents, while studying and will eventually move to the Sunshine Coast and maintain his love of basketball, athletics, soccer and debating. “I would also love to travel and learn about how the medical systems work in other countries because it will be useful to get new perspectives on what I learn at university,” he said.

Chief of Army Lieutenant General Rick Burr AO, DSC, MVO, and Private Harrison Nguyen cut the Australian Army’s birthday cake. Photographer CPL Sagi Biderman

280,000 Business Still To Lodge TPAR The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has today confirmed more than 60,000 businesses haven’t yet complied with lodgment requirements under the Taxable payments reporting system (TPRS) for 2019-20. The TPRS is a black economy measure designed to assist the ATO identify contractors who don’t report or under-report their income.

ATO Assistant Commissioner Peter Holt explained that the Black Economy Taskforce estimated that the black economy is costing the community as much as $50 billion, which is approximately three percent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The ATO estimates that around 280,000 businesses need to lodge a Taxable payments annual report

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(TPAR) for 2019-20. Mr Holt also clarified that it’s not just businesses that pay contractors in the building and construction industry that need to lodge a TPAR. 2020 was the first year that businesses that pay contractors to provide road freight, information technology, security, investigation, or surveillance services may need to lodge a TPAR with the ATO. This is in addition to those businesses providing building and construction, cleaning, or courier services.

“As any good tradie will tell you, the spirit level is a critical tool to ensure construction work is being done on the level. I like to think of the TPRS as a bit of a spirit level for tax obligations. Our role is to make sure the “bubble” is centred

as much as possible to keep things on the level and fair for everyone”, Mr Holt said.

Businesses who have not yet lodged need to lodge as soon as possible, to avoid penalties as forms were due to be lodged by 28 August 2020 and are now well overdue. Mr Holt added that some businesses may not realise they need to lodge a TPAR but may be required to, depending on the percentage of payments received for deliveries or courier services. “Many restaurants, cafés, grocery stores, pharmacies and retailers have started paying contractors to deliver their goods to their customers. These businesses may not have previously needed

April 2021

to lodge a TPAR. However, if the total payments received for these deliveries or courier services are ten per cent or more of the total annual business income, you’ll need to lodge,” Mr Holt said. “We have welcomed the collaborative way the building and construction industry has continued to work with the ATO to ensure the success of the TPRS, through regular engagement with head contractors across the industry,” Mr Holt said. More information and resources like videos, fact sheets, and webcast recordings, and examples to help businesses and their advisers work out if they need to lodge, how to lodge, and what to report is available at ato. gov.au/TPAR.

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New Pedestrian and Cycle Bridge for O'Mara Road, Narangba

Increased Efforts to Target Drug Driving on Queensland Roads The Queensland Police Service launched Operation Tango Anaconda last month, a statewide enforcement operation targeting drug driving. Running from March 1 – June 30, the operation will focus on high visibility random drug testing aimed at deterring drug driving offences and preventing serious and fatal crashes that occur as a result. Acting Inspector Paul Algie said drugs were the cause of almost 10 per cent of road fatalities nation-wide, with the impairment significantly increasing the likelihood of a crash. “If you are driving with drugs in your system you are 10 times more likely to be responsible for a crash,” Acting Inspector Algie said.

Constructions of the O’Mara Road pedestrian and cycle bridge and shared pathway by Moreton Bay Regional Council is expected to be completed in April, weather permitting.

The pathway connection will also include:

The objective of the project is to provide a high quality active transport connection linking Yarle Court to the north and Cottontree Drive to the south.

Once completed, the bridge and pathway will fill a missing link within the O’Mara Road corridor pathway, provide a safer crossing of New Settlement Road and support the continuation of the O’Mara Road fauna movement corridor.

• •

• •

lighting to improve pedestrian safety; landscaping and tree planting; fauna movement infrastructure to allow animals to cross New Settlement Road more safely; fencing and anti-throw barriers; and design features to ensure an attractive facility which adds value to the area.

Due to the nature of works, residents' access and traffic flow may be affected.

Hours of work will generally be between 7am and 6pm, Monday to Friday, with the pedestrian bridge being constructed at night. Where possible, residents will be notified in advanced of any changes. "We encourage residents to observe the instructions of work crews and road signage, plan any travel accordingly, and apoloise for any inconvenience which may be experienced." said Division 11 Councillor Darren Grimwade. Should you require further information, contact Council's Project Officer, Scott McIntyre on 3205 0555 or via Council website www.mortonbay.qld.gov.au.

“We know all too well that these crashes have very serious consequences that can directly impact your life, and those around you.” He said all available officers across the state would take part in the operation. “The message we are sending is very clear – if you are under the influence of drugs, do not get behind the wheel,” he said. “If you are drug driving, you can expect to see us. “Road safety is your responsibility. Every decision you make when you’re behind the wheel counts.” Sadly in 2021, 43 lives have been lost on Queensland roads, an increase of 20 from 2020 (as of midnight February 25).

New Check In Qld App Making COVID-Safe Simpler A new, free, check-in app which makes it much easier for Queensland’s hospitality businesses and their customers to stay COVID safe rolled out statewide last month. Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the Check In Qld app has been extensively trialled over the last few weeks and has come out tops. “Having a safe and consistent check-in app has been a top priority, as we embrace the ‘new normal’ of a COVID safer environment,” Ms Palaszczuk said. Once people have used the Check In Qld app at one business, it remembers their details, saving them time in the future and providing easy on-going, check-in across all participating venues.

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The app is free, contactless, secure and convenient receiving a thumbs up from venue operators involved in the testing and trials.

check-in-qld. A starter kit, which includes display posters with a unique QR Code, will be provided upon registration.

Minister for Health and Ambulance Services Yvette D’Ath said the app had been endorsed by Queensland Health and would play a critical role in the state’s contact tracing efforts.

By using the Check In Qld app, businesses will not need to manually collect or manage the information. The data entered into each customer’s app will be stored securely by the Queensland Government when they check in and will help to ensure it is readily available to contact tracers if required.

“People can have confidence, knowing check in details will be stored securely by the Queensland Government for 30 to 56 days and will only be used if required for contact tracing purposes.” Ms D’Ath said. Businesses and venues statewide are now strongly encouraged to register to use the app online. https://www.covid19.qld.gov.au/

card scanners, online booking systems and a digital spreadsheet. For customers, it’s as simple as downloading the app from Google Play or Apple App Stores and entering their details once. At participating venues, customers can then ‘Check in Now’ by opening the app and using venue’s Check In Qld QR code.

It is not mandatory to use the Check In Qld app however all hospitality businesses must continue to collect and store contact details electronically. Other electronic methods include online fillable forms, membership

April 2021

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Improvements For Caboolture Road Corridor

Construction has commenced to further improve safety on a busy Caboolture road corridor.

Avenue and we're extending the right-turn lane to provide more space for turning vehicles.

The improvements started this month at the Morayfield Road and Esme Avenue intersection, and along Beerburrum Road between the King Street and McKean Street intersections.

"Work will also include changing the Morayfield Road northbound approach to King Street to a right-turn lane, through lane and shared through and left-lane configuration, for improved safety and traffic flow.”

State Member for Morayfield Mark Ryan said a range of safety treatments would be delivered under the $28.8 million Morayfield Road and Beerburrum Road Route Safety Project to benefit all road users. "We are targeting known and potential crash locations along this busy stretch by building safer, more efficient intersections," Mr Ryan said. "We're modifying the traffic lights to control right-turns from Morayfield Road into Esme

"We're also installing a double barrier line on Beerburrum Road between the Hasking Street and Bertha Street intersections to prevent right turns at property accesses, improving traffic flow and reducing the risk of crashes. “We will also resurface King Street from Matthew Terrace intersection to approximately 200 metres west of Beerburrum Road intersection. "A new dedicated, right-turn lane and two dedicated, through

lanes on Beerburrum Road, southbound at Bertha Street intersection, as well as a new U-turn facility, will deliver further safety and efficiency benefits for Caboolture motorists.” Mr Ryan said right turns on Beerburrum Road into James, Hasking and East streets, Matthew Terrace and Nursery Road would be removed, as well as the U-turn near Nursery Road.

"The right-turn lane on Beerburrum Road will be extended to increase capacity for motorists turning into McKean Street or performing a U-turn at McKean Street intersection,” he said.

of all road users, nearby businesses and residents during the works." Construction will be undertaken between 6pm and 6am, Monday night to Friday morning and is expected to take several months. Night works are necessary due to the high daily volumes of traffic on Beerburrum Road and Morayfield Road. Lane closures are required to carry out these important improvements and would cause significant congestion and lengthy delays if closed during the day.

"McKean Street intersection will also be upgraded to be fully signalised.

For all traffic alerts, road closures and condition updates for major roads in Queensland, visit QLDTraffic.qld.gov.au.

"We appreciate the understanding and cooperation

You can also download the QLDTraffic app or call 13 19 40.

Winners Are Grinners At Goldie Cup Nathan Goldstiver couldn’t wipe the smile from his face as he presented North Pine Football Club with the ‘Goldie Cup’ trophy for 2021.

two tenets are what define Nathan rather than the ravages of the motor neurone disease which has rendered him unable to speak or play his beloved football.

The event, in Nathan’s honour and badged under his nickname of ‘Goldie’, ran on February 27 at Na-rangba Eagles Football Club, coordinated by friend and fellow footballer Malcolm Van de Graaff.

On Saturday, surrounded by family and the football fraternity, Nathan enjoyed his game as a spectator sport. Goldie presided over the two supportive playing ‘tribes’, Narangba Eagles and North Pine football clubs, for which he has played, as they faced off over a series of highly contested matches on the day.

In its second year, the Goldie Cup is a convergence of community for family and football, and as Malcolm articulates, these are his mate Goldie’s two greatest loves. Malcolm is keen to explain these

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Event Coordinator, Malcolm states, “We couldn’t have asked for a better day with the weather and

community input, an attendance of over 600 including special guests and such spirited play. The focus wasn’t as much on money as a good time for Goldie”. Malcolm said $6500 was raised and paid credit to all contributors*, thanking both the Deputy Premier of Queensland, the Honourable Steven Miles MP and Mayor Peter Flannery, Moreton Bay Regional Council for their speeches. Shane King MP was also in attendance and, with Mark Ryan MP, the two dignitaries are often heard to say the “real winners are the football community”, which continues

April 2021

to be the palpable feeling of the annual Goldie Cup. The Goldie Cup game play involved a win by Narangba U18, North Pine Reserves and end of day speeches saw an awarding of a ‘Best on Ground’ medal before the announcement that the final match, which came down to the wire, saw North Pine Football Club take out the coveted Goldie Cup, 2021. Above: Nathan ‘Goldie’ Goldstiver

with the North Pine Football Club winning team of the Goldie Cup 2021. Photo by MMM Sports Photography

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New Grants Platform Businesses, community groups and sporting clubs need never miss a grant opportunity again thanks to Moreton Bay Regional Council’s new Funding Finder platform. The new platform brings a range of local and national grants to one central location, helping individuals and groups quickly search and identify relevant funding opportunities. Mayor Peter Flannery said the new platform will be easier for people to use compared to the individual websites. “The Moreton Bay Region Funding Finder will take the guess work out for searching for grants that are often presented over multiple websites - now you Can see them all in just one click,” Mayor Flannery said. “Better yet, individuals can set up alerts to avoid missing deadlines and customise search criteria to ensure you’re across all the opportunities available. “There are also great tips and resources for understanding grants, preparing applications and managing your funding. “Many people don’t know where to start looking, which is why we decided to join forces with the Grant Guru platform to create this one-stop-shop resource.” To register for Moreton Bay Region Funding Finder, visit https://moretonbay.grantguru. com.au/

Helping Veterans Into Jobs Australian military veterans face difficulties adjusting to civilian workplaces even when they don’t have physical or psychological support needs, according to new research led by USC in conjunction with UNSW Canberra at the Australian Defence Force Academy. USC Professor Karen Becker (pictured) said the study, which analysed the experiences of 31 Australian Defence Force veterans who had gained civilian employment, found that a range of issues were impacting this work transition for both employees and employers. She said that even though the study involved a wide range of veterans, the similarities in experiences were surprising. “For many, Defence was their first job out of school and they knew no other workplace, so going into a civilian workplace was a culture shock,” she said. “For some, it was simple things like not immediately knowing colleagues’ roles without uniforms, learning to be informal in their interactions, struggling to explain in job interviews how their military skills

translate into specific roles, and understanding different group and individual dynamics.” The results have been released in a report called ‘Making the Move’ authored by Professor Becker, Head of USC Moreton Bay; UNSW Canberra’s Dr Matthew McCormack, a former Royal Australian Navy logistician; USC Human Resource Management academic Dr Dan Abell and USC researcher Michelle Smidt. Professor Becker said the findings led researchers to multiple recommendations on how to improve the transition, to benefit not only veterans and their families, but also business owners and recruitment managers seeking highly skilled staff. “There were people who had commanded groups of a hundred individuals in very stressful environments, yet their skills were undervalued or unrecognised in civilian jobs,” she said. “Some straightforward steps could help veterans find and retain rewarding work, and help businesses and organisations tap into and capitalise on this source of talent.

