Page 1

The The Magazine Magazine of of Fun Fun and and Fact Fact

YEARS YEARS

Almost Business as Usual at thhe High School Buzz King Recalls Our Most Celebrated Chronicler FIELD NOTES: Hugelkuultur Gardening Remember Brow wn County

Nov. Nov. / Dec. Dec. 2020 2020 FREE FREE


festivefood for the holidays!

wild & tasty

TIP

Try our Cranberry Black Walnut Balsamic Jam over a wedge of brie served with crackers or crostini. Always a party favorite.

We’re the destination for that thoughtful and unique gift of great flavor. Perhaps a variety of olive oil and balsamics, neatly packaged in an artisan wooden gift carrier.

We have curated a flavorful collection for your tasting pleasure with plenty to offer for foodies, the experienced cook, or the novice. It goes well beyond the high-quality olive oils and balsamics we built our reputation on. We’ve added jams, pastas, dipping oils, salsas, sauces, and much more. Come in for a tour of tastes and let us be your guide. You’ll be wild about our shop. Shop us online from anywhere, anytime at www.thewildolive.com

www.thewildolive.com | 37 W Main Steet Nashville, Indiana 47448 | (812) 988-9453


Village Green Building Celebrating over 100 years in nashville The Nashville you came to see and love…

Where you can see the work of local artists — whether it’s ice cream, candy and fruit preserves made the old fashioned way or the artwork of local artists and craftsmen. · first floor · Homemade Ice Cream Homemade Candies Homemade Fruit Preserves · second floor · Antiques · Art and Craft Galleries Working studios of local artists

V NA S H I L L E

INDIANA

The Candy Dish

Yes, we really do make it ourselves!

Fine Homemade Chocolate Candies and Fudge Gourmet Caramels Over 50 Flavors of Salt Water Taffy

812.988.0815

812.988.7606

Homemade Ice Cream

Harvest Preserve the

Homemade Fruit Butter Gourmet Food Cookbooks · Cookie Cutters Postcards · Greeting Cards Kitchen Gadgets Galore Giftware · Tea and Teaware

812.988.7606

Functional and Fine Art Made in Indiana

812.988.6675

61 West Main street · nashville, indiana


15 TREETOP CANOPY ZIP LINES PAINTBALL • ATV BUGGY TOURS • MTN BIKING HUMMER TOURS • EVENTS • CAMPING & CABINS WEDDINGS, PARTY, EVENTS HALL

Use Code OUR BC EXCLUDES SATURDAYS 2019 AND HOLIDAYS BUYBUY YOUR HOLIDAY GIFT YOUR HOLIDAY CERTIFICATE 10% OFF GIFT CERTIFICATE 10% OFF USECode CODE GIFT GIFT 10 Use 10

eXploreBrownCounty.com


Nineveh Edinburgh Morgantown 31 37 135 I-65 46 Bloomington Columbus 46 NASHVILLE 252

Brownie’s Bean Blossom Restaurant

Monroe Music Park & Campground

HELMSBURG

BEAN BLOSSOM

Helmsburg General Store

Vaught Rd.

Cordry Lake

Sprunica Rd.

to BL O

Rd sburg Helm

Dining

135

Craftsman Recreation

Country Club Rd

NASHVILLE Old SR 4

Kelp G rove R d.

6

46

NG

TO N

Salt Creek Golf Retreat

ls nta all tion Re ry M e e a iqu n Vac . Win o Ant ONE Co. O’ Brow rown C n w WB s B A Bro N Hill G

k Rd Cree Tire t l a Co. S wn

Bro

Dunham

Mt . Li

Bidders Junction

ber

ty R

MI

Bear Wallow Mainstream Distillery Fiber Abe Martin Lodge

eXplore Brown County

to COLUMBUS d

yB

Mike’s Music and Dance Barn

Lil’ Black Bear Inn

Rd.

lley Rd.

to BL OO

Musical Entertainment Artist and/or Gallery

Brick Lodge

Green Va

Yellowwood Rd

Lodging/ Camping

Mike Nickels Log Homes

Al’s Paint & Body

Rd.

Hoover Rd

ran ch

Rd.

Oak Grove

46

Somewhere In Time

135

Val le

Ow l Cr eek

BELMONT

Doodles by Kara Barnard

Flower and Herb Barn Farmhouse Café

GATESVILLE

BLOOMINGTON

Yellowwood State Forest

Sweetwater Lake

Rosey Bolte’s Uncommon Gourd Studio

Lightspinner Studio

Dr. Lisa Baker, DDS Fireplace Center

The Apple Works

Antiques Co-op Art Beyond Crayons Grandpa Jeff’s Trail Rides House of Clocks

Upper Bean Blossom

Franklin

Trafalgar

Helmsburg Sawmill Pool Enterprises

45 OMIN GTON

Martinsville

TRAFALGAR MORGANTOWN

Clay Lick Rd

Lake Lemon

135

to MORGANTOWN

NASHVILLE MAP ON PAGE 6

Carmel Ridge Rd

Brown N County

Indianapolis

Brown County State Park

Monroe Reservoir

CHRISTIANSBURG

ELKINSVILLE Bob Allen Rd.

k Rd ton Cr

STORY

Hamil

Christi

ansbu

ove r Gr

rg Rd

STONE HEAD

la Pop

T.C. Steele State Historic Site

PIKES PEAK

Homestead Weaving Studio Salem’s Good Nature Farm


JEFFERSON STREET

Hoosier Artist Gallery

HONEYSUCKLE LANE

OLD HICKORY LANE

Fallen Leaf Books

Miller’s Ice Cream The Candy Dish The Harvest Preserve B3 Gallery

Brown Co. Art Guild

Moonshine/ K. Bellum Leather

The Wild Olive

ST SR 135 N

Village Green

The Nashville House

Head Over Heels

Heritage Candy Store

Heritage Mall

Spears Pottery Juls Etc.

Weed Patch Music Company

Woodlands Gallery

Homes on a Limb

Main Street Shops

Foxfire

Foxfire Boutique

Log JJail L il

Pioneer Village Museum

MAIN STREET Our Sandwich Brown Co. Place Winery

Courthouse

Copperhead Creek Gem Mine

Iris Garden Cottages & Suites

Brown Co. Rock & Fossil Shop

GOULD STREET Iris Garden Complex

Brown Co. History Center

Brown Co Public Library

Gold &Old

Health For U

Redbud Ter.

Old

RE/MAX Team

Centra Credit Office Union

County Offices

Touch of Silver

LOCUST LANE

TO Lory Winford HeresHome Studio

MOLLY’S LANE Big Woods Village

Napopi Antiques Common Grounds Coffee Bar

Colonial Bldg.

Men’s Toy Shop

Heavenly Biscuit

MOUND STREET

Hidden Valley Inn

ROBERT “BUCK” STOGSDILL WAY

TO HELMSBURG - 6 MILES

The Emerald Pencil

Zieg LeDoux & Associates

J.B. Goods/ Life is Good

TO BEAN BLOSSOM & MORGANTOWN

Brozinni Pizzeria

Carpenter Hills O’Brown Realty

North House

Hotel Nashville

46

IHA

Brown Co Art Gallery

Masonic Lodge

SR

ARTIST DR

VAN BUREN


The Salvation Army

Precise Books & Payroll

JEFFERSON STREET Hoosier Buddy

Thrift Shop Community Closet

Nashville BP

Nashville Christian Church

PITTMAN HOUSE LANE

PAT REILLY DR

Calvin Place

Schwab’s Fudge

New Leaf Amy Greely

Life is Good JB Goods

VAN BUREN ST SR 135 N

SR 46 TO BLOOMINGTON - 16 MILES

McGinley Insurance

Little Folk Children’s Boutique

Franklin Square

The Totem Post

Jack & Jill Nut Shop

Brown Co Playhouse

58 South Apparel

FRANKLIN STREET

HONEYSUCKLE LANE

Brown Co Massage

Ferguson House

Clay Purl Brown Co Pottery

Antique Alley

Yellow Door Quilt Store

Old McDurbin Gold & Gifts

Country Heritage Winery

Bone Appetit Bakery Nashville Spice Co.

Brown County Inn

Brown County IGA

map not to scale

Brown Co Health & Living

Brown County Eye Care Blue Elk Family Clinic

Salt Creek Park

Casa Del Sol

Craftsman

Brown Co Music Center

Seasons Hotel & Conference Center

Doodles by Kara Barnard

Lodging

Theatre

Artist and/or Gallery Rest Room Dining

Musical Entertainment Parking

COUNTY MAP ON PAGE 5

Nashville General Store & Bakery

Brown Co Community YMCA

Bear Hardware

N

Nashville Indiana

Coachlight Square

SR 46 TO COLUMBUS - 16 MILES

VISITORS CENTER

Brown Co Craft Gallery

Cornerstone Inn

WASHINGTON STREET

Gyros Food Nashville is Art Fudge Kitchen Brown Co T-Shirt Moondance Shop Vacation Homes

Sweetwater Gallery

Wishful Thinking

Possum Trot Square

Back to Back

Yesteryear Old Time Photos

Carol’s Gifts House of Jerky

Artists Colony Inn

Artists Colony

Cedar Creek Winery

Nashville Express

Rhonda Kay’s

Out of the Ordinary and Hickory Bar

OLD SCHOOL WAY


8 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

ADVERTISER

ANTIQUES Antiques Co-op................................. 50 Bidder’s Junction.............................. 58 Brown Co Antique Mall.................... 19 The Emerald Pencil........................... 22 Napopi Antiques............................... 13 Nashville General Store & Bakery.. 29 Plum Creek Antiques....................... 56 Somewhere in Time.......................... 41 ART, ART SUPPLIES-INSTRUCTION Antiques Co-op................................. 50 Art Beyond Crayons......................... 50 B3 Gallery............................................. 3 Bear Hardware.............................49,56 Brown Co Antique Mall.................... 19 Brown Co Art Gallery....................... 18 Brown Co Art Guild........................... 19 Brown Co Craft Gallery.................... 15 The Emerald Pencil........................... 22 Hoosier Artist Gallery...................... 22 Rhoden Art at eXplore Brown Co.... 4 Lightspinner Studio-M. Sechler..... 15 Spears Pottery................................... 18 C. Steele Art..................................53,58 Rosey Bolte-Uncommon Gourd..... 18 Lory Winford, pastelist..................... 19 BOOKS Bidder’s Junction.............................. 58 The Emerald Pencil........................... 22 Fallen Leaf Books.............................. 12 IU Press - The Indiana Christmas..... 40 CLOTHING 58 South Apparel.............................. 38 Bear Hardware.............................49,56 Bidder’s Junction.............................. 58 Brown Co T-Shirt Shop..................... 35 Community Closet Thrift Shop....... 35 Foxfire Boutique............................... 45

ENTERTAINMENT/MUSIC Brown Co Playhouse........................ 33 Copperhead Creek Gem Mine........ 50 eXplore Brown Co............................... 4 FOOD & BEVERAGE Abe Martin Lodge............................. 22 Apple Works....................................... 40 Artists Colony Inn............................. 23 Bear Wallow Distillery...................... 47 Brown Co IGA.................................... 41 Brown Co Inn..................................... 34 Brown Co Winery.............................. 23 Brownie’s Bean Blossom Rest......... 53 Brozinni Pizzeria............................... 38 The Candy Dish................................... 3 Casa del Sol........................................ 44 Cedar Creek Winery.......................... 12 Common Grounds Coffee Bar........ 13 Country Heritage Winery................ 46 Farmhouse Cafe................................ 25 Gyros Food is Art.............................. 48 The Harvest Preserve......................... 3 Heavenly Biscuit............................... 51 Helmsburg General Store............... 44 Heritage Candy Store....................... 29 Hoosier Buddy Liquors.................... 25 Hotel Nashville.................................. 47 House of Jerky................................... 44 Jack and Jill Nut Shop...................... 13 Miller’s Ice Cream................................ 3 Nashville BP....................................... 51 Nashville General Store & Bakery.. 29 The Nashville House......................... 50 Nashville Fudge Kitchen.................. 60 Nashville Spice Co............................. 59 Our Sandwich Place......................... 44 Out of the Ordinary & Hickory Bar.39 Salt Creek Golf Retreat.................... 46 Schwab’s Fudge................................. 35

