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November | December 2019 OurHealthCharlottesville.com

ANNUAL

5th

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS 288 DOCTORS AND PROVIDERS IN 61 SPECIALTIES 2019

2019

2019

2019

HEALTH TRENDS: WHAT WERE THEY THEN AND WHAT ARE THEY NOW?

DISCUSSING POLITICS AND RELIGION DURING HOLIDAY DINNERS: CAN IT ACTUALLY BE DONE DIPLOMATICALLY?

A GOOD BEDSIDE MANNER GOES MUCH DEEPER THAN A REASSURING SMILE


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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville


ANNUAL

2019

Charlottesville & Shenandoah Valley’s

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER 24 Awards 20

FEATURES

NOVEMBER • DECEMBER 2019 FIRST EXPRESSIONS: A GOOD BEDSIDE MANNER GOES MUCH

20 DEEPER THAN A REASSURING SMILE

Doctors and medical providers are forced to do more with less, including time – with every minute considered precious and invaluable by themselves and their patients. Altogether, it makes having a relationship built on trust, and understanding of mutual expectations and effective two-way communication more important than ever.

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CHARLOTTESVILLE AND SHENANDOAH VALLEY’S 5TH ANNUAL BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS Join us in congratulating 288 of Charlottesville and Shenandoah Valley’s most esteemed doctors and providers in 61 specialties for being recognized in the 2019 Best Bedside Manner Awards.

JOIN THE

OurHealth Community ON SOCIAL MEDIA!

Write us, tweet us, or tag us today! #OurHealthCharlottesville

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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70 66

DEPARTMENTS NOVEMBER • DECEMBER 2019

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The Pulse | People. Places. News to Know.

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Health Scene | Happenings. Who’s Who. Trending.

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Discussing Politics and Religion During Holiday Dinners: Can It Actually Be Done Diplomatically? Politics and religion have long believed to be two topics we should avoid sharing opinions on – especially at family gatherings. But an expert at James Madison University weighs in with a different perspective, suggesting doing so correctly may spark more conversations that can turn out to be more productive than divisive.

Over 350 participants of all ages joined together to help raise more than $72,000 for the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s at Gypsy Hill Park in Staunton.

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Q&A on Health | Questions. Answers. Knowledge.

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Health Trends | What Were They Then, and What are

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Food and Fitness | Nutrition. Exercise. Prevention. Adopting Smaller Habits Every Day Will Make Your New Year’s Resolution Much More Manageable. Here are 21 healthy eating habits for you to adopt throughout the first few weeks of the new year.

They Now? It’s inevitable that trends come and go. What’s popular today will be a memory tomorrow. And while it’s true that some practices do prove to have staying power, they still evolve with the changing times.

Healing Words | Listen. Learn. Communicate.

74

Funny Bone | Spot the Seven Differences

JOIN THE OURHEALTH COMMUNITY ON SOCIAL MEDIA We want to hear from you! Don’t forget to tag us, #OurHealthCharlottesville 6

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville


MORE THAN A MAGAZINE ONLINE

NOVEMBER • DECEMBER 2019

SOCIAL MEDIA

PUBLISHER PRESIDENT/EDITOR-AT-LARGE VICE PRESIDENT OF PRODUCTION GRAPHIC DESIGNER ACCOUNTING MANAGER GUEST PHOTOGRAPHER

McClintic Media, Inc. Steve McClintic, Jr. | steve@ourhealthvirginia.com Jennifer Fields Hungate Tori Meador Laura Bower Jim London Sanders

CONTRIBUTING MEDICAL EXPERTS Jared Davis, MD Amy Mathers, MD Aaron Smith, CO Kari Somers, CNM Angela Stiltner, MD CONTRIBUTING PROFESSIONAL Kelsey Casselbury EXPERTS & WRITERS Judy Gardner Steve McClintic, Jr. Dylan Roche ADVERTISING AND MARKETING Cindy Trujillo | P: 434.907.5255 cindy@ourhealthvirginia.com Kim Wood | P: 540.798.2504 kimwood@ourhealthvirginia.com

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COMMENTS/FEEDBACK/QUESTIONS We welcome your feedback. Please send all comments and/or questions to the following: U.S. Mail: McClintic Media, Inc., ATTN: Steve McClintic, Jr., President/ Publisher/Editor: 303 S. Colorado Street • Salem, VA 24153. | Email: steve@ourhealthvirginia.com | Phone: 540.387.6482 Ext. 1 Information in all print editions of OurHealth and on all OurHealth websites (websites listed below) and social media updates and emails is for informational purposes only. The information is not intended to replace medical or health advice of an individual’s physician or healthcare provider as it relates to individual situations. DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES ALTER ANY MEDICAL TREATMENT WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF YOUR DOCTOR. All matters concerning physical and mental health should be supervised by a health practitioner knowledgeable in treating that particular condition. The publisher does not directly or indirectly dispense medical advice and does not assume any responsibility for those who choose to treat themselves. The publisher has taken reasonable precaution in preparing this publication, however, the publisher does not assume any responsibility for errors or omissions. Copyright © 2019 by McClintic Media, Inc. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. OurHealth Charlottesville/Shenandoah Valley is published bi-monthly • Special editions are also published • McClintic Media, Inc. • 303 S. Colorado Street, Salem, VA 24153, P: 540.387.6482 F: 540.387.6483. MAIN: ourhealthvirginia.com | ourhealthroanokenrv.com | ourhealthlynchburg.com | ourhealthrichmond.com | ourhealthcharlottesville.com | Advertising rates upon request.

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Local health. Anywhere you go. OurHealth magazine is Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville’s only resource entirely dedicated to delivering information about local healthcare services and healthy living topics. Pick up our print edition at more than 650 locations throughout the area or get the digital edition by visiting

ourhealthCharlottesville.com .

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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The Pulse

INFORMATION • EVENTS • AWARENESS

New Facilities, Services and Expansions Augusta Health Emergency Department Expansion Project Complete Augusta Health in Fishersville announces the completion of a major expansion and renovation of its Emergency Department. The project, underway since April 2017, has reached several milestones of phase completion along the way, with renovations of the ‘old’ Emergency Department as the last phase, now complete. The original Emergency Department, which opened 25 years ago, was built to serve 35,000 patients a year. In recent years, patient volume has reached nearly 60,000 visits per year. The original rooms, designed for equipment and technology of the 1990s, were not equipped to handle the needs required for today’s advanced technology. Today’s patients require increased acuity and often have a need for more complex care for cardiac and stroke, trauma, and behavioral health and substance abuse, requiring more modern workflows for department and staff. The combined expansion and renovation projects have nearly doubled the size of the Emergency Department. Now available are 48 larger, private treatment rooms—some with a dedicated purpose, such as a forensic room for sexual assault patients. The new entrance has a covered canopy and valet parking service. The improvements, not only aesthetically pleasing, improve staff efficiency, reduce wait times, enhance patient and family privacy and streamline coordination of care for the patients. To provide support for the construction and renovation of the Emergency Department, the Augusta Health Foundation’s Moments Matter Campaign was launched in March 2017. Dr. Jim Perkins of Waynesboro served as the Campaign Chair. The fundraising effort was well received by the community with major gifts totaling more than $2.13 million. The Augusta Health Board of Directors, Foundation Board of Directors and Executive Leadership had 100 percent participation. In addition, physicians, employees, community leaders, foundations, residents and local businesses financially supported this critical community health project. More information: For more about Augusta Health, its programs or its services, visit www.augustahealth.com.

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

Physician and nursing leadership at the Emergency Department ribbon cutting. (left to right) Cathryn Phillips, RN; Robert O’Connor, MD; Deborah Vinton, MD; Sharon Hardigree, RN.

New Facilities, Services and Expansions UVA Medical Center Opens Expanded Emergency Department UVA Medical Center’s Emergency Department expansion is officially open to patients. As of October 15, 2019, patients are now being treated in the newly expanded Emergency Department. The Emergency Department expansion adds an additional 30,000 square feet of space and includes 70 private beds, with eight dedicated beds for mental health care. The expansion also adds a rapid medical evaluation area that will enable patients with less-severe injuries or conditions to be treated faster. The new Emergency Department includes a separate pediatric Emergency Department, along with four dedicated resuscitation rooms. Construction continues on additional space in the new emergency wing, including additional operating rooms and inpatient beds for hospitalized patients, which are scheduled to open summer of next year. Once complete the entire expansion will offer an additional 425,000 square feet to the medical center. More information: Visit www.uvahealth.com.


New Facilities, Services and Expansions Sentara Martha Jefferson Offers New Pharmacy Services

2019

A new option for patients to receive their medications is now available at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital. The “Sentara to Home” pharmacy program delivers patients’ discharge medications to their room before the patient leaves the hospital. The service will deliver both prescription and over-thecounter medications that are recommended by the patient’s providers. The program is meant to help make the transition from the hospital, to home, as easy as possible for patients and their caregivers. “From the feedback we’ve received, this has been a real time saver for patients and their families, eliminating the need to stop at a pharmacy on the way home,” says J. Scott Anderson, RPh, of Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital’s Inpatient Pharmacy. “The program is intended to increase patient satisfaction, increase medication compliance and, ultimately, decrease readmissions.” Initially, Sentara Martha Jefferson piloted the program in one unit. After a successful trial run, the program was more recently expanded to the entire hospital. If patients or family members have questions about their discharge medications, consultations are still available from the outpatient pharmacist or from the pharmacist covering the unit. The choice of which outpatient pharmacy the patient uses after discharge is completely up to the patient. “We try to offer this service to anyone being discharged from Sentara Martha Jefferson, at least during the hours when our outpatient pharmacy is open,” says Anderson. The Sentara Martha Jefferson Outpatient Pharmacy is open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. More information: Visit www.sentara.com.

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www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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The Pulse

• NEWS TO KNOW

News and Notes UVA Health Establishes Billing and Collection Practices Advisory Council UVA Health has established a 16-person Advisory Council that will inform and advise UVA Health leaders as they consider additional improvements to billing and collection policies and practices to better meet the needs of patients. The council includes community leaders from social services, the faith-based community, schools and healthcare, along with UVA students and team members. They will work together to provide insights and recommendations to help UVA Health build on the changes to its billing and collections policies announced in September. “The changes announced in September are a first step, and we look forward to hearing feedback and input from the Advisory Council on additional ways we can better serve our patients as well as improve fairness and transparency,” says Chris Ghaemmaghami, MD, Chief Medical Officer for UVA Medical Center. Objectives for the advisory council include helping UVA Health leadership better understand the effects of current and proposed billing and collections practices on low-income, uninsured and underinsured patients. They will examine best practices, identify areas of additional improvement and make proposals to improve UVA Health’s practices. The council also will discuss ways UVA Health can consistently share information about billing policy and practice updates and gather perspectives from diverse community stakeholders.

News and Notes #GivingTuesday: A Global Generosity Movement, Close to Home Mark your calendar for Tuesday, December 3. Celebrated on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving and fueled by the power of social media and collaboration, GivingTuesday inspires millions of people across the globe to show up and give back to causes and issues that matter to them. The goal is to create a massive wave of generosity that lasts well beyond this day and touches every person on the planet. Last year over $400 million world-wide was gifted during this full day giving campaign. 12

ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBERS » Dr. Lehman Bates, Pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Charlottesville » Sylvana Fernandez-Ellauri, UVA Health Language Services Spanish Interpreter

» Don Gathers, Public Housing Association of Residents – Charlottesville » Tyler D. Gaedecke, UVA School of Nursing student » Charlene Green, Director, City of Charlottesville Human Rights Commission » Landon Hobbs, UVA School of Medicine student » Wanda Hoerman, Assistant Director, Albemarle County Social Services » Denise Johnson, Director of Equity and Inclusion, Charlottesville City Schools » Joy Johnson, Chair of the Board, Public Housing Association of Residents – Charlottesville

» Charles Lewis, UVA Health Telemedicine team member » Michaela Lieberman, Health Justice Legal Fellow for Legal Aid Justice Center » Mo Nadkarni, MD, UVA Health Internal Medicine » Karl Quist, Charlottesville for Reasonable Health Insurance » Lorie Strother, SWaM Contract Administrator for UVA Office of Procurement and Supplier Diversity Services

» Paula Tomko, CEO, Central Virginia Health Services, Inc. » Sharon Veith, MSN, RN, Westhaven Community Nurse and UVA School of Nursing

Karen Waters-Wicks, Community Education Coordinator for Albemarle County Public Schools, will serve as the council’s facilitator, while Elizabeth Beasley, Director of Community Partnerships for UVA Health, will serve as the council’s staff member. The Advisory Council has already begun working by reviewing the council’s objectives, discussing the impacts of UVA Health’s billing and collection policies and practices, and aligning on ways to foster improved communication with the community. More information: Visit www.uvahealth.com.

Right here in Charlottesville and the Shenandoah Valley, over 100 local charitable organizations participate every year, including:

» Abundant Life Ministries » Blue Ridge Area Food Bank » Charlottesville Area Riding Therapy » Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA » Charlottesville Free Clinic » Jaba

» Piedmont Virginia Community college » Red Cross » Valley Program for Aging Services » Virginia Institute of Autism » And so many more!

Looking for a way to involve the kids. We’ve got you covered! Making its debut this year is Giving Tuesday Kids. Visit www.givingtuesdaykids.org for some great ideas!

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

More information: Visit www.givingtuesday.org/whatshappening-near-me to see a few of the local nonprofits nearby, or visit Facebook @GivingTuesday and #GivingTuesday.


Brittany Behar, MD

Susan B. Gresham, OD

Amira Ali Ibrahim, MD

Keri Johnson, RN, MSN, FNP

Jordan Larew, NP

Nishtha Sodhi, MD

Keri Stevenson, MD

John T. Stranix, MD

Evan Turnbull, PA

EyeOne, PLC UVA Health Plastic Surgery Charlottesville | 434.924.5078 Staunton | 540.213.7720 www.eyeoneva.com www.uvahealth.com

Augusta Health Gastroenterology UVA Health Neurology Charlottesville | 434.924.2706 Fishersville | 540.245.7350 www.augustahealth.com www.uvahealth.com

Augusta Health Gastroenterology Fishersville | 540.245.7350 www.augustahealth.com

UVA Health Heart and Vascular Center Charlottesville | 434.243.1146 www.uvahealth.com

UVA Health Plastic Surgery UVA Spine Center UVA Health TMS Therapy Charlottesville | 434.924.2241 Charlottesville | 434.924.5078 Charlottesville | 434.243.3633 www.uvahealth.com www.uvahealth.com www.uvahealth.com

Monique Vaughan, MD

Kathryn Xixis, MD

UVA Health Urogynecology UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2103 Pediatric Neurology Charlottesville | 434.924.2706 www.uvahealth.com www.uvahealth.com

For More of The Pulse Visit:

www.ourhealthcharlottesville.com Do you have health-related news to share for The Pulse? Send to Stephen McClintic Jr. via email at steve@ourhealthvirginia.com.