“For example, employers could ensure there is senior management support, provide ongoing support mechanisms such as mentors, and share the value of veterans as a talent source.” Professor Becker, a human resources management researcher, said the study was particularly relevant to South East Queensland. “We’re close to Enoggera Barracks and we know many veterans choose to live in this region when they exit the military, so they’re now contributing to our communities,” she said.

Council's 2011 Flood Response Wins Top Award

A flood of praise has inundated Pine Rivers Park, after Moreton Bay Regional Council claimed gold at the Stormwater Queensland Excellence Awards 2020 for Excellence in Infrastructure.

Mayor Peter Flannery said Council’s hard work to stabilise the banks of the South Pine River in the wake of the devastating 2011 floods and revegetate the riparian zone was deserving of this accolade. “The environmental rejuvenation we’ve achieved over the last 18 months has surpassed even our greatest aspirations,” he said. “The 2011 floods that ravaged SEQ totally destroyed a 340-metre stretch of the South Pine River, collapsing the riverbank and destroying the ecosystem around it. “But a combination of clever engineering and strategic replantings completed in June 2019 has restored the area to a condition that’s better than

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before the floods. In fact, new mangroves germinating in the lower regions of the restored bank have already taken root. “I hope this award-winning riverbank stabilisation project will become a template for other Councils in the wake of future flood damage to sensitive river banks.

“This stretch of river is a vital part of the natural ecosystem as well as one of Strathpine’s most used public spaces, so it’s a win-win outcome.

“Not to mention great news for the incredible array of community events Pine Rivers Park plays host to throughout the year, including Kids Fest and Park Vibes.

“We’ve already seen vegetation returning to the riverbanks and wildlife returning to the area, which is fantastic for birds, fish and other wildlife that call the South Pine River area home.

Council worked with Alluvium Consulting to implement the innovative soft engineering solution to restore and stabilise the collapsed riverbank.

April 2021

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FEATURE

Naomi Scutts: Out Of The Blue Words: Sheree Hoddinett

N

aomi Scutts (pictured) is one of the Bluey animators that gets to bring everybody’s favourite characters to life and lighting up the screen in homes across Australia and overseas. She tells us how she joined the Bluey team, why she chose a career in animation and offers a little advice for those hoping to head down the animation path. As an artist and entertainer at heart, Naomi never envisioned that the combination would eventually lead to a career in animation. Now in her fourth year in the industry, she's still surprised about where her chosen career path has taken her. "I was very lucky to have found the right opportunities," she says. "I applied for an animation degree at university, so I had something else to focus on while finding other work, and I ended up loving both the craft and the friends I made along the way. It's been a healthy mix of hard work, networking and luck to now be in the industry, and it could easily have never happened." Having the opportunity to tell stories and leave a lasting impression on the audience keeps Naomi motivated and propels her love of working in animation. Even contributing to such a big team (about 60 people) hasn't impacted her creativity. In fact, Naomi believes it helps strengthen it. "Any time a kid laughs at something I've animated in Bluey, that's a very good day. I feel like a wizard," she says. "We're all very passionate people, thankful for an opportunity to make a lasting impression with our work, and it seems like it shows!"

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Words: Sheree Hoddinett

When Bluey first premiered on ABC Kids in October 2018, no one knew it would become the successful show it is today, let alone the creative team behind the scenes. Naomi says up until the show's release, it felt like being back at university, "working amongst like-minded people on a cool project that maybe a handful of people would see someday". She describes the audience response as mind-blowing, and a moment she'll remember for the rest of her life. So how did Naomi get the opportunity to become a part of the Bluey crew? "I was fresh out of Uni before Bluey. I'd recently moved out of home to start at my first industry internship, only for the project to fall through unexpectedly," she says. "Suddenly without work, I was weighing up all my options when I saw a listing looking for animators on a web series, followed by a children's series. "I had nothing to lose at that point, so I sent them a showreel of my Uni work, and by the next business day, I was working for Joe (Brumm – creator and writer). I worked closely under him on a series for a big website, Collegehumor, and that served as a training ground for when it was time to start Bluey." Although proud to be a part of the Bluey team and over the moon about the show's success, Naomi admits she's not one to brag about working on the show, except for the occasional and necessary remark around her friends. "I generally don't tell people myself, as I love being able to just observe from afar and remain anonymous," she says. "My family and friends are much less shy and love to tell me how much street cred they get for knowing a Bluey animator. In saying that, though, I'm the complete opposite around my friends; I'll obnoxiously point at scenes and say I animated that!"

April 2021

Working on a show that is now two seasons deep (104 episodes in total), Naomi already has her favourite episodes and even the animation of one character that stands out above the rest. She says in particular, animating young characters is a "really fun type of performance acting". "I have a few favourite episodes, but Bumpy and the Wise Old Wolfhound (season 1) encapsulates both the humour and the heart of the series well, I feel. It tends to be the episode I show people first," she says. "My favourite character to animate has to be Cousin Muffin, hands down. Her brashness and excitability make her a very liberating character to animate - I enjoy getting to be a little bit crazy with Muffin. "Kids and their idiosyncrasies are really endearing, and I get immense joy out of immortalising memories from my own and other people's childhoods into these characters." The Bluey studio is a hustling and bustling hive of activity. While each day can bring new and exciting developments and story ideas, overall, there is a typical/normal day aspect to the show, as Naomi explains. "Working in animation is very team-based. Every episode has been animated by a team of roughly 5 character animators over the course of a month," she says. "Our lead animator will have divided up all the scenes/shots within the episode amongst the team, and we get a briefing from the directors on what we want each scene to look and feel like before we get to work. "While we are animating, we'll often bounce ideas off each other and study several points of reference to try and get the animation feeling as authentic as possible. This means several

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If you aren’t familiar with the children’s television show Bluey, you either don’t have young children or it’s possible you have been living under a rock…for real life! Bandit, Chilli, Bingo and of course Bluey, are the lovable and very relatable Heeler family, that form the core characters in the Brisbane-based animated series. With two successful seasons already under their belts, the team are hard at work on the third season with audiences waiting to see what antics the Heelers, along with their family and friends, will get up to next.

people throughout the day may get up from their chair and act out something really silly, and that's just totally normal. It's a fun process." Outside of the Bluey studio, Naomi is a self-confessed video game nerd. Still, she also loves to draw and has plans to open her own online store showcasing her personal art. Although she knows the importance of separating work life and home life, sometimes it can be easier said than done.

"Honestly, just a huge thank you to anyone who loves our little Heelers as much as we do," she says. "It's a tremendous honour to be able to bring Bluey to such a huge audience, and we wouldn't have made it this far without your love and support."

"It's a known issue for people in the creative industry to have a hard time separating work from home, so I make it a priority to treat it like any other job and set those boundaries early," she says. "But every so often, an episode will come that gives me a good case of "Tetris effect", or I'll see my younger family members do something adorable or hilarious and keep a mental note to use it later on." For those youngsters looking to head down the path of animation one day, Naomi warns, it's not as easy as you might think and will require a bit of hard work to get there. Her initial advice is, "you just have to give it a go!" but to be prepared and not expect a successful career straight away or you'll likely be disappointed. "Animation is a small but high demand industry, and you may find you're doing everything right and still not have luck," she says. "Build up a portfolio and keep it on hand for when opportunities strike, but don't forget your roots: you're doing it because you love animation." After detailing how much she loves her craft, Naomi couldn't miss the opportunity to give a nod to the real influence behind the show that has become a favourite for many kids (and their parents too!).

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Revealing Hidden Artistic Talent Words: Richard Lancaster

A phone call in 1998 from an art teacher friend asking whether she would teach art to two children at her home presented a dilemma for the mother of three young children. But after consideration and buoyed by her love of teaching and art, she agreed. So began what ultimately became the birth of a lifelong dream for the art teacher and artist Gabrielle Turnbull (pictured below). Today, some 23 years later, Gabrielle has her own successful Art So Lively Arts Academy with a complement of nearly 70 adult and schoolage students attending regular art classes. Her journey to Arts Academy Director covers a period of some 42 years, which commenced in 1979 with Gabrielle gaining a Diploma in Teaching from the Kelvin Grove CAE. During her time there, she won an art prize as an outstanding student. Before this, at age thirteen, she had already shown her artistic talent by winning a Children’s $100 art prize given at the Lutwyche Shopping Centre opening. Gabrielle commenced her teaching career in Townsville and continued it in North Brisbane. She taught at several schools, including those

teaching children with special needs whilst raising three children of her own. She also became part of the local arts scene, where she won several awards. After a decade and a half, the family left Redcliffe and moved to a property near Kingaroy. ”We wanted a `tree change`.” remembers Gabrielle. Here, she taught at country schools, some of which involved teaching special needs children. She also threw herself into her dormant arts career, and very soon, stunning results began to bear fruit. She entered both state and national art competitions, listed as a finalist in no less than a dozen national art competitions. Her outpouring of artwork was impressive. In a decade long period from 2000, she staged five solo exhibitions and entered another dozen group exhibitions around Australia. All of this was building towards her ultimate goal of developing and owning her own Arts Academy. In November 2013, having moved back to Redcliffe, Gabrielle opened an Arts Academy in the Jetty Arcade in the Redcliffe CBD.