Head Over Heels............................... 35 J.B. Goods/ Life is Good................... 24 Little Folk Children’s Boutique....... 49 Men’s Toy Shop.................................. 29 CRAFTS, POTTERY, GIFTS Antiques Co-op................................. 50 Apple Works....................................... 40 B3 Gallery............................................. 3 Bone Appetit Bakery........................ 12 Brown Co Antique Mall.................... 19 Brown Co Art Guild........................... 19 Brown Co Craft Gallery.................... 15 Brown Co Pottery.............................. 15 Brown Co Rock Shop........................ 50 Carol’s Gifts........................................ 23 Clay Purl............................................. 39 The Emerald Pencil........................... 22 The Ferguson House........................ 45 Foxfire................................................. 45 Head Over Heels............................... 35 Homes on a Limb.............................. 23 Homestead Weaving Studio........... 18 Hoosier Artist Gallery...................... 22 House of Clocks................................. 50 Lightspinner Studio-M. Sechler..... 15 Little Folk Children’s Boutique....... 49 Men’s Toy Shop.................................. 29 Moonshine Leather.......................... 18 Napopi Antiques............................... 13 New Leaf............................................. 19 Rhonda Kay’s..................................... 38 Spears Pottery................................... 18 Sweetwater Gallery.......................... 15 The Totem Post.................................. 12 Rosey Bolte-Uncommon Gourd..... 18 Wishful Thinking............................... 12 Woodlands Gallery........................... 35 Yellow Door Quilt Store................... 13


DIRECTORY

Seasons Hotel & Conference Ctr.... 39 The Wild Olive..................................... 2 FURNITURE Antiques Co-op................................. 50 Bidder’s Junction.............................. 58 Brown Co Antique Mall.................... 19 The Ferguson House........................ 45 Napopi Antiques............................... 13 Plum Creek Antiques....................... 56 Somewhere in Time.......................... 41 HARDWARE Bear Hardware.............................49,56 HATS Head Over Heels............................... 35 Moonshine Leather.......................... 18 JEWELRY B3 Gallery............................................. 3 Bidder’s Junction.............................. 58 Brown Co Antique Mall.................... 19 Brown Co Craft Gallery.................... 15 Ferguson House................................ 45 Foxfire................................................. 45 Juls Etc................................................ 24 New Leaf............................................. 19 Old McDurbin Gold & Gifts............. 13 Rhonda Kay’s..................................... 38 Spears Pottery................................... 18 The Totem Post.................................. 12 Touch of Silver Gold & Old.............. 24 LODGING/CAMPGROUNDS Abe Martin Lodge............................. 22 Artists Colony Inn............................. 23 Brick Lodge........................................ 47 Brown Co Health & Living............... 57 Brown Co Inn..................................... 34 Cornerstone Inn................................ 15 eXplore Brown Co............................... 4 Hidden Valley Inn............................. 24 Hills O’ Brown Vacation Rentals..... 25

Nov./Dec. • Our Brown County 9

Hotel Nashville.................................. 47 Iris Garden Cottages........................ 51 Lil’ Black Bear Inn.............................. 53 Moondance Vacation Homes......... 49 North House...................................... 47 Salt Creek Golf Retreat.................... 46 Seasons Hotel & Conference Ctr.... 39 PET PRODUCTS Bone Appetit Bakery........................ 12 PHOTOS B3 Gallery............................................. 3 Hoosier Artist Gallery...................... 22 Spears Pottery................................... 18 Yesteryear Old Time Photos............ 41 REAL ESTATE Carpenter Hills o’ Brown Realty..... 28 RE/MAX-Marg & Brenda.................. 58 RECREATION eXplore Brown Co............................... 4 Grandpa Jeff’s Trail Rides................ 49 Salt Creek Golf Retreat.................... 46 SERVICES Al’s Paint & Body............................... 56 Dr. Lisa Baker, DDS........................... 38 Bear Hardware’s Bagged Trash....... 56 Bidder’s Junction - Auction House.58 Blue Elk Family Clinic....................... 57 Brown Co Eye Care............................ 56 Brown Co Health & Living............... 57 Brown Co Massage........................... 51 Brown Co Tire & Auto....................... 56 Brown Co Visitors Center................. 14 Brown Co Community YMCA.......... 58 Centra Credit Union......................... 25 Dave Carlile Heating & Cooling...... 57 Dunham Plumbing........................... 58 Helmsburg Sawmill Inc/ Pool Enterprises Inc.......................... 58 IN Seamless Guttering..................... 57

Mainstream Fiber Networks........... 57 McGinley Insurance (Farmers)........ 57 Nashville BP....................................... 51 Nashville Christian Church............. 56 Precise Books & Payroll.................... 56 Rambling Dog Design - SIGNS....... 58 Zieg LeDoux & Assoc........................ 56 SHOES Head Over Heels............................... 35 Moonshine Leather.......................... 18 The Totem Post.................................. 12 SPECIALTY SHOPS Bone Appetit Bakery........................ 12 Clay Purl............................................. 39 Fireplace Center................................ 44 Head Over Heels............................... 35 Health For U....................................... 57 House of Clocks................................. 50 House of Jerky................................... 44 Little Folk Children’s Boutique....... 49 Men’s Toy Shop.................................. 29 Moonshine Leather.......................... 18 Nashville Spice Co............................. 59 Weed Patch Music Company.......... 19 Wishful Thinking............................... 12 Yellow Door Quilt Store................... 13 STAINED GLASS Hoosier Artist Gallery...................... 22 Sweetwater Gallery.......................... 15 WEDDINGS Artists Colony Inn............................. 23 Hotel Nashville.................................. 47 OTHER Apple Works....................................... 40 Health For U....................................... 57 Mike Nickels Log Homes................. 44 Nashville Christian Church............. 56 Flower and Herb Barn...................... 57


Contents 12 WHERE IS IT?

13 SUBSCRIBE 16 Couples Caught Off Guard ~by Ryan Stacy 20 Almost Business as Usual ~by Bob Gustin 26 Peaceful Valley Heritage ~by Julia Pearson 30-31 Photos by Larry W. Baker* 32-33 Calendar 36 Sarah Noggle, textile artist ~by Bob Gustin 42 King Recalls Hohenberger ~by Jeff Tryon

48 Down in the Hills o’ Brown Sample of Hohenberger 52 Remember Brown County ~by Mark Blackwell

54 FIELD NOTES: Hugelkultur ~by Jim Eagleman 55 Kara Barnard Cartoon 56-58 INFO PAGES

Cover:

Contributors Bob Gustin worked as a reporter, photographer, managing editor, and editor for daily newspapers in Colorado, Nebraska, and Indiana before retiring in 2011. He and his wife, Chris, operate Homestead Weaving Studio. She does the weaving while he gives studio tours, builds small looms, and expands his book and record collections.

Ryan Stacy is a content writer at Monroe County Public Library, and also enjoys writing about Brown County. He and his wife live in Bloomington, where they can often be found chasing movies, good food, and cultural events. His other interests include reading, photography, and music.

Joe Lee is an illustrator and writer. He is the author of The History of Clowns for Beginners and Dante for Beginners and illustrator of six other titles, including Dada and Surealism for Beginners, and Music Theory for Beginners. He is an editorial cartoonist for the Bloomington Herald Times, a graduate of Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey Clown College, and a veteran circus performer.

Julia Pearson wrote for a Franciscan magazine for ten years and served as its human interest editor. She and husband Bruce now reside in Lake Woebegone Country for life’s continuing adventures. Julia enjoys traveling and visiting museums of all types and sizes, with her children and grandchildren.

Jeff Tryon is a former news editor of The Brown County Democrat, a former region reporter for The Republic, and a former bureau chief for The Huntsville Times. Born and raised in Brown County, he currently lives with his wife, Sue, in a log cabin on the edge of Brown County State Park. He is a Baptist minister.

Mark Blackwell no longer makes his home in Brown County where “the roadway is rough and the slopes are seamed with ravines and present a meatless, barren, backbone effect.” He now resides within sight of the sixth green of an undisclosed golf course. He was born in the middle of the last century and still spends considerable time there.

Jim Eagleman, recently retired DNR naturalist, and his wife Kay, enjoy hiking the many natural areas, preserves, and land trust sites in Brown and neighboring counties. His FIELD NOTES have appeared in this publication for several years. Contact Jim with comments and inquiries at <jpeagleman@gmail.com>.

Cindy Steele is the publisher and editor of this magazine. She sells and designs ads, sometimes writes, takes photos, and creates the layout. For fun, she likes to play the guitar or banjo and sing.

*Larry W. Baker is originally from Columbus, Indiana, but spent much of his childhood with his grandparents in Brown County. He resides here now with his wife Lura. He has several Brown County ancestors on both branches of his family tree, going back to one of the first families to settler here, the Elkins. He has collected Brown County books, paintings, and stories over the years and likes to capture the scenery, people, and history with his camera. Locals look forward to his Facebook posts of Brown County life. He served in the Army during the Vietnam War and retired from the Post Office. He has several kids, grandkids, and great grandkids.

Sarah Noggle, textile artist

~by Bob Gustin

OUR BROWN COUNTY ourbrowncounty.com ourbrown@bluemarble.net

Special thanks to Kara Barnard for her cartoon

Also online at issuu.com/ourbrowncounty OR search in the mobile app ISSUU and on Facebook for OUR BROWN COUNTY

Thanks, Mom, for making it happen!

P.O. Box 157 Helmsburg, IN 47435 (812) 988-8807

10 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

Singing Pines Projects, Inc. copyright 2020


Coloring Contest Win $20

Publisher’s choice. Send to this address by December 20.

OUR BROWN COUNTY P.O. Box 157 Helmsburg, IN 47435

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 11


Guess Photo Win $20 WHERE IS IT? Call (812) 988-8807 Be the first person to call and win the money! Leave a message identifying the location of the photo along with your name and phone number.

38 Franklin St. E. | Nashville, IN | drinkatthecreek.com | Open Every Day

The Totem Post ~Since 1952~

• Genuine Native American Jewelry • Zuni Fetishes • Sterling Silver Jewelry • Copper Jewelry 78 S. Van Buren St. • Minnetonka Moccasins Nashville , IN • Pendleton • Knives 812-988-2511 ~Open all year~ TheTotemPost.com

BONE APPETIT BAKERY For Dogs

• Premium, all-natural treats since 1997 • Over 20 varieties from low-fat to grain-free • Gourmet and seasonal snacks, too

Last issue featured the wooden carved bear at Bear Hardware. Cheryll Hendrickson guessed it first.

Get a FREE Sampler bag of natural dog treats with $10 purchase and this ad.

DOGS WELCOME! (812) 988-0305

Open 7 days 211 S. Van Buren St. (behind Visitor Center)

www.barkingood.com

Established 2001

A Wonderful Mix of ks Old, New, Used and Rare Books Journals • Sketchbooks Handmade Greeting Cards Local Postcards 45 S. Jefferson St. • Nashville, IN 812.988.0202 fallenleafbooks.com Open 7 days a week 10 am to 5 pm

12 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

FREE in-store demos!

Old School Way and Pittman House Lane

(next to the Toy Chest, behind Yesteryear Old Time Photos) Visit our website for class schedules www.wishfulthinking-in.com • 812-988-7009


The

Yellow Door QUILT STORE

We are a little quilt shop with BIG IDEAS! The fabric we feature is happy and bright. We also carry quilt kits and can ship them to you. Tues.–Sat. 12 to 4 • closed Sun. and Mon.

Antique Alley • 81 S. Jefferson St. • Nashville, IN 812-200-8269 • yellowdoorquiltstore.com

SUBSCRIBE! For the cost of a fancy coffee drink once every two months, you can have Our Brown County sent to your mailbox. That pays for postage, supplies, and processing time. Subscriptions make good gifts to family or friends, too.