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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Health Scene HAPPENINGS • WHO’S WHO • TRENDING words | OURHEALTH STAFF original photography | JIM LONDON SANDERS

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION WALK RAISES $72,000 On the beautiful fall morning of October 19, 2019, more than 350 residents from Augusta County, Staunton, Waynesboro, Fishersville and points beyond and in between joined together for the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s at Gypsy Hill Park in Staunton. Participants raised more than $72,000, surpassing the walk’s goal to help advance the care, support and research programs of the Alzheimer’s Association. Last year, the Greater Augusta Walk raised just over $62,000. Each year, participants are encouraged to raise money as a team or on an individual basis. Of the 56 teams that participated, this year’s top fundraising team, Dream Weavers, raised over $9,000. Since 2011, the team has collectively raised over $100,000! More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease – the sixthleading cause of death in the United States. Additionally, more than 16 million family members and friends provide care to people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. In Virginia alone, there are more than 150,000 people living with the disease and 465,000 caregivers. To learn more about upcoming events or to seek out resources and information visit the local chapter, Alzheimer’s Association of Central and Western Virginia at www.alz.com/cwva.

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville


www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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Questions. Answers. Knowledge. Are palliative and hospice care the same thing?

Did you know? November

IS NATIONAL

HOSPICE

& PALLIATIVE

CARE

AWARENESS MONTH Hospice care is a form of palliative care

provided to patients who likely have a less than six months prognosis based on advanced disease.

Palliative care is care that is provided to patients with advanced, lifelimiting disease, with a focus on comfort and not cure. The primary goal is centered on providing better quality of life when quantity of life may be limited. To receive palliative care, patients do not necessarily have to give up concurrent lifesustaining treatment, but typically they seek therapies that provide comfort for distressing symptoms related to advanced disease. Hospice care is a form of palliative care provided to patients who likely have a less than six months prognosis based on advanced disease. This prognosis is determined in consultation with the patient’s primary physician and a hospice medical director. Once a patient chooses hospice care and no longer wants to seek life-sustaining curative treatment, they receive a team of specialists who manage all aspects of their suffering as it relates to disease progression. Their team manages not only their physical symptoms, but also provides social, psychological, and spiritual support, as desired. Angela Stiltner, MD, HMDC, FAAHPM Hospice of the Piedmont Charlottesville | 434.817.6900 www.hopva.org

What is the longest lasting form of birth control?

Are senior centers just for retired people?

There are several options available for long acting reversible contraceptives, also known as LARC’s. Implants, which are made of flexible plastic and about the size of a matchstick, are inserted into the upper arm and last for three years. Also available are intrauterine devices (IUD’s). An IUD is a small T-shaped device that is inserted into the uterus by a healthcare provider. There are several to choose from that are effective for either three, five or ten years. All LARC options are highly effective at preventing pregnancy and convenient because the user does not have to remember to take a pill daily or have a diaphragm or other form or contraceptive on hand. An alternate option, if you are sure that your family is complete, is permanent sterilization. This would be a tubal ligation for women or a vasectomy for men. There are many great options available. Discuss with your healthcare provider which is right for you. Kari Somers, CNM

Augusta Health Care for Women Fishersville | 540.213.7750 Lexington | 540.463.7751 www.ahcfw.com

Maybe you have heard that senior centers are not what they used to be. Where once you might have found only mid-day bingo, today you can enjoy travel opportunities, hiking, lectures, Tai Chi, and more. Some senior centers offer activities during the day only, but more progressive centers recognize that a work or volunteer schedule during the day creates needs for evening and weekend activities as well. At The Center, we recognize the need for programs that meet in the evenings and on weekends, and once we open the doors of our new home at Belvedere (spring 2020), you will find expanded hours, seven days a week. Our fully equipped fitness room will offer hours starting at 7 AM for early risers. Always wanted to learn Mah-Jongg but too tired after work? Try a Sunday afternoon class. Live alone and hate to cook for one? So do The Center members who eat together every Tuesday night. Don’t wait to retire to find your Center. Judy Gardner

Member and Guest Relations Coordinator The Center Charlottesville | 434.974.7756 www.thecentercville.org

READ THIS EDITION OF

OurHealth Charlottesville & Shenandoah Valley ON YOUR TABLET OR SMARTPHONE

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Questions. Answers. Knowledge. Should we use anti-bacterial hand washing soap at home? Hand washing is critical to slowing the spread of infectious diseases. Hand washing can help prevent the transmission of important infectious diseases in the community such as diarrheal illness, influenza and the common cold.

Did you know? December 1-7, 2019

IS NATIONAL

HANDWASHING AWARENESS WEEK

Hand washing can help prevent the transmission of important infectious diseases in the community such as diarrheal illness, influenza and the common cold.

There is no definitive data demonstrating that routine use of antibacterial soap containing ingredients such as triclosan is better than hand washing with just plain soap and water. There have also been concerns raised about increasing bacterial resistance, impact on human health with long-term exposure and some of the potential effects on the environment of widespread use. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration made a recent decision to stop marketing antibacterial soaps because of lack of demonstrated effectiveness and lack of long-term safety data. This does not apply to waterless hand sanitizers, which have been shown to reduce transmission of infectious diseases and can be a convenient alternative to hand washing with soap and water. Amy J. Mathers, MD

UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.982.1700 www.uvahealth.com

How are custom-made foot orthotics different from inserts purchased at a retail store? Custom-made foot orthotics are medical devices designed to slip into your shoe to both provide comfort and to correct a wide range of biomechanical issues impacting the way you walk, run and stand. True custom foot orthotics are available only with a prescription after being evaluated by a doctor such as an orthopedic specialist or podiatrist. If the doctor determines that a medical condition is present and may be treated with a custom-made orthotic, the patient is then seen by a certified orthotist, who first thoroughly evaluates the person’s gait (an individual’s manner of walking), followed by making a mold of the feet that is used to construct an orthotic precisely designed to stabilize the existing condition and help provide better comfort. Simple inserts or insoles are available without a prescription at most retailers and are massproduced to fit a wide range of people. Because of this, the primary function of these inserts or insoles is to provide comfort through the soft, gel-like material construction most are made from, however, they aren’t designed to stabilize any underlying medical conditions that potentially exist. Aaron Smith, CO

Virginia Prosthetics and Orthotics, Inc. Charlottesville | 434.220.2426 www.virginiaprosthetics.com

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What non-surgical options are available for chronic pain relief? There are multiple non-surgical options for treating chronic pain, which is defined as pain lasting three months or more. We typically use a multimodal approach to targeting pain. Therapies may include medication options such as anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, nerve pain medications, and some anti-depressants. Exercise and physical activity can be instrumental in relieving pain and increasing mobility. There are also many lifestyle modifications that are important—such as maintaining a healthy weight, increasing activity, smoking cessation, and using good posture and body mechanics. Also available are a number of injectionbased treatments to target specific sources of pain. These injections include sacroiliac joint injections, epidural injections, nerve blocks, radiofrequency ablations, facet joint injections, joint injections, and trigger point injections. We are often able to achieve significant pain relief for the patient and improvement in function and quality of life using this personalized approach to chronic pain in conjunction with comprehensive treatment plans. Jared Davis, MD

Augusta Health Pain Management Clinic Fishersville | 540.332.5747 Augusta Health Multispecialty Clinic Lexington | 540.464.3465 www.augustahealth.com


www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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Expressions A GOOD BEDSIDE MANNER GOES MUCH DEEPER THAN A REASSURING SMILE words | DYLAN ROCHE

Not even medicine is exempt from being impacted by the fast pace of the world we now live in. Schedules are tight. Support services come at a premium. Regulations are complicated. And paperwork has become seemingly unlimited. Today, doctors and medical providers are expected to do more, which unfortunately can leave less time available to spend with each patient. Attempting to build a relationship with those receiving care based on trust, compassion, empathy and effective twoway communication – characteristics that largely define a doctor’s or medical provider’s good bedside manner – helps make patients more receptive to guidance, more honest about their lifestyle, more apt to embrace new technology and more likely to keep their appointments. But not everything a doctor or medical provider says is going to be warm and fuzzy, and sometimes patients will receive information the wrong way.

KEITH A. MCCURDY, EDS, LPC, LMFT, a mental health professional in western Virginia who has 30 years of experience specializing in relationship counseling, says a good bedside manner is based on a model of empathy, truthfulness and kindness. Those three qualities will help ensure smooth communication between the caregiver and patient. “It’s about being able to acknowledge the patient’s emotions,” he says. “A good bedside manner is about seeing the value in everyone.”

“A good bedside manner is about seeing the value in everyone.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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Breakdowns in Communication One of the major problems in communication is that many people suffer from what is known as a negative confirmation bias, according to McCurdy. “We much more easily hear what confirms our frustrations than what confirms our blessings,” he says. This isn’t merely in the case of doctor/provider-patient relationships — it’s in all relationships. As an example, McCurdy tells how he will often help couples on marriage retreats by giving them 30 seconds to write down everything that frustrates them about their spouse, followed by 30 seconds to write down everything they appreciate about the other. When it comes to their frustrations, each spouse scribbles away for the full 30 seconds, filling up entire sheets of paper; as soon as it’s time to write down their appreciations, both of them will have to stop and think for a moment. Then there’s the problem of people having distorted emotions. For example: a person’s fear felt during a bad dream or scary movie is every bit as real as the fear felt during a real-life threatening situation. “Our feelings can’t tell the difference between fantasy and reality,” McCurdy says. When it comes to doctor/provider-patient relationships, the combination of negative confirmation bias and distorted emotions can force a bad perception on the situation. Caregivers must be aware of this if they’re going to get through to people who are struggling to accept a difficult diagnosis or change poor habits. “If we’re going to operate from a platform of instilling hope and offering assistance, we’ve got to correct those things in ourselves,” McCurdy says.

Projecting a Good Bedside Manner So if patients can come to the exam room with a distorted perception, how can a doctor overcome that and still connect with them? The way to do this is by recognizing the patient’s humanity and inherent value, McCurdy explains. This is what makes a doctor successful. Even if a doctor has a strong understanding of medicine, that will accomplish only so much if the doctor doesn’t have good people skills. Instead, a doctor needs to connect with the human being behind the disease.

“When a patient feels valuable where they are, they are able to open up to accepting assistance and taking direction.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

A doctor or medical provider with good bedside manner is one who greets a patient warmly, makes eye contact when speaking, and uses language the patient will understand rather than medical jargon. A doctor or medical provider also must practice body language that is honest and express emotions that will put the patient at ease. But most importantly, caregivers with good bedside manner must be aware of a patient’s emotions and know how to react to them properly. CONTINUED ON PAGE 25


Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

ANNUAL

Charlottesville & Shenandoah Valley

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER

Acupuncture 2019

2019

AWARDS

The OurHealth Charlottesville & Shenandoah Valley Magazine Best Bedside Manner Awards are widely considered by doctors and providers as the most meaningful and cherished recognition they receive because it comes from patients and peers in our community. Throughout the month of June this year, the public was invited to visit www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com to cast their votes for their favorite medical providers in 61 medical specialties who they feel exemplify excellence in bedside manner – a medical provider’s total approach to patient care that encompasses the attributes of professionalism blended with compassion and attentiveness and the ability to communicate with concern and empathy.

For 2019, more than 33,000 votes were cast, which were tabulated by a third party firm to determine the first, second, third and honorable mention winners in each specialty. Please join us in congratulating the 288 doctors and providers in Charlottesville and Shenandoah Valley who are the 2019 Best Bedside Manner Award winners. If you have any questions, please submit via email to info@ourhealthvirginia.com.

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THI RD PLACE Gretchen Beck, MD Blue Ridge Allergy & Asthma Charlottesville | 434.977.6673 www.blueridgeallergy.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Emily McGowan, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

FIRST PLACE Anita Smith, LAc Anita Smith Acupuncture Staunton | 540.255.5050 www.anitasmithacupuncture.com

SECON D PL ACE Jing Huang, LAc Dr. Jing Acupuncture and Herbs Charlottesville | 716.380.3580 www.drjingacupunctureandherbs.com

Gary Rakes, MD Allergy Partners of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.951.2191 www.allergypartners.com/charlottesville

Anesthesiology 2019

T H IRD PL ACE Christie Savage, LAc Harmony Acupuncture and Healing Practices Charlottesville | 434.242.8305 Staunton | 540.245.0235 www.vaharmonyacupuncture.com

Allergy and Immunology 2019

FI RST PL ACE Heidi Henson, MD Anesthesia Associates of Augusta Fishersville | 540.332.4329 www.augustahealth.com

SECOND PLACE Burkhard Spiekermann, MD Albemarle Anesthesia Charlottesville | 434.654.7000 www.albemarleanesthesia.com

THI RD PLACE

FIRST PLACE Arvind Madaan, MD Charlottesville Allergy and Respiratory Enterprises (CARE) Charlottesville | 434.295.2727 Staunton | 540.245.0235 www.cvilleallergy.com

SECON D PL ACE Madeline Dillon, MD Allergy Partners of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.951.2191 www.allergypartners.com/ charlottesville

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

Jordan Hackworth, MD Commonwealth Anesthesia Associates North Chesterfield | 804.594.2622 www.caa-med.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Stephen Collins, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.982.0019 www.uvahealth.com Ed Eisenberg, MD Ed Eisenberg, MD – Anesthesia Fishersville | 540.416.0416 www.augustahealth.com Charles Pagels III, MD Anesthesia Associates of Augusta Fishersville | 540.332.4329 www.augustahealth.com


Audiology 2019

F I R S T P L A CE Kristin Koch, AuD Evolution Hearing Charlottesville | 434.260.8007 www.evolutionhearing.com

S E C O N D P L A CE Tammy Garber, AuD Hearing Health Associates Charlottesville | 434.205.4207 www.hearinghealthassoc.com

T HIR D P L A CE Julie Farrar-Hersch, PhD, CCC/A Augusta Audiology Associates, PC Fishersville | 540.932.5790 www.augustaaudiology.com

HONO R A B L E M E N TI ON Karen Klotz, HIS Virginia Hearing Group Verona | 540.248.1670 www.virginiahearinggroup.com Dawn Cooper, AuD, CCC-A Rivanna Hearing Center Charlottesville | 434.244.3277 www.rivannahearingcenter.com

Join Us in Congratulating The Winners OF THE

Best Bedside Manner Awards!

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22

Good Bedside Manner Doesn’t Mean Coddling Many patients will come into the exam room with a range of negative emotions. They might be upset about their diagnosis — fearful of what’s to come or frustrated by the thought that they have to change their lifestyle.