“I started with four students, and in those early months, I wondered whether my dream would succeed!” she remembers. But her perseverance paid off as her academy’s reputation as an Arts School of Excellence grew. Gabrielle’s success as an art teacher is two-fold. Her extensive understanding of art equips her to be able to impart the knowledge that the subject requires. She can also communicate effectively with both young and mature students, making her lessons attractive to participants. Her early days working in `special` schools have also given her a deep understanding of students with ‘special’ needs. “Over our seven-year history, we have had adults and children with a variety of disabilities,” said Gabrielle. “Once they are in class, I encourage the student to forget their disability, and they are soon engrossed in exercising their chance for self-expression.” “We also have a strict rule that everyone must observe, and that is to be kind to one another. I have found that children with disabilities often have hidden artistic talent, which can surprise their parents. Many of my students have won awards, including a young girl with hearing disabilities.” Gabrielle relates the story of a young teenager who had not spoken in several years because of trauma. Her desperate parents asked whether she could join an art class. Over a period of months, she communicated with Gabrielle via her notebook and showed outstanding promise as an artist. She has subsequently entered the South Brisbane TAFE, where she is studying art. “I love my job because I am the key that unlocks the hidden talent in all of my students, and that’s very satisfying,” Gabrielle says. To find out more about Gabrielle’s Art So Lively Arts Academy in Redcliffe, phone 0477 002545 or email gabriellekeim50’s@gmail.com.

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April 2021

Feature


www.featuremagazine.com.au

15


A glimpse into local sporting history Words: Sheree Hoddinett

Derek Stringfellow is a name synonymous with sport in the Caboolture area. If it wasn’t for him and his engineering background, some of the sporting fields you know and love today might not have come in to play. Derek was chief engineer with the Caboolture Shire Council and President of the Caboolture Sports Centre Committee (an entire community body formed in 1968 with no council funding), created to set up the Caboolture Sports Centre located on the grounds of Centenary Lakes. It’s no surprise then that sport and competition run through his own veins with Derek invested in golf, bowls, and bridge. It’s an amazing achievement for someone who is 92-yearsold and still a very active member of the community. Originally hailing from across the ditch (born in Christchurch, New Zealand), Derek always had plans to be a farmer when he grew up. But his plans deviated, and he found himself in the engineering line of work. He came to Australia in 1951, where he worked in Far North Queensland before time and circumstances (namely his very loving wife Eunice) brought him back to the South East Queensland area. He eventually settled in Caboolture, where he took on the role of shire engineer in 1964.

As well as his contribution to the sports centre, Derek was involved in other voluntary projects, including: • • • •

• •

building and grassing the original tees and greens at Caboolture Golf Club, proposing, raising funds and supervising the construction of the 3.3km Rotary Walk, design and supervision of construction of Caboolture Lakes lawn bowls complex, President of the Save a Heart committee formed in 1988 to raise funds to purchase a defibrillator. By October 1990, with over $10,000 raised, a defibrillator was bought and donated to Caboolture QATB, purchase and construction of Caboolture Bridge Club’s initial clubhouse, and design and supervision of construction of the Rotary sponsored working bee project of a concrete block amenities building for The Burpengary Riding for Disabled.

“Caboolture was a rural town, and having originally come from a rural town, I quite liked it,” he says. “I had applied for the shire engineer position, and I got it. I suppose every community needs an engineer.

Fast forward to his retirement, and Derek found a new focus, an opportunity to share an activity with his wife, Eunice.

“When I first came here, the Caboolture Shire had a population of just 5000, and when I retired in 1988, it had a population of around 250,000. You realise you’re getting old when you note that the water treatment plant, sewerage treatment plant and weirs on Caboolture River and Wararba Creek you supervised the construction of have been demolished or are no longer used.”

“My wife was the bridge player, and when I was nearing retirement, I said to her if she would like to play golf and bowls as I did, then I’ll play bridge, and we’ll have things to do together,” Derek says. “She tried golf but just couldn’t handle it. So I still played golf and bowls, and we forged quite a good bridge partnership. We won the club championships a number of times.”

In 1966 the War Veterans closed their dairy farm and their daytime cow paddock. This area, stretching from the north side of the now existing Elliott Street to the Caboolture River and from Riverview St east to near the existing two lakes west of Morayfield Road, was sold for development. When the development plan was lodged, Derek recommended that the council purchase an area for a future botanic garden. Caboolture’s only sports ground in the 1960s was the showgrounds. When the rugby and cricket club presidents approached Derek to have horses banned from the showground, he realised that Caboolture needed a sports centre more than a botanic garden.

In no real surprise, Derek has been with the Caboolture Bridge Club since the very beginning and has been instrumental in helping the club stay strong for many years. Although he regards himself as just a “member of the bridge club”, it’s a game he has mastered and learnt a lot from over the years.

Derek drew up a plan showing how different sports fields could be developed. As there was no council money to develop a sports centre, Derek called a public meeting to assess support. He was then elected President of the committee created to raise funds and build the proposed sports centre. This committee raised the money and formed working bees to create each of the fields one by one. “Virtually every sport played in Caboolture, except golf and lawn bowls, started on a field provided by the committee, and as the clubs outgrew the site, they were transferred to other suitable sites,” Derek says. “The development of the sports centre right from initial earthworks was a ten-year community project involving many people and thousands of hours of working bee effort.”

16

“Even though there is a lot of work in doing these things, you get quite a thrill in seeing people use it once it is complete.”

Along with bridge, Derek is also a member of the Caboolture Golf Club, where he manages to fit in a round on Wednesdays and sometimes on the weekend if he gets the chance. “In my younger days, I was more of a keen golfer,” he says. “When I was committed to the sports centre, I was doing working bees on the weekends, so that cut into golfing time. Unfortunately, I had to give it away for about 13 years with back spasms, and that’s when I took up bowls. So when I made my way back to the green, my game wasn’t quite what it used to be.” When he isn’t heavily involved in a sport of some kind, Derek also likes to spend some time with his family. He and Eunice had five children – a girl and four boys, which resulted in a big family now consisting of 17 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. “I’ve got no regrets,” Derek says of his big achievements. In recognition of Derek and Eunice’s contribution to the Caboolture Bridge Club, in 2018 The Stringfellow Teams Competition was established in their honour. It has become an annual event, held at the Caboolture Bridge Club, where teams from Caboolture and other clubs compete for the title. Bridge sessions are held Monday, Tuesday and Saturday afternoons at the Caboolture Bridge Club located at 10 Short Street Caboolture. For further information about the club itself, joining or taking lessons please phone (07) 5432 4468 or email caboolturebridge@bigpond.com.

“I think it’s the card game that requires the most thought and has the greatest difficulty. I enjoy trying to solve problems and get a system going,” he says. “Eun and I had a system. We understood what each was trying to tell the other they had in their hand by bids having a specific meaning. It’s definitely a game of strategy. If you go to any bridge club you will be taught a system. Whether you stay with that system or not depends on how you develop your game.” Although Eunice passed away a few years ago, Derek still makes his way to bridge 2 to 3 times a week. He enjoys the opportunity to interact with others in the community. “I find it an interesting game, and it gives me a social outlet too,” he says. “Even during the peak of Covid last year, we still managed to keep things going by playing online. “I’ve met a lot of different people. It’s quite surprising who you meet.”

April 2021

Feature


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17


Feature Magazine Available Weekly!

Filler media release - Katy sourcing Words: Krystall Murray

Publishers of the free, monthly community magazine – Feature – released their weekly e-bulletin last month due to popular demand. FeatureWeekly has been designed to complement its sister publication, Feature Magazine, by providing timely articles, community information and a budget advertising option for businesses, clubs and schools. ‘Our readers have been asking for Feature Magazine to be produced weekly for some time, and we are excited to once again fulfil their requests,” said Owner and Editor Darren More. Founded in 2014 under the pilot title of The Narangba Voice, the team of local creatives have worked to constantly meet community requests whilst maintaining affordable advertising opportunities. This has seen the magazine undertake several mastheads, including Our Narangba, Our Narangba & Burpengary and Our Kallangur, before adopting Feature.

For those who love the print magazine, there is no need to fear. The much-loved monthly print magazine will continue to be produced as per usual, with the FeatureWeekly e-bulletin only made available to subscribers. “We hate getting spam emails, so a link to FeatureWeekly is only sent out on Fridays and to those who have subscribed to receive a copy. Naturally, readers can unsubscribe at any time and just as with Feature Magazine, there is no cost involved to receive or read the e-bulletin.” What is next for the Feature Magazine team? Darren says that it all depends on the community.

“Feature is the best masthead for our magazine as it is exactly what we do – we feature all the good things in our community.” Said Darren.

“We have adapted over the years to provide what the community wants. Our entire team consists of those living in the same suburbs we cover. Some of our team are high school students. Others are grandparents, parents, or business professionals. Each brings with them a new view which, combined with the feedback from our readers, causes our magazine to evolve in ways we would never have dreamed of.”

Reminiscing about the early days of the magazine startup when the team only focused on Narangba, Darren recounted the many suburbs which have reached out over the years, asking him to expand the publication to include positive and inspiring stories from their area.

“Then there are our advertisers. We are 100% reliant on their support. We thank them for helping us grow not only in the number of suburbs we cover but also in the number of print copies we can produce. Without them, the Feature Magazine team would not exist.“

‘I thought we might have run out of stories by now,” he laughed. “Yet they keep coming. Our content team are always amazed by the people they interview and where the magazine takes them. However, the need for a weekly publication has been made evident by the endless requests from both readers and advertisers alike. With our workload already full, the question has been: how can we deliver a quality weekly publication without reducing the standard of our monthly print magazine?”

“If you had asked me, only six months ago, if we would ever go weekly or produce an e-publication, I would have replied with a definite: No! Yet here we are. Exploring new territory and I encourage the community to jump on board and support our work by subscribing to receive FeatureWeekly each Friday.”

After much brainstorming, the team created a new system that enabled a quality weekly e-publication – FeatureWeekly.

If you would like to subscribe to receive a link to FeatureWeekly each Friday, without cost, simply click on the Subscribe option via www.featuremagazine.com.au or email Darren via editor@featuremagazine.com.au and ask to be added to the subscription list.

“FeatureWeekly is extremely exciting for all of us. Not only does it contain all the timely information which we are unable to print in the monthly print magazine, but it also provides a free media forum for the community to publish their events, announcements and media releases,” said Darren.

With the content team now producing two publications, they are keen to hear inspiring and motivating stories from clubs, schools and residents so both Feature Magazine and FeatureWeekly can continue to upbuild the community. If you have a story idea, you can email it directly to Darren via editor@ featuremagazine.com.au.

“We are also excited to provide a publication that answers the plea for economical advertising from those who have a microadvertising budget. Through FeatureWeekly, we can provide advertising ranging from $3 a week for a directory sized advertisement to $94 a week for a two-page spread. It simply doesn’t get much better than this in the advertising world.”

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Both Feature Magazine and FeatureWeekly are produced in Narangba and are currently available in Caboolture, Morayfield, Narangba, Burpengary, Deception Bay, North Lakes, Mango Hill, Kallangur and online via www.featuremagazine.com.au.

April 2021

Feature


Adventurous Veteran

Words: Sheree Hoddinett Photos: Craig Rohse

Tucked away in a quiet part of our region, you'll find a piece of Australian history in the form of John Russell. Happily settled in Deception Bay, the 100-year-old (not that he looks it!) is not only a war veteran and an Order of Australia medal recipient but also an integral part of a ten-man team that established Australia's Mawson Station in the Antarctic. John published a memoir at the age of 99, and his memory is well and truly intact. Although his stories tend to intertwine and runoff in different directions, John remembers all the details as though it happened yesterday. It's hard to imagine what a person can achieve in 100 years. Still, John is undoubtedly a testament to the idea you can do anything and everything you set your mind to. Born in the UK on June 18, 1920, John moved to Australia at the age of 18 with hopes and dreams of joining an Antarctic Expedition as an engineer, but the war had other plans. Seeing it as his "duty", John enlisted and became a driving instructor, but things didn't quite go the way he thought they would. "I had Typhoid Fever and then a ruptured gangrenous appendix where I had to be flown by the Royal Flying Doctor Service to Alice Springs," he says. "I was in the hospital for 6 weeks where I was looked after royally, but eventually I was back in Sydney where they declared me medically unfit, and I was discharged." During World War II, John was part of the Darwin Overland Mobile Force (DOMF). It is a time he remembers as being a lot of hard and gruelling work.

waiting to take troops to the Suez. He was recruited as the current crew were needing to take leave. His travels took him to several places around the world before John returned to Australia.

was a life they grew accustomed to, and in 1958 John was requested to assist the American Antarctic Division on Ross Island. It was to be his last trip with the promise of a television for his wife, who agreed to let him go.