SUBSCRIBE

One Year’s Subscription for $20 (six issues)

C Cinnamon Salted Roasted Nuts Almonds R d Roasted & Pecans Daily Cashews, Fancy Mi Mix, P Pepitas, it Peanuts Delicious Candies - Homemade Fudge Mail Orders - 812-988-7480

Name: N

S.Van Buren (Shopper's Lane) Nashville

Old McDurbin Gold & Gifts 50%

Customized

• Anklets • Bracelets • Necklaces OFFLRY E Watches JEW Sterling Silver Rings 1000’s of Pendants

Blue building in Antique Alley S. Jefferson St. • Nashville, IN

COMMON GROUNDS

Address:

Mail with check or money order to:

Our Brown County P.O. Box 157 • Helmsburg, IN 47435

Napopi Antiques

COFFEE BAR It’s like a coffee shop in a living room (with things to amuse you)

Hot, Cold & Frozen Drinks • Selection of Teas Froothies (our fruit smoothies) Famous for Cheesy Eggs & Toast • Pastries • Quiche 66 N. Van Buren, Nashville (Molly’s Lane behind the red door) Opens 8:00 am M-Sat; 9:00 am Sun (Closed Wed) 812-988-6449

Plants and Records

55 N. Van Buren St. • Nashville (Near Big Woods & Men’s Toy Shop) 317-752-2218 • facebook.com/napopiantiques

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 13


Escape Comes Naturally in Brown County. And it always has. Where else can you relax under a canopy of trees? Watch the sun disappear beyond the horizon? Roam a quiet trail and listen to the birds sing? Snuggle up in a cabin nestled in the forest? Only in Brown County. To plan your getaway, stop by the Visitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center in downtown Nashville at 211 South Van Buren Street, call 812-988-7303, or visit BrownCounty.com

14 Our Brown County â&#x20AC;˘ Nov./Dec. 2020


Lightspinner STUDIO

41 Exceptional Accommodations #1 Rated on ofTripAdvisor in the heart Nashville

Martha Sechler Unique Watercolors Mixed Media Gourd Art

Custom gift certificates available for the holidays

4460 Helmsburg Rd. Nashville, IN • 812-703-3129 Open whenever home. Call ahead.

Sweetwater Gallery Stained Glass • Paperweights Mosaic Mirrors • Pottery Fabric Wallhangings

local artisans

created by hand

New Location: 158 Old School Way Nashville, IN • 812-988-0449

E S T

1 9 7 8

BROWN COUNTY

A unique cooperative gallery featuring fine arts and crafts by local and area artists Open Daily · 10 am – 5 pm 62 E. Washington · Nashville, IN 812.988.7058 BrownCountyCraftGallery.com Like and Follow Us!

including

Our Dining Room is now open to the public The Lodge at Cornerstone for breakfast daily and and lunch on weekends! Check out our newest accomodations, our off-site vacation rental Cabin 360 Cornerstone Lodge! cornerstoneinn. com

888-383-0300 • 54 e. franklin st. downtown nashville

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 15


Couples Bands Caught Off Guard ~story and photos by Ryan Stacy

Reverend and Breezy Peyton.

W

hen news of the 2020 pandemic’s severity first reached our community, many local musicians were caught off guard. John Bowyer and Jayme Hood, the couple who make up local Americana duo The Hammer & The Hatchet, had made big plans for this year. They’d just placed the order for the vinyl pressing of Road May Flood, their third full-length album, and had a tour of the Midwest set up to promote it. “We’d had a good level of success locally, and this was the year we’d stepped away from our day jobs,” Jayme

16 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

says. But like so many other performers, the band was soon forced to scrap the tour and hunker down with the rest of Indiana. “I was really excited, because we hadn’t toured before. So I was saying ‘We’re not even supposed to be [home], we’re supposed to be in Illinois or Wisconsin.’” Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, the high-energy country blues act with a home in Brown County and a worldwide following, were on the road when everything changed. The night they were in Austin, Texas to play at the South by Southwest Music Festival, which features over 2,000 live performances, it was cancelled. “It was like a funeral in that town,” remembers frontman Josh “Reverend” Peyton. “People were so bummed,” adds his bandmate and wife Breezy. “We knew it was pretty serious then. And then we wondered if our other shows were going to start falling off.” The band continued their tour, making it as far as Chicago before calling it quits and heading home. The adjustment to being suddenly grounded was a rough one for the Peytons, who typically spend most of the year on tour. “The first month was the worst. We were sitting at home alone, I was too scared to even go to the grocery store. I was a nervous wreck,” says the Rev. The beginning of the shutdown saw The Hammer & The Hatchet grind to a halt as well. After their tour was cancelled, Jayme found her well of songwriting ideas had inexplicably run dry. “The first few months were really silent. There was a lot of ‘Hold up. What does this mean? What do I do?’” she says. Both bands hung on to their hopes that they could pick things up again shortly. But as the months wore on, the reality of the situation sank in. Along with everyone else, the company pressing their new record was closed, so The Hammer & The Hatchet had nothing to sell online. John and Jayme


couldn’t rehearse with the musicians in their backing band, and they couldn’t even play at jam sessions at friends’ homes. And the Peytons, in addition to their cancelled summer dates, had another big damn problem: their road crew and other people who depended on them financially. “When I’m standing up onstage with a microphone, there’s a whole lot of people standing behind me you don’t see,” the Rev explains. “I don’t want anyone to lose their house.” But in true Brown County fashion, the two bands refused to allow a streak of bad luck to make them give up. Soon they’d stepped up their internet game, offering more livestreams of their performances; the Peytons put more work into Hard Times and Weirdness, a podcast they’d created to build their connection with fans. And both bands were writing material again, even incorporating their feelings and experiences during the pandemic into some of their songwriting. By summer 2020, their vinyl had arrived, and The Hammer & The Hatchet began to get offers to play at re-opening local venues. Though they were eager to get back onstage, they knew they had to strike the balance between opportunity and safety. “I ask a lot of questions. We talk about [safety] terms a lot before we come in,” Jayme says about accepting a gig. John cites the outdoor stage at Nashville’s Hard Truth Hills as an example of the good safety practices. “Everybody’s terraced away from you, up a hill. It’s a cool space,” he says. As strange—and difficult—as these times have been, some unexpected new doors have opened. “There have been some silver linings to this,” the Rev acknowledges. The Big Damn Band was able to write a new album during the shutdown, and he says it’s his best yet. The Band’s Patreon account, which offers online bonus content to their most devoted fans, has kept his operations afloat. And being home has allowed the Rev to spend valuable time with his parents, who are both navigating their own health issues. John and Jayme say their extended time on their beautiful wooded property has been

Jayme Hood and John Bowyer The Hammer & The Hatchet.

good for The Hammer & The Hatchet’s music. John says, “Being able to relax and take walks here has been really good. Some good new songs have come out of that.” The bands say that although they don’t know when things will return to normal, their number-one priority is being ready for whatever happens. “Uncertainty has caused us to give up on 2020,” says the Rev. “But we’re sowing seeds this year. They’re gonna grow to big giant oak trees next year.” The support of an arts-focused community like Nashville is a big help too, says Jayme. “Our strength is in our network here. We’ve got a really special community of people who want to help.” More about The Hammer & The Hatcher can be found at <thehammerandthehatchet.com>. More about The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band can be found at <bigdamnband.com>. 

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 17


HOMESTEAD WEAVING STUDIO

Brown County

See homesteadweaver.com for remote shopping Quality Handwovens by Chris Gustin

Art Gallery

Yarn • Looms • Supplies • Classes

Southeastern Brown County 6285 Hamilton Creek Road Columbus, IN 47201

812-988-8622

Open 11 to 5 most days CALL AHEAD Visit us on the Back Roads Tour

BROWN COUNTY’S ORIGINAL ART GALLERY · EST. 1926

OCTOBER 24 – NOVEMBER 14

42nd ANNUAL

Indiana Heritage Arts Exhibition and Sale Home to Brown County Artists Association and Indiana Heritage Arts Corner of Main Street & Artist Drive · Nashville, IN 812.988.4609 · Free Admission · Free Parking

Locally Crafted Pottery • Jewelry • Photography • Wood • Fiber • More... Downtown Nashville (S. Van Buren St. near stoplight/courthouse) • Open Daily

www.spearspottery.com • 812.988.1286 • Spears Gallery on Facebook

BROWNCOUNTYARTGALLERY.ORG shop online: bcartgalleryonline.org

OPEN DAILY

WITH COVID-19 PROTOCOLS IN PLACE

Moonshine Leather Co. Handcrafted Leather Goods Made in the USA

812.988.1326 · moonshineleather.com

38 SOUTH VAN BUREN · NASHVILLE, IN New home of K Bellum Leather! 18 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020


Lory Winford Fine Art

Pastelist inspired by nature’s colors

Locally built instruments and affordable student models meticulously displayed, making this little music store a destination point in Brown County Lovingly owned and operated by

Kara Barnard and Kristin Thompson

HeresHome Studio

musicians, instructors and instrument adoption specialists

Workshops and Private Lessons Studio visits by appointment only Commission work accepted 15 N. Johnson St. Nashville, IN

58 E. Main Nashville, IN—Look for BANJO by courthouse

812-200-3300 • www.weedpatchmusicshop.com

Lory Winford Pastelist

Brown County Antique Mall

NEW LEAF

Celebrating 25 Years as Owner

An eclectic mix of creative items by local, regional, and global artists

Antique Store since 1972

Calvin Place Franklin & Van Buren Streets Nashville, IN • (812) 988-1058 www.amygreely.com

Over 7,000 square feet of Antique and Vintage Glory Filled with antiques, jewelry, pottery, china, glass, furniture, artifacts, primitives, books, collectibles, and home decor. More than 70 dealers • We buy and sell

3288 State Road 46 East 3 miles east of Nashville, IN • 13 miles west of I-65 Open 7 Days a week till 5:30 • 812-988-1025

THE GUILD. FINE ART BY FINE ARTISTS. WELCOME TO OUR GALLERY AND MUSEUM Special exhibition Peace on Earth opens November 14

© 2020 Brown County Art Guild, Inc.

Featuring handcrafted jewelry by owner Amy Greely

Work shown at Hoosier Artist Gallery in Nashville

916-804-2484 • hereshomestudio@gmail.com

• Artwork for Sale • Artisan Gift Shop • Permanent Art Collection 48 S. Van Buren Street Nashville, IN 47448

ARTWORK BY JAMES OBLACK

812 988-6185 BrownCountyArtGuild.org

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 19


Almost Business as Usual

~story and photos by Bob Gustin

O

n a brisk October morning, 43 degrees and sunny, Brown County High School’s principal and assistant principal stand outside the main entrance at 8 a.m. With a friendly formality and clipboards in hand, they greet arriving students, sometimes exchanging small talk. Of course, one boy is in trouble, caught yesterday on a skateboard after he had been warned. He’s told to go wait in the principal’s office. But since this is 2020, things are a little different. Principal Matthew Stark and Assistant Principal Charles Hutchins also have no-touch scanners, and take the temperatures of students who have been sick. Everyone, students and administrators alike, are wearing face masks—except one teen, who has forgotten his. No problem. Stark pulls one out of his back pocket and the boy is on his way. It’s the coronavirus pandemic world, and the high school has adapted to the circumstances. Mostly, it’s business as usual at the high school, or almost as usual. There are no choir or band concerts, no field trips. There will be a homecoming king and queen,

20 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

but no dance. Reduced crowds at football games means they are all sold out. The soccer team was under a two-week quarantine. Clubs are still active, but students have assigned seating at meetings. Assigned seats are also the rule in the lunchroom, for the first time. Disinfecting has been added to the janitorial staff’s responsibilities, contact tracing to the nursing staff, and remote learning to the teachers. Attendance is tracked, as are illnesses. If symptomatic, students are quarantined and their contacts are traced. As of early October, one student had tested positive for the coronavirus, but the student was kept home by parents. All that means more paperwork, but “it’s the reality,” Stark said. But the essential part of life in school— learning—goes on. Stark says about 20 percent of the students are doing some sort of remote learning. Some of those do a program through Indiana Online, a statesponsored program, some through Zoom with


Masked Mr. Stark greets students as they arrive.

classroom teachers. The classroom teaching is referred to as synchronous learning, taking place in real time. Those remote learners, Stark notes, are sometimes just a few steps away from the refrigerator, the television, or other distractions. “It puts lots of responsibilities on students and their families to stay focused and keep learning,” he said. “It’s feast or famine. Some remote learners struggle with self-discipline.” Stark believes in-person teaching is the best, and the students and staff have demonstrated resilience, but the pandemic has meant extra work for the school’s staff. “They come in every day and get the job done. We try to give some kind of normalcy to a very unnormal piece.” Mathew Noriega, who has taught sciences for 25 years at Brown County High School, is both worried and hopeful. He teaches most of his classes in person, but has a chemistry course taught via Zoom to 26 students. “I work more on empathy and interaction” as a teacher, he said, which is difficult to do with distance learning because it is harder to get a read on how

students are doing. The Zoom sessions are recorded for those who can’t attend at the specified time, he said, and teenagers are unlikely to admit to having problems knowing it will be widely available. Plus, most of the students’ Zoom images are avatars instead of video since most of the internet connections are not fast enough to support video. That means he can’t see facial expressions or body language to help gauge how students are doing. Secondly, remote learning makes it harder for teachers to evaluate student work, he said. In a classroom, he can walk around and notice if a student is having trouble with lessons. With remote learning, he has to wait for a student to upload a picture of their work, then download it and make notes on it to send back to the student. So he prefers in-person teaching, which he calls a “human enterprise.” But he sees some positives to remote learning. All people learn in different ways, he said, and some students who suffer from anxiety, or are easily distracted, can put on headphones at home and have a better experience. “Remote learning could continue for a certain group of children” after the coronavirus has run its course, he said. “I flip-flop. A child does great in a bubble, but is that where you’re going to live the rest of your life? “I still like my job, I’m happy we’re back in school, and I’m proud of the kids. They wear masks without complaining. The remote learners show up on time. It shows the adaptability and resiliency of young people,” Noriega said. He said he remains hopeful because after all the messed up and sometimes inane responses society has had to the virus, “the kids haven’t changed a bit.” Some teachers have incorporated the pandemic into their lesson plans. Social studies and government classes are noting how it has affected government, and the biomedical staff has touched on the subject. Stark said he would not have thought it possible in August to have 80 percent of students in October classrooms. But now he knows it can continue as long as the school—and the community as a whole—is smart about what it does. It is working, he said, because Brown County is a lowspread area and contract tracing is more feasible. “With all the political rhetoric and everything surrounding COVID-19, I’m really proud of the students and staff. For the most part, it’s not been a problem. “We’re going about school here,” Stark said. 