“Nobody goes to a doctor or medical provider without being in need. When they’re coming in, they’re already stimulated with emotion.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

McCurdy explains that doctors and medical providers should acknowledge their patient’s emotion — even in situations where the emotion seems overblown — so they can then lay the groundwork for moving onto a solution. “Don’t fight the emotion of where they are,” McCurdy says. “When we can acknowledge the way they feel, it’s like letting air out of an overinflated tire.” In other situations, patients might be disappointed that there isn’t a miracle cure they were hoping for, such as pills and other pharmaceuticals that are perceived to be the sole solution. Doctors and medical providers should be prepared for this. “How many people feel they failed if they don’t leave the doctor with a prescription for an antibiotic?” McCurdy poses rhetorically. He says this is especially true in the field of pediatrics, when parents can get frustrated that not enough is being done to help their sick child. “That’s the mindset we have today, that everything should be solved, everything should have a quick fix, rather than accepting that sometimes, life is messy,” McCurdy continues. “We need to learn to be OK and have hope in the midst of life being messy. That’s a tough thing.” In these situations, McCurdy says it’s important that doctors and providers empower their patients to overcome hardships related to their health. The challenge, however, is that contemporary society doesn’t view struggle as a normal part of life the way people viewed struggle, say, 50 years ago. “We’ve changed our perception so that when we’re facing normal rigors of life, we view those as really negative,” he says. “When we suffer something traumatic, we feel completely helpless and hopeless.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 29 www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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Bariatric Medicine

2019

FI RST PL ACE Peter Hallowell, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.4811 www.uvahealth.com

SECOND PLACE Bruce Schirmer, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2104 www.uvahealth.com

THI RD PLACE Lane Ritter, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Medical and Surgical Associates Charlottesville | 434.654.5260 www.sentara.com

Cardiology

2019

FI RST PL ACE Timothy Williams, MD Cardiovascular Associates of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.293.4072 www.cvilleheart.com

SECOND PLACE

HONORABLE MENTI O N

Christopher Bunn, DO Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7080 www.augustahealth.com

Glenn Brammer, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7080 www.augustahealth.com

THI RD PLACE

Gary Murray, MD Blue Ridge Cardiology Fishersville | 540.332.5915

Jaime Escanellas, MD UVA Health Fishersville | 434.243.7121 www.uvahealth.com

Michael Ragosta III, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.1000 www.uvahealth.com Kenneth Sternberg, DO, FACC Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7080 www.augustahealth.com

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville


Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019

2019

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Chiropractic

Dentistry: Children’s Dentistry

Dentistry: Cosmetic 2019

2019 2019

F IR S T P L A CE Michael Amato, DC The Amato Clinic Staunton | 540.213.3904 www.amatoclinic.com

FI RST PLACE FIRST PLACE Brian Brumbaugh, DDS Brian T. Brumbaugh DDS Staunton | 540.213.2244 www.cavityfreekid.com

S E C O N D P L A CE Joseph Rizzo, DC Dockery Rizzo Chiropractic Wellness Center Staunton | 540.886.0010 www.dockeryclinic.com

T HI R D P L A CE Scott Wagner, DC Scott Wagner Chiropractic and Sports Medicine Charlottesville | 434.978.4888 www.scottwagnerchiropractic.com

Ben Ross, DMD, FACP Pantops Prosthodontics Charlottesville | 434.977.9836 www.pantops.org

SECOND PL ACE SECOND PL ACE David Herce, DDS Children’s Dentistry of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.260.6836

Daniel LaGrua, DMD Dental Health Associates Verona | 540.248.2500 www.mydentalhealthassociates.com

www.childrensdentistryofcharlottesville.com

THI RD PL ACE

T H IRD PL ACE

Anita Neel, DDS Aesthetic Dentistry of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.984.3455 www.cvillesmiles.com

Aaron Stump, DDS Charlottesville Pediatric Dentistry Charlottesville | 434.975.7336 www.cvillepediatricdentistry.com

HONO R A B L E ME N TI ON

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON

Michelle Heppner, DC Heppner Family Chiropractic & Wellness Charlottesville | 434.974.7955 www.heppnerfamilychiropractic.com

Kathryn Cook, DDS, PC Children’s Dentistry with a Mother’s Touch Charlottesville | 434.817.5437 www.childrensdentistrycharlottesville.com

William Knizner, DC Waynesboro Chiropractic Waynesboro | 540.943.1434 www.augustawaynesborochiropractic.com

Jessica Moore, DDS Children’s Dentistry of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.260.6836 www.childrensdentistryofcharlottesville.com Barrett Peters, DDS, MSD Piedmont Pediatric Dentistry Charlottesville | 434.973.4344 www.piedmontpd.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON Steve Browning, DDS Browning Family Dentistry Waynesboro | 540.943.4215 www.bcfamilydentistry.com James Lee, DDS Lee Family Dentistry Charlottesville | 434.293.9916 www.leefamilysmiles.com Melissa Wolfe, DDS Maple Ridge Dental Staunton | 540.885.5050 www.mapleridgedental.net

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOT TESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Dentistry: Endodontics 2019

T H IRD PLACE

HONORABLE MENTI ON

Jack Kayton III, DDS Dr. Jack T. Kayton Family and Cosmetic Dentistry Charlottesville | 855.599.5581 www.dentistrycharlottesvilleva.com

Todd Brandt, DDS, MD Blue Ridge Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Fishersville and Lexington | 540.886.2956 www.blueridgeoralsurgery.com

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON Kevin Albert, DDS Albert Family Dentistry Charlottesville | 434.973.7695 www.albertfamilydentistry.com

F I R S T P L A CE Robert Grover, DDS Grover Endodontics Charlottesville | 434.973.1221 www.groverendo.com

S E C ON D P L A CE Mark Vagnetti, DDS Piedmont Endodontics Charlottesville | 434.260.7025 www.piedmontendova.com

Anita Bell, DDS Anita Bell, DDS Stuarts Draft | 540.337.1324 www.anitabelldds.com

Dentistry: Orthodontics

Kenneth Bowman, DDS Bowman Family Dentistry Waynesboro | 540.943.8545 www.bowmanfamilydentistry.com

2019

Elizabeth Paige Crowder, DDS Sapon and Swisher Dental Waynesboro | 540.943.5211 www.waynesborofamilydentistry.com

FI RST PLACE

T HIR D P L A CE David Connelly, DDS Central Virginia Endodontics, P.C. Charlottesville | 434.973.4301 www.centralvaendo.com

Dentistry: Oral Surgery 2019

Dentistry: General 2019

FIRST PL ACE

F I R S T P L A CE Duane J Bickers, DDS DJ Bickers Family and Cosmetic Dentistry Charlottesville | 434.984.6400 www.djbickers.com

S E C ON D P L A CE Mark Hammock, DDS Dr. Mark A. Hammock, DDS Fishersville | 540.942.9013

Corey Burgoyne, DMD Blue Ridge Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Fishersville and Lexington 540.886.2956 www.blueridgeoralsurgery.com

SE CON D PLACE Nathaniel Tricker, DDS Central Virginia Oral and Facial Surgeons, PLC Charlottesville | 434.973.3348 www.cvofs.com

T H IRD PLACE Ihab Sadoon, DDS Parkside Family Dental Bridgewater | 540.828.3518 www.parksidesmiles.com

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Carlos IbaĂąez, DDS Charlottesville Oral Surgery and Dental Implant Center, PLLC Charlottesville | 434.295.0911 www.cvilleoralsurgery.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

Quay Parrott, DDS, MS Parrott Orthodontics Staunton | 540.949.6600 www.parrottorthodontics.com

SECOND PL ACE Brent Lenz, DDS, MDS Blue Stone Orthodontics Harrisonburg | 540.433.1060 www.bluestoneorthodontics.com

THI RD PL ACE Bart Weis, DDS Charlottesville Orthodontics Charlottesville | 434.971.9601 www.charlottesvilleorthodontics.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON Suzanne Dennis, DDS Dr. Suzanne Dennis Orthodontics Charlottesville | 434.973.4446 www.charlottesvilleorthodonticsvirginia.com Andrew Glassick, DDS Hamer and Glassick Orthodontics Charlottesville | 434.296.0188 www.cvillebraces.com

Congratulations

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARD WINNERS


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

Patients can be difficult because most people don’t have a healthy outlook on hardship — or they act that way, at least. When McCurdy speaks at conferences, he recalls to the crowd a bit of advice his grandmother used to give: “It’s not a big deal unless your head’s on fire and you’re bleeding out of your ear.” In that context, McCurdy will ask his audience how many of them have suffered a big deal that day, or that week, or even that month. It’s usually not until they reflect on the past year that most people concede they’ve been up against something that could be classified as a big deal. But then McCurdy asks his audience how many of them have acted as if they’ve faced a big deal already that day. Most people will raise their hand and acknowledge they have.

“The point made is you’re operating on a distorted perception and that’s affecting your ability to see the world accurately, to have hope in the middle of these things because you’re convincing yourself this is worse than it really is.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

“When we can separate that, then when someone really is in trauma, we can more effectively deal with it.”

Expressing Emotion Part of a doctor’s or medical provider’s communication is nonverbal, often in the form of facial expressions. As noted by pioneering psychologist Paul Ekman in the 1960s, certain facial expressions are universally recognized across cultures even if people aren’t speaking the same language. The expressions Ekman noted as such include: HAPPINESS, DISGUST,

ANGER, SADNESS, SURPRISE AND FEAR. CONTINUED ON PAGE 33

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Dentistry: Periodontics 2019

Claire Plautz, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.932.4444 www.augustahealth.com

T H IRD P LACE ( TI E) Anna Magee, MD Charlottesville Dermatology Charlottesville | 434-984-2400 www.cvillederm.com

Daniel Ricciardi, MD US Acute Care Solutions Charlottesville | 434.654.7150 www.usacs.com

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON Cynthia Dent, MD Blue Ridge Dermatology Waynesboro | 540.949.6934 www.blueridgedermatology.org

F IR S T P L A CE David Krese, DDS David L. Krese, DDS Charlottesville | 434.971.8159 www.davidlkresedds.com

Adam Rochman, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.932.4444 www.augustahealth.com

Brett Krasner, MD Family Dermatology of Albemarle Charlottesville | 434.964.9500 www.familydermalbemarle.com

Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Hannah Pearce, MD Albemarle Dermatology Charlottesville | 434.923.4651 www.albemarledermatology.com

S E C OND P L A CE Angel Ray, DDS Angel Ray, DDS Waynesboro | 540.943.5389

2019

Emergency Medicine FI RST PLACE

Dermatology

Nelly Maybee, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7180 www.augustahealth.com

2019

2019

SECOND PL ACE

FIRST PL ACE F IR S T P L A CE Kristen Savola, MD Savola Aesthetic Dermatology Center Fishersville | 540.451.2833 www.savoladermatology.com

S E C OND P L A CE John Hendrix Jr., MD Dermatologic Surgery of Central Virginia Charlottesville | 434.979.7700 www.dermsurgcv.com

T HI R D P L A CE ( TI E ) Jane Lynch, MD Shenandoah Dermatology and Aesthetics Staunton | 540.885.4500 www.shenandoahdermatology.com

Jennifer Kirby, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.1825 www.uvahealth.com

Jennifer Silber, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.932.4444 www.augustahealth.com

THI RD PL ACE Jessicah Collins, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7180 www.augustahealth.com

SE CON D PLACE William Brady Jr., MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON Sandhya Chhabra, MD Albemarle Endocrinology PLC Charlottesville | 434.244.0934 www.albemarleendocrinology.com

T H IRD P LACE David Rylak, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.932.4444 www.augustahealth.com

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON Robert Cocke, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.932.4444 www.augustahealth.com

2019

2019

2019

2019

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville


Family Practice

2019

FIRST PLA CE H. August Sanusi, MD Albemarle Center for Family Medicine Charlottesville | 434.973.4040 www.albemarlecenter.com

S E C O N D P L A CE

H ON ORA BLE M EN TI ON

H. Lynn Moore, MD Augusta Health Staunton | 540.337.2930 www.augustahealth.com

Colleen Arnold, MD Augusta Health Lexington | 540.463.3381 www.augustahealth.com

*Dr. Moore retired in August 2019 after 60 years of service to the community.

Scott Young, MD Carilion Clinic Family Medicine – Waynesboro Waynesboro | 540.949.8241 www.carilionclinic.com

T HIR D P L A CE

John Marsh, MD Middlebrook Family Medicine Middlebrook | 540.887.2627 www.middlebrookfamilymedicine.com

Fertility Medicine

2019

FIRST PLA CE Bruce Bateman, MD Reproductive Medicine and Surgery Center of Virginia Charlottesville | 434.654.8520 www.rmscva.com

S E C O N D P L A CE

H ON ORA BLE M EN TI ON

Diane Rozycki, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

Christopher Williams, MD Reproductive Medicine and Surgery Center of Virginia Charlottesville | 434.654.8520 www.rmscva.com

T HIR D P L A CE Laura Smith, MD Reproductive Medicine and Surgery Center of Virginia Charlottesville | 434.654.8520 www.rmscva.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Gastroenterology 2019

T H IRD PLACE Brian Behm, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.3090 www.uvahealth.com

Geriatric Medicine 2019

H ON ORA BL E MENTI ON Allan Hardy, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7350 www.augustahealth.com

F I R S T P L A CE David Balaban, MD Charlottesville Gastroenterology Associates Charlottesville | 434.817.8484 www.cvillegi.com

S E C ON D P L A CE Daniel Pambianco, MD Charlottesville Gastroenterology Associates Charlottesville | 434.817.8484 www.cvillegi.com

Cynthia Yoshida, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.297.5759 www.uvahealth.com

Join Us in Congratulating the WINNERS OF THE

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS

FI RST PL ACE David Chesler, MD Charlottesville Family Medicine Charlottesville | 434.973.1831 www.charlottesvillemedicine.com

SECOND PLACE D. Andrew Macfarlan, MD Sentara Family Medicine at Albemarle Square Charlottesville | 434.654.2830 www.sentara.com

THI RD PLACE Christina Tieu, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

Hematology/ Oncology 2019

FI RST PL ACE Naheed Velji, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.332.5960 www.augustahealth.com

SECOND PLACE Michael Douvas, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.9333 www.uvahealth.com

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29

Professor Robert Plutchik of the University of South Florida would later conduct follow-up research and add JOY and TRUST to Ekman’s list. Doctors/medical providers and patients can bring any of these expressions on their face when they enter the exam room, and in many cases, the emotion might not have anything to do with the appointment, diagnosis or recommended treatment. A patient might be sad because he broke a sentimental family heirloom before heading to the doctor’s office. The doctor or medical provider might be angry because he got a speeding ticket on his or her way to work. In either of these scenarios, each person’s expression might affect the communication between them and the overall experience of the visit.

Ang er

• E ye • B brows p u • D lging ey ulled do il e wn • P at e d n o s s u rs e d lip trils s

Consider a doctor’s or medical provider’s anger. ANGER is an emotion that can range from mild irritation to extreme rage. Anger is expressed via lowered eyebrows, pursed lips, bulging eyes and dilated nostrils. Inside the body, heart rate and blood pressure increase, and levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline rise abnormally. Anger can often be met with a defensive reaction. Similarly, the patient’s SADNESS, an emotion associated with loss or helplessness, can range from mild disappointment to extreme despair. It’s expressed by lowering the corners of the mouth, raising the inner part of the eyebrow and pouting the lips.