But his intention to become part of an Antarctic expedition was still there. John knew there were plans to establish an Australian Antarctic base. He even interviewed for a role but had to wait for the timing and funding to fall into place. While he was working as a senior technical officer in New Guinea, John finally got the long-awaited telegram advising he had formally been appointed the Australian Antarctic Division's engineer and was to return to Melbourne immediately.

John settled back into life in Australia again with his young family. He never did return to work in the Antarctic but fondly remembers his time, especially the extremely cold climate.

"We had to start assembling equipment for Antarctic research bases," John says. "The first trip was to Macquarie Island, there was a team of about 10 or 12 of us, and I was the engineer. "All up, I spent probably close to 5 years in the Antarctic, between Macquarie Island, Heard Island, and also being involved in the establishment of Mawson Station (in 1954)." John's initial interest in the Antarctic was sparked when he was just a schoolboy after seeing Ernest Shackleton's expedition's slideshow. "It showed so much of the expedition and told a story," John says. "I got very deeply interested in this, watching the photos of the Antarctic, all this clean white snow, no flies, no mozzies, no people, no animals except for the Summer months where they come to the shore for breeding."

"DOMF was 2nd AIF, urgently formed and assembled in Cowra (New South Wales) in a bid to help protect Australia from the Japanese," John says. "DOMF pushed and chopped through jungle as no roads or rail existed beyond Alice Springs in 1941."

After writing to Lady Shackleton and securing an afternoon tea with her at his father's encouragement, John's interest in one day visiting Antarctica continued to grow. This burning ambition triggered his interest in studying engineering, and his dream grew from there.

After he was declared medically unfit and discharged, it seems John wasn't quite finished with assisting others, and in a matter of weeks, he was on board the Aquitania – a British ship

While he was continuing his work as an engineer in the Antarctic, John's wife Joan (married in December 1953) and their young daughter Susan were at home in Australia. It

In uniform for the 2nd AIF.

Working on a tractor in Antarctica.

"Going from Melbourne to the Antarctic, you travel gradually, and during that gradual travel, you get used to the cold as you go. It's quite easy," he says. "The big problem with the Antarctic itself is actually the wind, and the fact is it doesn't snow that much. The average precipitation is about 2 inches per year. It's been building up for donkey's years." Nowadays, John lives a bit more of a quieter life near the water in Deception Bay with his daughter Susan as his full-time carer. He has a loving family life with 6 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren, who are all very proud of what he has achieved. He still loves to read, particularly history, and it's no surprise that there is a book out there about his time in the Antarctic. Titled Antarctic Engineer: Memoir of John Russell, the book was put together with Dale Lorna Jacobsen and published at the ripe old age of 99. "I didn't write it as a book," he says. "We used to have logbooks, and being away for a year or so at a time, I kept a bit of a personal book/diary as well. That's what my book is based on. It all came about because of Susan." "I have heard his stories many, many times," Susan says. "There are so many details, and he remembers all of it. His memory is still very much there." To reach 100 (soon to be 101) is something John is both "amazed and astonished by" given everything he experienced during the war. As we approach Anzac Day, John says, to him as a veteran, it's important to mark the day by "getting together with others and remembering".

John served in WWII.


Remembers "

I got very deeply interested in this, watching the photos of the Antarctic, all this clean white snow, no flies, no mozzies, no people…

"


OPINION

The World According to Kate report that hoon drivers causing the worst havoc on the roads is a myth. ‘Hoon drivers massively increase their risk of a crash, but the bottom line is not many people do that,” says Prof Holman. ‘Whereas you have many drivers going over the limit, which even by 5km/h doubles the risk of a crash.”

Bad Drivers Complaints about bad drivers are probably the third most common topic of every conversation I have, right after poor phone service and dog poo. It seems to me that there is an ever-growing presence of ‘hoons’ and ‘petrolheads’ in our suburbs who, when you speak to them, have a long list of complaints against ‘normal drivers’ and a great sense of pride in their ‘abilities behind the wheel’. As a mother of a 16-year-old whose anxiety and fear of driving dangers results in her refusal to learn how to drive, I cannot help but wonder if overconfident and cocky drivers – with or without a licence – are the cause of sensible drivers no longer hitting the wideopen road. ‘Petrolheads’ complain of atrocious driving displayed by ‘normal’ drivers including being

22

distracted, not giving way or giving way unnecessarily, middle lane hogging, driving at inconsistent speeds and excessive braking. All of which we must agree can, and have, caused fatalities on our roads. However, illegal drag racing, burnouts, speeding and other reckless road behaviour by those who believe ‘they have control’ of the wheel not only pose a road safety risk it affects all members of the public, not just other drivers. Drivers losing their ‘control of the wheel’ ploughing through fences, garages, home windows, damaging gardens and even worse, taking lives. Despite the illegal activity and zero-tolerance of the community for hooning, Professor D’Arcy Holman of the Road Safety Council of WA stated in a recent The West Australian

April 2021

In 2014, Sunshine Coast Daily reported RACQ Executive Manager for Technical and Safety Policy Mr Steve Spalding as saying: “High-level speeding has much more severe road safety implications than the largely amenity-based concerns about hooning offences such as burnouts.” As I strive to teach my teen how to drive safely, and confidently, on the roads – reminding her that accidents can, and will, happen – I personally struggle to understand why our leading experts see hooning and ‘normal’ matters such as drink driving and speeding as mutually exclusive. Tell me, what do you get when a hoon (regardless of experience) drink drives and/ or speeds on the roads? Or worse, in our suburban estates where our children walk along council footpaths because we told them to get off the games and out of the house? Whether you consider yourself a ‘petrolhead’, ‘hoon’ or ‘safe’ driver, please continue to check you are driving safely regardless of how confident you feel on the road. Our future generations depend on this.

Feature


Critically Speaking THE SKY IS NOT THE LIMIT.

H

uman kind’s thirst to conquer the Richard Lancaster unknown knows no Cryptic Critic bounds. Ever since we emerged from caves, the thirst to know what was over that hill has spurred us onto unlimited adventures of discovery throughout history. When Apollo 11 landed on the Moon on July 11 1969, and Neil Armstrong stepped onto the Moon’s surface and uttered his now-famous words, “One small step for man and one giant step for mankind”, he opened a pandora’s box of opportunity for space travel to the Moon. Since then 24 astronauts have made the trip to the Moon and of those 12 from the United States have walked on its surface. In all, seven other nations, Russia, Japan, the European Space Agency, China, India, Luxembourg, and Israel have all sent missions to the Moon. There are five United States flags and one of China’s on the Moon. Always looking to `turn a buck` out of any successful exploration, we humans are now looking to space tourism to satisfy our need to make money. Commercial flights can be booked to the Moon via Richard Branston’s Virgin Galactic and Blue Origin’s Jeff Bezos among others. Trips are scheduled for take-off from 2023, with tickets being snapped up at around US$250 million each. And you can get a bed overnight on the Moon, at NASA’s Space Station, for a

mere US$35000. However, there are `cheapie flights` available. Space Adventures is offering seats at US$150 million. But that consists of a Circumlunar flyby only. But with nearly every `man and his dog` having successfully sent at least one mission to the Moon, countries now turned their telescopic gazes towards other fields to conquer and Mars, the red planet, has become the next on the list. From 1962, when the Soviet Union sent its first mission to Mars, there have been 49 space missions to Mars, many failing before becoming skyward. Last month, the United Arab Emirates and China joined the elite club of the United States, Russia, the European Space Agency and India as having successfully mounted a space mission to Mars. Yes, you have guessed it. Space Tourism is a goer for Mars.

WRITE TO US! Email: editor@featuremagazine.com.au Post: PO Box 105, Narangba Q 4504 CONDITIONS: Please email a maximum of 150 words to editor@featuremagazine.com.au. Letters are published at the absolute discretion of the Editor. Feature Magazine has the right to reproduce letters submitted and accepted by the editor in print and electronic form. Letters may also be edited to fit. The views expressed are not the views of the publisher. No responsibility is taken for the views expressed in these letters. All letters to include a full name (first name and surname) and contact phone number (your contact number is not for publication).

Elon Musk has said his Starship will be ready to take passengers on an unpiloted 106 million kilometre, 7 month trip to the red planet next year. A crewed trip is to follow in 2024. Will we humans, not content at having desecrated Planet Earth, inevitably export all of the problems we have created over the centuries of habitation on this planet. Over 130 nations signed a treaty binding them to agree that no one nation will ever own the Moon. As history will show us, treaties are made to be broken!

www.featuremagazine.com.au

23


FAMILY

with Wendy Laimant

A MUM’S VOICE NO ALCOHOL FOR 30 DAYS

The Scoop Mum’s Challenge: ‘’I feel challenged being a person who has multiple roles. Having different hats for each part of the day. The cook, the cleaner, the mum, the wife, the friend, the carer, the teacher and the worker. All whilst wondering if you are doing it right and struggling to find time for myself.’’ - Alicia, Narangba. Best Hack: ‘’My girls can make dinner time very lengthy. It’s not always easy to get them to eat specific vegetables in a timely manner. I have found that calling different aliments different names can make it fun and familiar for them. Brussel sprouts have been renamed flowers and broccoli, little trees. It seems to work for us, and it keeps them smiling.’’

During my 35 years’ experience as a person, I believe that most people try to do well for themselves and others. What is more, we all appreciate relaxing at the end of the week or the day- or both. Regardless of our culture, work ethic, values or beliefs, we all have a way to reward ourselves for our efforts because we deserve it. For me, it typically was a fat glass of wine, kids fed and entertained. What’s wrong with that? It felt good and didn’t harm anyone. I would reason that it was my money. I worked for it, so I earned to decide how to spend it. Then as I poured another glass, I would justify it. ‘It’s Friday, and I worked really hard this week!’ or ‘This Thursday has been particularly ‘challenging’, and that was how it went. This was my normality. Sounds familiar? The initial reason behind my dry month came from trips to the doctors from inexplicable physical

symptoms. After some self-questioning, I realised that the symptoms all seemed to link back to my alcohol intake. Now, we all have our own sets of beliefs, values, reasoning and strategies. We deal with things the way it feels right to us. Or the way we think it is right. Would you agree? But what if one day, we realised what felt right and what we thought was right was actually wrong for us… Is there a better way? There I was, questioning myself and an old habit of mine. According to health professionals (which I am not), each person experiences a dry month differently. It can vary significantly based on how much alcohol they usually consume, how it is enjoyed, and a person’s level of self-control. Stopping alcohol for a defined period will act as a detox on the body, giving it a chance to recover, heal. But it’s not all that can happen. For myself,

the mental clarity and wave of motivation have been the highlight by far. Which lead me to make better decisions. Emotionally I found myself being able to handle my feelings more rationally. How often do we use alcohol as comfort? A Distraction or a Self-esteem boost. A way to socialise, connect, relax. But is the feeling real, and is the habit really supporting us? During these 30 days without alcohol, I gained focus and clarity. I started exercising regularly and joined a social group to develop a personal hobby. I faced some truth I was hiding from. And I started thinking…. What if I made it 2 months? Did you know that the Australian guidelines recommend that healthy men and women not consume more than 10 standard drinks a week and 4 standard drinks in a day?