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 21


MEMORABLE

Holiday Gifts

Spread holiday joy with a variety of handmade gifts to choose from. 45 S. JEFFERSON ST. NASHVILLE, IN 47448 812-988-6888

ES ITI S IO

GIFTS, BO OKS &

CU R

HOOSIERARTIST.NET

22 Our Brown County â&#x20AC;¢ Nov./Dec. 2020


Carol’s

GIFTS

the Since 1981

Inn & Restaurant

A Charming 19th Century Style Inn and Restaurant

Glass Baron Hand-blown Glass Jim Shore Collectibles • Lori Mitchell Figurines Fontanini Nativities • Painted Ponies

Lang Graphics Calendars & Paper Goods Billy Jacobs Prints Gooseberry Patch Cookbooks Blue Mountain Greeting Cards Handmade Soap & Bath Bombs Amia Suncatchers

Wind Chimes • Music Boxes • Children’s Books Halloween & Christmas Gifts & Décor Locally Handcrafted Pewter Christmas Ornaments 125 S. Van Buren St. • Artists Colony Shops Nashville, IN • Open 363 • Days 812-988-6388

• 20 Guest Rooms, 3 Suites with Whirlpool Baths • Banquet and Conference Rooms for Retreats or Parties • Gift Certificates Available Serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Breakfast Buffet 7:30 am–10:30 am Monthly Dinner Theatre Shows At the corner of Van Buren and Franklin Streets in Nashville, Indiana

812-988-0600 • 800-737-0255

artistscolonyinn.com

Brown County

WINERY WINER WINE RY RY

· AWARD WINNING QUALITY WINES SINCE 1986 ·

Arts Village Brown County ART VENUE

Every item in our store is

HANDMADE IN NASHVILLE Specializing in:

• Live Edge Hardwood Benches • Tables • Sun Catchers • Cutting Boards • Serving Trays Many other beautiful items

Complimentary Tastings · Two Tasting Rooms WINERY IN GNAWBONE

4520 State Road 46 East · Nashville 812.988.6144

VILLAGE OF NASHVILLE

East Main & Old School Way 812.988.8646

OPEN DAILY

Monday-Thursday 10 – 5 · Friday & Saturday 10 – 5:30 · Sunday 11 – 5

Wine & Wine-related Gifts · Gourmet Foods Outdoor Seating · Gift Cards · Online Ordering

BrownCountyWinery.com

Digitally Carved Signage Custom Work Available Customized Wedding Gifts

Hand-poured Candles Made in our store 59 East Main Street (Old School Way Alley) Nashville, IN

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 23


in Nashville, IN

172 N. Van Buren Street AND

102 S. Van Buren Street (Calvin Place)

www.JBGoods.com • 812-988-0900 All Suite Hotel in Downtown Nashville

48 years of quality service in Brown County

Private Bedroom with King Bed Dining Area and Fully Equipped Kitchenette Living Room with Queen Sofa Sleeper Private Porch/Balcony Fireplaces and Whirlpool Baths Available

812-988-9000

www.hiddenvalleyinn.net 201 N. Van Buren St. • Nashville, IN

24 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

Touch of Silver, Gold & Old 87 E. Main St. • Nashville, IN 47448 (812) 988-6990 • (800) 988-6994 Hours: 10am – 6pm • 7 days a week www.touchofsilvergoldandold.com


Centra Credit Union is in your neighborhood! 189 Commercial St. Nashville, IN 800-232-3642 | Centra.org

Federally Insured by NCUA. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Farmhouse Cafe ...a country drive to an unexpected dining pleasure · LUNCH ·

Homemade Soups, Salads and Garden Sandwiches

· DINNER ·

Steak · Salmon · Pork Chicken · Pasta R Garden and Fruit Salads Soups · Desserts Herbal Teas · Cool Drinks Beer & Wine

5171 Bean Blossom Road · Just 15 minutes from Nashville

A small, intimate restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating

Reservations Suggested · 812-988-2004 LUNCH: DAILY · 11–4 PM DINNER: TUESDAY–SATURDAY · 5–8 PM

farmhousecafeandtearoom.com · Like us on

Hoosier Buddy Liquors Cold Beer, Fine Wines & Select Spirits Cold Beer:

Hoosier Buddy offers more than 150 different beers, including more than 80 craft, micro, and imports. We proudly offer a wide variety of beers from Indiana’s finest brewers.

Fine Wines:

Hoosier Buddy is a wine-lovers type of store. With more than 200 wines to choose from, we’ve got something for everyone. Check out our “Affordable Imports” and “90+ Point” selections.

Select Spirits:

Hoosier Buddy offers an ever expanding array of top-notch spirits. Our whiskey category alone includes more than 75 different choices. Whether you’re looking for a Single Barrel Bourbon or a Single Malt from Islay— we stock them.

284 S. Van Buren • Nashville, IN (next to Subway) 812-988-2267 M-Th 8am-10pm • Fri. & Sat. 8am-11pm NOW OPEN SUNDAYS Noon-6pm Follow us on Twitter @HoosierBuddy1

As always, Hoosier Buddy Liquors reminds you to celebrate safe—don’t drink and drive.

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 25


~by Julia Pearson

Ruth Reichmann is seated with the mic at the Brown County Bluegrass Music historical marker dedication in June of 2016. Jim Schultz is standing on the right. State senator Eric Koch is standing on the far left.

A

ll state and national history is written with the hand of local history. All culture is embedded in the literature, artifacts, sites, and geography of the local landscape. The heritage passed down through generations is the heritage that is preserved and made accessible to interested citizens. In 2014 Ruth Reichmann’s determination to safeguard Brown County’s treasures led to the formation of Peaceful Valley Heritage and Preservation. By-laws were approved April 15, 2015. The Mission Statement is all encompassing and summarizes a deep focus on Brown County treasures: to foster, preserve, and promote the rich history of Brown County; to encourage interest and education in local history; to identify significant historical sites and artifacts; to recognize the impact of heritage crafts, art, literature, and music stirred by the indigenous creativity of the natural surroundings; and to protect and share these irreplaceable attributes with all interested people. The group meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month in the lower level of the Brown County Community Foundation, currently with all COVID health and safety measures observed. Recent monthly meetings were made available for Zoom participation as well as in-

26 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

person attendance. Board members are Jim Schultz, president; David Martin, vice president; Greg Wright, treasurer; Lorna ReichmanN, secretary; and Vivian Wolf, Dorothy Babcock, Susie Arnold, and Tim Alward. The restoration of the old log jail received the group’s early attention. The jail is the only Indiana jail of hewn-logs standing in its original location. It was constructed in 1879 and replaced the first jail that was built in 1837 by James Taggart and William Snyder. Stabilizing the old jail led to securing cabin restoration specialist, Bird Snider. As the work began, Jim Schultz recounts how the charred logs of the original jail, which had been destroyed by fire, were uncovered and were used within the construction of the second jail. Old shoes, and shards of glass found at the site were given to the Brown County Historical Society’s collections. Board member and chair of the cemetery committee, Vivian Wolff, says there are 108 cemeteries in Brown County. Sprunica Church and cemetery were chosen as an early project. The 150 plus year old church and cemetery are a relic of a once thriving community that once had a one room schoolhouse, a store, and a Redman’s lodge. Sixteen of the gravesites in the churchyard are from one family. Due to the diligence of the


Peaceful Valley Heritage & Preservation cemetery committee, a Department of Natural Resources sign was installed in July 2019. The Peaceful Valley Heritage and Preservation turned to other cemeteries in the county to preserve. They learned that according to state ordinance, township trustees are legally responsible for the perpetual care of the graveyards if not on private property. Vivian Wolff has put her wordsmithing talent and energy to writing grants, thus securing funds to restore headstones. A small stone requires $350 for Stonehugger, Inc. to do this precise and specialized work. Volunteers devoted to cemetery restoration meet on the first Saturday of the month. In this season between All Souls’ and Thanksgiving, a weekend ride in Brown County’s back roads can provide unexpected stops at Brown County cemeteries. Dates on stones give testament to war veterans, those who perished in the flu epidemic of 1918, young lives that were claimed by childhood illnesses, and young women who did not survive childbirth. The careful preservation of graveyards give us an opportunity and place of quiet assurance that others have faced similar health calamities to this generation’s corona virus epidemic. Headstones carved by Henry Cross can also be located and photographed. Stone carver and farmer, Henry Cross, born on August 1, 1821. He moved to Brown County and married Mary Clark on October 12, 1845. Along with

Continued on 28 Bird Snider and his crew restoring the old log jail.

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 27


PEACEFUL VALLEY continued from 27 neighbors, he built a fine home just south of present day’s Pike’s Peak. It’s believed the house was located south of Melott Cemetery where many of his tombstones can be found. For twenty years, he farmed and made his tombstone carvings. Behind his house and beyond a creek, he cut pieces of finely granulated sandstone and would sled them back to his basement workshop to carve. They were each unique in detail and artistry. The Melott Cemetery had his family plots, and Cross’s twin sons who died in infancy have elaborate stones carved by their father. Cross’s life ended tragically on February 26, 1864 in an accident while he was felling trees with some neighbors, and his grave is next to his little sons. Cross is noted to locals for the carvings of three Stonehead road markers. Thanks to the Peaceful Valley Heritage and Preservation, Inc. the creations of Henry Cross will be watched over for years to come. Willow Sullivan created the website <peacefulvalleyheritage.com> for the group and her artistic stamp is also on the active Facebook page. During these “stay at home” moments, they provide virtual descriptions of other enriching projects, such as making historical markers throughout a community. Contact information is available on the website and Facebook page for all those who are interested in preservation efforts, large and small.  Restoration of William Browning’s grave stone. He was a dignitary and Civil War veteran.

158 N. Jefferson

Kathryn Richardson Branch Manager 812-327-7462

Debbie Fleetwood Kathryn & Donna Team Scroggins Team Broker Brokers Brokers 812-327-6862 812-327-3865 812-327-7462 317-418-2320

Bob Kirlin Broker 812-720-0222

Phil Shively Team Brokers 812-325-2290 812-322-0378

812-641-5626

28 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

Tom Vornholt Broker 317-989-3323


Nashville’s Unique Dining Experience (1800s Cabin) BREAKFAST & LUNCH

Jams, Jellies, Preserves, Specialty BBQ, Chicken Salad, Soups, Pit Ham 118 E. Washington St. Nashville, IN Linen, Rugs, Candles, Curtains, Stitcheries Cinnamon Rolls, Cobblers, Cookies, Brownies 812-988-6362 • Open daily 9 to 5 Gluten Free Items, Coffees and Cappuccino Antiques, Billy Jacobs Prints nashville general store and bakery nashgenstore812

Variety of T-Shirts

Things you can live Thi li without... ih but b who h wants to! Old Colonial Bldg. 60 N. Van Buren St. Nashville, Indiana•812.988.6590 menstoyshop@yahoo.com•Visit us on Facebook

Tobaccos and Premium Cigars

Knives by Benchmade, Kershaw, Microtech, Esee, Tops, Protech, Zero Tolerance and more

Guns and Ammo for Competition, Hunting, Sport, and Home Defense

Luminox Watches (used by Navy Seals)

41 S. Van Buren St. Nashville, IN (in the Heritage Mall) 812.200.1077 HeritageCandyStore@gmail.com

We ship everywhere!