If the doctor or patient are aware of how they are feeling, they can better understand how the other might respond to their emotion, and they can strive to change their expression so they are not bringing problems like broken heirlooms or speeding tickets into the exam room. CONTINUED ON PAGE 37

Disgust

Sadn ess

down pulled brows • Eye d le e wrink p • Nos ulled u er lip p p p U • e s loo • Lips

• In ner rais corners of e • L ed yeb owe row s mou ring cor n e rs th w ith p of th outin e g of www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com lips

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2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

HE M ATO L O GY / O N CO LOGY T HIR D P L A CE

Internal Medicine

Susan Modesitt, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.9333 www.uvahealth.com

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

2019 2019

HONOR A B L E ME N TI O N Kelvin Raybon, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.332.5960 www.augustahealth.com

FIRST PL ACE

Michael E. Williams, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.9333 www.uvahealth.com

Stephanie Pitsilos, MD Augusta Health Staunton | 540.245.7725 www.augustahealth.com

Infectious Disease 2019

Amanda Guedes, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.213.2630 www.augustahealth.com

S E C ON D P L A CE Eric Houpt, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.982.1700 www.uvahealth.com

T HIR D P L A CE Allison Baroco, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.213.2630 www.augustahealth.com

Richard Brantley, MD Fox and Brantley Internal Medicine Charlottesville | 434.244.5684 www.foxandbrantley.com

T H IRD PLACE ( TI E)

John Snyder, DO, FACP Augusta Health Stuarts Draft | 540.245.7870 www.augustahealth.com

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON David Chesler, MD Charlottesville Family Medicine Charlottesville | 434.973.1831 www.charlottesvillemedicine.com

WINNERS OF THE

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS 34

SECOND PL ACE Brooke Vergales, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0123 www.uvahealth.com

THI RD PL ACE (TI E) Robert Sinkin, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0123 www.uvahealth.com Jonathan Swanson, MD UVA Children's Hospital Charlottesville | 434.924.0123 www.uvahealth.com

Nephrology

Renee Fischer, MD Sentara Internal Medicine Physicians Charlottesville | 434.654.2800 www.sentara.com Joyce Geilker, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.4500 www.uvahealth.com David Herring, MD Sentara Waynesboro Internal Medicine Waynesboro | 540.941.2400 www.sentara.com

Join Us in Congratulating the

Jennifer Burnsed, MD UVA Children’s Hospital Charlottesville | 434.924.0123 www.uvahealth.com

SECON D PLACE

Kimberly Dowdell, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

F I R S T P L A CE

FI RST PL ACE

William Sayre, MD Carilion Clinic Internal Medicine – Lexington Lexington | 540.463.2181 www.carilionclinic.org Shelley Snodgrass, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.332.5687 www.augustahealth.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

FI RST PL ACE Kevin McConnell, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Medical and Surgical Associates Charlottesville | 434.654.5260 www.sentara.com

SECOND PL ACE Jennifer Charlton, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2096 www.uvahealth.com


www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Neurology 2019

T H IRD P L ACE

HONORABLE MENTI ON

Alison Baumann, FNP-C Albemarle Center for Family Medicine Charlottesville | 434.973.4040 www.albemarlecenter.com

Kenneth Barron, MD Center for Advanced Gynecology Charlottesville | 434.234.4903 www.virginiagyn.com

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON Ananda Cronin, FNP Neighborhood Family Health Center Charlottesville | 434.227.5624 www.cvhsinc.org

F I R S T P L A CE Madaline Harrison, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.5568 www.uvahealth.com

S E C ON D P L A CE Robert McMahon, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2706 www.uvahealth.com

T HIR D P L A CE Peter Puzio, DO Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.932.5878 www.augustahealth.com

HONOR A B L E M E N TI O N James Brenton, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2706 www.uvahealth.com

Candyce Dorsey, NP Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.296.9161 www.charlottesvillepeds.com Carrie Ferrel, MSN, NP UVA Health Louisa | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com Tiffany Greenberg, MSN, FNP-C Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.332.5687 www.augustahealth.com Matthew Lemieux, MSN, PNP UVA Health Fishersville | 540.932.0980 www.uvahealth.com

Kelly Vincel, CPNP Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.296.9161 www.charlottesvillepeds.com

Roberto Lianez, NP Shenandoah Valley Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Fishersville | 540.932.5850 www.shenandoahvalleyorthopedics.com

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Siva Thiagarajah, MD Obstetrics and Gynecology Associates Charlottesville | 434.979.2121 www.obgynassociatescville.com

Ophthalmology

FI RST PLACE David Barnes, MD EyeOne Fishersville | 540.213.7720 www.eyeoneva.com

FIRST PLACE

SECOND PL ACE

Edward Wolanski, MD Edward T. Wolanski, M.D., PC Charlottesville | 434.293.9800 www.wolanskigyn.com

Ashley Schauer, MD Blue Ridge Ophthalmology Charlottesville | 434.295.3227 www.blueridgeeyemd.com

THI RD PL ACE SE CON D PL ACE Ami Keatts, MD, FACOG, CPPS Augusta Health Care for Women Fishersville | 540.213.7750 www.ahcfw.com

T H IRD P L ACE S E C ON D P L A CE

Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms, MD The Woman’s Center Ob-Gyn Associates Fishersville | 540.332.5577 www.thewomanscenterva.com

Obstetrics and Gynecology

Nurse Practitioner (NP)

F I R S T P L A CE

Matthew Montgomery, MD Jefferson OB/GYN Charlottesville | 434.977.4488 www.jeffersonobgyn.net

2019

2019

2019

Dane Larsen, MD, FACOG, CPPS Augusta Health Care for Women Fishersville | 540.213.7750 www.ahcfw.com

Kelly Owens, MD Jefferson OB/GYN Charlottesville | 434.977.4488 www.jeffersonobgyn.net

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

Mark Gonce, MD Charlottesville Eye Associates Charlottesville | 434.977.5160 www.charlottesvilleeye.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON B. Christian Carter, MD Albemarle Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, PC Charlottesville | 434.295.5193 www.aposva.com


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 33

But not all shows of emotion are bad. Because doctors and medical providers must be personable to form a relationship, emotion is important. In many cases, an expression of happiness can put patients at ease or make them feel optimistic. HAPPINESS is an emotion often associated with contentment or satisfaction, and it’s expressed with a smile, sometimes with the mouth parted to expose the teeth. Cheeks are raised and wrinkles form on the outside of the eye (known as crow’s feet) and from the outer nose to the upper lip. A person who is happy has a lower heart rate and reduced blood pressure. People who fake an expression of happiness might not necessarily be deceitful, but rather showing friendliness toward others.

Hap piness

To achieve a productive bedside manner, doctors and medical providers must find a way of separating the emotions of the outside world with what they must accomplish in their practice.

• M usc tigh le aroun d th • C tened e ey hee es k corn s raise d wit e rs raise h lip d dia gon a l ly

Part of that is achieving perspective — realizing that not everything is the end of the world, such as in the hypothetical case of the speeding ticket.

“If I’m going to instill hope and offer assistance to folks who are struggling, I can’t act like everything in my life is a big deal.”

Surprise

up pulled brows up d • Eye e ll u lids p • Eye n th ope • Mou

– Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

“If I get a speeding ticket on my way to work and I let it affect my whole day, I’m acting as if it’s this horrible thing, then I’m not able to effectively deal with patients. How can I speak into their perception of life if I’m distorted by something that in the long run is not really a big deal?” CONTINUED ON PAGE 41

Fear

• E ye • U brows pull ppe ed u eyes r eyelid s p u p a n d to sligh • M lled g et h t ly outh er stre bulging up with tche www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com d

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2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Orthopaedics

OPHT H A L MO L O GY H O N ORA BLE M E NT I O N CO N TI N U E D... Todd Long, MD EyeOne Charlottesville | 540.213.7720 www.eyeoneva.com

2019

Paul McConnell, MD EyeOne Staunton | 540.213.7720 www.eyeoneva.com

Optometry

FI RST PLACE

David Nielsen, DO Charlottesville Orthopaedic Center Charlottesville | 434.244.8412 www.cvilleortho.com

Stephen Keefe, MD Keefe Centre Fishersville | 540.317.1547 www.drkeefeent.com *As of December 1, 2019, Dr. Keefe will see patients at Advanced ENT and Allergy in Newport News, VA.

Ramon Esteban, MD Shenandoah Valley Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Fishersville | 540.932.5850 www.shenandoahvalleyorthopedics.com

F I R S T P L A CE

T H IRD P L ACE

Chelsea Johnson, OD MyEyeDoctor Charlottesville | 434.760.2020 www.myeyedr.com

Edward Hemphill, MD Carilion Clinic Orthopaedic Surgery – Lexington Lexington | 540.510.6200 www.carilionclinic.org

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON

S E C ON D P L A CE

William Grant, MD Albemarle Orthopaedics, PLC Charlottesville | 434.817.7200 www.drwilliamgrant.com

Shannon Franklin, OD Crozet Eye Care Charlottesville | 434.823.4441 www.crozeteyecare.com

Stephen Gunther, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Orthopedic Services, Pantops Charlottesville | 434.654.5575 www.sentara.com

T HIR D P L A CE Lauren Rivellino, OD EyeOne Charlottesville | 540.213.7720 www.eyeoneva.com

John Hall, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Orthopedic Services, North Charlottesville | 434.654.5575 www.sentara.com

HONOR A B L E M E N TI O N Janice DiGirolamo, OD MyEyeDoctor Charlottesville | 434.977.2020 www.myeyedr.com

Tom Pereles, MD Shenandoah Valley Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Fishersville | 540.932.5850 www.shenandoahvalleyorthopedics.com

Susan Herndon, OD EyeOne Fishersville and Staunton | 540.213.7720 www.eyeoneve.com

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2019

FIRST PLACE

SE CON D PL ACE

2019

Anthony Zarella, OD Horizon Family Eye Care Charlottesville | 434.296.2020 www.horizonfamilyeyecare.com

Otolaryngology (ENT)

2019

2019

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

2019

SECOND PL ACE James Daniero, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2040 www.uvahealth.com

THI RD PL ACE Stephen Early, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.5934 www.uvahealth.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON Michael Plautz, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7010 www.augustahealth.com Paige Powers, MD Piedmont Otolaryngology Charlottesville | 434.220.0045 www.entdoc.com

Join Us in Congratulating

THE WINNERS OF THE

2019

Best Bedside Manner awards


Pain Management

2019

FIRST PLA CE Akhtar Purvez, MD Pain and Spine Center of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.328.2774 www.painspinecenters.com

S E C O N D P L A CE R. Benjamin Messinger, MD Charlottesville Interventional Pain Management, LLC Charlottesville | 434.295.3600 www.charlottesvillepainmanagementcenter.com

T HIR D P L A CE

H ON ORA BLE M EN TI ON

Jared Davis, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.332.5747 www.augustahealth.com

Reza Salajegheh, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

Palliative Medicine

2019

FIRST PLA CE Angela Stiltner, MD Hospice of the Piedmont Charlottesville | 434.817.6900 www.hopva.org

S E C O N D P L A CE

H ON ORA BLE M EN TI ON

Timothy Short, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

Leslie Blackhall, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.3922 www.uvahealth.com

T HIR D P L A CE Patrick Baroco, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7262 www.augustahealth.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Pediatrics

Physical Medicine 2019

2019

HONORABLE MENTI ON Meghan Little, DPT, CHT, CMTPT Synergy Rehab and Wellness Staunton | 540.416.0530 Waynesboro | 540.932.0333 www.synergyrehabandwellness.com Debbie Oickle, PT,MHSC,OCS,MTC Atlantic Sports & Rehab Services, Inc Charlottesville | 434.978.4915 www.atlanticsportsandrehab.com

F I R S T P L A CE

FIRST PLACE

L. Paige Perriello, MD, FAAP Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.296.9161 www.charlottesvillepeds.com

Daniel Sullivan, DO Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7400 www.augustahealth.com

S E C ON D P L A CE Anne Robertson, MD Valley Pediatric Group Verona | 540.885.8143 www.valleypediatricgroup.com

T HIR D P L A CE Gretchen Brantley, MD Piedmont Pediatrics Charlottesville | 434.975.7777 www.piedmontpediatrics.net

SE CON D PL ACE David Rubendall, DO UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.0075 www.uvahealth.com

2019

Susan Miller, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.5600 www.uvahealth.com

FI RST PLACE

Physical Therapy

Robert Fern, MD, PhD, FAAP Valley Pediatric Group Waynesboro | 540.949.0118 www.valleypediatricgroup.com Michael A. Williams, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.5321 www.uvahealth.com Paul Wisman, MD, FAAP Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.296.9161 www.charlottesvillepeds.com

Join Us in Congratulating the WINNERS OF THE

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS 40

Physician Assistant (PA)

T H IRD P L ACE

HONOR A B L E M E N TI O N Peter Devries, MD Valley Pediatric Group Waynesboro | 540.949.0118 www.valleypediatricgroup.com

Annie Shreckhise Weaver, PT, DPT, CF-L1 Synergy Rehab and Wellness Staunton | 540.416.0530 Waynesboro | 540.932.0333 www.synergyrehabandwellness.com

2019

Amy Martin, PA-C WellFamily Medicine Charlottesville | 434.962.6234 www.wellfamilymed.com

SECOND PL ACE Cameron Simmons, PA Charlottesville Family Medicine Charlottesville | 434.973.1831 www.charlottesvillemedicine.com

FIRST PLACE Tobin Forbus, PT, DPT, MS Synergy Rehab and Wellness Waynesboro | 540.932.0333 Staunton | 540.416.0530 www.synergyrehabandwellness.com

THI RD PL ACE Gary Corder, PA Cardiovascular Associates of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.293.4072 www.cvilleheart.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON SE CON D PL ACE Heather Walton, DPT, OCS Move Better Physical Therapy Charlottesville | 434.817.0980 www.movebettertherapy.com

T H IRD P L ACE James Collins, PT, CSCS Pivot Physical Therapy Charlottesville | 434.245.6472 www.pivotphysicaltherapy.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

Katherine Loose, PA Charlottesville Dermatology Charlottesville | 434.984.2400 www.cvillederm.com Yara White, PA-C Savola Aesthetic Dermatology Center, PLC Fishersville | 540.451.2833 www.savoladermatology.com


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

Doctors and medical providers also must provide support to patients during hard times in their life. If a caregiver must deliver unfortunate news, such as a bad diagnosis, he or she should communicate with compassion rather than personal sadness. As McCurdy explains it, the doctor or medical provider should focus on the patient’s emotions rather than their own. “At the most basic level, even if the news is horrible, we’re still in this with you,” McCurdy says. “When we share bad news, it’s a lot less about my emotional state.”

He emphasizes that the doctor or medical provider should, instead of reinforcing the patient’s emotional state, remind them of their own strength. The key to that is showing empathy — not to be confused with sympathy, which is often misapplied in society, according to McCurdy. If a patient comes in with a situation that it not traumatic but simply difficult, the doctor or medical provider shouldn’t be overly sympathetic and say, “I’m so sorry you’re going through that.” This show of sympathy encourages a false perception. “What we need to get better at is offering empathy, and empathy is about acknowledging what they’re expressing,” McCurdy explains. “A patient who comes in for care, but is having a hard time doing their part to take better care of their health gets frustrated. In turn, the doctor or medical provider can get frustrated with what may be perceived as the patient’s disregarding or not following his or her medical advice, thus seeing him or her as quote ‘noncompliant’. Instead, we can show empathy and demonstrate we can relate to and identify with the patient, such as saying: ‘I can tell how frustrating this is for you.’ When we show empathy, we disarm someone from the emotion that’s driving them.” The other part of consoling a patient is having a sense of immediacy. It’s easy to reflect on the past or anticipate the future. What life choices brought the patient to this state of health? What steps are needed for him or her to get healthy again? Instead, when doctors and medical providers are immediate — that is, focused on the moment at hand — they can help the patient move past the moment. “We need to stop and address what we see right then. When we do that, the patient connects to what I’m doing,” McCurdy says. “Empathy and immediacy go hand-in-hand.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 45

Joy

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• R elax ey e s e d ey e b row ,a • S ome nd chee s, a so times p ks rese ft sm ntin ile

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Empathy Sympathy: vs.