Lila and Atarley’s Cheesy Puff Scrolls. Here is a quick afternoon snack that gets the kids involved.

Lila and Atarley

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- Carla, North Lakes. A place to visit with the kids: Now that the weather is cooling down let us tell you about a great adventure playground in Upper Caboolture. Bunya adventure playground. This remarkable place will challenge, amuse and entertain your kids! The racing slides and the aluminium climbing waves are loved by many brave explorers. The top playground is catering for the younger tribe to play under the large shade cloths. Be bold and check it out! Worm prevention: The school holidays are the perfect time to treat the whole family for threadworms. Threadworms are highly contagious as they can stay alive on skins, surfaces and objects for weeks. The symptoms are usually an itchy bottom, trouble sleeping and irritability. The family needs to be treated with over-thecounter medicine. The bedsheets, any surfaces and objects that may have become infested with eggs need to be washed thoroughly.

You will need: • • • •

3 large squares of frozen puff pastry; 1 cup of cheese; Olive oil; Seasoning.

• • • • •

Set the oven to 180 degrees. Defrost the pastry, drizzle the pastry sheets with olive oil. Sprinkle seasoning of your choice. Rub the oil and seasoning heavenly. Sprinkle cheese on your pastry sheet, covering the whole surface. Cut the pastry into 2 cm strips. Roll each strip into a scroll. Lay the scrolls onto the baker paper. Cook for 25 mins or until cooked heavenly. Take out and enjoy!

Method:

• • • •

April 2021

Wr

ite To Sen Us! seek d us your advic help child e or sha ful hints, 's suc re yo cess! ur Send t o e d it oy o u r le t t e r s t o o r p o s t r @ fe a t u r e m a g a zt h e E d it o r P O B o x t o L e t t e r s t o in e .c o m .a u th 105, Na r a n g b a Qe E d it o r 4504

Feature


Luke HOWARTH MP Federal Member for Petrie

Our plan for Australia Suppress the virus and deliver the vaccine

Cement our economic recovery to create jobs (and more jobs)

Continue to guarantee the essential services that Australians rely on

Care for our country

Protect and secure Australians’ interests in a challenging world

Luke HOWARTH MP L Federal Member for Petrie F

40 Hornibrook Esplanade, Clontarf QLD 4019 07 3284 8008

Luke.Howarth.MP@aph.gov.au

lukehowarth.com.au

LukeHowarthMP

Authorised by L. Howard, Liberal National Party of Queensland, 40 Hornibrook Esplanade, Clontarf QLD 4019.

www.featuremagazine.com.au

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HEALTH

Moreton All Body Care

How To Set Up Your Home Office Ergonomically

Since COVID-19 and the implementation of social distancing restrictions, an increasing number of businesses and employees are working from home. Initially, the changes were so sudden that not much consideration was taken into how people were achieving this or what their workstations looked like. Working at an office provides a number of benefits that are often overlooked when transferring work processes into a home. Things like optimal lighting for reading or looking at screens, desk height and adjustable chairs are all in place to provide a safe and comfortable work environment. It has been well documented that poor workplace ergonomics (a combination of prolonged sitting and poor posture) can cause low back pain, neck and shoulder pain, tennis elbow and carpal tunnel injuries. As it is now clear that the COVID-19 restrictions are here for the long term, it’s time to look more closely at the ergonomic design of your home office.

supporting your spinal curves. If your chair is not adjustable, you may need to use a small pillow, rolled towel or blanket to place in the small of your back and help to support the lower back.

4. Keyboard and Mouse. Keep the mouse and keyboard within easy reach to ensure arms are close to the body, elbow bent at 90 degrees. This will ensure the wrist is in a neutral position.

3. Setting up the Screen. The computer screen (laptop or desktop) should be directly in front of you, at arms length away. The top of the screen should be at eye level. If you are using a desktop, you can adjust the screen height. Using a laptop is a little bit more difficult. Ideally, place the laptop up on some props to ensure it is the correct height. It is recommended that if you are doing this, to buy a separate mouse and keyboard.

5. Keep Your Body Moving. Setting up your workstation goes a long way in reducing stress on your joints and muscles. However, it is still very important to keep your body moving. Take regular breaks during the day, aiming for every 30 minutes. This improves circulation, reduces muscle fatigue and allows the body to reset.

Ergonomic workstations are designed specifically to ensure the body’s joints are aligned in order to reduce the strain on the muscles. To do this, the hips, knees, ankles and elbows should all be at 90 degrees. Here is how to set up your at-home office. 1. Chair Height. Select a chair that has a high back and supports your spine. If your chair is adjustable, change the height of the seat so you can sit comfortably at the desk or table, with your arms relaxed by your body. Your feet should be flat on the floor with your thighs parallel to the ground (knees bent 90 degrees). This may mean you need to place your feet on a box, small step or a stack of books. 2. Back Support. Ensure the back of the chair is straight,

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April 2021

Feature


Shiatsu Massage

Words: Deb Howcroft, Zen Chi Natural Therapies, North Lakes

Shiatsu is a beautiful art of Japanese acupressure massage using the principles of Ki extension to bring the body back into balance. Shiatsu has been proven to be highly effective at alleviating pain, supporting healing and bringing relief to symptoms. A holistic approach is taken when applying a Shiatsu treatment protocol. Other oriental therapies such as Cupping, Moxibustion and Gua Sha may also be used to support treatment. Reasons you should book an appointment: • Musculoskeletal disorders • Postural Problems • Soft Tissue Injury • Sporting Injury • Headaches • Pre-menstrual Symptoms • Infertility • Pregnancy Support • Regulating Menstrual Flow • Shoulder Pain • Knee Problems • Joint Pain • Insomnia • Chronic Problems • Relaxation • Back Pain • Neck Pain • Digestive Disorders • Fatigue • Depression • Anxiety • Emotional Problems

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27


BEAUTY

LaBella Day Spa + Clinic

Q&A

with Monica Shanahan

The Seven Most Common Questions Women Ask About Their Skin.

Q: What ingredients should people look for when they are buying skincare products for anti-ageing?

If we never use vitamin A, the receptor shuts down, which can cause a retinol response when using a particular type of vitamin A.

A: Definitely vitamin A. It is the only ingredient that can repair DNA. Imagine if we repair the damage of our mother cell, the stem cell, will produce healthier cells.

Retinal response manifests itself with redness, dryness or a rush putting many off on using vitamin A. The secret is increasing the amount applied slowly.

Healthier melanocyte results in balanced melanin production, translating less pigmentation. This means healthier Langerhans cells which are less reactive, translating stronger and less red skin and a more efficient skin turnover (every 28 days). In short, fewer wrinkles. A win-win!!

Q: What does "active" skincare ingredients mean?

Vitamin A has an intercellular function, which means it works inside the cells. The cell membrane function is to keep things out of the cell and protect the nucleus, which is the brain of the cell. It has a tiny receptor that allows only vitamin A to enter. Amazingly, the cells are exposed to vitamin A and more receptor will be built so more vitamin A can get in the cell and repair it. Sadly, this process works the same in reverse.

A: Yes, we hear this word a lot in skincare. There will be a lot to say about it, but the short answer is: an active is an ingredient that has been proven to change the structure of your skin at the cellular level. In other words, it is the compound of the product that is doing what the product says to suppose to do. An example of this is retinol, found in different forms, an active form of vitamin A we were just talking about. Q: What are the three most common skincare mistakes you have experienced yourself or seen on a client? A: Exfoliating the skin too much, not considering sunblock part of a skincare routine and thinking that one facial can fix it all. I always say to my clients: "suppose you would like to lose some weight, do you think if you go to the gym one time, would it be enough?" Q: What is the difference between a toner and a serum? A: They are two totally different products, although they do have a similar consistency. Toner can be used after cleansing the skin to remove any remaining trace of product

Ask Monica! Do you have a beauty question that needs answering? Email Monica via editor@ featuremagazine.com.au

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April 2021

or impurities from the skin and restore the skin's PH level. Serums are delivery systems; they provide a high concentration of active ingredients designed to perform a specific function. You should choose the serum with the active ingredient which targets your specific skin condition. Q: When is the best time to start your skincare regime? And how often? A: Skincare means taking care of your skin and giving your skin what it needs when it needs it. It is never too early to start. Even a child needs to clean their skin and apply sunblock, right? I believe that a skin care routine is part of self-care. It helps us feel happy and content so a skin care routine should be a constant in our life, and of course, it will give us a beautiful look. I always encourage my clients to know their skin and understand it better because the skin will tell you when it needs something from you. Q: If you were taken to a Paradise island for a month but could only bring two skincare products, what would they be? A: I would like to say sunblock and my favourite eyelash serum. But in reality, it would probably be my cleanser and the sunblock. Q: In what order should you apply your skincare products? And how? A: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Cleanser Toner: because I have oily skin Moisturiser Eye cream Eyelashes serum

In regards to how, always follow the product instruction!

Feature


www.featuremagazine.com.au

29


SENIORS

with Just Better Care

Top 5 Disability Podcasts

1CRUcial Conversations Podcasts offer easy access to programs that entertain, inform, and inspire. Here are five disabilityfocused podcasts that might surprise...

This limited-edition series features five stories of grassroots leadership by people in the disability sector in Queensland. These stories of change show us what it means to be a leader and what it takes to create real and meaningful change in the lives of people living with a disability. Produced by Brisbane-based organisation, Community Resource Unit, the initiative aims to contribute to the development of strong, principled leadership among people with disability and families to contribute to better lives for people living with a disability.

2One in Five

Put together by The University of Melbourne’s Melbourne Disability Institute, One in Five explores some of the most complex issues facing the 20 per cent of Australians who live with a disability. Launched in December 2019, the podcast gives voice to people with disability and asks about their experiences with everything from employment, housing and the law to supporting families and early intervention.

4Abnormally Funny People

This hilarious podcast features a group of stand-up comedians of all abilities light-heartedly ‘reviewing’ disability products. As well as introducing entertaining reviews of products, services, technology, travel and more, the podcast’s impressive line-up of guest comedians also provides their take on their lives, society and the response to disability through the lens of comedy.

Got This: Parenting with 5We’ve a Disability Packed with fascinating stories, this podcast aims to share stories that provide an accurate representation of family life and explores the issues that parenting with a disability brings, whilst also challenging the stigmas and stereotypes. Guests cover a range of issues, including parenting with an intellectual disability, forced hysterectomies, acquiring a disability and parenting later in life, and queer, disabled parenting.

3Disability Done Different

Put out by Melbourne-based group Disability Services Consulting, Disability Done Different aims to have the kind of conversations that come about when passionate people aren’t afraid to speak their mind. This podcast offers unique insights with interesting guests who have carved their own path in the disability.

TERRY YOUNG MP

Federal Member for Longman

Please contact my office if you need help or referrals with: Centrelink and Medicare

NDIS and Aged Care Federal Grants

Immigration and Visas NBN and Communications

Unit 7, Level 1, 69 King Street, Caboolture QLD 4510

07 5432 3177

terry.young.mp@aph.gov.au

TerryYoungMP

terryyoung.com.au

Authorised by T. Young, Liberal National Party of Queensland, Unit 7, Level 1, 69 King Street, Caboolture QLD 4510.


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31


LANDSCAPE with Lawrie

What to do in Autumn Now is the time to spend time in the garden and get planting. The soil is moist from the summer rains. The days are cooler, which helps the plants adjust to the new garden environment. The new roots grow rapidly in moist, warm conditions and continue developing throughout the coming cool winter. Then in early spring, the plant starts with a rush to develop new foliage supported by the newly established root system. It is now a well-developed small plant that is adapted to its new location and, as it matures, will rapidly become a healthy new addition to your garden. So now is the best time to visit a nursery, but be sure that those new plants you select are suited to your soil conditions. Get Planting!

Viewpoint ‘Design with Nature’ has been applied in all of my projects, both large and small, to preserve and create a natural lifestyle environment of forests, parks and home gardens. These are the special places that can restore our association with nature, and most importantly, improve our health and wellbeing. Whatever the future holds for our expanding cities, parks, and gardens, I believe it is fundamentally important that Australian native plants are more generally appreciated for their ideal suitability in creating the landscapes in which we live. Plant material is the basic element of every landscape design. In establishing a successful garden, it is important to have a thorough knowledge of the plant species best suited to the climate and soils of the locality, particularly to know their size, growth habit and aesthetic qualities.

A Good Place to Walk Undoubtedly one of the best walks you can do in our area to experience a cross-section of the native flora is at John Oxley Reserve, Ogg Road, Murrumba Downs. The Carole Green Walkway (1.3km) takes you on a meandering pathway to introduce the natural plant communities extending from the rich volcanic red soils on the upper slopes down to the moist sandy loams of the alluvial terraces and the boardwalk along the wetlands fringing the North Pine River. Take the time to read the signage and learn about the native flora and the pioneering past. Also, do some nature spotting along the way, with possums, birds and tree snakes calling this location home.

First impressions are always the most lasting, so it is important to set the scene right from your front gate, by creating a strong garden character, which expresses your personality and says ‘welcome’ to the visitor and encourages them to explore further into the garden. I look forward to sharing the natural landscapes of this diverse coastal area of Moreton Bay from Caboolture to Petrie. and investigating the unique plants that naturally grow here, as well as other Australian species from similar environments, all suited to enhancing your home garden setting.

What’s on for Green Fingers: April 24 – Autumn Native Plants Market, Samford Native Plants Queensland is excited to announce that their annual Autumn Plants Market will be held at an expansive new venue in ‘The Barn’ at Samford Showgrounds. More than 20 of our local growers will have an amazing range of native plants available for every Australian garden – plants for small gardens, water-wise plants, bush foods, rainforest plants, bird attracting and rare or unusual plants. The specimens come in a range of sizes, from tubes to mature plants. Most of

these species are not available from nurseries elsewhere. Growers will be pleased to discuss their plants with you and offer expert advice on plant selection, planting and care. Native Plants Queensland members will also be there to help with information and to help you to find the right plants you are looking for to create or add to your native garden. Information: npq.org.au/ nativeplants

Together we will also look into garden problems you may have, identify unknown plants, and share your gardening experiences.

Lawrie During his 40 year career as a Landscape Architect, Lawrie has designed amazing places like Roma Street Parkland & World Expo88, bringing the diversity and uniqueness of Australian native plants to the community. Do you have a question for Lawrie? Email him via editor@ featuremagazine.com.au.

Lawrie Smith AM

Plant of the Month

This spectacular small tree Xanthostemon chrysanthus, from the coastal rainforests of far north Queensland, is closely related to the better-known bottlebrushes and eucalypts. ‘Golden Penda’ grows up to 15 metres in its natural habitat but in cultivation is generally much smaller. Formative pruning will contain this tree to a large dense shrub and also increase massed flowering over the canopy.

Xanthostemon chrysanthus

From autumn to late winter, dense groups of spidery golden yellow flowers form in dense spherical terminal heads up to 150mm in diameter and are very attractive to nectar-feeding birds. ‘Golden Penda’ was selected as the theme plant for World Expo 88 where it was first introduced to mass planting. Then known as ‘Expo Gold’, this tree has been popular ever since in south-east Queensland and has proven to be a hardy street tree and garden specimen. It is also suitable as an indoor pot plant.

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We are Ge�ing Record Prices Ask me how we do it!

s tion a l atu r g Con � d Sol

s tion a l atu r g Con � d Sol

s tion a l atu r g Con � d Sol

Find out what your home is worth today. With so many record prices being set and strong market conditions continuing now is the time to get a market update and see what you home is worth. Even if you are not thinking of selling this is a free service to all residents. Upsizing, downsizing, tree or sea change, updating your insurance or just curious? Text your name and address to 0419 122 590 for your free market update. Lincoln Moffat 0419 122 590

lincoln.moffat@bmn.rh.com.au

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33


PETS

with RSCPA Queensland

Off-Leash Dogs: How to Prevent Trouble Walking your dog is meant to be a nice casual and calming experience. However, sometimes things can go wrong that are out of our hands. Here in Australia, we have leash laws that require all dogs to be on a lead in public places unless in a designated off-lead area. Unfortunately, not everyone obeys these laws, resulting in stressful situations for responsible dog owners. What do you do when you are enjoying your on-lead walk with your pooch, and an off-lead dog runs towards you? Many people are unsure what to do in these situations, and sometimes our actions can make it worse. Here are some tips on how to deal with this situation. Why put a lead on your dog? Walking your dog off-lead is like saying, "I don't need to wear a seatbelt because I am a perfect driver". You cannot control what the other cars do, and similarly, you cannot control what other dogs do. So please remember that laws are in place for a reason. So everyone can enjoy walking their dogs in a calm and safe environment without the risk of being approached by unknown unleashed dogs. Please be courteous to your fellow pet owners. So what should you do if an off-lead dog runs towards you? When enjoying an on-lead walk with your pooch and an off-lead dog runs towards you, it

can be hard to know what do in these situations - Sometimes, our actions can make it worse. Here are some tips on how to deal with this situation: 1. Don't be shy! Yell out to the unleashed dog's owners and ask them to put their dog back on their lead immediately. You will often be greeted with the owner saying, "It's ok, he is friendly." This does not give the owner the right to let their dog 'do what they want' when out in public spaces. Even the most social of dogs can be caught off guard by another pooch running towards them. 2. Carry a distraction: There is no sure-fire way to stop a dog running at you, but here are a few tips that may help in that situation. • Carry high value treats like chicken, cheese or meat. Not only will they help your dog focus on you, but often throwing a handful of high value treats in the face of an approaching dog can stop them in their tracks, so they can then find all the treats on the ground. This should give you enough time to walk away with your dog, calmly. • Carry an umbrella! Even though you may not be expecting rain, an umbrella can be used to open as the dog approaches, which should startle the oncoming dog. It can also be used to shield your dog from the off-lead dog. • Carry a water bottle (the squirty kind). Not only can you stay hydrated, but the use of squirting water in the face of an approaching dog can also startle them

enough to stop. It catches them by surprise and may buy time enough time for the owner to leash their dog and you to walk away with yours. What happens if it all goes wrong? Do you break up the fight? Breaking up a dog fight is ALWAYS risky. However, in the heat of the moment, all we care about is our dog's safety. The best way to break up a fight is to grab each dog's back legs and raise them off the ground (like a wheelbarrow) and walk backwards. If you are the only person present, do this to the dog leading the attack. Eventually, the other dog will try and get away. Carrying an extra lead can also assist if you need to urgently clip a dog to pull it away. Remember it is not your fault If an off-lead dog runs at you and that dog or your dog attacks, it is essential to remember that you are not at fault. The person who did not have sufficient control of their dog is legally responsible. They will be liable for all vet costs required to treat any injuries to your dog and any humans caught in the crossfire.

Don't forget to: •

Call your local council as soon as possible to report the incident and have their animal management quick response team attend. Take photos of all injuries and get as much information as possible about the offending dog. •

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April 2021

Remain calm! Making accusations and getting worked up will not help the situation.

Seek medical attention as soon as possible at your vet or doctor for those that have been injured.

Ask any witnesses for their details.

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CAN YOU HELP US PROVIDE A VALUABLE SERVICE TO MEMBERS OF OUR COMMUNITY WHO HAVE DIFFICULTY PREPARING THEIR OWN MEALS?

WE URGENTLY NEED MORE VOLUNTEER HELPERS FOR OUR KITCHEN HOURS WOULD BE 7.00AM TO 11.00AM MONDAY TO FRIDAY

EVEN ONE DAY A WEEK WILL HELP, AND VOLUNTEER DELIVERY DRIVERS ARE ALSO WELCOME

CONTACT THE OFFICE ON: Phone: 07 3888 3754 email: burpen@bigpond.com OR CALL IN, WE ARE BEHIND THE LIBRARY IN STATION ROAD.

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35


"

I can't imagine how hard it must be to not have vision. It must be a very tough thing for anyone to go through.

"

Alita enjoyed her visit to Guide Dogs Queensland.

Hanging Out With Puppies In Training Words: Sheree Hoddinett

For Alita, the whole fundraising process has been quite a learning experience, one that was made even more enriching by going and seeing the work Guide Dogs Queensland does behind-the-scenes. We first met Alita Huyton in late 2020. As a Guide Dogs Youth Ambassador, the Morayfield youngster was on a mission to raise muchneeded funds for Guide Dogs Queensland to assist those in the community living with vision loss. Alita and her mum Gayle organised photoshoot opportunities where pet owners could bring their beloved pooches along for a treasured snap-in exchange for a donation to Guide Dogs Queensland. Alita's goal was to reach a target of $1,500 so she could have the chance to head along for a special playdate with some Guide Dogs puppies. Well, she reached her goal and recently had the opportunity to cuddle up to some adorable and playful puppies, an experience she will treasure for a long time to come. "We reached the $1,500 goal on the last day of fundraising, it was close, and we only went over by a few dollars," Alita says. "So many people came in with their dogs for Christmas photos, I knew we must be close. We didn't find out the actual amount raised until the end of the day. Reaching my goal also meant that I visited Guide dogs Queensland HQ and have a play date with the puppies. "I got to have an interview, morning tea and do a tour of Guide Dogs HQ, but the best part for me was seeing the puppies." The Guide Dogs Headquarters tour also provided Alita with a little insight into how much reach the organisation has and how much of a difference each and every contribution can make.

36

Photos: Gayle Huyton - Gayle Marie Photography

"At the end of the tour, we visited the memorial garden," she says. "There are plaques with the names of community sponsors and people who have left money to Guide Dogs Queensland. There is a wall for working guide dogs and another wall with the ID tags of retired and passed guide dogs." With the 'important' side of the visit done and dusted, of course, it was time for Alita to get down to some furry business, interacting with the very gorgeous puppies of which she had many to choose from! "I got to play with one litter of about 14, but there were three litters of puppies there, and they were all black!" she says. "And the best part was getting sleepy puppy cuddles." Mum Gayle is exceptionally proud of Alita and what she has already achieved at such a young age. She's also grateful for what this opportunity has taught Alita about looking out for others.

Given she's only nine-years-old, Alita knows that any money she has raised will make a big difference and go a long way to helping someone who has vision loss. "I can't imagine how hard it must be to not have vision. It must be a very tough thing for anyone to go through," she says. "The guide dogs make so much difference in helping people live more of a normal life." After everything she has already experienced over the past year in her role, is being a Guide Dogs Youth Ambassador something Alita is likely to do again? It's a question she was swift to answer with a resounding yes! "It was so much fun reaching goals along the way and knowing it was for such a great cause," she says. "The best thing about having this opportunity is being able to raise money to help others and also meeting the most adorable puppies ever!"

"Alita is always thinking of ways to help other people, so being a Guide Dogs Queensland Youth Ambassador came naturally to her," Gayle says. "She now realises how much work it takes to raise that amount of money and when we found out that It costs at least $35,000 to breed, raise and train a single guide dog, it put into perspective just how important our fundraising is." So with one goal reached, what's next on the agenda for this bright and bubbly go-getter? "I will try to continue raising money for the guide dogs," Alita says. "I have some new ideas like baking cupcakes. Hopefully, mum will have some free time later in the year to help me raise money, too, for what I see as an amazing and very worthwhile cause."

April 2021

Taking the all-important puppy photo.

Feature


Great facilities

EVEN BETTER COMPANY TO SHARE THEM WITH!

AND

Welcome to the village.

Old friends, new friends, furry friends.

The essence of a village is defined by its people and places. At Oak Tree Retirement Village Burpengary, creating a friendly village atmosphere is at the heart of everything we do. Here, you’ll be surrounded by like-minded people with facilities and activities that make it easy to meet new friends and share common experiences. Keep your social calendar as full as you choose, discover new hobbies, and enrich your retirement spending more time doing the things you love.

At Oak Tree, we know that being close to your support networks is vital. That’s why we build our villages in the areas that are familiar and where you’ve put down roots. We actively encourage you to invite friends and family to the village. Guests are welcome to stay in your villa or make use of the purpose-built village facilities. Old friends are certainly welcome at your new home. At Oak Tree, we also know that having a pet by your side can help improve your outlook on life, make you feel more socially connected and better enable you to deal with stress or grief, particularly after the loss of a partner. That’s why we are one of the few village operators who openly welcome furry friends.

The importance of community connection. Community connection plays a vital role in both our physical and mental wellbeing, particularly during our senior years. Staying social and getting out and about can help reduce health problems, give you purpose and allow you to live independent for longer. At Oak Tree, our retirement villages are designed to help you meet new companions, nurture existing friendships, and maintain that important sense of connectivity during retirement.

118 Pitt Road, Burpengary Call 1300 367 155

oaktreegroup.com. au

With great facilities, a connected Village Manager to support you, and new friendships to be formed, your only regret will be not making the move sooner!

To book your private tour of Oak Tree Retirement Village Burpengary, call 1300 367 155 or visit oaktreegroup.com.au


MARINE & AUTO

with Brishbane YAMAHA

Quintrex 540 Sea Spirit

There’s nothing quite like owning a boat. Hair whipping in the wind, the smell of salt and sun cream and the freedom to discover new swimming holes and secret fishing spots is undeniably Australian. Quintrex are well aware of the expectations of Aussie boaters and have designed a craft cuddy cabin series that ensures that the possibilities are endless. The Quintrex Sea Spirit range comes in a variety of sizes from 520 through to a 590. The most popular size according to the leading Australia Quintrex dealer, Brisbane Yamaha, is the 540. Its manageable size and versatility is hard to deny and harder to resist.

Quintrex are market leader in creating boats that appeal to both entry level and experienced boat owners. It’s hard to imagine another boat that offers this level of comfort, in a package that’s equally versatile and indestructible, with the ability to fish inshore, offshore or even towing skiers and inflatables. When you’re looking for a bit of shade and a place to escape, simply head into the cuddy cabin for some respite.

Specifications

Price: Around $60,000 Construction: Aluminium Length Overall: 5.61m Beam: 2.25m Max hp: 130hp Construction: Topsides 2.0mm, bottom 4.0mm Capacity: 7 people Weight on trailer: approx 1100kgs Engine as tested: Yamaha F115hp Four Stroke Fuel Capacity: 95L Pictured: 510 Ocean Spirit

The Boat The Sea Spirit range is a classic fishing platform. Heading offshore, passengers are protected by a large aluminium cabin, topped with a classy round cornered windscreen. While their abilities do not end there, the protection offered by the cabin is the primary reason the Quintrex Sea Spirit range is so popular. Adding a cabin to any aluminium hull can result in a bulky and awkward appearance. The Quintrex version does not and I’m a big fan of this design. Inside the cabin, Quintrex have run a padded seat/bunk style bed along each side. The cushion is thick enough to lie on comfortably and there is enough room for two on a cosy night out. Underneath each seat is a storage tub, and you can option up with an infill to create more space. There are also side pockets offering even more storage.

There are the normal additions such as twin pedestal seats, deep and long side pockets, an anchor well, grab rails at the stern and around the bow, plus a fold away rear 2/3rds bench and transom door. You can fit any number of options to make the Quintrex 540 Sea Spirit capable of anything. I would add a multi function display to the dash and perhaps a second one on the shelf above, which will provide better vision. Gauges can go either side of the dash unit. I would also certainly consider the optional ski pole, live bait tank in the transom, a stereo and possibly the mega transom chopping board. In sunny climates you may also add a bimini over the cuddy cabin. Access to the bow is through a hatch door in the front of the cabin, a handy safety feature that keeps occupants in the boat at all times. There is plenty of room for offshore fishing where anglers may carry more than the average amount of rope. The five stage paint job, performed in house by Quintrex, is as good if not better than any I’ve seen on any boat. Interestingly, rod holders are an option and while I feel at least two should be standard, I can only surmise that they are optional to allow customers to place them wherever they like. Fishermen can be a picky bunch and the guys at Brisbane Yamaha will certainly help you find the perfect placement. The onboard fuel tank is 95 litres. It is located under the flat carpeted floor. A rear ladder comes standard, allowing for easier re-entry after water sports and two small platforms are usable at a pinch. Power The Quintrex 540 Sea Spirit was fitted with a Yamaha F115 Four Stroke engine. Quintrex quote a minimum of 75hp and a maximum of 130hp. As it stands, the F115 is perhaps the sweet spot for this hull. It can push the boat onto the plane effectively with all the gear and a couple of friends onboard. It is a really

efficient choice, due to its ability to have the torque that gets the rig moving and the speed to keep it on the plane. Performance The Quintrex Blade hull is one of, if not the best, aluminium hulls on the water. It is an evolution from the previous Millennium hull. It has a sharp entry that slices through the water superbly. The flared bow keeps water away from the boat and the concave bottom sheet is incredibly stable side to side. The handling is precise and the hull goes exactly where you point it. It tracks straight with little input from the driver. The Blade hull has a reputation for its soft ride but it corners hard, fast and quite flat. Something to be aware of if you hunt into corners close to flat out. With the cabin up front adding weight, all the Sea Spirit hulls respond well to a certain amount of engine tilt. This gets the boat riding efficiently on the rear of the Blade hull where it is flatter and therefore more fuel efficient. While conditions for the boat test were smooth, you know the Quintrex Blade hull will perform on the rough stuff too. Tow Vehicle On a purpose built Quintrex aluminium trailer, the entire package has a dry weight around 1100 kilograms maximum. You can tow this behind a family car like a Toyota Camry, although it would be close to the 1200kg limit when fully loaded with fuel and equipment. Overview The Quintrex 540 has all the appeal and versatility families will be looking for. It really is a lot of boat for the money. The cuddy cabin provides protection and adds storage other platforms do not. The hull is capable of pursuing a variety of on water activities from fishing to water skiing and beyond. Plus, the 540 Sea Spirit is a handy overnighter for a couple too.


Helping you get more from your home loan. If you’re buying, investing or switching loans, we’re here to help. As your local CommBank Home Lending Specialists, we have the expertise and resources to help provide: Free customised property reports For your target property or suburbs. Budget guidance Understand how much you can afford. Changes to your home loan Refinance, top up, switch or restructure your loan to suit your changing needs. Scenario planning Create a repayment plan to achieve your goals. Talk to us today. Dave Richardson

Jack Lockwood

CommBank Morayfield Branch Morayfield Shopping Centre, Cnr Leda Boulevard & William Berry Drive, Morayfield

CommBank Morayfield Branch Morayfield Shopping Centre, Cnr Leda Boulevard & William Berry Drive, Morayfield

dave.richardson@cba.com.au

jack.lockwood@cba.com.au

0472 843 525

0428 540 063

Shannon Pritchard CommBank Burpengary Branch Burpengary Plaza, Cnr Progress & Station Roads, Burpengary shannon.pritchard@cba.com.au 0432 959 810

Things you should know: Applications are subject to credit approval. Eligibility criteria and other conditions may apply to some loans. Full terms and conditions will be included in our loan offer. Fees and charges may be payable. Property information is obtained from third parties and is not intended to be advice or a professional property appraisal and should not be relied upon as such. You should also make your own enquiries and assessments before making any decisions. Commonwealth Bank of Australia ABN 48 123 123 124. Australian credit licence 234945. K788 250121


PUZZLES

SOLUTIONS ON PAGE 47

SUDOKU #56 Puzzle 6 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50)

Puzzle 6 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.64)

MEDIUM 8

HARD

2

3

5

1 3

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What to do in ____ (6) ____ with Wendy Laimant (6) ____ Jean's Coffee (6) Packerdirect ____ Shop (7) ____ Yourself Into The Ground (7) ____ Howarth (4) Signature ____ (4) Sports Central ____ (10) Creekside ____ (4) ____ Veteran Remembers (11) Raine&____ (5) Peace of ____ Kindy (4) Hanging Out With ____ In Training (7) The World According To ____ (4) Narangba Valley ____ (6) Local Dining ____ (5) ____ Young (5) ____ Day Spa + Clinic (7) Marine & ____ (4) No ____ For 30 Days (7) Short + Sharp columnist Jayden ____ (8) Rocks Café ____ (7) Top 5 ____ Podcasts (10)

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April 2021

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On the Cover: ____ Scutts (5) Brisbane ____ (6) ____ State School (8) ____ Safety (6) How to Set up Your Home Office ____ (13) Rehab and Mobility ____ (11) ____ with Lawrie (9) Enable ____ Care Services (4) A Glimpse Into Local ____ History (8) Motmot ____ & Eats (6) Trees ____ Memorial (7) Moreton All Body Care: Health and ____ (9) Chris's ____ (9) ____ Ryan (4) John the TY ____ Man (7) ____ Lifestyle (7) ____ Bins (3) Feature Magazine Goes ____! (6) Q&A with Monica ____ (8) Artisans Guild Art & Craft ____ (7) ____ Potter (6)

Feature


www.featuremagazine.com.au

41


Local Dining Guide For advertising enquiries call 07 3886 9040.

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April 2021

Feature


MOTMOT COFFEE & EATS MotMot - Coffee & Eats is the source for specialty coffee in the heart Petrie and very convenient to the station. MotMot offers a range of dining possibilities including all-day brunch, fresh juices, smoothies & more. Open Weekdays 6am to 1pm and Weekends 7am to 1pm.

Ph: 0492 826 236 5/6 Whites Road, Petrie @MotMot.Coffees

www.featuremagazine.com.au

43


SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL TRADES & View Feature Magazine online at www.featuremagazine.com.au

Driving Yourself Into The Ground

Words: The team at Lifestyletradie.com.au

Your vehicle is wrapped top to tail with the company’s logo, slogan, and phone number. You spent big bucks to make sure your vehicle signage was clear and showed off your awesome trade business.

story too. At your next toolbox meeting, it would be ideal to address it with the team and remind them of best practices whilst driving. •

But, everyone has just watched you tailgate • Captain Slow, driving like a mad man to arrive at your next job on time, and now remembers your business name for the wrong reason. • Your behaviour was so poor that they call the • number from your truck and complain about your driving to the dispatcher. We know this • because it’s happened to us. It’s important to continually remind yourself and your team that you drive a moving billboard for your company. Therefore, how you drive and behave has an impact on your company’s overall reputation and you need to educate your team on best practices.

Remind your team of the company’s values and behaviour expectations. Many vehicle tracking systems allow you to monitor speed. Let them know that you can see when they are breaking the speed limit. Explain that safe driving is always the best option — even if it means you are late. Let them know the consequences for repeat offenders. Ask for their thoughts and opinions on the matter and hear them out.

If this is a continual issue, look at your own systems and processes — are you booking jobs too close together? Understand what was making them late or feeling stressed on the road.

We get it; it’s sometimes hard to keep your cool, especially around Captain Slow. We are all guilty Every situation is different; always calmly speak of making some poor driving decisions to get with the accused tradie and get their side of the somewhere on time…. But if your trucks are AGED CARE SERVICES

BINS

seen on the road all the time by the community, it’s critical to ensure you and your team always drive like angels.

KEY TAKEAWAYS: •

You are driving a moving billboard for your company.

Your driving impacts your company’s reputation.

If someone complains, get the facts!

Address it with the driver and your team and remind them of their responsibilities.

Consider your own behaviour and adjust it to how you want to represent your company.

ELECTRICAL Cont'd                 9

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Covering All Your Electrical Requirements | All Areas Domestic | Commercial | Industrial FUNERALS

CARPENTRY

Your Local Just Better Care team can offer the support and advice you need to get started. ELECTRICAL

44

April 2021

Feature


SERVICES

To place an ad call 07 3886 9040 or email ads@featuremagazine.com.au

All Plumbing & Gas Works ks Maintenance Alterations Renovations New & Old Homes

Call today

FREE Quote

KINDERGARTEN

LEAFLET DELIVERY

KITCHENS

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MAN WANTS WORK AROUND THE HOUSE. Gardening and weeding, pruning trees & shrubs. Anything considered. Honest & reliable. Reasonable Rates - Ph 3285 6128 LAWYERS

PICTURE FRAMING

www.featuremagazine.com.au

45


Trees Reshape Memorial Words: Jo Newberry

On the intersection of Progress and Morayfield Roads, Burpengary, surrounded by Native and Pine Trees, lies the Burpengary War Memorial. The Memorial was opened on The Anzac Day Centenary in 2015 in front of over three thousand. The guest of honour, Mr John Smith OAM, was joined by Councillor Peter Flannery in handing over the Memorial to the Burpengary community. The ANZAC Centenary Memorial was designed by the Vietnam Veterans Association Of Australia (VVAA) and assisted by landscaper and Veteran Mr John Van Pelt of the Redcliffe Sub Branch of VVAA. It consists of pillars and

curved concrete with a rough texture on one side which represents the boards for Shoring up the trenches in WW1. There is a glass inset to which a beautiful pathway leads in and around a central electronic eternal flame plinth, honouring the fallen Australian and New Zealand Defence Forces. Each pillar is placed in the exact GPS position of their campaigns (should you flatten the world) and is adorned with the campaign colours at the top with information of the corresponding wars and peacekeeping operations underneath. I am sure children, especially On Anzac Day, will match the Returned Service Personnel medals in attendance with the pillars! You may notice that one pillar is not quite in position.

Unfortunately, before construction, a tree had claimed that GPS location! Tree growth made changes to another original feature of the Memorial. The curved concrete has a glass feature which, on the 25th of April, the rays of the rising sun glow through the Ode of Remembrance to the eternal flame. However, as in peaceful times, change and growth happen, as do trees grow, preventing the rays from shining through the glass. Alas, natures living metaphor for the beauty of restoring peace and ceasing the destructive ways of wartorn times. Lest We Forget

Writers: Freelance With Us! Will you be the next freelancer to join our fun, relaxed yet professional team? Get paid to inspire and showcase our amazing community! All ages and experience levels encouraged to apply. Email a sample of your work and a bit about you to

editor@featuremagazine.com.au.

Feature

magazine.com.au

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April 2021

Feature


H

Brisbane Bar Tide2021 Times Time AprilLocal 2021 Time

6 0513 1115

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APRIL

Time

m

0.56 2.22 U 1735 0.52 2337 2.20

0.50 2.13 TH 1817 0.43

0545 0.64 1142 2.10 E 1801 0.55

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1 0619 1203 2

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3 0136 0818

Time

16 0602 1141

0.74 1.84 FR 1749 0.60

0016 0640 SA 1215 1821

17

2.18 0.74 H 1211 1.96 1830 0.61

2.36 0.76 SA 1349 1.73 1946 0.67

0047 0700 R 1244 1900

2.13 0.84 1.81 0.70

0240 0939 SU 1508 2053

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Medium, difficulty rating 0.57) express, implied, statutory or Hard, difficulty rating otherwise in 0.64) respect to the

9 Moon 6 availability, 3 8 2accuracy, 4 Quarter 5currency, Last Full 6 3 5 6 4 7 1 2 2 1 3 8 9 5 8 4 7

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1 3 4 5 quality 9 completeness, or reliability or 7 5 of6 the 8information 1 that the information will be fit 4 9 6 1 7 for any particular purpose or 2 4 3 9 7 will not infringe any third party 5 7 Property 8 2 rights. 3 Intellectual 1

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9 3 4 of 5 the 6 Copyright 8 2 3tables 7 is 6vestedtidal prediction in the 6 Commonwealth 1 8 7 of2 Australia 7 1 9by the 4 National 2 represented Tidal Centre, 8 7Bureau 1 of3Meteorology. 9 6

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(Medium, difficulty rating 0.52) Hard, difficulty rating 0.61)

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SHORT + SHARP:

Words: Jayden Johnston

Laughably Ironic “And once more, give him another round of applause!”

from me with force. I can’t help it. The thought that I’ll never feel that happiness and excitement again is terrifying.

I smile at the crowd, making sure they see my happiness, how much this performance means to me. I take a short bow and wave again before slowly making my way off the stage. The clapping doesn’t stop until I’m far away; it fades out slowly, the diminuendo of applause giving way to crushing silence.

It’s so selfish of me to think so, as well. What I do doesn’t matter. Not really, at least. I’m not fighting wars, raising money for charities, improving awareness for disabilities, protesting in the streets. I’m just a guy with a microphone, trying to make people laugh. But as soon as I started that career, I lost a little piece of myself to the noise.

It’s only then that I allow the smile to fall from my face and my legs to give way beneath me. I thought that this time, I’d feel something. Anything. But once again, it’s a performance leaving me hollow; it’s not a feeling of unhappiness, though. That would at least be bearable. No, this is a feeling of emptiness.

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Bile rises from my stomach, burning 8 throat. 6 I2quickly 1 get 9 up4 off 5the 3 my ground and run for the bathroom, 7 9 it to 5 a 2toilet3 stall6 just4 in 1 making time for my lunch to be launched

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“They’re asking for an encore. Will you be returning to the stage?” I sigh deeply. I really don’t want to. But it’s what they’re all paying me for, and they shouldn’t lose their money’s worth because I failed my job. “I’ll be out in two minutes.”

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I can’t give up now. Maybe this time, the tears of joy will mean something.

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Maybe now, they’ll resonate in a way they haven’t for years.

puzzle solutions

Puzzle 6 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50) MEDIUM Puzzle 3 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

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8 9 1 1 4 7 3 5 9 4 6 8 7 3 2 2 5 6

6 3 5 8 7 5 2 6 1 2 4 1 3 9 9 7 8 4

2 4 6 7 5 8 4 3 3 6 1 5 8 1 7 9 9 2

3 1 8 3 1 6 5 4 7 9 9 2 4 7 6 8 2 5

7 2 4 5 9 9 8 8 6 1 2 7 1 4 5 6 3 3

1 8 3 6 8 1 9 7 2 3 7 4 5 2 4 5 6 9

5 7 9 9 6 3 1 2 4 5 3 6 2 8 8 4 7 1

4 5 7 2 2 4 6 1 8 8 5 9 9 6 3 3 1 7

4 8 8 5 1 1 9 6 5 3 3 7 2 2 6 9 7 4

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6 2 9 9 2 6 1 5 4 4 7 8 5 3 3 7 8 1

8 9 1 6 6 8 4 3 7 7 9 4 3 1 5 5 2 2

5 4 3 3 4 7 2 2 6 5 1 1 8 9 7 8 9 6

2 5 7 1 9 2 8 9 3 8 5 6 6 4 4 3 1 7

3 1 2 4 5 5 7 8 8 6 4 9 1 7 9 2 6 3

9 7 6 8 7 3 3 4 1 2 2 5 4 6 8 1 5 9

1 6 4 2 8 9 5 7 9 1 6 3 7 5 2 4 3 8

Puzzle 9 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59) HARD Puzzle 6 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.64)

F A M I L Y A E M R L E A A H G O N A N D O S S C P M I C A B O P R C A D V E N T I L M I N L A G Y R K A T I C N G U I D E E L N I A U T O J O

8 8

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W T H O L E S A O L E U R S D P E

S H A B N A H N A G R I F F I N

Puzzle 12 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.52) Puzzle 9 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71) www.featuremagazine.com.au

9 4

A sudden fit of rage fills my body, and I strike the mirror with a hard fist, glass shards flying everywhere. One embeds itself into my cheek, and a streak of red trickles down like a teardrop.

“Yes?” I say sharply, concealing my face.

Why doesn’t their applause Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficultymean rating 0.56) anything anymore? Why don’t the laughs and smiles I put on these 4 1 8 5 6 7 2 9 3 people’s faces give me the joy they used 2 to? 7 Every 9 time 4 1I take3 to 6the 8 5 stage, I’m hopeful that I’ll learn how to3laugh 5 properly 6 9again. 2 Every 8 time, 1 7 4 my hopes are dashed.

3

Flushing the toilet, I stagger to the sink, rinsing my mouth out and splashing my face with water to try and break me out of whatever feelings I’m having. Or not having, I suppose. The mirror is dirty, and I can barely look at my hideous reflection. Look at him, I think, he thinks he’s so great.

“Excuse me, sir.”

Of nothing.

1

I chuckle bitterly, staring into the depths of the toilet bowl. It’s ironic, really. The comedians have forgotten how to laugh.

A U T U M N A M G L O E M E R D R I A U K E I H O M T U R E E C A A O U S H O R N A P U P P I E S E N W T A E R T E R R Y K E L L A Y M A L C S T O N D D I S A B I

J R I N V I B A R C A O F F É E E A N T V E N N A

A N G

R E W E L L B E I R N G

G A L O H O L E R L I T Y

47


Say hello to freedom Freshwater by Ingenia Lifestyle is a welcoming over 50s lifestyle community with thoughtfully designed homes and a newly-opened clubhouse – The Wattle. Residents enjoy access to the state-of-the-art facilities including a 20m pool, fully equipped gym, gold class cinema, games room with pool tables, library and crafts room, dining hall, and four lane bowling green plus much more! Discover resort-style living at Freshwater by Ingenia Lifestyle.

NEW HOMES SELLING FROM $339,000*

Call 3495 0192 to book a tour of the display village and clubhouse. liveinfreshwater.com.au *Price is based on owning your home and leasing the land and is correct at time of printing and subject to change without notice.

Profile for Feature Magazine

Feature Magazine April 2021 Edition  

Free, monthly, print community magazine for Caboolture, Morayfield, Narangba, Burpengary, Burpengary East, Kallangur, Dakabin, North Lakes,...

Feature Magazine April 2021 Edition  

Free, monthly, print community magazine for Caboolture, Morayfield, Narangba, Burpengary, Burpengary East, Kallangur, Dakabin, North Lakes,...

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