Fresh Homemade Fudge Old-Fashioned Candies Candy by the Pound Cream Filberts/Mothballs Rock Candy • Jelly Belly Chocolates/Turtles Pucker Powder Sugar Free

Ask about our Wedding Favors and Fundraising with Fudge

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 29


photos by Larry W. Baker


The schedule can change. Please check before making a trip.

Brown County Playhouse Hall of Fame Nov. 6 & 7 It’s a Wonderful Life - Radio Play Nov. 27 & 28 7:30 | 29 matinee 2:00 Believe the Magic of Christmas 2020 Dec. 4-6, 11-13, 18-20 | Fri. 7:30 Sat. 2:00 and 7:30, Sun. Matinee 2:00 Check website for schedule 70 S. Van Buren St. 812-988-6555 www.BrownCountyPlayhouse.org

Country Heritage Winery Music 7:00-10:00 Seating limited due to COVID Nov. 6 Barry Johnson Nov. 7 TBA Nov. 13 Bob Palindrome Nov. 14 Robbie Bowden & Carolyn Dutton Nov. 20 Open Mic Night Nov. 21 Impasse Nov. 27 Steve Hardin & Company Nov. 28 Steve Fulton Dec. 4 Gary Applegate Dec. 5 Speed City Spoilers Dec. 11 Paul Bertsch Band Dec. 12 Chuck Wills, Tribute Dec. 18 Christmas Sing-a-long Dec. 19 Clearwater Band 812-988-8500 www.CountryHeritageWinery.com

Big Woods Pizza Nov. 3 Rich Hardesty 5:00 44 N. Van Buren St. 812-9886004 Check Facebook page

The Original Big Woods Nov. 5 Charlie Jesseph 6:00 60 Molly’s Lane 812-988-6000

Hard Truth Hills Free Concert Series

Wine Down Wednesdays Every Wed. Jeff Foster plays guitar 6:00 Hobnob Corner Restaurant 17. W. Main St.

eXplore Brown County: Native American History Zip Month of November 11:00-5:00

Santa’s Zip and Sip

Month of December 11:00-4:00 Closed Tues. and closed Wed. starting week of Thanksgiving 2620 Valley Branch Rd. 812-988-7750 www.explorebrowncounty.com

Brown County Bikes Party in the Woods First and Third Thursdays 6:00-8:00 pm Meet at Brown Co. State Park upper shelter. Lights and Helmets required.

Trek Tribe Thursday Bike Ride First Thursday 6:00-8:00 pm Brown Co. State Park upper shelter Join Kate Nolan for skills jams, trail rides, and sessions. Free event for all skills levels. Weather permitting. Watch trail status on MTB Project or HMBA’s website.

Cabin Fever 5K Nov. 7, noon to 2:00 at Deer Run Park To raise money for scholarship fund

Annual Chocolate Walk Nov. 14, Downtown Nashville 10:00-5:00 Sample yummy chocolate treats while strolling through the village of Nashville. Proceeds to Brown Co. Humane Society Tickets at Brown Co. Visitors Center or www.bchumane.org/chocolate-walk/

Murder Mystery Dinner Show

Nov. 3 Jan Bell & Will Scott 3:00 Artists Colony Inn, Nov. 14 6:30-8:30 418 Old State Road 46 Nashville, IN 812-988-0600 812-720-4840 www.HardTruthHills.com

32 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

calendar State Park Deer Hunt Nov. 16-17, Nov. 30-Dec. 1 Brown Co. State Park closed for deer management hunt 8:00 pm day before until 8:00 am day after

43rd Annual Brown County Children’s Auction Nov. 18-Dec. 2 ONLINE ONLY Online due to COVID via Brown County Children’s Auction Facebook page. Bid on many beautiful items art, crafts, items from merchants, gift cards and much more! All proceeds are used to buy clothes for Brown County children that are in need. See details opposite page.

Brown Co. YMCA Hilly Half Nov. 21, 7:00 am to 2:00 pm Brown Co. State Park. Starts and finishes at the Saddle Barn/ Lower Shelter. Register by Nov. 20 7 pm— No race day registration. Half marathon, 10K, and 5K distances. 812-988-9622 www.browncountyymca.org

Thanksgiving Buffet 11:00-3:30 Seasons Conference Center COVID social distancing 812-988-2284 for reservations

Village Art Walk Nov. 27, 4:00-7:00 Free self-guided walking tour of downtown Nashville art galleries www.VillageArtWalk.com

Tree Lighting Ceremony Nov. 27 6:00, Brown Co. History Ctr. This year is a mini-ceremony lighting the tree, History Center, and the school house. No Santa or snacks due to COVID.


Holiday Lights Parade and Toy Drive Dec. 5, 6:00 Floats travel through the Village of Nashville. Bring a new unwrapped toy to donate to the local Salvation Army.

Reindeer Romp 8K and 5K Dec. 5, 11:00-4:00 Brown Co. State Park Nature Center Sign up by Tuesday, November 17 to be guaranteed a T-Shirt. Race begins at 1 p.m. on Dec. 5. Packet pick-up Dec. 4 noon to 3 p.m. at the YMCA, or Dec. 5 at the Nature 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

7 Vista Challenge Brown Co State Park

the Lodge, the Nature Center, or the downtown Visitors Center. Takes about an hour by car or two by bike. Must take seven photos, one at each vista.

Brown County Art Guild Thru Nov. 7 Fall Exhibition & Color Trip Exhibition Opening Nov. 14 Special Exhibition Peace on Earth 48 S. Van Buren St. 812-988-6185 www.BrownCountyArtGuild.org

Indiana Heritage Arts Exhibition and Sale

Thru Nov. 14 Takes visitors on a quest to find the most Brown Co Art Gallery beautiful view in the park by visiting 812-988-4609 seven different overlooks. Those who www.BrownCountyArtGallery.org complete it get a free 7 Vista Challenge sticker and can purchase a T-shirt at

Believe

43rd Annual Brown County Children’s Auction details The 43rd Annual Brown County Children’s Auction will be held as an online Facebook Auction this year because of the pandemic. The auction features donated art, crafts, antiques, gift certificates and other donated items from the community. Through the years the auction has provided over $640,000 in clothing to Brown County children in need. The auction will start November 18 at 8:00 am and end December 2 at 8:00 pm. Pickup of items will be on December 5 at the Nashville Police Station on Artist Drive. To bid, please go online to the Facebook page Brown County Children’s Auction and follow the instructions. If you would like to donate an item for the auction, please call 812-320-2601 or drop it off at Out of the Ordinary restaurant. Cash donations are accepted at PNC Bank or People’s Bank in Nashville. Please help ensure that all children in Brown County have a Merry Christmas in 2020.

the Magic of Christmas 2020

Live & memorable. Make plans now!

DECEMBER 4-6, 11-13, 18-20

ALSO, PLAN TO SEE OUR LIVE RADIO PRODUCTION OF:

It’s a Wonderful Life NOVEMBER 27-29 812.988.6555 | BrownCountyPlayhouse.org Showtimes, tickets & schedule online | Box Office: Thursday-Sunday | 70 S. Van Buren St. Nashville, IN

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 33


brown County Inn HOTEL, RESTAURANT & BAR

On the corner of 135 & 46 just 3 blocks of downtown with free parking

Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week

8am to 9pm Sunday to Thursday

8am to 10pm Friday & Saturday

www.browncountyinn.com

34 Our Brown County â&#x20AC;¢ Nov./Dec. 2020

(812) 988-2291


87 East Main Street • Nashville, IN • (812) 988-6080

Head over

Heels

• Minnetonka • Stetson n • Tilleyy Hats • Merrell

Women’s boutique, kids and teen clothing, men’s clothing, and household items Selling gently used items to benefit Brown County. Accepting clothing and household item donations.

Look for the sign

s

Open ALWAYS on Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:00 to 5:00 (weather permitting)

HATS HA ATS • FOOTWEAR • ACCESSORIES

Like us on Facebook at Brown County Community Closet, Inc.

49 S. Van Buren St. in Nashville • 812-988-6535 headoverheels@switched.com • fax: 812-988-6505

South Van Buren in Nashville (near stoplight, behind Subway) (812) 988-6003

Design Your Own or choose from Ready Made Garments Hundreds of choices! • Something for all ages and sizes • T-Shirts • Hoodies • LS Tees • Hats

• Tanks • Jackets • Jerseys • Tye Dye

• Night Shirts • Swim Shorts • Beach Towels • Flip Flops

Corner of Washington and Van Buren Street (Across from Visitors Center) Nashville, IN • 812-988-6939

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 35


Sarah Noggle Textile Conservator ~story and photos by Bob Gustin

“When you handle an old textile, you learn a lot about how it was done…. A lot of handwork is logical. It’s lasted that long because someone thought it out. It’s logical and it made sense.”

P

icture this: It’s 1861, and soon-to-be President Abraham Lincoln is making his way through rural Illinois in a horse-drawn buggy. He’s headed to Springfield, Illinois, where he’ll catch a train to Washington, D.C. In some little settlement along the way, ladies of the town come out to greet him, and present a handspun, handwoven 34-star American flag to him. (Kansas was

36 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

admitted to the union earlier that year.) But it’s a rough road, and Honest Abe folds the flag and sits on it to cushion the ride. Sarah Noggle knows it’s possible that story may not be true. But it’s the story that was told to Lincoln College officials in Lincoln, Illinois, when they accepted the old flag for their collection, though the 34-star flag was not officially adopted until July 4 of that year. It was, in any case, the flag of the Lincoln presidency, whether he actually sat on it or not. No other president served while the 34-star flag was flown. That flag was one of the projects Sarah took on as a textile conservator, making repairs so that it can be properly displayed. In the world of historic textiles, there are three levels: preservation, which seeks to prevent further damage to a piece of cloth; conservation, which makes repairs necessary to make the piece visually appealing; and restoration, restoring the piece to as close as possible to its original condition. Sarah, a Brown County weaver and textile artist, has worked for 14 years as a fabric conservationist for museums, universities, and public and private collections.


She has conserved Civil War flags, old quilts, stage curtains designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright for Taliesin East, and many other textiles. One job was preserving inaugural gowns from the 1880s worn by the wives of Arkansas governors. She also worked on a series of tapestries woven in Europe in the 1700s honoring Phaeton, a figure in Greek mythology. “Every piece has its own story,” she said. While working on one tapestry, she realized the wool in it probably came from sheep overlooking a medieval village, and it was likely woven by candlelight. And when working to conserve Civil War flags, she would look up the regiments which carried them. “We can’t pass by what history can teach us,” she said. “It repeats itself, sadly at times.” One quilt she was working on recently is of handspun wool, colored using natural dyes. It was made in Indiana in the 1830s and currently in a private collection. To conserve it, she has found cloth that is a close match, and uses root from the madder plant as a natural dye. Madder has been used since ancient times as a dye, and would have been available in 1830s Indiana. Her efforts were rewarded with dyed fabric which is an almost exact color match to the old quilt. Sarah has lived in Brown County for 42 years. Born in northern Indiana to a pair of teachers, she lived in various locations around the state, including Nashville, before moving to New Mexico, where she lived seven years,

marrying David, a builder, and opening a bakery. “I always wanted to be here in Brown County again, even as a sad nine-year-old who had to move away,” she said. “Textiles happened when I moved back here and was looking for something to do with my hands.” She took a spinning class at Yarns Unlimited in Bloomington, which led to weaving and knitting and working at the store for 23 years. Suzanne Halvorson, who owned the store, introduced her to Harold Mailand, a textile conservator in Indianapolis. Soon, Harold and Sarah were working together in the textile conservation business. But that is only one part of her weaving business. From her studio on Clay Lick Road, she weaves dishtowels and other creations, and has been a member of the Back Roads of Brown County Studio Tour in October, cancelled this year because of the coronavirus. Because of the cancellation, she has a stock of about 75 dishtowels on hand, as well as whimsical creatures made on wire bodies using the thrums, or leftover parts of her weavings. Sarah and David have four children: daughters Chelsea, Sarabeth, and Leslie, and son Teddy. All are artists, she said, mixing common sense with an artistic ability. Sarah’s conservation work not only keeps historic pieces in good condition so that young people can learn from them, also they become a learning tool for Sarah. “When you handle an old textile, you learn a lot about how it was done. It’s a lot of fun finding a new technique that’s been long gone because it’s handwork. “A lot of handwork is logical. It’s lasted that long because someone thought it out. It’s logical and it made sense.” Sarah can be reached at <sarahnoggleweaving@gmail.com> or 812-320-2916. 