Instead of reinforcing a patient’s emotional state, a doctor should remind them of their own strength. The key to this is showing empathy — not to be confused with sympathy. If a patient comes in with a situation that is not traumatic by simply difficult, The use of SYMPATHY encourages a false perception. Where as, the use of EMPATHY disarms the patient from the emotion that’s driving them. EXAMPLE OF SYMPATHY: “I’m so sorry you’re going through this.” EXAPMLE OF EMPATHY: “I can tell how frustrating this is for you.”

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Plastic Surgery: Cosmetic 2019

SE CON D PLACE Jonathan Black, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.1234 www.uvahealth.com

F IR S T P L A CE

Podiatry 2019

HONORA B L E ME N TI O N Jeremy Benedetti, MD, FACS Augusta Plastic Surgery Fishersville | 540.932.5771 www.uvaplasticsurgery.com Thomas Gampper, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.5068 www.uvahealth.com

Plastic Surgery: Reconstructive 2019

FIRST PL ACE

THI RD PL ACE

Christopher Stewart, DPM Central Virginia Foot and Ankle Laser Center Charlottesville | 434.979.0456 www.cvillefootankle.com

Diana Smith, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.332.4060 www.augustahealth.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON Nassima Ait Daoud Tiouririne, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.0563 www.uvahealth.com

SE CON D PLACE Joseph Disabato, DPM Virginia Foot and Ankle Surgical Associates Culpeper | 434.248.7093 www.vfasa.com

T H IRD P LACE Maryellen Waltz, DPM Foot and Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic Fishersville | 540.949.5150 www.footandankle-usa.com

Psychology and Counseling 2019

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON Theodore McKee, DPM Blue Ridge Footcare and Surgery Staunton | 540.885.8891 www.blueridgefootcareandsurgery.co

F IR S T P L A CE Christopher Campbell, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.8116 www.uvahealth.com

42

SECOND PL ACE Thomas Jayne, MD Augusta Psychological Associates Fishersville | 540.949.4202 www.augustapsychological.com

Sara Kaltreider, MD Eyelid and Facial Aesthetics Charlottesville | 434.244.8610 www.eyelidandfacialaesthetics.com

Brian Showalter, MD The Center for Plastic Surgery at Sentara Martha Jefferson Charlottesville | 434.654.8920 www.sentara.com

FI RST PLACE Timothy Kane, MD Comprehensive Behavioral Health and TMS Treatment Center Staunton | 540.688.2646 www.getbacktoyou.com

S E C OND P L A CE

T HI R D P L A CE

2019

T H IRD P LACE John Jared Christophel, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.9391 www.uvahealth.com

Saied Asfa, MD Asfa Plastic Surgery and Medical Spa Harrisonburg | 540.432.0303 www.asfaplasticsurgery.com

Psychiatry

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

FI RST PLACE Joshua Cordonnier, LCSW Charlottesville Psychological Associates Charlottesville | 434.971.4747 www.cpatherapy.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

P SYC HO L O GY A N D COUN SELIN G S E C OND P L A CE Sharon Davis, LPC Thriveworks Charlottesville | 434.812.4009 www.thriveworks.com

T HI R D P L A CE David Sedgwick, PhD Charlottesville Psychological Associates Charlottesville | 434.971.4747 www.cpatherapy.com

H ON ORA BL E MENTI ON

Radiology

Jason Lawrence, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7190 www.augustahealth.com

FI RST PL ACE

Radiation Oncology

HONORA B L E M E N TI O N Katharine Knapp, LPC Creative Integration Therapy Charlottesville | 434.260.3501 www.creativeintegrationtherapy.com

SECOND PLACE

FIRST PLACE Robert Kyler, MD Shenandoah Valley Radiation Oncology Associates Fishersville | 540.245.7100 www.augustahealth.com 2019

F IR S T P L A CE

H ON ORA BL E MENTI ON

Alex Schult, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Medical and Surgical Associates Charlottesville | 434.654.5260 www.sentara.com

T HI R D P L A CE Yun Michael Shim, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.5219 www.uvahealth.com

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John Angle, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.9401 www.uvahealth.com

Rheumatology 2019

Timothy Showalter, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.5191 www.uvahealth.com

S E C OND P L A CE

2019

THI RD PLACE

T H IRD PLACE

George Verghese, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7190 www.augustahealth.com

2019

V. Colt Peyton, MD Charlottesville Radiology, LTD Charlottesville | 434.654.7106 www.crlsurgical.com

SE CON D PL ACE Anthony Crimaldi II, MD Central Virginia Radiation Oncologists Charlottesville | 434.654.8125 www.sentara.com

2019

Christopher Gaskin, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.0630 www.uvahealth.com

2019

Emilie Thomas, MA, LMFT Valley Pastoral Counseling Center Waynesboro | 540.943.8722 www.valleypastoral.org

Pulmonary

2019

Pearl Yu, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.5321 www.uvahealth.com

2019

Einsley-Marie Janowski, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.982.6278 www.uvahealth.com

Join Us in Congratulating the WINNERS OF THE

2019 BEST

BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

FI RST PL ACE Astrud Leyva, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.0439 www.uvahealth.com

SECOND PLACE Keith Frick, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.0439 www.uvahealth.com

THI RD PLACE Ann Henry, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

Focusing on the Content, Not the Delivery Productive communication is a two-way street. Doctors and medical providers must speak well and listen well, as do patients. In situations where a doctor’s or medical provider’s tone isn’t exactly what the patient wants to hear — because it sometimes will not be — the patient should understand that the caregiver still has his or her best interest at heart. For example, a doctor or medical provider might be happy and jovial when they first come in to greet the patient, thus putting the patient at ease. But later in the appointment, the caregiver has to be very firm and forward with his or her advice as to what the patient should be doing at home. Recognizing this firmness is not necessarily poor bedside manner is very important. “The doctor or medical provider has to be aware of his or her delivery; at the same time, the patient needs to realize it’s the content not the manner,” McCurdy says. “We’ve got to work on both. I’m not necessarily warm and fuzzy, but I like to think I’m hopeful. I’m hopeful, but very direct.”

Good communication is about taking what is said at face value. Those who overthink or overanalyze nonverbal communication — or those who are passive aggressive in their delivery — run the risk of drawing or delivering false information. “Ignore what you see and pay attention to what you hear,” McCurdy says. “Learn to ignore the white noise.” This can be difficult when one or both parties is bad at communication, and not just in a doctor/providerpatient relationship. McCurdy compares it to a man who asks his wife whether he can play golf one Saturday. His wife scoffs and says yes in an exasperated voice. If the man listens to tone, he won’t go play golf; on the other hand, if he listens to the content, he will take his wife at her word and feel at liberty to play golf that day. This is about trusting and operating on the words that a person says, and about having transparent communication. CONTINUED ON PAGE 49

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

HONORA B L E M E N TI O N

SECON D PLACE

Don Martin, MD Sentara Rheumatology Specialists Harrisonburg | 540.689.5700 www.sentara.com

Stephen Brockmeier, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.7778 www.uvahealth.com

Surgery: Colon and Rectal

T H IRD PLACE

Sleep Medicine 2019

2019

Clark Baumbusch, MD Sentara Charlottesville | 434.654.5575 www.sentara.com

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON John MacKnight, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

FI RST PLACE Kristin Turza, MD, FACS, FASCRS Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7705 www.augustahealth.com

F IR S T P L A CE Elizabeth Foreman, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Medical and Surgical Associates Charlottesville | 434.654.5260 www.sentara.com

Surgery: Cardiac 2019

Traci Hedrick, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.2670 www.uvahealth.com

THI RD PL ACE

S E C ON D P L A CE W. Chris Winter, MD Charlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine Charlottesville | 434.293.9149 www.cvilleneuroandsleep.com

T HI R D P L A CE Eric Davis, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

Sports Medicine 2019

F IR S T P L A CE Jack Otteni, MD Shenandoah Valley Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Fishersville | 540.332.5850 www.shenandoahvalleyorthopedics.com

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SECOND PL ACE

FIRST PL ACE John Kern, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.982.4301 www.uvahealth.com

Zachary Gregg, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Medical and Surgical Associates Charlottesville | 434.654.5260 www.sentara.com

Surgery: General

SECON D PLACE Gorav Ailawadi, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.5052 www.uvahealth.com

2019

T H IRD PLACE Leora Yarboro, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2158 www.uvahealth.com

Congratulations WINNERS OF THE

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

FI RST PLACE William Blake McKibbin, MD Augusta Surgery Fishersville | 540.332.5909 www.augustasurgery.org

SECOND PLACE John Sedovy, MD Carilion Clinic Wound Center – Lexington Lexington | 540.458.3488 www.carilionclinic.org


www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

S U R G E RY: GE N E R A L T HIR D P L A CE David Shonka, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.1565 www.uvahealth.com

HONOR A B L E M E N TI O N Lynn Dengel, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com William Thompson, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7705 www.augustahealth.com

SE CON D PL ACE

THI RD PL ACE

A. Bobby Chhabra, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.982.4263 www.uvahealth.com

Ashok Asthagiri, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.2757 www.uvahealth.com

T H IRD P L ACE Michael Potter, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Orthopedic Services, North Charlottesville | 434.654.5575 www.sentara.com

Surgery: Orthopaedic 2019

Surgery: Neurosurgery

Surgery: Hand 2019

F. Winston Gwathmey Jr., MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.7778 www.uvahealth.com

2019

FIRST PLACE F I R S T P L A CE Michael Devine, MD Charlottesville Hand Surgery Charlottesville | 434.984.4263 www.cvillehand.com

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FI RST PLACE

Mark Shaffrey, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.1843 www.uvahealth.com

SECOND PL ACE George Godette, MD Augusta Orthopedic Surgery Lexington 540.464.3465 Staunton | 540.885.1281 www.augustaortho.com

SE CON D PL ACE

THI RD PL ACE

John Jane Jr, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.5749 www.uvahealth.com

David Diduch, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.7778 www.uvahealth.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville


IS YOUR

FAVORITE DOCTOR OR PROVIDER MISSING

FROM THE LIST OF WINNERS? CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45

“If you get both sides working at once, it works well. In a patient/provider-doctor relationship, that’s pretty tough because we can only control one side of that.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

Ultimately, however, a doctor’s or medical provider’s number one priority is communicating what a patient needs to hear, even if that means tough love. Patients should recognize this as such. “My job is not to make you feel good,” McCurdy says. “My job is to tell you the truth and give you the information you need because you are valuable.” From the patient’s perspective, it helps to acknowledge his or her doctor or medical provider is just another human being with complex emotions who is trying to do the best he or she can with the knowledge possessed. “Don’t put doctors or medical providers on a pedestal,” McCurdy says. “It’s the same with doctors/medical providers, lawyers, preachers and folks in government. We need to recognize they are individuals just like we are. As patients, we need to go in and realize this is a person as well.” And, it helps when patients demonstrate kindness toward their providers.

In the Charlottesville and Shenandoah Valley community, there are thousands upon thousands of exceptional doctors and providers who are just as committed to providing exceptional bedside manner to their patients as the winners on this list. If you feel your doctor or provider is deserving of recognition for his or her excellent bedside manner and would like to receive reminders of when voting will open for the 2019 Best Bedside Manner Awards so you can nominate him or her, please visit

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com and subscribe to our e-newsletter.

Working off the model of empathy, truthfulness and kindness, doctors and medical providers will be able to help their patients feel seen and heard — this will go a long way in demonstrating to patients that they are valued and their doctor or medical provider has their best interests at heart.

“When we can demonstrate that value to them, all of sudden their issues are important, then they’re willing to trust more and willing to take more direction.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

This is what makes up good bedside manner, and it can make all the difference.

ON THE WEB

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

S U R G ERY: O R TH O P A ED IC HONOR A B L E ME N TI O N Tom Brown, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.243.1673 www.uvahealth.com

Surgery: Spine

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON

HONORABL E MENTI ON

Xudong Joshua Li, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

Christoper Willms, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Medical and Surgical Associates Charlottesville | 434.654.5260 www.sentara.com

Surgery: Vascular

Urgent Care Medicine

2019 2019 2019

F I R S T P L A CE Francis Shen, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.982.4832 www.uvahealth.com

S E C ON D P L A CE Jacob Young, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Neurosciences Charlottesville | 434.654.8960 www.sentara.com

T HIR D P L A CE Clark Bernard, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7400 www.augustahealth.com

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FIRST PLACE Charles Goff, MD, FACS Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.245.7705 www.augustahealth.com

SECON D PL ACE James Denton, MD UVA Health Culpeper | 540.825.2600 www.uvahealth.com

T H IRD PL ACE Lewis Owens, MD Sentara Martha Jefferson Vascular and Vein Center Charlottesville | 434.654.1700 www.sentara.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville

FI RST PL ACE Daniel Parks, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.332.4000 www.augustahealth.com

SECOND PLACE Christopher Sutton, MD VelocityCare Lexington Lexington | 540.462.3950 www.velocitycarebycarilion.com

THI RD PLACE Benjamin Farley, MD Augusta Health Fishersville | 540.332.4000 www.augustahealth.com


HONO R A B L E ME N TI ON

Congratulations CHARLOTTESVILLE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Urology

John Campbell, MD Patient Care First Staunton | 504.885.6789 www.patientcareplus.com

2019

Urogynecology/Female Pelvic Medicine

2019

FIRS T PLACE Brian Stisser, MD Blue Ridge Urological, PC Fishersville | 540.932.5926 www.blueridgeurological.com

SE COND PL ACE F I R S T P L A CE Elisa Trowbridge, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2103 www.uvahealth.com

S E C O N D P L A CE Kathie Hullfish, MD UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2103 www.uvahealth.com

T HIR D P L A CE George Craft II, MD Shenandoah Urogynecology Winchester | 540.773.8169 www.shenandoahurogynecology.com

Julian Fagerli, MD Urological Associates Ltd. Charlottesville | 434.295.0184 www.cvilleurology.com

T H IRD PLACE Tracey Krupski, MD, MPH UVA Health Charlottesville | 434.924.2224 www.uvahealth.com

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON Sam Graham, MD Blue Ridge Urological, PC Fishersville | 540.932.5926 www.blueridgeurological.com William Jones III, MD Blue Ridge Urological, PC Fishersville | 540.932.5926 www.blueridgeurological.com

ON THE WEB

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2019 BEST

BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS ON SOCIAL MEDIA!

2019

2019

2019

2019

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARD Winners! 2019

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARD WINNERS CERTIFICATION NOTE:

As of summer 2019, all doctors receiving recognition for their bedside manner held current certification from the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), as applicable. The American Board of Medical Specialties is the recognized leader in developing and setting the gold standard for physician specialty certification in the United States. The 24 ABMS Member Boards that offer Board Certification in 40 specialties and 87 subspecialties adhere to rigorous training and assessment standards. It is for this reason, that all physicians recognized in OurHealth Charlottesville and Shenandoah Valley Best Bedside Manner Awards are certified by one or more of the American Board of Medical Specialties Member Boards in their applicable specialty or subspecialty as verified through our partnership with ABMS Solutionsâ„¢ The Primary Source for Verification.

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville


MEDICAL PROFILES

CHARLOTTESVILLE GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES EXPERTS IN DIGESTIVE CARE

1139 East High Street, Suite 203 | Charlottesville | c 434.817.8484 | w www.cvillegi.com

On-Site Endoscopy Center The Digestive Care Center at Charlottesville Gastroenterology Associates is a state-of-the-art endoscopy facility located on the terrace level of our main clinic. Providing convenient on-site parking and drive through patient pick-up and drop-off areas. The Digestive Care Center, equipped with the latest endoscopic technologies, offers our patients the ultimate in efficiency and safety as well as comfort and convenience. Monitored anesthesia care provided by on-site anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists eliminates the need for a hospitalscheduled procedure for many patients.