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 37


AUTHENTIC NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA

You will find traffic stopping items at 58 South! Our porch review has attracted many of you already. We enjoy offering today’s fashion. You’ll find affordable items that are wearable every day or for those special occasions. Our accessories, hats, and scarves complete the outfit or add new fresh looks to your existing wardrobe. Our Fitflops will bring comfort to your tired and weary feet—come hear the testimonies!

58 South Apparel 58 S. Van Buren St. • Nashville, IN

Located in downtown Nashville next to the Brown County Playhouse 812-988-8440 • fiftyeightsouth@gmail.com

A family-friendly pizza place PIZZA • SALADS • CALZONES

140 W. Main Street • (812) 988-8800 In the heart of Nashville by the Village Green area at the intersection of Main and Jefferson Streets.

Dine-In or Carry-Out

Sun.–Thurs. 11am–9:00pm; Fri. & Sat. 11am–10:00pm

We appreciate our loyal customers!

Our market fresh product selections are the result of your requests. This season we display: Flags & Gazing Balls, Dog & Cat themed items, Tervis Tumblers, Swan Creek, Woodstock Chimes, Melissa & Doug, Stony Creek Lighted Vases, Simply Southern T’s & Ivory Ella, Lizzie James and Katie Lofton, Our Favorite Handcrafted Jewelry

Located in the heart of downtown Nashville next to Out of The Ordinary and across from the Brown County Playhouse

Did we mention all the hats, scarves, and fashion jewelry?

Rhonda Kay’s 69 S. Van Buren St. • Nashville, IN 812-988-2050 • rhondakays@msn.com

38 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020


Hotel & Conference Center Located across from the NEW Brown County Music Center

Open Daily at 11 a.m.

Open Year-Round for Lunch & Dinner

Fresh made to order starters, salads, sandwiches and house specialties

Brown County’s only “Husband Day Care” Back Door Alley Entrance

Guinness on tap • Full bar • Specialty drinks • Bloody Mary • Islander • Margarita

Full menu available in Bar • Large TV Out of the Ordinary Restaurant & Hickory Sports Bar

61 South Van Buren St. • Nashville, IN Across the street from the Brown County Playhouse

(812) 778-9730 •

OutOfTheOrdinaryRestaurant

Balcony Rooms Coming this fall:

N Outdoo a ty a a

92 w franklin st • nashville, in • 812.988.0336

sunday 12-4, tuesday—saturday 11-5, Tuesday evening 6:30-8:30 come see us in antique alley, next to brown county pottery online store: claypurl.com

Conference facility–up to 500 560 State Road 46 East, Nashville, IN 812-988-2284 • SeasonsLodge.com Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 39


Celebrate this holiday season with

An Indiana Christmas, perfect for stockings.

For the Holidays

Apples are our specialty, but we also offer a wide variety of preserves, honey, baking mixes, and delicious condiments.

“An Indiana Christmas is a curl-up book you’ll savor year after year.” —Margaret McMullan, author of Where the Angels Lived

• Quality fresh Christmas trees • Apples shipped anywhere in USA • Unique gifts and Holiday decor • Customized fruit and gift baskets • Special order Holiday baked goods

A collection of timeless short stories, poems, plays, and letters, An Indiana Christmas features work from Kurt Vonnegut, Jean Shepherd, and more, painting a festive picture of what Hoosiers truly hold dear at the holidays. Available wherever fine books are sold.

iupress.org

40 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

Enjoy our fresh, from scratch, homemade baked goods. Enjoy a warm apple dumpling. Visit our Fudge Shop and Ice Cream Parlor.

317-878-9317 8157 S. 250 W. Trafalgar, IN www.apple-works.com Mon. thru Sat. 9 to 6 , Sun. 10 to 6


Sepia Old Time Color Color Black & White

OVER 200 BACKGROUNDS Wild West • Prairie • Civil War • Roaring 20s and more! 145 S. Van Buren Nashville, IN

A quaint, country antique store with an eclectic selection of antique, vintage, and collectible items.

5737 Hoover Rd. Nashville, IN Thurs.-Sat. • 812-994-1801

Lmorgan64@gmail.com • Teeksrus@Facebook.com

Next to Artist Colony Inn, Back-to-Back Complex

Weekdays 10–6, Sat. 10–7, Sun. 10–6

812-988-7305

BROWN COUNTY Hometown Proud Local Grocery Store Serving Beautiful Brown County Since 1975!

See us for Thanksgiving and Christmas TURKEY DINNERS with all the sides

text

Fruit and Veggie Trays Made to Order

• Certified Angus Beef • Large Beer and Wine Sections N A SHVI LLE • Picnic Supplies to • Full Service Bakery/Deli 99000 • Custom Cake Decorating • Organic Grocery • Dairy • Produce • Frozen • Wine

• Ever-Growing Selection of Gluten-Free Products

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK TO GET THE WEEKLY AD Brown County IGA 30 Hawthorne Dr. • Nashville • East SR 46 at light • 812-988-4546 Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 41


Buzz King Recalls

Our Most Celebrated Chronicler ~by Jeff Tryon

B

ack in Frank Hohenberger’s day, before the advent of digital photography, there was a thing called a “latent image”—a photograph had already been recorded on film, but had not yet been made visible by processing the film with chemicals in a darkroom. In a way, Buzz King’s relationship with the famous Brown County photographer was like a latent image; at the time, as a child, he didn’t really see it. But in the intervening sixty or so years, his understanding and appreciation of the county’s most important chronicler has developed. King grew up on West Franklin Street in Nashville, and Hohenberger occupied rooms two blocks east at the Bartley House, where he lived the last 20 years of his life. As a child, he had been in Hohenberger’s darkroom, his workspace, but not regularly. King discovered at an early age that he shared a birthday, January 4, with the celebrated photographer and newspaper columnist. “He spent his birthday at our house every year until the year he died,” King said. “He was always down at Christmas, and on both occasions, he always brought me a gift. At Christmas, it was usually a book, wrapped up in brown manila-type paper. On birthdays, he always brought me a pack of 20 of the little boxes of Chicklets—that was his favorite.”

42 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

Buzz King and Frank Hohenberger celebrating their birthdays together.

Hohenberger was working at a photography store in Indianapolis when he saw some pictures that someone had brought in to be developed and he asked, “Where is this?” He made several trips to Brown County, eventually moving here in 1917. Even though he travelled quite a bit and even tried living other places, he could never break away from his fascination with this place and its people. “He did more than any single person to make Brown County popular, throughout the whole nation, actually,” King said. “He wrote articles and his photos and pamphlets and papers—all kinds of good stuff. Photography wasn’t his only thing, he was a printer, too. He printed Christmas Cards for people every year, he printed little booklets. His press was small and printed things one at a time. He could print about a five-inch paper. For a couple of years, he published a little one-or-two-page thing called the Nashville Observer. Quite a few people subscribed to it.”


Hohenberger had apprenticed as a printer at 13, and spent most of his next 30 years as a printer in various shops throughout the Midwest, eventually, at the Indianapolis Star. “My Uncle Rex and my dad did things for Frank. They helped him,” King said. “Dad drove him places so he could take pictures. Frank could drive, but he never liked it. He wasn’t much of a driver.” He said one time Hohenberger was coming down Miller’s Hill too fast and tried to turn the corner too quickly and rolled his Model T over on its top. “He got out and just got up and walked away.” Because of their close relationship, Buzz’s father Fred had the chance to watch the master photographer in action with the huge, wooden view camera which exposed 5X7 film sheets in a light-proof carrier that slid in and out of the camera. “Dad would take him out to a place and he would set up his camera with the little curtain over it and he would stick his head under it and look.” The two friends would just sit and talk, and once in a while Frank would look up. They would talk some more, and at some point, he would get up, focus, slide in a film carrier, take a picture, turn it over, take another picture. Then he’d say, “Let’s go.” “He waited for the sun to be in the exact right spot to make the picture better. He was really a master at that. He only took a few color

Hohenberger’s publication December, 1955.

Hohenberger’s photo on a 1952 Christmas card. Hobb’s Branch Road.

photographs, and that was late in his life. He liked the black and white.” Hohenberger not only rubbed elbows with the famous and celebrated—he photographed Eleanor Roosevelt at the door of the Brown County Art Guild and hobnobbed with Ernie Pyle when he was here— he was also friends with a lot of local notables. “He was great friends with Andy Rogers and his dad before him,” King said. “They got along famously. He was friends with a lot of people. He had a fabulous friendship with Pods Miller, who ran the drug store just about a block up the street from where Frank lived. He was a very friendly guy, very pleasant.” He personally knew big national names like George Eastman and Thomas Edison. He had their phone numbers in his book. Continued on 48

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 43


Our

Building Fine Log Homes for over 40 Years HONESTY • INTEGRITY • HANDCRAFTED QUALITY

3497 Clay Lick Road • Nashville, IN • (812) 988-2689 mikenickelslogcabins.com

SANDWICH PLACE At the corner of Main & Van Buren Street (near the stoplight/courthouse) 812.988.2355

Family Friendly Menu Cooked from Scratch Breakfast (till 11:00) • Lunch • Early Supper Open daily at 8:30 am till slow (Closed Wed. & Thurs.)

Build your own sandwich, burgers & dogs, daily specials Tex-Mex menu items, delicious desserts

THE FIREPLACE CENTER 11 flavors of BEEF 3 flavors of TURKEY 3 flavors of BEEF BRISKET 4 flavors of BEEF STICKS 2 flavors of PORK 2 flavors of BACON Also: Elk, Boar, Buffalo, Venison, Gator, Rabbit, Salmon, Kangaroo, Turtle, Ostrich, Trout, Camel, Python, Ahi

Jerky Seasonings & Dips • Peanuts

125 S. Van Buren St. Artists Colony Shops (Between Toy Chest and Carol’s Gifts)

Nashville, IN • (812) 988-1592

houseofjerkybrownco.com

Helmsburg GENERAL STORE

Complete line of: • Wood Stoves and Inserts • Gas Stoves and Inserts • Fireplaces Your first step to Energy INDEPENDENT LIVING 812-336-2053 1-800-344-3967

1210 W. 2nd St. Bloomington BloomingtonFireplaces.com

AAuthentic Mexican Cuisine Family Owned and Operated •Daily Specials •Kid’s Menu

Owners: Sharon & Leonard Richey

Pizza & Wings, Groceries, Ice Large Selection Domestic/Craft Beer & Wine LOTTERY, Tobacco Products Camping Supplies, Live Bait & Tackle Hunting & Fishing Licenses Check Station, Firewood State Road 45 and Helmsburg Road Intersection • (812) 929-7797

44 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 812-988-4535 Carry Out Available COACHLIGHT SQUARE 101 E. Washington St. one block east of S. Van Buren St. (in front of the high school) in downtown Nashville


The

Ferguson House

• Holiday Decor • Swan Creek Candles • Home Accessories • Fashion Jewelry • Garden Accents • Iron Decor • Man Cave and more… 78 West Franklin Street Nashville, IN • 812-988-7388

Fashion Apparel Jewelry and Purses 59 East Main Street, Suite B Nashville, IN • 812-988-8707

Foxfire

• Gifts and Home Decor • Personalized & Memoriam Gifts • Swan Creek Candles • Kitchen Accessories • Baby Gifts • Holiday Decor • Garden Decor 59 East Main Street, Suite A Nashville, IN • 812-988-8707 Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 45


Wine Tasting Daily Choose from multiple Award Winning Wines! Patio & Indoor Seating Gift Shop Live Music Every Friday & Saturday 7-10 pm S. Van Buren & Washington, Nashville IN 46 Our Brown County â&#x20AC;˘ Nov./Dec. 2020

812.988.8500

countryheritagewinery.com


Brown County Getaways

HOTEL NASHVILLE

BRICK LODGE

NORTH HOUSE

Suites, Studios, Restaurant & Bar Hot Tubs, Indoor Pool, Whirlpool Weddings & Receptions, Special Getaway Packages

Accommodates 8 Guests, 2 Bedrooms & 2 Baths Game Room w/Pool Table, Cable TV, DVD Player Full Equipped Kitchen, Central Heat & Air Gas Fireplace, Outdoor Hot Tub, Gas Grill

Accommodates 8 Guests, 3 Bedrooms & 2 1/2 Baths Cable TV, DVD Player, Fully Equipped Kitchen Central Heat & Air, Electric Fireplace Secluded Hot Tub, Gas Grill

245 N. Jefferson St. | 812-988-8400 |800-848-6274 www.hotelnashville.com

1878 N. State Rd. 135 | 812-988-6429 www.bricklodge.com

194 N. Van Buren St. | 812-988-6429 www.northhousegetaway.com

Nov./Dec. 2020 â&#x20AC;¢ Our Brown County 47


Buzz King addressing the crowd during the Hohenberger historical marker dedication last year. photo by Jeff Tryon

Down in the Hills o’ Brown County ~by Frank Hohenberger excerpts from December 21, 1924

I BUZZ KING continued from 43 He was a friend and correspondent of famed artist T.C. Steele and a friend of legendary Indiana University Chancellor Herman B Wells. Wells saw that Hohengerger’s huge collection of historical photographs came to reside at the university’s Lilly Library—some available to view online. “I wish we had been closer, I really do. I saw him, but I did not hang out with him. I’m not sure he wanted me to. I was little.” King said. “We regret things we didn’t do….That’s part of being people. “When I was 10 or 12, Carey Cloud invited me up to his studio to help make Cracker Jack toys,” King recalled. “And I turned him down. To this day, I wish I’d done that. But then, it was probably Saturday, I had a lot of things going on.” You can gain an appreciation for Hohenberger’s early photographs of Brown County by visiting the new Hohenberger Bar at the Nashville House, or from a booth at the Hobnob Corner Restaurant, both at the intersection by the county courthouse. Stay safe and here’s to a great reemergence.

IS

Delicious! Our own Tzatziki sauce recipe, made from scratch Free samples • Local Delivery Available <Most items under $10> gyrofoodnashville.com • Gyros Food

S. Van Buren & Old School Way • Possum Trot Sq. Look for the sidewalk signs • (812) 318-0840

48 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

t’s been a long time since we had a real, oldfashioned Christmas in these hills. The weatherman doesn’t supply us with the old-time quota of snow during the holidays he used to, and—well, doggone it, things don’t seem just right. The time was when there were as many sleighs operating on the hills from November until March as there are automobiles flitting to and fro in Brown County any time of the year. The boy that was any kind of a carpenter at all, put in his spare time nailing together some kind of a frame that would hold two snugly and cozily, and the expense of courting a girl was nothing to speak of as compared with the prices of today. In the backlots of some Nashville homes you can still see relics of the “cutter” days and if you have time to stop and inquire about who made them, etc., you are opening up a conversation that is going to terminate with: “Won’t you come in for supper?” At this season of the year, when folks are gathered ’round the old fireplace to toast their shins and enjoy the apples brought up from the cellar, reminiscences are in order almost any time. A Nashville woman was regretting very much the slipping away of old-time customs. “Why,” she said, “I remember as though it were only a few years ago when we had large Christmas trees in front of the Courthouse. These were brought from Pine Bluff, and if there was enough snow on the ground—a very common thing—they were merely dragged in. And what a time we had doing the decorating! I want to tell you that we didn’t skimp on hanging presents, either. Seems like everybody had a gift on those trees. Yes, branches bending way down. We had programs of dialogues, pieces and songs in the upstairs room of the Courthouse, and money for the local schools was raised by selling chances on a doll or a photograph album. Then we’d wind up with a ‘most-popular-girl’ contest and you can bet the money began to jingle at a merry clip. Best of all, we had splendid order and everyone seemed to enter into the spirit of the day.  Hohenberger’s column appeared weekly in the Indianapolis Star newspaper from 1923 to 1932 and 1936 to 1954.


Blue Moon Log Cabin

Mature trees adorn the 110-year-old cabin's landscape. This 1 bedroom, 1 bath log cabin is a splendid romantic getaway. Enjoy a warm cup of coffee from the cabin's coffee bar or a glass of wine from a nearby winery while relaxing on the porch swing. Step onto the private deck and slip into the hot tub, gazing upon the stars.

‘s

Infant • Toddler • Kids

Clothing, Toys, Infant Gear, Hairbows

We carry an assortment of handmade items along with vegan, organic, and earth-friendly materials

91 W. Franklin St. • Franklin Sq. • Nashville littlefolkchildrensboutique@yahoo.com

GRANDPA JEFF’S

Trail Rides Relax on a journey with Grandpa Jeff. ff. Take in the scenery and wildlife. No two rides will ever be the same —sunny summer days, fall colors, winter snowfalls, spring blossoms. Trail Rides, Pony Rides, Hay Rides Cattle Drives, and Custom Excursions

At least one hour notice. Trail Ride Reservations can be made by phone, e-mail, or through our website.

Grandpa Jeff personally trained our horses to take exceptional care of your family and friends of all ages.

call or text www.GrandpaJeffsTrailRides.com cell (812)272-0702 info@GrandpaJeffsTrailRides.com 5889 S. Skinner Rd. Morgantown, Indiana

* Log Cabins * Game Rooms * * Pet Friendly * * Hot Tubs * Private Pools * * Lake Fronts *

Call, Book Online, or Stop in! 812.988.6554 • 30 Washington St. • Nashville, IN Like and Follow Us! MoonDanceVacationHomes.com

Your Headquarters for the Great Outdoors CAMPING SUPPLIES: Tents, Camping Lights, Sleeping Bags, Grills, Fire Starters, Coleman Heaters & Lanterns, Cooking Utensils • Fishing Tackle • Horse Tack • RV Replacement Parts • Bee Keeping Supplies • Maple Syrup Supplies • Pet & Livestock Food • Antiques We Fill Propane Tanks

WE SELL & DELIVER BULK MULCH & TOPSOIL Salt Creek Plaza • Nashville (812) 988-8888 • www.BearHardware.com Mon.–Sat. 7:30am–7:00pm • Sun. 10:00am–4:00pm

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 49


Visit

Morgantown 10 miles north of Nashville on scenic State Road 135 EST 1927 Sales . Repair . Watch Batteries

75 W. Washington St., Morgantown, IN 46160

www.TheClockConnection.com Like us on Facebook Open Tue-Fri 11-5pm & Sat 10-2pm Closed Sun & Mon 812-597-5414 . houseofclocks@att.net

ANTIQUES CO-OP 129 W. Washington St. • Morgantown, IN 46160 (In the old hardware store building)

Country Primitives Advertising Antique Garden Old Paint Early Smalls Open 6 Days (Closed Mon.)

Furniture, Art Architectural Elements Pottery The Odd and Unusual and A General Line Like us on Facebook

(812) 597-4530

Layaway Available

ART Beyond Crayons Creativity beyond the classroom Pick your • Art Lessons for All Ages Palette: • Group Painting Parties

• Birthday Paint Parties • Home Schooled Instruction

Judy D. Wells • owner, K–12 Licensed Educator • judydenisewells@gmail.com 59 S. Marion St. • Morgantown, IN • (317) 403-7147 Flexible hours including weekends and evenings

50 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

Brown County’s Most Historic Restaurant Serving our famous fried biscuits and apple butter, fried chicken and other traditional favorites all made in our own kitchen from scratch. Come check out our Old Country Store, beautiful new patio, expanded menu and HOHENBERGER BAR 15 South Van Buren Street 812-988-4554 www.nashvillehousebc.com

Nashville, Indiana’s #1 Fun Attraction

COPPERHEAD CREEK

GEM MINE Pan for Gems Fossils Arrowheads

Fun and Educational for All Ages

BROWN COUNTY

ROCK and FOSSIL SHOP

5000 lbs. of NEW Beautiful & Unique Specimens for 2020

Just North of the Courthouse 79 N. Van Buren ~ (812) 988-2422 online at www.BrownCountyRockShop.com


Brown County “A Lil’ Taste of Heaven” SERVING BREAKFAST AND LUNCH Chair Massage: $25 Table Massage: $75

Michael Rebman Certified Therapist

Featuring Fabulous:

Biscuit Biscuit Sandwiches Sandwiches Homemade Homemade Biscuits Biscuits and and Sausage Sausage Gravy Gravy Cinnamon Cinnamon and and Pecan Pecan Rolls Rolls Bottomless Coffee and Ice Tea

812-988-4447

138 South Jefferson St. • Nashville Formerly Michaels Massage* browncomassage.com * I am opening up my practice to the whole county, not just the Michaels.

812-720-3440

165 N. Van Buren St. • Nashville, IN CHECK OUR FACEBOOK PAGE FOR HOURS Delivery within a mile radius when available Pet-friendly patio

Find us on Facebook at Heavenly Biscuit Inc.

Fresh In-Store Donuts “Smack Dab in the Heart of the Village” Nashville, Indiana

Located just North of the Courthouse across from Big Woods Restaurant and Brewery

www.IrisGardenLodging.com

Broasted Chicken

(812) 988-2422

812-988-1822

The Iris Garden rests comfortably in the heart of the village of Nashville. Simply walk out of your door to explore the wonderful shops, restaurants, wineries, and breweries without having to drive anywhere.

Nashville BP State Roads 46 & 135 270 S. Van Buren St. in Nashville

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 51


Remember Brown County

“Remember the Alamo!” “Remember the Maine!” “Remember Pearl Harbor!” “Remember to call your Mother!” ~by Mark Blackwell

R

emembering is a good thing. The philosopher George Santayana said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” Well, that particular word of forewarning is most relevant in those “Groundhog Day” situations where you might find yourself repeating the same idiot behavior that got you into the predicament in the first place. Remembering has a preventative effect—kind of an antidote to stupidity. But that’s not memory’s only virtue. Remembering how things were helps to keep a tally of progress—for good or ill. I find it instructive to think back over the fifty years that I have been acquainted with Brown County and the changes that have been made.

52 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

When I first came to the county, I came through Gnaw Bone where there was a big flea market and an old-fashioned sorghum mill. The mill operated by having a mule, tethered to a horizontal pole, walk in circles hour after hour to turn the mill that crushed the cane to extract the sorghum syrup. Back then, I found that mule to be a potent metaphor for a life to be avoided at all cost. I knew that I didn’t want to be tethered to a monotonous life, turning the mill of somebody else’s fortunes. But in the time it took for me to shake off that vision of the future, I turned north onto the Van Buren Street portion of Highway 135. The intersection at the time was occupied by a Dairy Queen and just up the street was McDonald’s Chevrolet dealership. This was memorable for two reasons. One, was that Nashville, even though it was smaller than it is now, somehow supported a new-car dealer. The other reason is that in the show room window sat a 1954 Corvette. It was one of only 3,640 built, and there it was in little old Nashville. I remember the old “Ferguson House” shop on west Franklin Street because of the guillotine on the front porch. It was owned by a rather eccentric lady who stocked the shop with antiques, brica-brac, stuffed wolves, and a skeleton in a coffin. The skeleton would on occasion sit up to entertain unsuspecting customers. I remember the smell; it was akin to what the writer Ray Bradbury called “mummy dust.” Nowadays many of the places and things that I remember are gone. But Brown County is not just Nashville. It is the woods, and parks for hiking and camping, and lakes for boating and fishing. I like to think back on camping and canoeing with my daughters in Yellowwood State Forest. One time in particular stuck in my mind. It was in the latter part of the last century, on a sunny summer weekend. The two youngest of my three daughters and I decided to take the canoe down to Yellowwood lake and go camping. We spent that Saturday canoeing, cloud watching, and playing with lily pads. As the afternoon wore on,


we landed the boat at the rally campground and proceeded to set up the tent and put together a campfire. After supper was done and cleanup completed, we ended the day watching the sun go down and treating ourselves to s’mores. With the last of twilight, as the fire began to dance, I decided to tell the girls about the monster catfish of Yellowwood Lake. This was, I thought, a clever ploy to keep the girls close to camp during the evening before bedtime. The basics of the story are that there is a catfish in the lake that has never been caught. He is very old and very big. He weighs more than 90 pounds and he’s more than 9 feet long with barbels that span more than12 feet. During the day he sleeps in the deepest parts of the lake but after sundown, he wakes and he is hungry. Now, most catfish do their hunting and feeding at the bottom of the lake, but not this monster. A fish his size has a hard time finding enough food in the lake to satisfy them, so this fish has learned to launch himself up on shore. There he uses his catfish barbels like tentacles, probing the dark beach for campers. Then, upon sensing an unwary camper, the fish would wrap one of its barbels around their legs and back into the lake dragging dinner into the depths. Well, I’m here to report that the story worked and the girls kept the campfire between them and the lake. I believe it must have been around two or maybe two-thirty in the morning when I was awakened by my youngest daughter saying, “I have to go pee.” I said, “Okay, you know where the outhouse is.” And she said, “I can’t go by myself.” So I said, “Wake your sister up and she will go with you.” But the little darling said that wouldn’t work. I asked,” Why?” And she said that her sister was not big enough to fight the catfish and she had to go right now. There it was, I was being punished for telling a good story. Of course I had to leave my nice warm sleeping bag and trudge out into the moonlight on a mission of mercy to save my daughter from a catfish that I had invented. And that is just one of thousands of Brown County memories that I keep in a little storage barn in the backyard of my mind. I advise folks to come on down and make some Brown County memories of your own. 