Who is Charlottesville Gastroenterology Associates? For more than 35 years, Charlottesville Gastroenterology Associates has been committed to providing exceptional, patient-centered care for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases. Affiliated with Martha Jefferson Hospital, our six highly experienced physicians, advanced care practitioners, and support staff work hard at combining state-ofthe-art medical expertise with a team approach to providing health care services that are courteous, efficient, and compassionate. Our work has earned the trust and confidence of thousands of patients and their referring physicians.

What services does Charlottesville Gastroenterology Associates offer? Conditions we treat include abdominal pain, Crohn’s disease, acid reflux, constipation, and many others. We offer an array of in-office procedures using our staff anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists, which affords our patients monitored anesthesia, a deeper level of sedation that provides greater comfort and safety during colonoscopy, upper endoscopy, and other in-office diagnostic procedures. In-hospital procedures are performed at Martha Jefferson Hospital in Charlottesville.

What services does Charlottesville Gastroenterology Associates offer? • Colon cancer screening • Peptic ulcer disease • Reflux and esophageal disorders • Gastrointestinal bleeding • Gastrointestinal malignancy (including cancers of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and pancreas) • Gallbladder disorders • Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis) • Anorectal disorders (hemorrhoids, fissures) • Viral hepatitis • Cirrhosis

Our providers offer quality, patient-centered medical care for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases.

In addition, we offer access to clinical trials that provide an opportunity to pursue investigational treatments at the cutting edge of medicine.

2019

Arun R. Mannem, MD | Diego A Gomez, MD | Emily M. Christman, MD | Daniel J. Pambianco, MD | Davidwww.OurHealthCharlottesville.com H. Balaban, MD | Elliot Z. Smith, 53 MD


MEDICAL PROFILES

DAVID NIELSEN, DO

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON SPECIALIZING IN UPPER EXTREMITIES

CHARLOTTESVILLE ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 183 Spotnap Road, Suite C | Charlottesville c 434.244.8412 | w www.cvilleortho.com

What Does Charlottesville Orthopaedic Center Pledge to its Patients? To Keep You Moving From Head To Toe – that’s our pledge at the Charlottesville Orthopaedic Center. Physician-owned and patient centered, we’re dedicated to providing you with high-quality orthopaedic care so that you can always enjoy doing the things that make your life rich and meaningful, whether that’s running a 10K, getting back to work, or playing with your grandchildren. With the appropriate type and level of care and rehabilitation, we help you restore movement and strength – and optimism.

Does Charlottesville Orthopaedic Center Offer Emergency/Urgent Care Appointments? Yes! For non-life threatening orthopaedic-related conditions such as sprains and fractures, you can avoid waiting in the ER and see an orthopaedic specialist first, when you need it most. We offer same day or next day appointments during the weekdays. For additional information, call 434.244.8412.

Who is David Nielsen, DO? Dr. Nielsen obtained his degree in medicine at the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kirksville, MO. He completed a residency in Orthopaedic Surgery at Ohio University in Dayton and a fellowship in Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery at the University of South Florida in Tampa. Dr. Nielsen served on the staff of the hand section at the Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Tampa prior to founding the Charlottesville Orthopaedic Center. He specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of all musculoskeletal conditions of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, as well as general orthopaedics. Dr. Nielsen has met the rigid standards of the Certificate of Added Qualification in hand surgery, in addition to being board certified in general orthopaedics. As well as having served as the Chief of Orthopaedic Surgery at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital, he belongs to numerous national and regional societies, and he lectures locally as well as across the country. Dr. Nielsen enjoys spending quality time with his wife and daughter in addition to traveling, cooking, music and various outdoor and sporting activities.

“Dr. Nielsen is caring, has wonderful bedside manner, and he explained everything in detail regarding our son’s recent injury. His staff is outstanding and the ease of appointments is amazing.” – Deborah, parent of son treated by Dr. Nielsen

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What Types of Services Does Charlottesville Orthopaedic Center Provide? Dr. Nielsen works with patients in both Charlottesville and the surrounding communities treating musculoskeletal conditions in a variety of categories including: Hand, Wrist and Elbow, Shoulder, Hip and Knee, Sports Medicine, Minimally Invasive Orthopaedics, Fracture Care, Joint Replacement, Stem Cell Therapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP). To learn more about related conditions for each service, visit www.cvilleortho.com/services.

WELCOMING

NATALIE SMITH, PA Natalie Smith, PA grew up in central Indiana. She attended Wake Forest University where she played collegiate volleyball and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Health and Exercise Science and a Master’s degree in Management. She obtained her Master’s in Physician Assistant at Jefferson College of Health Sciences in Roanoke, VA. She had an early love for orthopaedics given her background as a collegiate athlete, and she completed several elective rotations in orthopaedics while in PA school. One such rotation was with Dr. Nielsen where she was able to learn directly from him. After graduating, she practiced in Family Medicine for three years until she had the opportunity to join Dr. Nielsen in his private practice. Outside of work, Natalie enjoys spending time with her husband and children, watching UVA volleyball and basketball, as well as continuing to play volleyball.


MEDICAL PROFILES

CHILDREN’S DENTISTRY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE 1470 Pantops Mountain Place | Charlottesville | c 434.234.4082 w www.childrensdentistryofcharlottesville.com

f ChildrensDentistryOfCharlottesville |

Brad Green, DDS | David Herce, DDS | Eric Johnston, DDS | Robert Lunka, DDS Jessica Moore, DDS | Anna Dinh, DDS | Jose Urresti, DDS | John Will, DDS

What is the Philosophy of Children’s Dentistry of Charlottesville?

What Services Does Children’s Dentistry of Charlottesville Offer?

At Children’s Dentistry of Charlottesville, we’re not just concerned about your child’s teeth; we’re concerned about his or her well-being and overall health. Our passion is serving children, and in support of this passion, we are driven to provide an environment that is friendly, nurturing, and fun and where our patients and their families are always treated with the kindness, dignity, respect, compassion and empathy they deserve no matter their age or background.

We provide a wide variety of dental services to children of all ages, including those with special needs. Some of our services include:

What Experience Does Children’s Dentistry of Charlottesville Have Working With Special Needs Children? We have over 30 combined years experience working with children affected by: autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, seizure disorders, anxiety/depression, cleft lip and cleft palate, heart defects and other physical, cognitive and mental disabilities.

• Dental Exams: All dental exams include: orthodontic assessments, dental x-rays, checks for diseases, including infection and tooth decay and gum disease evaluation. • Cleanings: Remove plaque deposits from teeth – even in the hardest to reach spots and polish teeth to remove stains and rough areas. • Restorative Care: Tooth decay affects nearly everyone – no matter how well they brush or floss. Our dentists help treat tooth decay and restore your child’s beautiful smile. Our restorative care services include: Xomposite and amalgam fillings, crowns and bridges and other minimally invasive treatment options. • Sports Injury Prevention: To help protect your child from sports injuries, we offer custom-made athletic guards. • Sealants: Our safe, gentle approach to tooth sealants can reduce your child’s cavity risk by up to 80%. • Dental Urgencies: If you are a current patient and have a dental emergency, you may contact us for emergency services 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 434.270.0552.

Servicios Dentales para Niños Charlottesville En Children’s Dentistry of Charlottesville, creemos que todas las personas son especiales. Creemos que los pacientes son más que un par de dientes. Todos merecen ser tratados con gentileza, dignidad, respeto y compasión – ¡nuestra pasión es atender a los niños!

2019

2019

• On-Going Care and Maintenance: Through regular appointments, we can fix problems before they cause serious damage to your child’s teeth. Our on-going care plan includes regular cleanings and exams, dental x-rays, fluoride treatments and consultations with our experienced dentists.


MEDICAL PROFILES

BEN B. ROSS, DMD, FACP BOARD CERTIFIED PROSTHODONTIST

2019

PANTOPS PROSTHODONTICS 404 People Place, Suite 301 | Charlottesville c 434.977.9836 | w www.pantops.org | f f g f f

What is Prosthodontics? Prosthodontics is the field of dental specialty involved with restoration and replacement of missing teeth and/or facial structures, including crowns, bridges, veneers, dentures, and implants. Prosthodontics is about more than replacing missing teeth though. It’s about taking control of your oral health by entrusting your well-being to a specialist with advanced training and expertise in state-of-theart technology as well as tried and true methods. Prosthodontics is personalized, precise dental care that transforms lives.

Why Should You See a Prosthodontist? Prosthodontists are the “architects of the smile” and are usually referred to as the “quarterback” of the care plan for your oral health. They collaborate with your general dentist and other dental specialists to ensure that you receive the best, most effective treatment possible. Prosthodontists are dental specialists who have received 3 years of additional training in the diagnosis, restoration and replacement of missing teeth, to achieve a unique understanding of the dynamics of a healthy smile and mouth. This specialized training must be completed through an American Dental Association (ADA)-accredited program, and it involves learning state-of-the-art treatment techniques and procedures for multiple complex and diverse dental conditions.

What Services Does Pantops Prosthodontics Offer? Pantops Prosthodontics’ experienced team pays close attention to detail to ensure that you receive the highest quality of care possible. They strive to provide you with a welcoming, professional environment, and utilize the latest dental technologies to ensure precision and excellence in each treatment provided. Pantops Prosthodontics offers preventative care in addition to a variety of prosthodontic services to treat an array of conditions, including: Atrophy and Denture Difficulties, Cleft Palate and Congenital Conditions, Dental Attrition, Esthetic Dental Services, Night Guards and Bite Splints, Oral Effects of Eating Disorders, Dental Veneers, Teeth Whitening and Xerostomia (Dry Mouth), and Teeth-in-a-day with Implants.

BEN B. ROSS, DMD, FACP 56

NEW TECHNOLOGY

at Pantops Prosthodontics

Pantops Prosthodontics strives to keep the patient experience as comfortable as possible yet innovative and informative through incorporating new technology with proven techniques. Through the use of advanced imaging technology, Pantops Prosthodontics can now help screen for conditions where regular dental x-ray use is insufficient. The Cone Beam CT Scanner provides three-dimensional images of the teeth, soft tissues, nerve pathways and bone in a single scan and can help the medical team visualize airway insufficiencies and virtually plan dental implant placement, eliminating the need for costly and sometimes unnecessary surgical procedures. Often, a three-dimensional model of the teeth and surrounding structures is necessary to get the best possible diagnosis and treatment plan for patients. Pantops Prosthodontics’ use of an intraoral scanner (3D impression scanner) improves the patient experience by saving time and improving the comfort level when making three-dimensional models of the teeth. Through this technology we are able to facilitate visual learning for the patient by allowing the ability to view images real-time, as well as the ability to share images immediately with our on-site dental prosthetic lab, reducing wait time for our patients. Come find out what other new advances are at Pantops Prosthodontics when it comes to patient comfort and technology!

Through the use of advanced imaging technology, Pantops Prosthodontics can now help screen for conditions where regular dental x-ray use is insufficient.


MEDICAL PROFILES

PEDIATRIC ASSOCIATES OF CHARLOTTESVILLE EXPERT PEDIATRIC CARE – SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 1011 East Jefferson Street | Downtown | c 434.296.9161 1522 Insurance Lane, Suite A | North Office | c 434.974.9600 2411 Ivy Road | West Office | c 434.296.8300 71 Jefferson Court | Zion Crossroads | c 540.406.4100 w www.charlottesvillepeds.com

What services and treatments are offered at Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville? Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville is a private practice clinic whose doctors, nurses and staff specialize in the care of infants, children, adolescents and their families. We have daily office hours, as well as evening and weekend hours for emergencies. All of our physicians are certified by the American Board of Pediatrics. They also have fields of interests in certain pediatric sub-specialties including adolescent care, allergy, asthma, attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), infectious diseases, anorexia and sports medicine, to name a few.

What specialty services are offered at Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville? Pediatric Associates also provides specialty services with an on-site audiologist, adolescent nurse practitioners, lactation consultants and newborn nurse practitioners. Our hospital affiliation is with Martha Jefferson Hospital where we admit newborns and sick children. Many of our doctors are on the Instructional Faculty at the University of Virginia where they do research and teach medical students, nurse practitioner students and resident physicians.

2019

2019

Providers at Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville: Now Open Pediatric Associates is excited to announce the opening of its fourth location in Zion Crossroads. Through continued regional growth, Pediatric Associates strives to provide convenient access to exceptional pediatric care. The office, located at 71 Jefferson Court, is now accepting appointments.

PHYSICIANS (From Left to Right): Carlos E. Armengol, Jr., MD Lori W. Balaban, MD | Gemila H. Bouber, MD | Alaina Brown, MD Sheila F. Davis, MD | Jay M. Gillenwater MD | Teresa H. Hashisaki, MD Amanda Jones, MD | Sarah E. Knight, MD | Amy Malek, MD Katherine D. Mika, MD | L. Paige D’A. Perriello, MD | Marion Szwedo, MD A. Robert Trundle, MD | Paul P. Wisman, MD | Karyn E. Wolfe, MD CLINICIANS (From Left to Right): Casee Dorsey, PNP | Jennifer Fontenot, PNP Kelly Vincel, CPNP (not pictured) Marian Fredner, MS, CCCA/FAAA

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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MEDICAL PROFILES

EDWARD T. WOLANSKI, MD GYNECOLOGY SERVICES FOR WOMEN

600 Peter Jefferson Parkway, Suite 300 | Charlottesville c 434.293.9800 | w www.wolanskigyn.com Office hours: Mon – Fri: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

GLADLY ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. Who is Edward T. Wolanski, MD? Dr. Wolanski is a board-certified OB/GYN who has been supporting the healthcare needs of women for more than 30 years. Having discontinued only the obstetric part of the practice, Dr. Wolanski is now focused on gynecologic care supporting the healthcare needs of women throughout their lifespans. He treats the person, not the medical condition, and supports women in developing healthy lifestyles through good nutrition and exercise. This respectful method allows women to participate actively in decisions involving their healthcare.

What happens during a well-woman exam? Dr. Wolanski provides well woman visits offering you the opportunity to ask questions and to express and explore any concerns you may have about your reproductive health in general. The exam includes a pap smear with HPV testing if indicated, pelvic and breast exam, screening for diseases, assessment of your general lifestyle, and plans for reproduction or contraception. When appropriate, Dr. Wolanski can order additional testing if needed, for example lab work or radiological imaging.

What conditions does Dr. Wolanski treat? Dr. Wolanski offers both routine preventative care and treatment for a wide range of conditions of the reproductive system including cervical conditions, colposcopy, hormonal conditions, ovarian conditions, perimenopause/menopause, STI/STD, uterine conditions and vaginal and vulval conditions and birth control options (IUD and Diaphragm). Dr. Wolanski is highly trained in performing surgical procedures including uterine ablation, hysteroscopy, hysterectomy/salpingooophorectomy, laparoscopy, D&C and laparoscopic tubal ligation. All surgeries are performed at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital.

What pregnancy-related services does Dr. Wolanski offer? Although Dr. Wolanski no longer provides prenatal care or labor and delivery services, he does offer treatment of various pregnancy-related conditions including pregnancy confirmation and initial workup, treatment of miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy and fertility issues.

2019

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Health Trends

What Were They Then and What Are They Now? words | DYLAN ROCHE

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It’s inevitable that trends come and go. What’s popular today will be a memory tomorrow. And while it’s true that some practices do prove to have staying power, they still evolve with the changing times.

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4 5

10

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When it comes to health, modern science continually changes our concept of what’s best for the human body, whether it’s the food we eat, the exercises we do, the medicine we take or some other healthy habit we adopt. But what the masses latch onto isn’t always what’s necessarily the best option, and the necessary information isn’t always available when the trend is at its peak. So, what health trends captured America’s attention over the past decade, and what do we think of those trends now in 2019? How has science shaped our understanding of these practices, and in what ways is their influence still a part of our culture? Let’s take a look.

We’re giving each trend a rank on a scale of 1 to 10. Those that proved to have staying power and scientific support get higher scores, while those that flopped when put under scrutiny get lower scores.

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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1

Elimination of Trans fats 2 3 4

10 ELIMINATION OF TRANS FAT

HEALTH RATING:

The conversation around trans fats 10 years ago paved the way for partially hydrogenated oils to be removed from the market today, making the food industry safer for all consumers.

5 6 7 8

The fight to eliminate trans fats from the American diet has been going on for decades, but it wasn’t until the last 10 or 15 years that it really entered mainstream conversation. And it wasn’t until 2019 that these dangerous oils finally left the market. Found in processed fats like partially hydrogenated oils, trans fats pose a threat to health by lowering HDL cholesterol (commonly known as the good cholesterol) and raising LDL cholesterol (commonly known as the bad kind), thus contributing to heart disease.

Back in the early ‘90s, the Center for Science in the Public Interest began to urge 10 the Food and Drug Administration to include information about trans fats on food labels. But it wasn’t until 2006 that laws went into effect stating that trans fats had to be included on Nutrition Facts labels. That was also the year New York City became the first city to ban partially hydrogenated oils from all restaurants.

9

The year 2009 was a turning point, as studies showed then that more manufacturers were responding to the growing awareness by replacing trans fats in their products with healthier types of oil. In 2012, a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed a decline in consumption of trans fat.

But the biggest progress took place in 2013, when the Food and Drug Administration announced a preliminary determination that partially hydrogenated oils were no longer generally recognized as safe. Two years later, the FDA went one step further and declared that the industry had three years to eliminate partially hydrogenated oils from all its recipes. As of 2019, no new products can be made with partially hydrogenated oils, and the war on an especially dangerous ingredient has been won.

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Low-Carb Diets 2

3 Low-carb diets work for fast weight loss, but doctors still maintain that carbohydrates are an important source of energy. More importantly, those who consume too much saturated fat and avoid fruits and vegetables run the risk of hurting their long-term health.

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10

The aversion to carbohydrates has stuck around in one form or another, and the biggest diet craze today is ketogenic diets, known to most people simply as keto. In this form, 7 going low carb means being much more restrictive. 8 Doctors with the Mayo Clinic cite the scientific reasoning behind keto is that when you decrease carbohydrate intake, the body turns to fat for energy. With keto, people must eat fewer than 50 grams of carbohydrates a day.

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LOW-CARB DIET

HEALTH RATING:

Even though the low-carbohydrate diet advocated by physician and cardiologist Dr. Robert Atkins has been around since the 1970s, it saw a resurgence in 3 the 2000s. Other popular eating plans based on reduced carbohydrate 4 consumption, such as the South Beach Diet, also evolved toward the end of the decade. The idea behind these diets was that cutting refined carbohydrates 5 and sugar could aid in weight loss.

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For many people, it works for weight loss. The catch? It calls for cutting out lots of healthy food, including many fruits and vegetables. There’s not enough research on the longterm effects of a ketogenic lifestyle, but doctors fear that the high levels of fat, particularly saturated fat, along with the limits on nutrientrich fruits, vegetables and grains, don’t bode well for a person’s health.


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Cannabis 2 3 4

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CANNABIS

8

HEALTH RATING:

10

Far from being considered a dangerous psychoactive substance the way it once was, cannabis is now regarded for its health benefits. Times have definitely changed with this one!

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It’s amazing what a difference 10 years can make in the public’s perception of a drug. Cannabis, more commonly known as marijuana, has gone from being an illegal substance to an acceptable medicinal alternative to pharmaceuticals. Although many progressive thinkers had been pushing to destigmatize cannabis for years prior, it still carried criminal penalties at the end of the last decade. Early in 2009, Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps suffered a scandal after a photo was released showing him smoking recreational cannabis. USA Swimming suspended him from competing for three months, and a heroic figure of athleticism lost the respect of many.

Fast-forward to today, and medicinal cannabis is legal in 29 states and Washington, D.C. Harvard Medical School estimates that 85 percent of Americans support the legalization of cannabis and at least several million Americans currently use it. Does this make what Phelps did acceptable by modern standards? Maybe, maybe not. Cannabis use among athletes is still a subject of debate. The World Anti-Doping Agency lists cannabis as prohibited in competition; however, a 2018 review published in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine notes that there is no evidence of performanceenhancing effects from cannabis and that it is useful for pain and concussion management. And some athletes are open about their use, such as ultramarathoner Avery Collins, who advocates cannabis for athletes, claiming it helps him focus when he is running for hours at a time.

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Superfoods 2 3 4

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SUPERFOODS

HEALTH RATING:

The superfood trend has introduced many lesser known fruits and vegetables into the mainstream, but people should not let themselves believe that any one food is a cure-all miracle that will provide them all the nutrients they need.

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10

If you feel as if every year brings a new food trend…well, you’d be right. It all started in 2009 with a segment by Dr. Mehmet Oz (better known simply as Dr. Oz) on The Oprah Winfrey Show when he introduced America to a little-known fruit called the acai berry, touting it as having twice the antioxidant content of a blueberry. Suddenly, everyone wanted to start eating acai berries for their enormous health benefits. And in the years that followed, specific foods would emerge from relative obscurity into the mainstream and be hailed for their cure-all properties: quinoa, kale, coconut, avocado and so forth. Each one of them was loosely referred to as a superfood.

Today, the trend continues, and although doctors and dietitians encourage people to try new foods, they want them to look past the hype around these so-called superfoods. Why? Well, as the experts at Harvard Medical School emphasize, no single food can offer all nutritional and health benefits the human body needs.

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Instead, people should start thinking of superfoods as important additions to the diet. It’s great that more people are eating healthy foods, but variety and balance is still key. Consider this: A 2018 review published in the journal Food & Function looked at the effects of 17 superfoods sourced from an internet search and found only limited evidence for their effect on things like BMI, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. So in the era of avocado toast, experts such as those at Harvard emphasize that people should not focus all their attention on one specific food to improve their health. Instead, they should focus on other equally nutritious options that might not get as much media attention.

www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com

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Swine Flu and Vaccinations 2 3 4

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5 6 7

SWINE FLU AND VACCINATIONS

HEALTH RATING:

8 10

Reaction to the swine flu helped raise awareness about the importance of vaccinations, but there’s still progress to be made in eradicating all viruses.

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Swine flu was one of the biggest health stories of 2009 and 2010. The strain of influenza formally known as H1N1 broke out across the world. In the United States, the first reported cases supposedly resulted from trips to Mexico. By March 2010, an estimated 59 million Americans had been affected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By August 2010, the World Health Organization had declared that the outbreak had moved into post-pandemic mode. But during the time that swine flu was rampant, the U.S. government launched a massive vaccination campaign to fight its spread.

Through advertising and press conferences, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ran an aggressive campaign to spread awareness of and encourage vaccination, which played a major role in reining in H1N1, although it continues to circulate today as a strain of seasonal flu.

Many people responded to the campaign and started making flu shots a regular part of their fall health routine. The CDC estimates that vaccinations were able to prevent an estimated 5.3 million flu illnesses in the United States during the 2018 flu season.

But despite the CDC’s efforts, and despite the growing number of people who vaccinate every year, a vocal group of dissenters in 2019 continue to distrust vaccines — flu or otherwise. Case in point? Measles, which were eliminated in the United States in 2000, are making a comeback. So far in 2019, about 670 people from 22 states have been affected. Doctors emphasize that the best way to avoid the measles is to get the vaccine, but skeptics continue to fear negative side effects. Lack of insurance or access to health care is also an obstacle in the push for vaccination.

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Minimalist Running Shoes 2 3 4

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It’s not the worst trend to enter the mainstream, but science doesn’t seem to support the claims that these trendy shoes were any better for runners than other (i.e. less-expensive) versions. In 2019, most people are back to using traditional cushioned running shoes.

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Between 2010 and 2012, sales in minimalist shoes tripled. More and more people were subscribing to the idea that if they trained in these types of shoes, they could strengthen their feet back to how nature intended them to be.

But the American Academy of Sports Medicine and the American Podiatric Medical Association maintained 8 that there was not enough research to support either the benefits or the risks, and encouraged anyone interested in the trend to consult a podiatrist beforehand.

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MINIMALIST RUNNING SHOES

HEALTH RATING:

Interest in barefoot running and minimalist running shoes rose after the release of Christopher McDougall’s Born to Run. The idea behind the practice is that running shoes with thinner, minimalized soles encourage a natural gait, strengthen the foot and reduce risk of injury.

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9

Then the lawsuits started. Vibram, one of the leading manufacturers, settled in a class-action lawsuit stating its marketing made unsubstantiated claims that minimalist shoes were better for preventing injuries. The trend very quickly fizzled out, although some runners continue to swear by minimalist shoes. As for the science behind it, a 2019 study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology explains that it’s less about the shoe itself and more about how athletes adjust their gait to compensate for the lack of cushioning. Runners in cushioned shoes tend to land on their heels whereas barefoot runners land on the balls of their feet to absorb the impact.


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Interval and Circuit Fitness Training

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4

10 INTERVAL AND CIRCUIT FITNESS TRAINING

HEALTH RATING:

These workouts are scientifically supported and continue to grow in popularity.

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By the late 2000s, countless fitness junkies were embracing new workout routines like bootcamp-style fitness programs, functional fitness, circuit training and HIIT (high-intensity interval training). These types of fitness classes were popular because, as the Mayo Clinic observes, they require little or no equipment and they create a sense of camaraderie among the participants.

Over the past 10 years, these workouts continued to be popular, particularly circuit training and HIIT. The American 9 Council on Exercise (ACE) explains that most people give up a 10 fitness routine because they’re either bored or pressed for time. Both these styles of exercise avoid those problems — they’re varied, so you don’t get bored, and they’re so intense that you get the benefits of a full workout in a shorter period of time.

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And that short amount of time still counts, according to the experts. Per the recommendation of the Department of Health and Human Services, you should get 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity. So it’s still effective to work out less as long as you’re working out harder.

You should get

75 MINUTES

of vigorous aerobic activity a week.

These fitness trends have stuck around with good reason, but that’s not to say they’re not better in 2019 than they were in the past. With the surging popularity of fitness apps like Esquared, which lets you find and drop in on classes close to where you are, it’s easier than ever for people to seek out opportunities for these types of classes, even if they’re traveling or moving to a new area.

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HealthCare Reform 2 3 4

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HEALTHCARE REFORM

HEALTH RATING:

Strides have been made in reforming the American healthcare system, but it remains a controversial topic. How legislators will handle it going forward remains to be seen.

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The new decade was a milestone for healthcare changes in the United States. In 2010, a little more than a year after his inauguration, President Barack Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which required everyone to have health insurance by 2014. The legislation strove to make affordable health insurance available to more people by providing subsidies for lowincome households, expanding Medicaid, and restricting health plans from denying coverage to anyone for any reason.

Throughout the years that have followed, healthcare has continued to be a huge part of political discourse, and it is now a major talking point for presidential candidates running for office in 2020.

To put it simply, there are lots of opinions. Joe Biden, who was vice president under Obama, wants to expand the Affordable Care Act and give Americans the choice of either enrolling in a public health insurance option or keeping their employer-based plan. Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren want to get rid of private insurance and establish Medicare for All. And Donald Trump wants to do away with the Affordable Care Act and reduce funding for Medicaid and Medicare. A decade after it first started trending, healthcare reform continues to be a controversial topic, and there doesn’t seem to be an easy solution in sight. In summer 2019, the American Medical Association stated it “strongly believes that every American should have access to meaningful, affordable coverage” and that America must “build on our current system of coverage provided by employers, government, and individually selected plans so that patients can benefit from choice and competition.” 63


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E-Cigarettes 2

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E-CIGARETTES

HEALTH RATING:

E-cigarettes might have once been seen as a safe alternative to cigarettes by some people, but experts emphasize that’s not the case. They still pose certain health hazards. More research is being done to help doctors and legislators fully understand the risks that vaping devices might pose.

Electronic cigarettes, e-cigarettes, e-cigs, vapes — whatever you want to call them, they were originally embraced by people as a safer alternative to smoking tobacco 3 products. That’s because electronic cigarettes produced vapor instead of smoke. 4 When a person puffs on an electronic cigarette (or vapes, per the proper terminology), they inhale a vaporized nicotine solution that mimics that flavor 5 and feeling of tobacco smoke.

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Action in the United States started in 2009 with the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, which gave the Food and Drug Administration the authority to regulate tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. However, despite the controversy, proponents of vaping continued to build a culture around it. The first VapeFest was held in Richmond, Virginia, in March 2010. A decade later, more information continues to be available on e-cigarettes. The National Institute on Drug Abuse notes that research so far shows they are less harmful than cigarettes when people who regularly smoke switch to them, but they are still dangerous to a person’s health. There are other concerns as well. It’s now understood that e-cigarettes can lead to a nicotine addiction just as cigarettes can, and it’s still to be determined whether they are an effective smoking cessation aid. More research is needed. Meanwhile, as of fall 2019, the FDA and CDC are investigating incidents of respiratory illness associated with vaping products.

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Gluten-Free Eating 2

Back toward the end of the 2000s, eating a gluten-free diet was still an emerging lifestyle. People were doing it, but it wasn’t as commonplace as it is today. But there’s been a lot of misconception that’s floated around in the years in between.

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GLUTEN-FREE EATING

HEALTH RATING:

While it’s great that growing awareness of gluten has made life easier for those with Celiac disease, it has also led to a lot of false information that has duped people into putting unnecessary dietary restrictions on themselves.

From the get-go, experts weren’t onboard with this alternative. In 2008, after e-cigarettes had been in the U.S. market for about two years, the World Health Organization stated it did not consider e-cigarettes to be a legitimate smoking cessation aid.

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Gluten-free diets are beneficial for people with Celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder in which gluten — a type of protein found in wheat, barley and rye — triggers an immune reaction in the small intestines that prevents the absorption of nutrients.

Scientific circles have studied gluten allergies since the 1970s, but between 2005 and 2010, awareness of gluten entered mainstream culture. Celebrities and other prominent figures started claiming avoiding gluten helped them lose weight. Sales of gluten-free products exploded, and countless people started turning to wheat alternatives like rice flour.

However, doctors have responded to the gluten-free diet’s popularity by emphasizing the reality: Less than one percent of Americans actually have Celiac disease, and there’s no evidence to support claims of weight loss or overall improved health in people who don’t have an allergy. On the contrary, as Mayo Clinic points out, striking whole-grain products made from wheat, rye and barley can affect your intake of fiber, vitamins and minerals.

Restaurants and food manufacturers continue to cater to gluten-free living by providing more options and designating those options with gluten-free labels. For those who have Celiac disease, this is a huge step forward in helping them manage a normal life with their dietary restriction. For those who don’t have an allergy — well, it’s just another marketing ploy.

ON THE WEB

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Politics and religion have long been considered topics of conversation to steer clear of, especially when among families and friends. But a James Madison University communication studies professor is challenging this notion. Her research suggests that weighing in on these tough topics instead of avoiding them may spark conversations that can turn out to be more productive than divisive.

words | STEVE MCCLINTIC, JR.

While there are lots of good times to look forward to as the holidays approach, the season can also bring much unwanted stress. Whether it be diet concerns, the pressure of planning events or even anxiety over family gatherings, there’s no question that emotions can run high. But when it comes to a line commonly, almost universally, considered one never to be crossed – discussing heavy topics that traditionally have a track record of wrecking havoc on the most merry of occasions – James Madison University professors Lori Britt, PhD and Jaime Kurtz, PhD suggest what many would believe unthinkable: invite politics and religion to the table this holiday season. Dr. Britt, professor of communication studies at James Madison, says it actually may prove beneficial to dive into heavier topics over a meal with loved ones. As the focal point of her research – facilitating healing conversations – Britt’s aim is to shape dialogue that positively impacts individuals and communities. “Well designed and facilitated talk can keep people at the table even when the issues are difficult. This offers more opportunity to collaboratively find solutions,” says Dr. Britt.

Well designed and facilitated talk can keep people at the table even when the issues are difficult. This offers more opportunity to collaboratively find solutions. – LORI BRITT, PhD –

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BE HAPPY DURING THE HOLIDAYS

Leave the Stress Behind

Happiness is among Dr. Kurtz’s research interests, including looking at how people in other countries view happiness compared to Americans. She has authored more than 30 books and papers on the subject, including “The Happy Traveler: Unpacking the Secrets of Better Vacations.”

A few suggestions Dr. Kurtz can pass along to ease holiday stress include:

» Don’t procrastinate. Spread out your

shopping and other holiday prep so you’re not overwhelmed and battling crowds at the last minute.

» Anticipate likely challenges. Is there a

particular relative you always butt heads with? A person who is especially hard to shop for? Travel headaches that leave you exhausted? You can strategize on how to manage these challenges ahead of time.

» Consider what research says about gift giving. Give gifts that connect you with your

loved ones (such as a spa day together), gifts that save time for busy people (a meal delivery service), an experiential gift (movie tickets or a hot air balloon ride) or gifts that somehow really say, “I understand you.”

» Most of all, just take the pressure off of yourself. The more you try to craft a perfect holiday, the more stressed, less present, less connected, and less happy you will be.

Lori Britt, PhD Associate Professor in the School of Communication and Director of the Institute for Constructive Advocacy and Dialogue (ICAD) at James Madison University.

Jaime Kurtz, PhD

Dr. Britt’s teachings with the Institute for Constructive Advocacy and Dialogue at James Madison, where she serves as the director, is what the University describes as being infused with a passion for training students to design and facilitate conversations where people can tackle challenging issues and impede productive and healing conversations. Here are some tips she shares:

How to Have a Healing Conversation About Hot Button Topics Introduce a Topic in a Non-Confrontational Way Instead of beginning the conversation offering your viewpoint on a topic, first try to understand what others are concerned or hopeful for regarding pressing public issues. We have an easier time when we learn what people care about; the “why” rather than the “what” of their position. The National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD) offers these starter questions as part of its Revive Civility Project:

» What are you most thankful for about America? » What are your thoughts and feelings about the deep divisions and incivility we see now in the country?

A good practice is attempting to engage others through the spirit of curiosity. Dialogue shouldn’t be considered a competition where there’s a winner and loser; it’s about understanding each other. Try to shape the space into one where you can uncover the nuance. Think about asking questions that get beneath the surface of what another person believes so you can have a better understanding of why. This helps us humanize each other. For instance, I may not agree with my father’s commitment to free markets as the solution to many of our pressing concerns, but understanding his upbringing, his commitment to hard work, his career in banking, and his experience going through several recessions makes me understand why certain things are important to him. This allows us to learn about each other in deeper ways.

Establish Ground Rules for the Conversation If you are having a conversation with a large group, chances are there is going to be some strong opinions on both sides. Setting some ground rules before you begin can help keep everyone on point and reduce the chances of the conversation veering to far off the path. Examples can include:

» Assume Best Intent » Listen to Understand, Not to Counter » Don’t Interrupt » Share the Air (don’t monopolize the conversation)

If you get a group to agree to the guidelines, it’s easier to then gently remind or redirect a person or persons should the conversation seem to be getting off point. It may feel awkward to do at first, but in order to shape new habits for communication, we need to learn how to talk to each other in productive ways.

Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at James Madison University.

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ON THE WEB

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2019

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Food Fitness NUTRITION • EXERCISE • PREVENTION

Adopting Smaller Habits Every Day Will Make Your

Much More Manageable words | DYLAN ROCHE

By the time most people have been through the indulgent weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas, they’re ready to make a resolution in the new year to eat healthier. The problem? Well, most people don’t stick to those New Year’s resolutions and go right back to their old habits after a few weeks. This year, resolve to do things differently — instead of giving your diet a sudden overhaul that you then abandon three weeks later, aim to adopt a new small habit every day for three weeks. They don’t have to be big changes, but as you adopt more and more of them, they will start to make a major difference.

Here are

21 healthy eating habits for you

to adopt throughout the first few weeks of the new year.

If you find that they’re manageable, try a new one every day; if you find that you’re having a little bit of trouble, try making a change every other day or every three days.

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Start a food journal or download a nutrition app. Logging a food journal will ensure that you’re keeping an eye on what you’re eating and being conscious of how you’re fueling your body. It is also helpful to go back at the end of the day and evaluate what you might have eaten too much of or what your diet is lacking. Most nutrition apps can calculate your calorie and nutrient intake automatically if you simply enter the food and the portion size, thus taking care of the math work for you.

Focus on nutrient balance with every meal. Counting calories can get overwhelming, but it’s much easier for you to focus on having a source of protein, complex carbohydrates and healthy fats (ideally plant-based fat) at every meal. Meals that lack one of these nutrients — for example, a bowl of pasta with olive oil has carbohydrates and fat but no protein — won’t leave you feeling as satisfied and energized.

Distracted driving is one of the main risk factors for younger drivers. These apps can help your young driver establish good habits and be safer on the road:

Replace• LifeSaver at least one refined-grain product with a whole-grain one.

• TrueMotion Family The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends • Mojo that at least half the grains you eat should be whole grains, are aDriveMode better source of fiber, • whichAT&T vitamins and minerals. Start slowly by phasing • SafeDrive out one refined grain with a whole one at each • Focus by TeenDrive meal. Have whole-wheat bread or brown rice instead of their white counterparts. As you get used to the taste and texture of whole grains, you can start to include more and more while phasing out refined carbohydrates.

Make half your plate vegetables or fruit. When you sit down to a meal, is your plate primarily meat and starch with a side of vegetables? Swap your proportions. Loading up half your plate with fruits and vegetables will still satisfy you because it’s volume that makes you feel full, not calorie content. You’ll also be taking in lots of extra vitamins and minerals with all those fruits and veggies.

Start leaving the skin on your produce. Many people peel their fruits and vegetables, but the skin is a great source of vitamins, minerals and fiber. Fiber is especially important for people who are trying to achieve a healthy weight because it helps you feel full faster and keeps you full longer.

Take up a non-food-related hobby. After you finish dinner, focus on something that requires active engagement like a crossword puzzle, knitting or painting instead of simply watching television. Reducing boredom and diverting your attention elsewhere will help you break the habit of mindless eating and instead learn to eat at mealtimes or designated snack times.

Add more color to your diet. Fruits and vegetables come in a variety of colors. Some are red, some are orange or yellow, others are green, while others are blue or purple. Eating a variety of colors means you’ll be getting a variety of nutrients. Try a new color every day, and aim to start including at least three or four colors every meal.

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Drink a glass of water if you’re feeling hungry. Sometimes you think you’re hungry but what you’re really feeling is dehydrated, and drinking a glass of water can remedy your craving. Even if it doesn’t, the water will fill you up so that you’re inclined to consume less when you do sit down to eat.

Use half your usual sugar or cream in your coffee.

Use herbs in place of table salt.

If you’re the type of coffee drinker who likes to load up your cup of joe with lots of sugar and cream, you might be taking in more calories than you realize. You don’t have to switch to drinking it black right away, but using half your usual amount of sugar and cream in your coffee will still give you the taste that you like with far fewer calories. As you cut back on sugary foods and drinks, you’ll also start to notice that your cravings for something sweet decrease.

It’s not just that excess sodium leads to high blood pressure. Salty foods are addictive, so you’re inclined to eat more of them. Start adding flavor to your food using fresh herbs and spices instead of salt.

Use olive oil in place of butter. A tablespoon of butter and a tablespoon of oil have approximately the same number of calories, but olive oil is full of monounsaturated fats (that’s the good kind, which help your body fight plaque buildup in your arteries) and antioxidants. The rich flavor also means you can get away with using less of it.

Try a new plant-based source of protein. Meat and dairy are great sources of protein, B vitamins and other nutrients, but they also tend to be high in saturated fat and cholesterol. On the other hand, plantbased sources of protein like nuts, beans and quinoa have lots of fiber and tend to be lower in calories. Try a plant-based source at a meal every day. If you’re feeling extra adventurous, go vegetarian just one day a week. You’ll find that you consume more vegetables and fewer calories without feeling deprived.

Pack your lunch. Packing your lunch saves you from poor take-out choices midway through your workday. Don’t think that packing lunch requires a lot of time or effort. You can take leftovers from last night’s dinner, or you can pack healthy ingredients to make something at work. If you have the option, see whether you can keep bread, lean deli meat, lettuce, tomato and mustard in your office’s kitchen so you can easily assemble a healthy sandwich.

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Eat your fruit instead of drinking it. If you frequently drink fruit juice, you probably think of it as a great source of nutrients like vitamin C. But fruit juice retains all of a fruit’s natural sugar without any of its fiber, so it’s going to spike your insulin levels, leaving you feeling hungry only a little while later. Instead of drinking juice, grab an apple or orange and enjoy the real thing. You’ll feel more full and have more energy.


Have smoothies for your go-to snack. Smoothies are an easy option for getting extra fruits and vegetables into your diet, and their high water content helps fill you up. Just be sure to make them at home so you have control over the ingredients — a smoothie from your local smoothie bar is likely full of added sugar. Spinach and avocados have mild tastes that are easily masked by flavorful fruit. Try mixing spinach, avocado, banana, strawberries, blueberries, almond butter and a little bit of honey up in your blender at home for a low-calorie, nutrient-rich pick-me-up to replace a Frappuccino or milkshake.

Research the ingredient list on a packaged food. You only need to do this once or twice to gain some perspective. The next time you’re eating food out of a package, read the ingredient list and look up anything that you don’t recognize. You might find that even foods marketed as healthy are full of added sugars, sodium, preservatives and artificial ingredients. Enjoy these in moderation, but aim to make more meals and snacks from scratch in your kitchen at home.

Ditch soda and opt for seltzer instead.

Make your own salad dressing.

Your soda habit is easier to give up than you might think. Try swapping your regular sugary beverage for seltzer, which has the same fizzy sensation but with none of the empty calories. If you want a little flavor, add a bit of fresh lemon or lime.

Salad dressing is a great way to liven up your fresh vegetables, but packaged products can be full of added sugar, sodium and preservatives. Start making your own salad dressing with a blend of olive oil and an acid of some sort (vinegar, wine or lemon juice). To give it some extra flavor, try adding herbs and mustard, or even a little bit of a natural sweetener like honey or maple syrup.

Stick to only one drink. Nobody is saying you can’t have alcohol if you’re trying to eat healthy, but moderation is key. Enjoy one drink and make it last throughout the evening. Alcohol is not only an empty source of calories (that is, calories without any nutritional benefit) but it lowers your inhibitions and makes you more inclined to make poor food choices.

Shop the perimeter at the grocery store. Do a workout that you enjoy. One of the most important lessons you have to teach yourself when learning to eat healthy is to stop thinking of food as a crime you need to atone for with exercise. Find a workout you enjoy and look forward to. Not only will enjoying your physical activity make you more likely to stick with it, but you’ll also start thinking of food as a way of fueling your workout so that you feel your best before, during and after.

ON THE WEB

For your next grocery shopping trip, make your way around the perimeter of the grocery store first. You can get fruit, vegetables, lean meats, dairy and fresh bread without venturing down any of the aisles where you’ll mostly find processed, packaged food. Once you’ve done this, look through your cart and ask yourself whether you actually need to go through the center section of the grocery story. In many cases, you might find that you already have everything you need.

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Funny BONE HUMOR • SEARCH • CHECK

OURHEALTH ADVERTISER DIRECTORY 17

ABC Health Care

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Alternative Hair Solutions, LLC

7

Alzheimer’s Association

4

American Heart Association

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Augusta Health

35

Augusta Health Care for Women

31

Blue Ridge Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

2, 47

Can you spot the SEVEN differences between the two cartoons? Be the first reader to email us describing what the seven differences are and you will earn the satisfaction (and bragging rights) of having your name in print in the next edition. OK, START YOUR SEARCH! Email info@ourhealthvirginia.com with the subject line Funny Bone Charlottesville.

Visit www.OurHealthCharlottesville.com or our Facebook page @OurHealthCharlottesville and sign up for our e-newsletter for more fun games, quizzes and contests to win great prizes!

Carilion Clinic

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Center for Advanced Gynecology

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Center for Neurorehabilitation Services

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Central Virginia Foot and Ankle Laser Center

53

Charlottesville Gastroenterology Associates

54

Charlottesville Orthopaedic Center

55

Children’s Dentistry of Charlottesville

58

Edward Wolanski, MD, PC

26

Evolution Hearing

35

Eye One

39

Hospice of the Piedmont

23

InnovAge

Mary Baldwin University

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Medical Facilities of America

17

Our Lady of Peace Retirement Community

39

Pain & Spine Center of Charlottesville

56

Pantops Prosthodontics

57

Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville

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Rebecca’s Natural Food

32

Reproductive Medicine and Surgery Center of Virginia, PLC.

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Rivanna Hearing Center Rosewood Village

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CONGRATULATIONS

Savola Aesthetic Dermatology Center, PLC

13

Stephen D. Keefe, MD

ASHLEY ABRAMS

19

The Center

Ashley Abrams of Charlottesville was the first person to email the correct seven differences in last issue’s Funny Bone. For the full list of answers visit our facebook page @OurHealthCharlottesville.

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of Charlottesville

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23, 76 University of Virginia Health System 69

University of Virginia Imaging

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Virginia Prosthetics and Orthotics


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Profile for OurHealth Magazines

OurHealth Charlottesville and Shenandoah Valley: November/December 2019  

It's that time of year again! Find out if your favorite doctors and providers made the list in OurHealth's 5th Annual Best Bedside Manner Aw...

OurHealth Charlottesville and Shenandoah Valley: November/December 2019  

It's that time of year again! Find out if your favorite doctors and providers made the list in OurHealth's 5th Annual Best Bedside Manner Aw...