Brownie’s is back in business!

Featuring some of your old favorites and some tasty new ones Dine In or Carry Out

5730 N State Rd 135 • Bean Blossom • 812-720-3743 Daily Specials • Breakfast till 2:00 7 am to 8 pm New owners Evelyn Allen Mulherin and Brian Baker

Lil Black Bear Inn B&B Breakfast Bre Br Bre rea ak akf kffa k ast as sstt Daily Daily Da illy ly

Your Home away from Home On three acres with a pond, grill, firepit, hot tub, and large patio

Close to Nashville and Columbus • Kid and Pet Friendly

8072 State Rd 46 East • Nashville, IN • 812-988-2233 lilblackbearinn.com • lilblackbearinn@gmail.com

ONE-OF-A-KIND MOSAIC TABLES

POSTCARD PAINTINGS SERIES

Available at Spears Pottery in Nashville, IN (On South Van Buren Street, near the stoplight, next to the Nashville House)

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 53


FIELD NOTES: Hugelkultur

I

~by Jim Eagleman

know a few gardeners who like to experiment. Their trial and error attempts at growing different things, composting, starting seeds under different conditions, impresses me. Like anyone curious, they want to see the results of their efforts. With evaluation of production, more and different gardening methods are employed. The true experiment I recall from my science classes involves undertaking a procedure to make a discovery or test

54 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

a hypothesis. You suspect something and set out to see if it happens. An investigation into an unknown can produce results that can be both predictable and surprising. And that, to a gardener—I am told since I do not consider myself even a poor one—is the fun part! My sister-in-law’s experimentation with a gardening attempt intrigued me. She and my brother-in-law sent pictures of their garden a few weeks ago, at the end of a successful growing season. They read of an Austrian technique called hugelkultur, or mound gardening. Raised beds have been used for years by successful gardeners; dirt from side trenches is added and the additional dirt that allows root vegetables like carrots and beets to grow into aerated soil. The side trenches also give you a place to walk while tending to the plants. The mounds with the hugel approach are built using all kinds and sizes of wood: cut stumps, long logs, limbs and branches, twigs, leaves—everything from the tree. And the idea is to have it rot and enrich the soil. A trench is dug about a foot deep, maybe four to five feet wide, and the wood debris is placed end to end in the trench. Here any compost is added, also newspaper, clean cardboard, and yard waste (no treated lumber or mulch) before dirt covers the trench. Over time, as the wood material decomposes, nutrients not originally present are now slowly added to enrich and supplement the soil. This was why her garden was so successful, the rotting wood slowly added nutrients the plants needed, now and for future seasons. I went online to look up the hugel method of mound gardening and found it is used all through Europe and is fast catching on with American gardeners. It


is spelled H U G E L and pronounced HOO-gle. The height of the mound can vary, all the way up to six and seven feet, depending on the amount of sunlight, water required, plants to be grown, and wind direction. We intend to use the method to change the front yard, now a shaded area with big trees. It lacks sunlight except for maybe a few hours in midsummer. Years ago when our boys were young, I tried desperately to grow grass in what I hoped would be a large, green space with lush turf and not a blade of crabgrass. I took great pains to fertilize, water, and tend regularly to this shaded area. I even fenced it off with wire and stakes and yellow strips of sheeting tied every few inches. When the boys accidently went beyond the fencing to chase a ball or frisbee, I yelled to get out, and stay out! We thought when the grass finally did grow, we’d have a nice yard where they could play. When a friend visited and saw the drama, he calmly stated, “Hmmm, it appears to me

you’re growin’ boys, not grass!” That made a lot of sense, and I felt guilty. Now years later, yards and expansive lawns in shaded woods seem foolish and against nature. We hope the hugel mounds will create better soil, not for garden plants, but for our native plant area. Over time, I transplanted several native shrubs there like arrowwood, spicebush, highbush cranberry, and wild hydrangea. This year, we purchased native plants as seeds or root clusters from a native plant nursery. We hope native flowering plants we enjoy like shooting star, blue cohosh, wild ginger, and wild bergamot will grow. It’s a start. I’ve brought in ferns from our woods: Christmas, New York, Broad Beech,and Maidenhair Fern that survived transplanting and thrive. They are spaced in and around the native plants, creating what we hope will eventually become a lush woodland with herbal layer and ground cover. Soil is the most basic ingredient to this plan. The hugel mounds should help restore nutrients.

I haven’t read where hugelkultur is used for this purpose, but I figure if you improve the soil for garden plants, why couldn’t it help the native ones? This is what I first meant by experimenting. We soil workers—us dirt diggers, who love getting hands and knees dirty, sweat running down the face, smelling dirt—like to see what changes we can do to improve things. It resorts back to my natural resources classes where different management strategies were discussed depending on a desired outcome. Hugelkultur employs what is stressed in managing nature areas: decomposition is vital to healthy plants. You see this everytime you walk through the woods—decay and rotting wood, a natural process, makes it possible for plants to grow. You can do different things to and on the land, as long as it is compatible with what nature itself can do. I can still hear a professor’s philosophic mantra: “Treat the land as though your life depends on it, because it does!” 

Nov./Dec. 2020 • Our Brown County 55


INFO PAGES

Precise Books and Payroll, Inc. Locally owned since 2010

• Individual Income and Business Taxes • Business Set Up • Business Financial Statements • Payroll Preparation and Payroll Taxes

(812) 988-4031

www.precisebooksandpayroll.com

ACCOUNTING / TAX PREP

ACCOUNTING & PAYROLL

56 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

Full Service Mechanical Garage 24 Hour Towing–Big or Small, We Do it All

$2 Bag • Salt Creek Plaza • Nashville Mon.–Sat. 7:30 am–7:00 pm, Sun 10:00 am–4:00 pm

& ASSOCIATES INC. Tax Preparation, Tax Planning, Bookkeeping, and Payroll

(812) 988-2865

bruce1040@sbcglobal.net 64 W. Gould St. • P.O. Box 565 • Nashville, IN

Brown County Tire TIRE &

AUTO Repair

24 hr. Wrecker Service

812-988-8473

27 Salt Creek Rd (Intersection SR 46) Nashville

Sunday Services: 9:00 am & 10:30 am Youth Group meets Wednesdays 6:30–8:00 pm Kids Worship & Nursery Sunday mornings

160 S. Van Buren St. • Nashville, IN

812-988-2889 • www.nashvillechristianchurch.org

EYE CARE

1814 State Rd. 135 N. • Nashville, IN 47448 812-988-7518 • 812-325-9209 (after hours)

AUTO - TIRE, REPAIR, TOW

COMPLETE COLLISION REPAIR

CHURCH

AUTO COLLISION, REPAIR, TOW

Plum Creek Antiques Open-Air Market Bean Blossom • Fruit Jars • Garden Art • Furniture • Iron Things, • Lots of Junk and more 5 minutes north of Nashville (intersection of SR 135 & SR 45) (812) 988-6268

BAGGED TRASH DROP OFF

AL’s PAINT & BODY

ANTIQUES

138 S. Jefferson St. Suite C • P.O. Box 953 Nashville, IN 47448

ZIEG LeDOUX

Checking eyes in Brown County for over 50 years!

50 Willow Street • Nashville, IN 812-988-4937


INFO PAGES

Nov./Dec. â&#x20AC;˘ Our Brown County 57 Continued on 58

Indiana Seamless Free Estimates

Gutter Cleaning and Leaf Cover Available

Matt Hunter

HEALTH

GUTTERING

GUTTERING 812-344-4167

HEALTH CARE

Blue Elk Family Clinic  

Dr. Larry Sanchez

     

812-200-8265

We look forward to getting to know you

HEATING & COOLING

Quality Workmanship since 1992 Fully Insured

INSURANCE LANDSCAPING

HEALTH & LIVING

812-465-COOL (2665) 24 HOUR SERVICE FINANCING AVAILABLE Generac Authorized Dealer FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999

www.firstcalldave2save.com

Nashville â&#x20AC;˘ Salt Creek Medical Arts Building

INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call Dave 2 Saveâ&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;˘ Mulching - Seeding NEED HELP? â&#x20AC;˘ Weeding - Pruning â&#x20AC;˘ Tree / Shrub Planting â&#x20AC;˘ Fences - Walkways â&#x20AC;˘ Retaining Walls â&#x20AC;˘ Mowing / Trimming (812) 988-7232 â&#x20AC;˘ Flower / Herb Beds

We Can Do It All!

Complete Landscaping/ Design Services


Continued from 57

INFO PAGES

58 Our Brown County • Nov./Dec. 2020

TEAM

Pool Enterprises, Inc.

Logging to Lumber

812-988-6161

~ Custom Log Home Lumber Packages ~ Posts ~ Beams ~ Rafters ~ Barn Siding ~ Board & Batten ~ Firewood ~ Mulch ~ Sawdust ~ Buyers of Standing Timber

REAL ESTATE

LOGGING - LUMBER

Helmsburg Sawmill

The Marg and Brenda Team is Your Brown County Team

Inc.

Marg DeGlandon CSSS, CDPR Broker/Owner Cell: 812-360-4083 • margd@remax.net

www.helmsburgsawmill.com

Brenda Longtin CSSS, CDPR Associate Broker Cell: 812-360-3889 • shaht@mibor.net

812-988-4485 • www.MargAndBrendaTeam.com

helmsburgsawmill@gmail.com • facebook.com/helmsburgsawmillinc

10 Artist Drive, P.O. Box 1609 • Nashville, IN 47448

Licensed Plumbing Contractor since 1981 Bonded • Insured #CO89000011

Repair, Remodel, Pump Service, Water Conditioning, Drain Cleaning, Water Heaters

UPCYCLED ART

PLUMBING

Dunham Plumbing Co., Inc.

Mosaic Tables and Small Paintings Available at Spears Pottery in Nashville, IN

812-988-0248 • Nashville, IN

BOATS • TRUCKS • MURALS • LOGO DESIGN •

• HOMES • BANNERS • BILLBOARDS • STORE FRONTS

SIGNS THAT DELIVER: Digital Print & Vinyl to Hand Lettered, Carved & Gilded

812-822-2933 • RamblinDogDesign@gmail.com

THRIFT • CONSIGN • AUCTION

SIGN MAKER

All Types of SIGNS by CHRIS A. SHUSTER

(On South Van Buren Street next to the Nashville House)

BROWN COUNTY YMCA FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT FOR HEALTHY LIVING FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

BUY 1 GUEST PASS, GET 1 FREE 1 per person, expires 12/31/20

Swimming Pool Fitness Center Gymnasium Exercise Classes

Personal Training Swim Lessons Day Camp Climbing Wall

812-988-9622 • www.browncountyymca.org

YOUR CATEGORY

WELLNESS

Open at 5:30 a.m. Mon.–Fri.

BIDDERS JUNCTION

Thrift & Consignment Shop and Auction House Includes: thrift store items, handmade goods, jewelry, books, records, movies, housewares, clothing, primitive, unique and collectible treasures, pre-owned and antique furniture

Auction House accepting consignment items for sell at auction. Currently online auctions. Live outdoor ones next spring. 4359 State Road 46 East • Nashville (Gnaw Bone) Wednesday – Sunday • 812-636-5003

Your Ad Can Appear Here

Reach thousands of readers for just $70 an issue (6 a year)

(discounts for multiple issues)

Contact Cindy at ourbrown@bluemarble.net or call 812-988-8807


nashville Spice c o. OVER 430 SPICES, RUBS & BLENDS

Gourmet Jams & Sauces · Artisan Salts · Cocktail Mixers Baking · Mustards · Hot Sauces · Kitchen Gifts & Accessories

NashvilleSpiceCompany.com

In Coachlight Square · 227 S. Van Buren Street · Nashville, IN 812.200.1069


Profile for Our Brown County

Nov./Dec. 2020 OUR BROWN COUNTY  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded