SEPT/OCT 2011 Our Brown County

Page 1

Sept. –Oct. 2011

FREE Why Visitors Come Back for Good • www.OurBrownCounty.com

Banjos and Barn Doors

Ferrer Gallery

Brown County

Radio Hour

Knitting From Sheep to Purl

And: Back Roads Studio Tour Abe Martin Sorghum Mills Uncle Pen and the Hall of Fame Are you an Antique? Sampler at Night Owl’s Café Our Nut Crop Nashcar Races

MAPS • CALENDAR • ARTICLES • PHOTOGRAPHS


Just in time for Bean Blossom! Clint Bear and the folks at Weed Patch have put their heads together to create an affordable, hand-built instrument for the guitarist that yearns to be heard over all the banjos, fiddles, and beer drinkers. Hoosier guitar builder, Clint Bear is building the ultimate workhorse. A brand new cannon with high quality tone woods, a super playable neck, and enough sound to be heard without exhausting your precious digits.

Weed Patch Music Company

OC Bears are known for their loud, even tones and Clint’s incredible artistry. He is building this model without all the eye candy. This is an affordable hand-built work horse you’ll be riding for a long time.

We build our own banjos and offer expert set up and repair

Dulcimers, harps, and a large variety of folk instruments

Locally built fiddles and reliable old friends

Weed Patch Music 58 East Main Street Nashville, Indiana (812) 988-1180 Locally built mandolins and affordable imports

weedpatchmusiccompany.com

Look for the giant banjo next to the courthouse.


Trafalgar

Nineveh Edinburgh Morgantown 31 37 135 I-65 46 Bloomington Columbus 46 NASHVILLE

d.

Country Mouse Weaving Studio

PIKES PEAK

CHRISTIANSBURG

r

Spears Gallery

STONE HEAD

Grv

Rd

Brown County State Park

ELKINSVILLE

135

Explore Brown County

nch R

NG

Abe Martin Lodge

STORY Monroe Reservoir

Rawhide Ranch

Rinnie Seitz Rd

la Pop

Lodge on the Mountain T.C. Steele State Historic Site

to BL OO

MI

46

o.

BELMONT

Mike’s Music and Dance Barn

er Riv gs Big rnishin Fu

TO N

NASHVILLE

46

ton Cr k

Casa del Sol

Craftsman

tals Ren n kidscommons o i e y at . Tir wn Vac Winer neto to COLUMBUS o C ro Mo Co. wn Bro ills o’ B rown Camp B H Mt. Libe GNAW r ty Rd BONE

6

C f Gol ood eek eaf t Cr & S Sal Steak BC

Knight’s Trash Removal

st

Artist and/or Gallery

Bra

Helm

sburg

Donna ’s Custom Framin g Old SR 4

Green Valley Lodge Yellowwood Lake

Tim ber Cre

Faerie Hollow Studio

Val ley

Oak Grove Pottery

Rd. Country Club Rd

Oak Grove

Al’s Paint & BodyAl’s Garage

Musical Entertainment

Rd

Rd.

Historical Society

aum

Ow l Cr eek

Lodging

Brah

BLOOMINGTON Dr. Lisa Baker, DDS Bloomingfoods Elegant Options Fireplace Center Laserlite Laser Tag 4th Street Festival

Mike Nickels Log Homes

Rd

135

Dining

nsburg

Hilltop Cabins and Suites Rd

Lan

ge

Rid

GATESVILLE

. Rd

Clay Lick Rd

am

Doodles by Kara Barnard

Hamil

TON

Wild Hair & Sun

OMIN G to BL O

Flower and Herb Barn Farmhouse Café

Monroe Music Park & Campground BEAN BLOSSOM

Cordry Lake

Rd

McDonald’s Shopworth

HELMSBURG

TRAFALGAR Appleworks, Scottish Highlander Festival Home in the Country Antique Show

Fruitdale Market

Brownie’s Bean Blossom Inn

45

Sweetwater Lake

252

to MORGANTOWN

Lake Lemon

Franklin

Christia

N

Martinsville

Carmel Ridge Rd

NASHVILLE MAP ON PAGE 4

135

Sal t Cr eek

Brown County

MORGANTOWN Sheep Street Fibers Ady’s Fabric & Notions House of Clocks

Indianapolis

Bob Allen Rd.

Homestead Weaving Studio Salem’s Good Nature Farm Elizabeth O’Rear Studio


Johanna Lee Bathology

JEFFERSON STREET

Hoosier Artist

The Bookloft

Night Owl’s Beading Café

OLD HICKORY LANE

Brown Co Art Guild

Hobnob Corner

? info

VISITORS CENTER

ST SR 135 N

Ferrer Miller’s Gallery Ice Cream

For Bare Feet

Pit Bull Leather Bedazzled Jewelry J Bob’s

Brown Co Winery

Head Over Heels

Wishful Thinking

Silas Andrews

Main Street Shops

Foxfire

Masonic Lodge

Ol d

SR 4

6

IHA

Health for “U” Precise Books & Co Payroll, Inc. Re/Max Brown Art McGinley Insurance Realty Gallery

Redbud Terrace

FirstOffice Merchants Bank

County Offices

Brown Co Public Library

Gold &Old

Townhouse Touch of Silver Gifts

Weed Patch Music Co. His BookShop Glass Planet Gifts Wandering Old McDurbin Past Gold Antiques Brown Co Craft & Gallery Treasures

Log Jail

Pioneer Village Museum

MAIN STREET

Nashville Candy Store Sports Etc.

Heritage Mall

Spears Pottery

That Sandwich Place

Nashville House

Courthouse

open M-F8-4

Copperhead Creek Gem Mine

Iris Garden Gallery and Cottages

Iris Garden Gallery

LOCUST LANE

Village Green Bldg.

Tucker Bldg.

Granny’s Christmas Shop Mercantile Store

MOLLY’S LANE

HONEYSUCKLE LANE

Honeysuckle Hideaway

Colonial Bldg.

Common Grounds Men’s Toy Shop Main Street Images Brown Co. Bead Co.

Carmel Corn Cottage

GOULD STREET

Brown County Historical Soc. Traditional Arts Building

MOUND STREET

Hidden Valley Inn

OLD SCHOOL WAY

TO HELMSBURG - 6 MILES

Jane Gore Realty

The Woodlands Gallery

TO BEAN BLOSSOM & MORGANTOWN

Harvest Moon Pizzeria

Bright & Williamson Insurance

Hills O’Brown Realty

Muddy Boots Cafe

J.B. Goods/ Life is Good

Hotel Nashville

ARTIST DR

VAN BUREN


The Salvation Army

Linda Thomas Massage

New Leaf Amy Greely

JEFFERSON STREET Hoosier Buddy

Artists Colony Inn Carol’s Crafts • Toy Chest

Artists Colony

Cathy’s Corner

Nashville Express

Male Instinct

The Ordinary

Psychic Rebecca Bartlett

Papertrix

Ole House

Ethereal Day Spa and Salon Chateau Thomas Winery

Brown County IGA Brown Co Inn Harvest Dining Room Bear Hardware • Comfort Inn Corn Crib Lounge Willow Manor Apartments Eye Care of Brown County Brown Co Community YMCA

Salt Creek McDonald’s Inn Pine Room Tavern Pizza King

Casa del Sol

Seasons Lodge & Winter Conference Center Art and Craft Fair

Doodles by Kara Barnard

Salt Creek Park

The Palace Holy Cow Theatre of Brown County

SR 46 TO COLUMBUS - 16 MILES

Coachlight Sq

Theatre

Dining

Craftsman

Artist and/or Gallery Rest Room

Lodging

Musical Entertainment Parking

COUNTY MAP ON PAGE 3

map not to scale

N

Nashville Indiana

Nashville General Store & Bakery

Cornerstone Inn

WASHINGTON STREET Appetit Camelot Shoppes Bone Coachlight Sq Bakery

Nashville Fudge Kitchen

Possum Trot Sq

Sweetwater Gallery Grasshopper Flats

VAN BUREN ST SR 135 N

SR 46 TO BLOOMINGTON - 16 MILES

PAT REILLY DR

Madeline’s

Nashville BP

Abe’s Alley PITTMAN HOUSE LANE

Calzone Jones

Peg Ann’s Boutique

The Original Soup to Nuts

Franklin Sq

White Sands Boutique

Melchior Marionettes

Jack & Jill Nut Shop

FRANKLIN STREET Life is Good Calvin Place JB Goods

HONEYSUCKLE LANE

Michael’s Massage

Through the Looking Glass Wooden Wonders Nashville Image Old Time Photos For Bare Feet • The Purple Fig Nature’s Cabin Brown Co Weavery & Roots Paint Box Gallery, The Clay Purl Brown County Bauble® Boards Head to Toe • K. Bellum Leather Peaceful Valley Gallery Brown Co. Pottery Ferguson House

Antique Alley

OLD SCHOOL WAY


ANTIQUES

Cathy’s Corner.....................................62 Elegant Options.................................45 Home in the Country Antique Show in Trafalgar...........................................25 Nashville General Store...................18 Silas Andrews......................................29 Townhouse Gifts................................19 Wandering Past Antiques...............46

ART, ART SUPPLIES, ART INSTRUCTION

Antique Alley Shops.........................17 Back Roads of Brown Co Tour........44 Bear Hardware....................................49 Brown Co Art Gallery........................59 Brown Co Art Guild...........................59 Brown Co Bead Company...............37 Brown Co Craft Gallery....................21 BC Winter Art & Craft Fair................47 Cathy’s Corner.....................................62 Chateau Thomas Winery.................22 Elegant Options.................................45 Ferrer Gallery.......................................21 Glass Planet Gifts...............................42 Hoosier Artist......................................58 Night Owl’s Beading Café...............43 Wandering Past Antiques...............46 The Woodlands Gallery...................51

BOOKS

The Bookloft........................................47 His Book Shop.....................................11

CLOTHING

Antique Alley Shops.........................17 Bear Hardware....................................49 BC Winter Art & Craft Fair................47 For Bare Feet.......................................67 Glass Planet Gifts...............................42 Head Over Heels................................29 J.B. Goods/ Life is Good...................17 Male Instinct........................................46 Men’s Toy Shop...................................51 Peg Ann’s Boutique...........................52 Pit Bull Leather Co.............................49 Sports Etc.............................................29 White Sands Boutique.....................32

CRAFTS, POTTERY, GIFTS

Antique Alley Shops.........................17 Appleworks..........................................62

Our Brown County Back Roads of Brown Co Tour........44 Big River Cabin Furnishings...........61 Bone Appetit Bakery........................47 Brown Co Bead Company...............37 Brown Co Craft Gallery....................21 Brown Pottery.....................................58 Brown Co Rock & Fossil Shop........66 Brown Co Visitors Center................10 BC Winter Art & Craft Fair................47 Carol’s Crafts........................................41 Cathy’s Corner.....................................62 Chateau Thomas Winery.................22 The Clay Purl........................................28 Common Grounds............................21 Country Mouse Weaving................45 Elegant Options.................................45 Faerie Hollow Studio........................45 The Ferguson House........................15 Ferrer Gallery.......................................21 Foxfire....................................................15 Granny’s Christmas Shop................30 Head Over Heels................................29 Homestead Weaving Studio..........45 Hoosier Artist......................................58 House of Clocks..................................46 J Bob’s....................................................62 Johanna Lee Bathology...................53 K. Bellum Leather..............................20 Madeline’s............................................62 Main Street Images...........................63 Male Instinct........................................46 Men’s Toy Shop...................................51 Mercantile Store.................................30 Nashville General Store...................18 New Leaf...............................................59 Night Owl’s Beading Café...............43 Oak Grove Pottery.............................20 Ole House.............................................31 Papertrix...............................................31 Pit Bull Leather Co.............................49 Scottish Highlander Festival..........26 Sheep Street Fibers...........................46 Silas Andrews......................................29 Spears Gallery and Spears Pottery....................................45 Sports Etc.............................................29 Sweetwater Gallery...........................17 Townhouse Gifts................................19

The Toy Chest......................................41 Wishful Thinking................................42 The Woodlands Gallery...................51

ENTERTAINMENT

19th Hole Sports Bar & Grill...........25 Bean Blossom, Monroe Music Park and Campground..............................33 The Palace Theatre of Brown Co and Robert Shaw...............................22 Chateau Thomas Winery.................22 Copperhead Creek Gem Mine......66 Hotel Nashville Gazebo Parties....54 kidscommons.....................................11 Melchior Marionettes.......................56 Nashville Express...............................11 Night Owl’s Beading Café...............43 Rawhide Ranch...................................63 Robert Shaw-The Man in Black and Heartbreak Hotel...............................22 Scottish Highlander Festival..........26 Weed Patch Music Company........... 2

FOOD & BEVERAGE

19th Hole Sports Bar & Grill...........25 Abe Martin Lodge.............................10 Appleworks..........................................62 Artists Colony Inn..............................41 Bloomingfoods...................................63 Brown Co IGA......................................39 Brown Co Inn..........................30,53,55 Brown Co Steak & Seafood Co......25 Brown Co Winery...............................63 Brownie’s Bean Blossom Rest........44 Calzone Jones.....................................28 Carmel Corn Cottage.......................19 Casa del Sol..........................................19 Chateau Thomas Winery.................23 Common Grounds............................21 Farmhouse Cafe.................................61 Harvest Moon Pizzeria.....................21 Hobnob Corner Restaurant...........26 Holy Cow..............................................23 Hoosier Buddy Liquors....................49 Hotel Nashville............................39, 54 J Bob’s....................................................62 Jack & Jill Nut Shop...........................42 McDonald’s..........................................56 McDonald’s Supermarket...............44 Miller’s Ice Cream...............................21


Advertiser Index Muddy Boots Cafe.............................28 Nashville BP.........................................31 Nashville Candy Store......................29 Nashville Fudge Kitchen.................68 Nashville General Store...................18 Nashville House.................................30 Night Owl’s Beading Café...............43 Ole House.............................................31 The Ordinary.......................................30 The Original Soup to Nuts..............21 Pine Room Tavern..............................49 Pizza King.............................................42 Seasons.................................................30 That Sandwich Place........................11 Trolly’s....................................................61

FURNITURE

Big River Cabin Furnishings...........61 The Ferguson House........................15 Wandering Past Antiques...............46 The Woodlands Gallery...................51

HARDWARE

Bear Hardware....................................49

HATS

LODGING / APARTMENTS/ CAMPING Abe Martin Lodge.............................10 Artists Colony Inn..............................41 The Brick Lodge.................................39 Brown Co Inn..........................30,53,55 Comfort Inn.........................................51 Cornerstone Inn.................................57 Explore Brown County.....................26 Green Valley Lodge...........................31 Hidden Valley Inn..............................51 Hills o’ Brown Vacation Rentals.....25 Hilltop Cabin & Suites Brown County Cabins......................59 Honeysuckle Hideaway...................47 Hotel Nashville............................39, 54 Lodge on the Mountain..................42 The North House...............................39 Rawhide Ranch...................................63 Salt Creek Golf Retreat.....................25 Salt Creek Inn......................................47 Seasons.................................................30 Willow Manor Apartments.............27

Head Over Heels................................29 K. Bellum Leather..............................20

MUSEUMS

Antique Alley Shops.........................17 Back Roads of Brown Co Tour........44 Brown Co Bead Company...............37 BC Winter Art & Craft Fair................47 Cathy’s Corner.....................................62 Faerie Hollow Studio........................45 Ferguson House.................................15 Ferrer Gallery.......................................21 Foxfire....................................................15 Glass Planet Gifts...............................42 Grasshopper Flats..............................17 Hoosier Artist......................................58 J Bob’s/Bedazzled Jewelry..............62 Main Street Images...........................63 New Leaf...............................................59 Night Owl’s Beading Café...............43 Old McDurbin Gold..........................21 Ole House.............................................31 Peg Ann’s Boutique...........................52 Touch of Silver Gold & Old.............19 White Sands Boutique.....................32

Bone Appetit Bakery........................47

JEWELRY

Pioneer Village Museum.................11

PET SERVICES/PRODUCTS PHOTOS

Back Roads of Brown Co Tour........44 Glass Planet Gifts...............................42 Main Street Images...........................63 Spears Gallery and Spears Pottery....................................45

RECREATION

Camp Moneto.....................................16 Explore Brown County.....................26 Rawhide Ranch...................................63 Salt Creek Golf Course.....................25

SERVICES (see also SERVICES DIRECTORY)

Dr. Lisa Baker, DDS............................28 Brown Co Visitors Center................10 Ethereal Day Spa and Salon...........25 Michael’s Massage Therapy...........41 Nashville BP.........................................31 Rebecca Bartlett, Psychic................50 Linda Thomas Massage...................61

SERVICES DIRECTORY 64-65 Adirondac Style Furniture Al’s Paint & Body-Garage Baldwin Tree Service Bright & Williamson Insurance Brown Co Community YMCA Brown Co Tire & Auto Eye Care of Brown County Farmers Insurance—McGinley First Merchants Bank Fruitdale Market Health for “U” Hills o’ Brown Realty Jane Gore Realty Knight’s Trash Removal Mike Nickels Log Homes Precise Books and Payroll, Inc. Remax Team Wild Hair

SHOES

Head Over Heels................................29 K. Bellum Leather..............................20

SPECIALTY SHOPS

Ady’s Fabric & Notions.....................46 Bone Appetit Bakery........................47 Carol’s Crafts........................................41 Fireplace Center.................................45 For Bare Feet.......................................67 Granny’s Christmas Shop................30 House of Clocks..................................46 K. Bellum Leather..............................20 Male Instinct........................................46 Men’s Toy Shop...................................51 Papertrix...............................................31 Pit Bull Leather Co.............................49 Sheep Street Fibers...........................46 Sports Etc.............................................29 The Toy Chest......................................40 Weed Patch Music Company........... 2 Wishful Thinking................................42

STAINED GLASS

Ferrer Gallery.......................................21 Sweetwater Gallery...........................17

WEDDINGS

Artists Colony Inn..............................41 Hotel Nashville............................39, 54

OTHER

Flower and Herb Barn......................61


contributors

Bill Weaver is an author and radio personality currently living in Bloomington. He’s published The College of Beer: The Story of Nick’s English Hut, and numerous zines including ER, D’KNOW, and The New York Squid. He writes for Our Brown County, IntoArt, and the Bloomington Herald-Times Homes section. He maintains a website of short stories called The Liars Bunch at <www.liarsbunch.com>. He’s known as Gus Travers, the co-host of WFHB’s The Dark End of the Street.

M. Joanne Nesbit is a former newspaper reporter, author of three books on the early Brown County artists, and current student of the fascinating history of the Brown County Art Colony. Her books are available at local book stores and galleries. She raised her children on Possum Trot Road. She now lives in Michigan where she is retired after a career as a public information officer for Indiana University and the University of Michigan.

Joe Lee is an illustrator and writer. He is the author of The History of Clowns for Beginners and Dante for Beginners and illustrator of six other titles, including the forthcoming Dada and Surealism for Beginners in the ongoing “for Beginners” series. He is an award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Bloomington Herald Times, a graduate of Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey Clown College, and a veteran circus performer. Joe lives with his wife Bess, son Brandon, George the cat, and his dogs, Jack and Max.

Henry “Hank” Swain moved to Brown County with his bride Mardi in 1947. He supported a family of five daughters by building homes. Hank’s books Leaves for the Raking, and Why Now? are bi-products of writing for Our Brown County. He has served the Chamber of Commerce, the Nashville United Methodist Green Room class, the Bloomington Society of Friends, League of Women Voters, and WRAPS (Writers, Readers and Poets Society). You will sometimes find him relaxing in his kayak on Salt Creek.

Mark Blackwell makes his home in an area of Brown County where “the roadway is rough and the slopes are seamed with ravines and present a meatless, barren, backbone effect.” He was born in the last century and still spends considerable time there. He plays music with the “Lost Shoe String Band” when he can get away with it, writes for Our Brown County, and works when he has to.

Lee Edgren, writing since kindergarten, attended journalism school at the University of Michigan. Her career includes writing for a newspaper, for a government agency, and for UM Medical Center. She became seriously interested in yoga during the late 1980s and traveled widely. Lee has a master’s degree in Wellness Management from Ball State University. She lives in both in Brown County and in northern Michigan and owns River Light Yoga studio.

Julia Pearson is the Museum Director for the Brown County Historical Society. She and her husband, Bruce, reside in Bloomington. Julia is human interest editor and writer for a Secular Franciscan magazine, and is currently writing a column entitled “Leaves of Brown” for the Brown County Democrat. She loves traveling and visiting museums of all types and sizes worldwide, especially with her children and grandchildren.

Jim Eagleman is a 33 year veteran of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources as an interpretive naturalist, first working at Turkey Run State Park for three years and for the last 30 at Brown County. He and his wife Kay have three sons, all graduates of Brown County High School. Kay and Jim enjoy all outdoor activities, especially kayaking. Jim is currently working on his memoirs.

Greg Clarke is a freelance photographer based out of Bloomington. He has a degree in Fine Art Photography from Towson University and has had work on display in several galleries. His photos have appeared in Bloom and The Ryder. He is a gentleman, a scholar and a Gemini. You can see more of his photos on the website <www.GregClarkePhotography. com>.

Laura Gleason is a freelance writer based in Bloomington. By day she edits online courses for businesses, and by night she writes for publications such as Our Brown County, Ryder magazine, and The Bloomingfoods News. She lives in a co-op house and enjoys gardening, potlucks, and photography.


The cover is of Bud Smith and his grandson Nash Stuart in Bean Blossom. photo by Cindy Steele

12 NASHCAR Outhouse Race and Picnic 12 Main Street Images–personalizes 14 Banjos and Barn Doors by Bill Weaver 18 Brown County Radio Hour by Lee Edgren 20 Sampler at Night Owl’s Beading Café 24 Knitting–Sheep Street, The Clay Purl by Laura Gleason 36 Back Roads Studio Tour 36 Brown County Bead Company 42 Uncle Pen Days/Hall of Fame Festival by Mark Blackwell 48 Ferrer Gallery by Lee Edgren 52 Rhythms of Brown County by Henry Swain 54 Fall Nut Crop by Jim Eagleman 56 Are You and Antique? by Mark Blackwell 58 Sorghum by Joanne Nesbit 60 Abe Martin by Julia Pearson 8 Contributors 9 Subscribe 11 Where Is It? Contest 13 Photos by Geoff Thompson 34–35 Calendar of Entertainment/Events 40 Coloring Contest

inc.

Cindy Steele, publisher P.O. Box 157 Helmsburg, IN 47435

812-988-8807 www.ourbrowncounty.com ourbrown@bluemarble.net copyright 2011 Thanks, Mom, for making it happen!

Subscriptions Make Great Gifts

SUBSCRIBE One Year’s Subscription for $12 —for postage and handling.

Name:

Address:

Send with check or money order to:

Our Brown County P.O. Box 157 Helmsburg, IN 47435

LAST ISSUE’S CONTEST WINNERS: • The Where Is It? photo was of The Dillman Farms fella in front of J Bob’s on Van Buren Street in Nashville. Brooke Claburn was the first to call. • Jamie Leung of West Monroe, LA won the Coloring Contest.

Note from the Editor Fall is a time when most local residents bypass the visitor traffic by taking the less traveled paths around Nashville. Not me, I embrace the crowds. The volume of visitors equates to seasonal prosperity for the majority of our customers. I enjoy witnessing the surge of commerce. Nature photographers gravitate to Brown County to capture our fall foliage. But leaves don’t vary much from year to year in my opinion. The tree by the train is always a bright yellow. And the one by my driveway is always a shade of red. What interests me more are the thousands of colorful faces from all over the world that come here to have a good time. People are usually smiling and friendly and often walk streets hand-inhand. That happiness rubs off. So in Brown County’s busiest time of the year I take the time to mingle with strangers and enjoy the view. —Cindy Steele


Is all the magic of the Holidays! The sparkling lights, s… tempting treats, cozy fireplace, Carolers and the village shops… Mrs. Claus and I come back every year! ILoveBrownCounty ILuvBrownCounty 800.753.3255 | browncounty.com

Arts

Nature

Adventure

el Slide ter Chann Wa ns ets tai Foun ump Buck l D re rfal Wate and mo

There is always something to do in Indiana’s largest State Park: Aquatic Center, Horse Back Riding, Mountain Bike Trails, Fishing, Tennis...

We have the room for you!

Our full service restaurant is open daily.

Brown County State Park 160 accommodations: P.O. Box 547 Nashville, IN 47448 Abe Martin Lodge and guest rooms, two-story cabins, 1-877-Lodges-1 • (812) 988-4418 the Little Gem Restaurant and historic cabins. www.indianainns.com We have the perfect setting for any event, Corporate Retreats, Weddings, Getaways and Family Reunions and More!

10 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


HIS BOOK SHOP Specializing in New, Used, and Rare Christian Books

WHERE IS IT? Win $20

We Buy Christian Books Across alley from Courthouse (812) 988-4873 58 East Main St. P.O. Box 365 www.hisbookshop.com Nashville, Indiana 47448

Largest Collection of Bobby Knight Memorabilia Breakfast 8:30 - 11 a.m. Sandwiches & Salads 11 a.m. - ? At the corner of Main & Van Buren Streets (underneath the Nashville House) - 988-2355

Nashville Express Sightseeing Tours

2 1/2 mile scenic tour of Nashville Board at Fearrin’s Ice Cream • Franklin & Van Buren

Be the first person to call and get the prize money. Leave a message with the specific location of the Mystery Photo, your name, and phone number.

(812)988-8807

also service to Seasons, Brown County Inn, Comfort Inn & Salt Creek Inn

May – October • $5 per person • 812-988-2308

in Downtown Columbus, a short drive from Nashville

available for field trips, business functions, private tours 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. longer on weekends (ask the driver)

Pioneer Village Museum Behind the Courthouse between Old School Way and Locust Lane Open Sat. , Sun., Holidays 1 – 4:30

Pioneer Cabin Blacksmith Shop Log Jail Loom Room Doctor’s Office

For Info: Brown Co. Historical Society (812) 988-2899 • (812) 988-6089

Three floors of learning and Fun! Lightspace Play Wall and Exer-gaming Bikes

Bubbleology Our House Japan Kids at Art

2OFF

$

with ad up to 4 people exp. 4-30-2012

Slide down our giant toilet

Hands-on Exhibits & Activities for Families with Toddlers www.kidscommons.org to Early Teens 309 Washington St. Columbus, IN • 812-378-3046 Tues.–Sat. 10–5,Sun. 1–5 and also Mondays June 6 – Aug. 8

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 11


NASHCAR Outhouse Race and Abe Martin Picnic

Main Street

Images

M

September 17, 2011

D

on’t miss the fun on September 17 when Nashville’s Main Street gets blocked off for the 7th annual Abe Martin’s Picnic and NASHCAR Outhouse Race. Time trials will start at 10:00 and the final heat awards will be presented at 5:30. There will also be an event for kids on Friday, September 16 at 6:30. The We Care Gang is the charitable organization that puts on the event. Visit <www.wecaregang.org> for entry forms and rules/regulations. Teams accumulate points toward an overall victory not only by racing their outhouses, but through participation in a plunger toss, a round robin corn hole tournament, a vote-based competition for the best-themed outhouse, and the outhouse that raises the most money. It is the money raised—not strict adherence to vote-counting—that is most important. The Gang will host a pig roast picnic under a tent next to the Nashville United Methodist Church at 36 South Jefferson Street. The cost of a plate includes a barbecued-pork sandwich, chips, and lemonade. Proceeds go to provide shortterm assistance to less fortunate people in Brown County. Fundraisers have brought in $30,000 since the group’s founding in 2005. For more information contact Bob Kirlin at (812) 720-0222. 

A Raptor Rendezvou B

October 22-23

rown County’s own Indiana Raptor Center (formerly Return to the Wild) is bringing the first Raptor Rendezvous to Nashville on October 22 and 23 featuring three main events: • October 22-24 from 9 to 4 at the Village Green in Nashville: “Meet and Greet” tent with raptors to visit up close and photograph. A trading post will offer T-shirts, collector pins, handmade jewelry, decorated turkey feathers and turkey fans, bird houses, stone fetish carvings, felted animals, photography, totem sticks, antique collectibles, and antler art.• • October 22 at 2 pm at the Brown County State Park Nature Center A live bird of prey program featuring birds from the Indiana Raptor Center. • October 23 from 12 to 4 the Abe Martin Lodge Melodeon Room The largest raptor program ever presented in the state of Indiana—featuring birds from Indiana Raptor Center and guest presenters and birds from the Illinois Raptor Center, WildCare, and Utopia Wildlife Rehabilitators. There will be a silent auction to benefit the center. The Abe Martin Lodge will provide Hors d’ oeuvres and a cash bar. Proceeds from the events will be used to feed and care for the 25 resident birds at the center, as well as the 60-80 patients treated there annually. All contributions go directly to animal care and facility maintenance. Donations are tax-deductible. 

ain Street Images, located in the old colonial building on North Van Buren Street across from the courthouse in Nashville, has a new personalized service that can produce a sports team high-definition print with your name on it in a matter of minutes. There are two main types to choose from: the stadium print and the locker room. The locker room shows four jerseys with player names including one with your name on it. You can pick any team you want from the NFL, MBL, NHL, and some colleges. Then you pick which current team members you would like to see next to your name in the print. The stadium print option is for your favorite football or baseball team. The prints are produced from high definition quality images and can be purchased separately or with an affordable frame. These prints make great gifts for the sports fan who has everything. Main Street Images also offers a variety of popular prints of celebrities like Marilyn Monroe and bands such as The Beatles. Brown County landmarks such as the Story Inn and the Bean Blossom Covered bridge can be purchased framed or un-framed. In addition to the prints, they sell a variety of quality jewelry at affordable prices. To contact Main Street Images visit their website at <www. mainstreetimagesonline.com> or call (812) 988-4898. 


Brown County as Geoff Thompson sees it...

Geoff Thompson has a new photography shop in the Tucker Building across from the courthouse in Nashville. You can reach him at (812) 720-0086 and also see his work at <www. geoffthompsonimages.com>.


“I

by Bill Weaver

don’t sit around much,” says Bird Snider when asked how he finds the time. “If I sit around very long I’ll be asleep.” Snider reclaims old barns and log cabins, using the wood to build homes and make cabinets, doors, furniture, and musical instruments. “This is the first bluegrass banjo I ever built,” he says while opening the case for the instrument he plays with his other passion, the White Lightning Boys bluegrass band. It’s made from dense purpleheart and walnut carefully inlaid with abalone and mother-of-pearl. “My first go at a really nice instrument,” he says proudly. Bird grew up on Carmel Ridge in northern Brown County. “My Mom would have to honk the horn three times to get us kids to come home,” he remembers. “The closest kid to us was two miles, and that was straight through the woods. We used to hunt ginseng, yellowroot, and mushrooms.” Snider still enjoys finding mushrooms. “I take off work in the spring and I hunt for three weeks from daylight to dark every day,” he says. “Over the years I’ve taught myself how to identify the mycelium coming up right off the dirt, you know? It looks like a piece of fuzz with a little head on it. I start finding them in February and keep real close track with what’s going on.” His log home is a work in progress, made from wood he’s reclaimed. “I set all these logs by myself with ropes and pulleys, got them up on this floor deck,

14 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

Brian “Bird” Snider with his first banjo creation. photos by Greg Clarke

made the foundation, poured the footers, made the trim.” He found the doors sitting alongside the road. “The beams I ripped down and prettied them up a little bit. I hewed that timber for Beth Mathers’s ‘witch house’ by Beanblossom. It laid outside for eight or ten years and now it looks like it’s a hundred years old.” The Snider family has been a part of Brown County history from the beginning. William Snider built the old log jail in 1837 with Frank Taggart. “The Sniders used to own from Beanblossom Overlook all the way down the valley to Helmsburg and then up Railroad Road,” he says. “My great-great-granddad lost it all in two poker games. “I bought a cabin that used to sit on the property and I found this box hidden with deeds with his name on them from the 1840s and I also found this—every tax receipt from 1837 to 1933 on that property!


“There’s always something hid in an old cabin,” Bird says, showing off a tobacco pouch he found in an old French trading camp at Gnaw Bone. He’s found tools, gemstones, a pipe still packed with tobacco, and the flint and steel the farmer used to light it. “You always find something neat in an old barn,” he laughs. He traces his interest in history and artifacts to his friendship with Jack Weddle. “He was my Mom’s schoolteacher,” he remembers. “He packed me around for years growing up. We’d go artifact hunting all over the Midwest, down the Ohio River. He was the one who taught me to chew tobacco!” Snider is making fewer homes these days, instead crafting furniture, cabinets, mirror frames, tables, and anything else that captures his interest. One of the banjos he’s made was bought by

A desk Bird created with old barn wood accents.

a collector in San Francisco. “It was like losing a kid when it left,” he says. “Some of the stuff I make I don’t care if I sell or not because I love it, you know?” Bird regretted never having a chance to play that banjo with its delicate mother-of-pearl inlay of flying kestrels. Then one night, while he was playing in Bloomington, its owner suddenly walked through the door. “I said, ‘Hey, you got that banjo with you?’ and he said, ‘Yeah.’ So I got to play it all night,” Bird laughs. The White Lightning Boys began in Snider’s back room as a weekly gathering of friends. ”We never intended on playing a gig,” he says. Continued on 16

The Ferguson

House

Visit rooms of:

• Iron Decor

• Swan Creek Candles • Holiday Decor • Home Accessories

• Collegiate Gifts

• Fashion Jewelry

• Accent Tables

• Garden Accents

and more . . .

78 W. Franklin Street Nashville 812-988-7388

Foxfire

59 E. Main St. in Nashville 812-988-8707

• Gifts and Home Decor • Willowtree Angels • Swan Creek Candles • Kitchen Accessories • Baby Gifts • Holiday Decor • Rhythm Clocks • Fashion Jewelry and Purses • Garden Decor Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 15


BANJOS continued from 15 “We were drinking a jug of moonshine one night, playing music, and a buddy of mine said, ‘We ought to call ourselves the White Lightning Boys!’ Somehow someone got us a gig at Upland Brewery and it all started from there. Never in a million years did I think I would get a chance to play at the John Hartford Memorial Festival.” While rooted in the traditional bluegrass style the band’s influences include “rock and roll, rap, about everything there is out there. What’s hard to do is keeping it fresh,” he continues. “You’ve just got to keep working on new material. We’ve played in festivals, bars, and with Tim Grimm around the state. We played in Kentucky last weekend. We’ve opened for the Travelin’ McCourys, Cornmeal, Tony Rice, and Cherryholmes. “It doesn’t leave a lot of time on the weekends,” he allows. “But it’s fun. I love it. We’ve got a real good group of guys.” Their CD is Barefoot Nelly, available in stores, and at iTunes, cdbaby, and Reverb Nation. The White Lightning Boys can be followed on Facebook and a list of upcoming shows are at <www. reverbnation.com/whitelightningboys>. Bird’s woodwork is featured at: <www. barndoorsandbanjos.net> and <www. etsy.com/shop/barndoorsandbanjos>. You can contact him at (812) 988-6807 or <hbbarndoorsandbanjos@gmail.com>.

16 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


Sweetwater Gallery featuring locally crafted:

Stained Glass Paperweights Mosaic Mirrors also offering:

Pottery Kaleidoscopes Metal Sculpture Owners, Ron and Penny Schuster

145 S. Van Buren Nashville located in the Back-to-Back Complex

812-988-0449 www.schusterglass.com

Two Nashville Locations: The Original – 172 N. Van Buren Life is Good Kids – Calvin Place (S. Van Buren & Franklin)

est. 1972

For Quality and Price call 812-988-4037 Top Dollar Paid for Old Gold 150 S. Van Buren St. • Nashville

The Bookloft Hoosier Artist

Brown Co. Art Guild

Jack and Jill Nut Shop

VAN BUREN ST

Sterling Silver • Fine Diamonds Opals • Gemstones • Wedding Rings Titanium Bands • Austrian Lead Crystal

JEFFERSON ST

Doug Stoffer, Designer/Jeweler

Brown County Bauble® Boards Brown County Pottery Brown County Weavery and Roots The Clay Purl For Bare Feet Ferguson House Head to Toe K. Bellum Leather Nashville Image Old Time Photography Antique Alley on the West Side Nature’s Cabin Nashville House Paint Box Art Gallery Peaceful Valley Gallery The Antique Ordinary The Purple Fig Alley Shoppes Through the Looking Glass Wooden Wonders FRANKLIN ST Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 17


Brown County Hour

I

by Lee Edgren

t’s 5:00 p.m. on the third Saturday in October. Turn your radio on. It’s time for the bi-monthly broadcast of the Brown County Hour on WFHB FM 100.7 in Brown County, a wholly home-brewed variety show, put together entirely by volunteers, most of whom have had no previous broadcasting experience. And before it was even a year old, it was an award-winning endeavor. Every episode has a different theme: Fall in Brown County; The Holidays; Earth Day; The Arts in

Nashville General Store & Bakery

Standing from left to right: Rick Fettig, Scott Nelson, Bruce Clegg. Sitting left to right: JT Robinson, Vera Grubbs, George Clegg, Pam Raider, Janice Pearce, Susan Showalter. Not pictured Kaylee Witt, Gunther Flumm, Jeff Foster, Pete Sebert

Brown County, to name a few. What will you hear this time? True tales of the past told by raconteur Steve Miller, grandson of painter Dale Bessire? Bluegrass by the White Lightning Boys? Or frog or bird songs captured by Geoff Keller, whose recordings are archived in the world-famous Cornell Lab of Ornithology? You might hear a snippet of local history with “Jacob Brown” or Julia Pearson. You might catch a Vera

Step Back in Time...

Gift Baskets filled with Jams, Jellies, Fried Biscuits with Apple Butter Shagbark Hickory Syrup Chicken Salad full of Grapes and Pecans w/ Pumpkin Bread. Sandwiches on Baked Breads or Kaiser Rolls. Smoked Turkey w/Cranberry Mustard, Pit Hams. Pulled Pork BBQ marinated in our own Vidalia BBQ sauce. Mama Marie’s Meatloaf. Beans and Cornbread.

812-988-6362

Pumpkin, Banana, and Cinnamon Breads Homemade Pies and Cakes Cinnamon Rolls Caramel Apple Nut Pie Hot Apple Dumplings Muffins, Persimmon Pudding Variety of Ice cream Flavors Shakes, Sodas, and Floats

Grubbs interview or poem, or one of Kaylee Witt’s vivid stories about raptors or other wild inhabitants of the county. Now and then there are stories about political issues. And you will almost certainly hear a cleverly rhymed poem from “Gunther Flumm” that casts a quizzical eye on modern life. The Brown County Hour is all about community. In its very first broadcast on July 26, 2010, The Brown County Hour became

Visit our shop next door.

The yellow building 118 E. Washington St., Nashville 18 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

Antiques, Quilts, Kitchen Curtains, Lamps, Shades, Rugs Keeper of the Light Candles


WFHB’s most listened-to program, with more than 1,000 downloads per episode. In April, 2011, that same first program won third place for radio writing in the Indiana Society for Professional Journalists annual awards, besting both corporate media and longer running shows. In June, a surprised Pam Raider was named WFHB’s Producer of the Year. Bloomington-based WFHB-FM is an entirely community-supported radio station, unlike most FM stations. In 2004, the FCC allocated a few FM frequencies not already assigned, with the stipulation that they become operational by fall 2007 or be lost. WFHB acquired 100.7 and then seemingly forgot about it. As Pam Raider tells the story, a call was made by the station to Nashville businessman Andy Rogers just before the license for the frequency ran out. Could he help WFHB raise $20,000 in two months? If he could, a translator (a radio device that receives the original broadcast signal and rebroadcasts at a different frequency) would be located in Brown County, extending the broadcast range of WFHB into the hills o’ Brown. Shortly after the call, Andy and Pam Raider ran into each other on the street. They agreed to join together to raise the money. Pam thought the community ought to get something more than the translator—like a radio show! And so, the idea of a program that could showcase all that is the best of Brown County was born. A series of fundraisers led to the securing of the $20,000. The translator became a reality. Developing a show took several more years. Open meetings led to Continued on 32

CARMEL CORN COTTAGE Sweet Treats

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Mention Ad for IN-STORE DISCOUNT 87 E. Main St. • Nashville 812-988-2229 • www.townhouse-gifts.com

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 19


Night Owl’s Beading Café

I

The Sampler

generally eschew eateries that are combinations of a restaurant and some other kind of business. I mean, “Ernie’s Ribs and Auto Repair?”; “Gina’s Pet Grooming and Deli Sandwiches?” Really? We all have our little quirks, when it comes to eating out. My wife won’t go into any restaurant with “Country” in its name. But from now on, I’m making an exception for a new place down on Jefferson Street, just off the Village green called Night Owl’s Beading Café. I discovered Night Owl’s more or less by accident one night when we went down to catch one of our offspring entertaining the masses of his adoring fans

with ballads and banter both old and new. I had heard a little rumble on the grapevine that the food was good—someone had recommended the Italian plate (Bruschetta, soprasatta sausage, Genoa salami, mixed olives and provolone and mozzarella cheeses, served with a baguette). This was my chance to slip in and sample, observe and record for your future amusement. The Sampler never rests. Meals must be eaten. The space is warm and inviting, with high tables that I like, with wood paneled walls lined with shelves that display art and artifacts. Night Owl’s is providing an atmosphere that feeds the creative self, including the “Owl’s Nest” where live music from an eclectic range of performers can be heard. If I have a weakness as a professional diner, it is a certain lack of precision focus; I came for the Bruscetta but ended up ordering the Greek salad. I tempted Mrs. Sampler—a devotee of all olives—with the olive and Feta plate, but she opted instead for the Middle Eastern plate; hummus, baba ganoush, stuffed grape leaves, and kalamata olives, served with veggies, olive oil, and pita points. Continued on 28

Fine Leather Goods ds Handbags, Belts, Hats, Accessories Also selling shoes:

Island Slipper, Haflinger, Arcopedico, Sanita, moccasins and sheepskin slippers

Featuring Leather Goods made by Brown County Craftsmen Also leather, tools, dye, and supplies

812-988-4513 • www.kbellum.com 92 W. Franklin, Antique Alley in Nashville, IN

20 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


escape and be transported

COMMON GROUNDS NEW LOCATION

not just a coffee bar …an experience Our menu features: great espresso drinks, award-winning coffee, and exceptional teas. We offer unique gift, garden, and vintage wares. 66 N. Van Buren

Old Colonial Bldg.

Nashville 812-988-6449

Old McDurbin % Gold & 50 Gifts

OFFLRY E JEW

•PIZZA •PASTA •SANDWICHES • SALADS Dine in or Carry Out

988-6565

open daily 10–5 • 812-988-7058

140 W. Main Sun.–Thurs. 11–9 • Fri. & Sat. 11–10

Customized

• Anklets • Bracelets • Necklaces

Watches Sterling Silver 1000’s of Pendants Rings 58 E. Main Street (next to courthouse)

58 East Main Street Nashville, Indiana (next to Brown County Courthouse) www.browncountycraftgallery.com

Hey, we’re Back!

• Soups • Salads • Sandwiches Franklin St. & Honeysuckle Ln. next to Acorn Cottage in Nashville 812-988-4411

the HISTORIC VILLAGE GREEN BUILDING

V NA S H I L L E

INDIANA

REPRESENTING OVER 40 LOCAL & REGIONAL ARTISTS Also the working studios of

Yes, we really make it right here!

Dick & Dixie Ferrer · Fine Art Barb Brooke Davis · Textile Art

Homemade Ice Cream since 1977 812-988-0815 · www.millericecream.com

www.ferrergallery.com · 812·988·1994

Classes Available · Gallery on the 2nd level

61 WEST MAIN STREET · NASHVILLE INDIANA Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 21


22 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


Van Buren and Washington Streets in Downtown Nashville, IN Coachlight Square • Shop, Dine, Sip some Wine, and Enjoy a Show

Fresh-cut Steaks Chicken BBQ Ribs Seafood

“Best of Taste of Brown County”

Sun.–Thurs. 11–9 Fri. & Sat. 11–10

Call Ahead Seating Available

Non-Smoking

Tour Groups Welcome

812-988-0444

Dine Inside or on the Patio

A Menu for the Whole Family Salads • Sandwiches • Kids Menu Beer, Wine, & Spirits

We’re More Than Just International Award-winning Wines! Wine Bar Open Daily for Tasting and Sales Classic Movies Thursdays 6 pm • Live Music Friday and Saturday 7-10 pm Sunday Songwriter Showcase 3–5 pm Cheeses and Gourmet Foods • Unique Wine Gifts 812-988-8500 • 888-761-WINE (6463) • www.chateauthomas.com Open Monday thru Saturday at 11 am and 12 Noon on Sundays

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 23


KNITTING at Sheep Street and The Clay Purl by Laura Gleason

N

ancy de Caprariis takes the crackers out of her pocket and three Shetland rams come thundering across the pasture to get them. “This is Lasagna, Clayton, and Calamari,” says de Caprariis, who knows many of the 94 sheep who live on the Sheep Street Fibers farm by name. Knitting and the fiber arts have experienced a resurgence in popularity in the last decade, and businesses like Sheep Street in Morgantown and The Clay Purl in downtown Nashville teach people how to take part. Like many adult knitters, Michele Hayes, who owns The Clay Purl, learned the skill as a child but dropped it for many years. She was originally taught at age 10, “From a lady, I called her grandma, who lived by us,” in Valparaiso, she said. She didn’t do much knitting after college, but in the last 10 years, her interest resurfaced and she started taking on more complex and challenging projects.

Nancy de Caprariis at the farm near Morgantown. photo by Cindy Steele

She’d always wanted to own a shop in Nashville, where she lived in the late 80s and early 90s. So when her husband, David, got a job in town in 2005, she saw her opportunity. But what kind of store would it be? “I just kept coming back to the knitting. The needle arts are so popular right now,” Hayes said. The business, which also showcases Hayes’s son Paul’s ceramic work, opened in May in Nashville’s historic artists’ colony. Knitting appeals to a broader swath of the population that its reputation might suggest. Hayes sees young men, older men, married couples, children, and women of all ages. “One girl came in and she was training for the Olympics (in skating), and she crochets during her breaks, and while traveling,” Hayes said. Classes were originally scheduled to begin in the fall, but Hayes had

Michele Hayes, owner of The Clay Purl in Nashville. photo by Cindy Steele

24 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

so many requests that she started them up in June. Since then, different teachers have offered basic knitting, crochet, knitting hats, vests, felting, and making knitted sheep dolls. “It’s a little lamb stuffed animal which teaches outside-of-the-box knitting,” Hayes explained. Nancy de Caprariis knows all about stores growing and expanding in scope. Her shop was incorporated in 1998, when de Caprariis thought she’d open a “little bitty yarn shop.” She sold a variety of yarns and taught classes in knitting and weaving. Along came Tim Ackerman, offering to sell wool from his flock of sheep. Enchanted with the wool and the animals that produced it, Nancy and her husband Pat started Continued on 38


Cha�� �w�� ��� W�n��� B��e�…

A Fall Gathering on the Homestead Antique Show

Fully furnished cottages, vacation homes and log cabins, many with hot tubs, seasonal fireplaces, game rooms, outdoor activities, fishing, some pet friendly. Guest ranch and lodge accommodates large groups. Views of Lake Monroe and Brown County State Park.

Saturday, September 17, 2011

O����� S�e�i�l�

9 am – 4 pm

Home in the Country Antiques Waltz Farm 275 E. 600 S., Trafalgar, IN 46181

Call for more info (317) 878-4630 or (317) 933-3755 Visit me at: www.homeinthecountryantiques.com A gathering of quality primitive dealers specializing in early country antiques in original surface and paint. Delicious food will be available with plenty of seating for dining on the old country veranda.

Ethereal E thereal

DAY SPA

and SALON

Vacation Rentals Y��� h��� �w�� �r�� h��� �� S�u����� In�i�n� 812-988-6429 ·

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4118 State Road 46 East · 4.5 miles east of the Village of Nashville Office Hours 9 AM–5 PM · Monday through Saturday

y la p & t ou y e m o c , a w a Get

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Free back sugar scrub with any massage

18 Hole Championship Golf Course Golf Carts with GPS Navigation Systems Driving Range and Fully Stocked Pro Shop Overlook Lodge Condominiums Seasonal Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub

Couples Suite | Tranquility Room Water Features | Spa Packages 812.720.9009 · EtherealVillage.com

Daily 10–7 · Sunday by appointment – 40% off packages 211 S. Van Buren · Village of Nashville, IN · 2nd floor

Brown County Steak & Seafood Company 19th Hole Sports Bar & Grille Conference Facility

Save 10% Brown County Steak & Seafood Company with this ad

2359 State Road 46 East 2½ miles east of Nashville

812.988.7888 SaltCreekGolf.com

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 25


Restaurant Serving Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Soups • Salads Sandwiches • After Five Menu Fine Wines Available Breads, Pastries, and Danish Baked Here Daily Center of Nashville Main and Van Buren Streets Open Daily • (812) 988-4114

at Valley Branch Retreat ZIP LINES· PAINTBALL ATV TOURS · MOUNTAIN BIKING CABINS · CAMPING EVENTS · PARTY RENTAL HALL

812.988.7750

info@ExploreBrownCounty.com 2620 Valley Branch Road | Nashville, IN 47448 GPS 39.1638298 / -86.1485959

eXplorebrowncounty.com 26 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

SScottish i h Highlander Hi hl d

FESTIVAL Sept. 24 & 25

10:00 am to 5:00 pm Emcees Robert Miller and Nathan Parker

• Highland Reign • Brendan Loughery • 78th Fraiser Highlander • Irish Dancers Saturday • Scottish Dancers Sunday • Highland Laura • Southern IN Pipes & Drums • Clan of Destin Glen

Craft Booths Artisans at Work Shepherds’ Pie, Pork BBQ, Hot Dogs 11:00-2:00 Pie, Dumplings, and Ice Cream All Day

Wagon Rides to the Pumpkin Patch Pony Rides and Train Rides North of the Brown County Line Near Peoga Call for directions 317-878-9317


Willow Manor Apartments Nashville's Premier Senior Apartments 55+

Available NOW 1 and 2 Bedroom Apartments

Apartment * Full size washer and dryer * Patios and Balconies * Central air conditioning * Full set of kitchen appliances * Garbage disposal * Cable TV hookups * Pets welcome * 24 hour emergency maintenance * Built to ADA standards * Elevator

Community * Resident Activities * Picnic area with grill * Outdoor gazebo * Garden area * Fitness center * Computer Resource center * Library * Community center with kitchen * Meeting rooms

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Call Today (812) 720-9400 Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 27


Muddy Boots

Café

New Late Hours: Mon.–Sat. 7 to Midnight, Sun. 8 to 8 Scrumptious Entrees • Vegetarian Selections Handmade Desserts • Specialty Coffee Drinks Breakfast Served All Day

Live Music Daily

812-988-6911

www. muddybootscafe.com

136 N. Van Buren Street • Nashville

the clay purl welcome! Unique Yarns, Supplies, Locally Made Pottery & Jewelry, Classes, Knit Groups, and More! 90 W. Franklin St.• 812.988.0336 • claypurl.com

Lunch and Dinner

“This is a Nice Place.”

• Calzones • Gourmet Pizzas • Deli Sandwiches • Speciality Salads • Homemade Soups • Desserts • Carry Out Items Closed Sun. Abe’s Alley 145 S. Jefferson and Mon.

(812) 988-8884 • calzonejones.com 28 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

SAMPLER continued from 20 Many more substantial choices abound. The sandwich melts are hand-melted and include turkey, corned beef, ham, roast beef, or tuna served with Monterey Jack, baby Swiss, or Provolone cheeses on Italian style ciabatta bread or a bagel. Sandwiches are served with chips or fruit. Then there’s Night Owl’s nachos made with refried beans, black olives, blended cheese, served with a fresh, house-made pico de gayo on organic tortilla chips. There are chicken, tuna or egg-salad sandwiches on croissant, served with lettuce, tomato, and chips or fruit; a classic Caprese salad with baby mozzarella, heirloom tomato and basil leaves, served internationally on a French baguette with Italian dressing. There’s also a “quiche of the day” or soft pretzels served with warm nacho cheese or cream cheese. My Greek Salad arrived, and it was not only entirely delicious and of an ample proportion, it was downright gorgeous! Night Owl’s Beading Café is seeking to produce a dining experience in which they create edible art from fresh fruits, vegetables, and other high quality ingredients. Now, I know you may cringe when you hear this, reflexively recoiling from some long-buried “California cuisine” trauma. This isn’t like that. It’s just good, wholesome food, beautifully arranged and presented. Mine looked so good, I had to pause and enjoy the look of it while I helped Mrs. Sampler with her Middle Eastern plate. It isn’t my fault she always orders what I end up wanting.

Family Cosmetic Preventive Dentistry 812-332-2000 www.drlisabaker.net

Lisa J. Baker, DDS 4217 E. 3rd Street • Bloomington, IN 47401


It was very tasty and pleasing all around, as was the healthy and attractive Greek salad—Romaine, heirloom tomatoes, cucumbers, thin-sliced red onions, kalamata olives, and feta cheese served with the Night Owl’s own special Greek dressing and pita points. And then, of course, there are the beads—a whole store full of beads and beaded jewelry, supplies, and various kinds of pendants. Mrs. Sampler wandered over to the merchandise. As a general rule I’m interested in what kind of jewelry she likes (a good thing to know about your wife), but I chose to sit and observe from a distance. Still, very nice beads and bead work all around. And you could eat pretty well as you create some beaded works of your own. Night Owl’s desserts, especially the ready supply of fresh muffins, scones, and other such fresh-baked delights, got my attention. The menu also includes a fruit and cheese plate, a Night Owl’s fruit salad marinated in sparkling grape and pomegranate juice and topped with real whipped cream, or decadent desserts like the aforementioned muffins, occasional various fresh pies, Dag’s vanilla bean ice cream, or lemon sorbet. You can try the three-berry plate, with your choice of raw sugar, real whipped cream or—how can you resist it?—drizzled Ghirardelli chocolate. The music was good. The food was satisfyingly delightful. The crowd of friends and strangers seemed briefly to meld into a harmonious, happy company as they sampled the various offerings, edible and otherwise, with each of their senses. And I was profoundly satisfied. 

Silas Andrews A Mix of Jewelry, Antiques, and Home Decor

We carry Candleberry Candles

HERITAGE MALL Shops South Van Buren Street Nashville, Indiana

SPORTS etc. Your Team Headquarters for Y Licensed Sports Novelties and Collectibles

• Collegiate • NFL • MLB • NBA • NASCAR

Visit our website

www.browncountysports.com 41 S. Van Buren St. Heritage Mall Nashville, Indiana

812-988-6809

• Memorabilia • Apparel • T-Shirts by The Mountain • Vintage Photos • Postcards

Head over

Heels • Minnetonka • Stetson • Tilley Hats

HATS • FOOTWEAR • ACCESSORIES 49 South Van Buren Street

in Nashville • 812-988-6535 headoverheels@switched.com • fax: 812-988-6505

Nashville Candy Store Old-Fashioned Candy Homemade Fudge Peanut Brittle

Main Street Shops Old School Way Nashville, IN 812-988-6255

Heritage Mall 41 S. Van Buren (3 doors south of Nashville House) www.nashvillecandy.com (812)988-8745 toll free (877)735-8657

Buy a pound of FUDGE Get a half pound FREE

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 29


No visit to Nashville is complete without a visit to

George George Ge org rge C Tucker Tu r Building Bu dingg

New rooms with balcony view, restaurant, lounge, and enclosed pool. Conference facility for up to 600 people.

812-988-2284 • SeasonsLodge.com

Across from Brown County Courthouse

44 N. Van Buren St. north of stoplight

Granny’s Christmas

A Brown County Landmark renowned for savory home cooking and old-fashioned hospitality

& Gift Shop

812-988-4554

• Santa • Snowmen • Precious Moments • Dept. 56® • Snow Village • Dickens • Nutcrackers and much more! (812) 988-6208 • second floor

MERCANTILE STORE

Featuring comfortable rooms, restaurant, bar, and indoor pool. Meeting space for up to 275 people.

“Old and Young Love this Shop!”

812-988-2291 • BrownCountyInn.com

Nashville’s extraordinary eating and beverage experience 812-988-6166

30 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

Brown County

• T-Shirts • Toys • Gifts • Collectibles • Brown County Souvenirs (812) 988-2725


5 Ye

GREEN VALLEY LODGE

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OFF*

• FREE Wireless Internet • Super Clean Rooms • Peaceful Valley Setting • 1 mile to Nashville and Brown County State Park

“in room” hot tub suite

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Reserve at www.greenvalleylodge.com or 812-988-0231 toll free 1-800-205-8369 692 St. Rd. 46 W Nashville, IN 47448

Ole House

62 E. Washington St. Nashville, IN across from Coachlight Square/Circle K Indiana Salsa • Jams (free samples) H d ft d W d k Handcrafted Woodwork Magnetic Mailbox Covers Sports Items Custom Glass-Bead Jewelry Goose Clothes Indiana Blacksmith Ironworks Concrete Decorative Items www.ole-house.com • 812-988-4770

Flags•Flags•Flags•Flags Largest FLAG Inventory in Indiana

10% OFF any FLAG

with coupon • not valid with other discounts • expires 11-30-2011

Exclusive FLAG Designs

ar Annivers

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ar y

Dynamic classes and demo table.

Artistic Rubber Stamps FFor cardmaking, d k g & Scrapbooking collage & altered art The newest items and techniques! Receive

5 FREE SHEETS OF 8 1/2 ” X 11” CARDSTOCK with this coupon.

Try our new Coordinations paper. Cardmakers’ cardstock sale now in progress. Buy any 10 sheets, get 5 more sheets free! 160 Old School Way in Nashville behind Village Candlemaker

(812) 988-2002 www.papertrix.com

Nashville BP 14 ” PIZZA $9.98 from 4:00–7:00 pm State Roads 46 & 135 270 S. Van Buren St. in Nashville

988-1822 Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 31


We Moved! New Location*

White Sands Boutique “A Caché of Fabulous Stuff”

HOT • NEW • STYLISH

“Dahling, You’ Love this Shop! You’ll I a Fabulous It’s L Boutique” Little

White Sands Boutique

A Fun Place to Shop

Women’s Apparel, Handbags, NEW LOCATION Jewelry, We moved across the street behind Hats, Old Bartley House— formerly Ruth’s Garden’s and more!

*

courtyard Nashville, IN (812) 988-6980

32 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

RADIO HOUR continued from 19 other fundraisers, and finally equipment acquisitions, the finding of a studio space in the Traditional Arts Building, the training of interviewers in using tape recorders, and the training of a few participants in the skills of electronic editing. A grant from the Brown County Community Foundation has led to a spin-off project archiving “Conversations with our Elders.” A core group of writers and production people emerged. Pam Raider, by now the Executive Producer of the show, and Susan Showalter, Pete Sebert, Kaylee Witt, Vera Grubbs, Steve Miller, John Sisson, Janice Pearce, and Patty Peaker became key members of the creative group. And Technical Producer and Webmaster Jeff Foster, Jeff Quick, and Rick Fettig became key members of the production group, with Pam and Susan learning more and more about production and, especially, radio script writing. The greatest challenge came as program editor Jeff Quick died unexpectedly, just as he was putting the April Earth Day show together. The close-knit group was stunned by Jeff’s death but managed to produce the episode in spite of their grief and inexperience. Pam and Susan did most of the final editing for that show. Before the summer show, Scott Nelson, a veteran of TV audio production in California, George Clegg, and J.T. Robinson joined the production team and Bruce Clegg became a new correspondent. The Brown County Hour celebrated its first birthday on July 1, 2011. The Brown County Hour remains a work in progress. All the regulars are hoping for more community taping, live music, live radio theater, and a monthly broadcast schedule. And the doors are still open to new people and new ideas. Anyone who is interested is welcome to join the Wednesday night planning and production meetings, held at the studio at the back of the Historical Arts building. “It’s really amazing,” Pam says, “There’s lots of synchronicity with this show. We pick a theme, and the people and resources to develop it just seem to come out of the woodwork.” All past episodes are available on the show’s website: <www.browncountyhour.com> or <www. wfhb.org>. Brown County organizations can be listed on the WFHB calendar by emailing your info to <calendar@ wfhb.org> at least one week in advance. People interested in being a program underwriter can contact WFHB General Manager Chad Carrothers at <manager@wfhb.org> or (812) 323-1200. 


Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 33


Calendar

The schedule could change. Always check if planning a special trip. The Palace Theatre “It’s Only Temporary” Sept. 1, 8, 16, 22, 29, Oct. 6, 11, 20, 27 “Platinum Girls” Sept. 23, Oct. 13, 14 “Forever Vegas” Sept. 15, 30, Oct. 5, 7, 21, 28 “Cowboy Sweethearts” Sept. 9, 14, Oct. 18, 26 “How Great Thou Art” Special Events: “Once Upon a Smidebush” Sept. 2 and 9-One-person cabaret show starring Amy Smidebush. Amy sings her way through a diverse selection of music featured in her series of one-person shows at “Don’t Tell Mama,” a cabaret near Times Square in New York City. Robert Shaw Shows: Special Dream Lover-A Salute to the Music of Bobby Darin on Oct. 1, 15, 22, 29 Robert Shaw as Elvis and Johnny Cash “Heartbreak Hotel” Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24, 27,Oct. 1, 4, 15, 22, 25, 29 “Man in Black” Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24, 28 Oct. 1, 12, 15, 19, 22, 29 “How Great Thou Art” Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25, Oct. 2, 16, 23, 30 Coachlight Square • Van Buren and Washington Streets in Nashville Info 812-988-2101 www.palacetheatreobc.com

Melchior Marionettes “Comedy Cabaret on Strings” Sept. 3, 17, 24 (Closed Sept. 10) “The Slightly Haunted Puppet Theatre” Oct. 1-Oct. 31 Saturdays and Sundays at 1:00 and 3:00 (addtional times in Oct.) Also Thurs. Oct. 20, Fri. Oct 21 and Fri. Oct. 28 Free Popcorn! Tickets $5 S. Van Buren St. Downtown Nashville

Brown County Inn Corn Crib Music Fridays, Saturdays 9:00

Seasons Lodge Music Fridays and Saturdays 9:00

Chateau Thomas Winery Music 7:00-10:00 Fri. and Sat. Sept. 2 Impasse Sept. 3 Mark LaPointe Sept. 9 Ronny Lee Sept. 10 Barry Johnson Sept. 16 Bloodshot Moon Sept. 17 Fire in the Dawn Sept. 23 Mack Jump Sept. 24 Lazy Saints Sept. 30 Ken Wilson & Company Oct. 1 Gary Applegate Oct. 7 Greg O’Haver Oct. 8 Tim Brickley Oct. 14 Bryan Hodge Oct. 15 Barry Johnson Oct. 21 Mark LaPointe Oct. 22 Marvin Parish Oct. 28 Greg Ziesemer & Kriss Luckett Oct. 29 Lazy Saints call for later dates Info 812-988-8500 www.ChateauThomas.com

Muddy Boots Cafe Live music: Monday-Thurs. 6:30-8:30 Friday and Saturday 7:30-9:30 Info 812-988-6911 Sept. 1 Kara and Chuck Sept. 2 Bonz Sept. 3 Jeb Brester Band Sept. 5 Grant Eversoll Sept. 6 Lou Stant Sept. 7 Whiskey Mystic Sept. 8 Dan Cantwell Sept. 9 Whipstitch Sallies Sept. 10 Cootie Crabtree Sept. 12 David Dwyer Sept. 13 Don Ford Sept. 14 Richard Groner Sept. 15 Jon Mosey Sept. 16 Indiana Boyz Sept. 17 Travis Creek Sept. 19 Llyod Wood Sept. 20 Johnathan Hunter

34 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

Sept. 21 Johny Nevada & the Rockets Sept. 22 Don Ford Sept. 23 Porch Hound Sept. 24 Mizfits Sept. 26 David Dwyer Sept. 27 Hannah Groves Sept. 28 Noel Niehaus Sept. 29 Dean Phelps Sept. 30 Brian Walle Call for later dates North end of Van Buren Street in Nashville

Night Owl’s Beading Café Music Wed. and Thurs. 7:30-10:30 Fri. and Sat. 6:00-9:00 and 9:30-12:30 Sept. 1 Grant Eversoll Sept. 2 Wakefield, Mama’s Intuition Sept. 3 Entwyned, Michael Cochran Sept. 7 Closed Sept. 8 Whiskey Mystics Sept. 9 Bart Fortner, Brian Fortner Sept. 10 Keenan Rainwater, Lexi Minnich Sept. 14 Mike Nichols Sept. 15 Rick Clayton Sept. 16 Whipstitch Sallies, Trish Sept. 17 Tucker Eads, Meagan Maudlin Sept. 21 TBA Sept. 22 Tammera Lane Sept. 23 Dumpster Mike, Baraka Sept. 24-29 TBA Sept. 30 Curtis Cantwell & Janiece Jeffey Oct. 1 Entwyned, Michael Cochran Oct. 6 Whiskey Mystics Oct. 7 Wakefield, Mama’s Intuition Oct. 8 Whipstitch Sallies, Lexi Minnich Oct. 12 Mike Nichols Oct. 13 Rick Clayton Oct. 14 Bartfortner, Brian Fortner Oct. 15 Tucker Eads, Megan Maudlin Oct. 21 Baraka, Trish

Pine Room Tavern Saturdays Live music Sundays Jazz musicians 7:00-9:00 Sept. 14 Ryder Film Series “Farmageddon” Info 812-988-0236 www.pineroomtavern.com

Abe Martin Lodge Little Gem Restaurant Music Saturdays Dave Miller 6:00-8:00 Info 812-988-4418


Mike’s Music & Dance Barn Mondays Country Dance Lessons Saturdays Mike’s Smooth Country Band Special Events: Second Saturdays - Lloyd Wood Show Second Fridays - Ballroom Dance Sept. 9 Ballroom Dance Sept. 10 Lloyd Wood Sept. 16 Travis Albertson “Sincerely Elvis” Oct. 8 Lloyd Wood Oct. 14 Ballroom Dance Oct. 15 50s and 60s Music-Mike’s band Oct. 21 Terry Lee Rock-a-boogie Info 812-988-8636 www.thedancebarn.com

Hotel Nashville Gazebo Parties Sept. 4 Barry & Joe, 5:00-9:00 Sept. 9 Foster Jones, 6:00-10:00 Sept. 16 Little Daddy Caddy, 6:00-10:00 Sept. 23 Paper Relics, 6:00-10:00 Sept. 30 Marvin, 6:00-10:00

Salt Creek Golf Retreat 19th Hole Bar Music Fridays and Saturdays Info 812-988-7888 www.saltcreekgolf.com

SPECIAL EVENTS: Village Art Walk

Brown County Art Renaissance Weekend Indiana Heritage Arts: “Behind the Easel: Sharing Our Stories” Sat. Sept. 10, 7:00 at Brown Co Art Gallery T.C. Steele State Historic Site: Sat. Sept. 10 Great Outdoor Art Contest Brown County Art Gallery: “Pumpkins and Puppies” Sept. 10, 10:00-9:00; Sept. 11, Noon-5:00

Wagon Train Jam Sept. 29-Oct. 1 at Monroe Music Park in Bean Blossom. Info 800-414-4677 or 812-988-6422 www.beanblossom.us

Fish Fry and Corn Roast October Sat. and Sun. at the Courthouse

10th Annual Back Roads of Brown Co. Tour of Studios Month of October. Free self-guided tour.

7th Abe Martin County Picnic Works for sale and artists demonstrations. & NASHCAR Outhouse Race www.BrownCountyStudioTour.com Sept. 17 and kid’s race Sept. 16. Donations go to We Care Gang to help those in need in Brown County. Food, contests and the “NASHCAR” outhouse races. Friday Sept. 16 at 6:30 is the Big Wheel race sponsored by Bear Hardware and the We Care Gang. Saturday Sept. 17 is picnic for charity and outhouse race. Fun begins at 10:00. This year also includes a Duck Race for the Community Foundation.

Hoosier Hops and Harvest Sept. 17 at Story Inn, Noon to 6:00 Local chefs will prepare a wide array of dishes using locally produced ingredients. Jason Wilbur and Tom Roznowski will entertain with original works. Celebrity Hoosier authors, growers, and other guest artists will make appearances.

Second Saturdays April–December 5 to 8 pm. 11 participating galleries. Restaurant discounts on tour Sat. and Sun. 37th Monroe Hall of Fame www.artalliancebrowncounty.com and Uncle Pen Days Festival (812) 340-8781 Sept. 21-24 at Bill Monroe’s Music Park in Bean Blossom. Legends as well as up-andcoming groups. Plenty of pickin’ in the Old Settlers Reunion Sept. 2 and 3 at Bill Monroe’s Music Park in parking lot. Good food and camping. Info 800-414-4677 or 812-988-6422 Bean Blossom www.beanblossom.us Children’s rides, games, food concession stands, family history exhibits, old tractors Scottish Highlander Festival and other old items on display, Brown County books for sale, horseshoe contest Sept. 24-25 Live Scottish and Irish music, reenactment groups, Shepherds pie, and Info www.browncountyinoldsettlers.org other food, crafters, and wagon rides to pumpkin patches. 10-6 Bean Blossom BikerFest Apple Works, 8157 S. 250 W. Trafalgar Sept. 8-10 at Bill Monroe’s Music Park For directions (317) 878-9317 For tickets: www.ballsbiker.com or call 812-988-9151

Fall Fare - Methodist Church Oct. 1, 8:00am-3:00 Village Green Food, Arts, Crafts, Flea Market, and more...

Kelp’s Pumpkin Patch: Annual Farm Fest Oct. 1 at SR 46 in Gnaw Bone There is plenty to do for everyone... games and prizes, hay rides, petting zoo, face painting, pumpkin carving, and more!

Collector’s Showcase Oct. 8 & 9 at Brown County Art Gallery

OTHER ACTIVITIES: Pioneer Village Museum Open Saturdays & Sundays 1:00 to 4:30 May thru October in downtown Nashville

Brown County Dragway Racing every Sunday, Gates open at 9:00 5 miles north of Nashville on Gatesville Rd. Info 812-988-6103 www.browncountydragway.com

Bucks & Does Square Dances Sept. 16, Oct. 7 at Historical Society 135 N 8:00-10:30 Sept. 9, Oct. 14 at Abe Martin Lodge in Brown County State Park, 8:00-10:00

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 35


D

Back Roads Studio Tour

uring the entire month of October, 10 artists’ home studios will be open to the public. You can meet 17 artists and craftsmen (some guest artists), watch them work, and explore the spaces that inspire them. And getting there is half the fun. Most studios are tucked into the woods along picturesque country roads. There’s a little something for everyone. At Oak Grove Pottery, Judy and Tom Prichard make functional and decorative pieces in a variety of glazes. At Spears Gallery, Larry Spears creates unusual teapots, bowls, mugs, and fountains. At Faerie Hollow Studio, Cheri Platter creates jewelry from Precious Metal Clay (PMC), often using lampworked beads created by her husband Dallas. Hand-painted silk scarves are a new this year. Carrie Foley and Janet Cullen make fine handwrought gold and silver jewelry with gemstones, wire wrapping, and copper pins. At Homestead Weaving Studio, Chris Gustin creates hand-woven designs in throws, scarves, and clothing and makes rugs from repurposed fibers. Joan Haab returns to the tour this year with her hand-woven rayon chenille garments and crocheted purses. Sandy Taylor offers stained glass and mosaic frames to complement her nature and travel photographic prints. Joe Henderson, at Hickory Hill Studios, makes hardwood clocks, furniture and accessories, while his wife Peggy creates baskets, jewelry, and gourd art. Their son, Sawyer, makes wooden kitchen utensils. Rose Bolte offers gourd art, mixed media, and other 3D pieces. Amanda Mathis paints Americana and folk art. She has a new series of miniature paintings for the fall tour. Douglas Runyan will exhibit his oil paintings and pastels at Homestead Weaving Studio. He is teaching a pastel class on October 22. Oak Grove Pottery is featuring painter Monique Cagle, of Sleepy Cat Studio, as a guest artist. She also creates painted glassware, crocheted and felted items, and handcrafted jewelry. The holidays are just around the corner, and many of the artists are already gearing up for them, with great one-of-a-kind gift ideas.

36 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

The tour is free to the public. A map and road signs will guide you from studio to studio, allowing you to explore the scenic back roads along the way. Each studio on the month-long tour operates with their own days and hours of business so be sure to check the brochure or website for those you plan to visit. Artist information and images can be found at <www.BrownCountyStudioTour.com>. Maps are available at area businesses, participating studios, the Visitor Center, and can be downloaded from the website. 

B

Brown County Bead Company

rown County Bead Company is a new store on Molly’s Lane just off North Van Buren in Nashville. It is owned by Julie Allen, jewelry artist and entrepreneur. Over the years Julie created a lot of jewelry but often didn’t have a place to sell it. Her shop now serves as a venue for other artisans without a storefront of their own. Seven local artists make their works available to Julie and she markets them with the label “Handmade in the Hills.” These artists provide many different types of pendants from a variety of materials including gourds, watercolors, polymer clay, and metals. Customers can choose one of the pendants and then pick out accent beads. “A lot of people doubt themselves,” says Julie. “They pick out a few beads and then they say ‘I like that!’ when we put them together.” Brown County Bead Company offers custom jewelry services and can repair jewelry. There is a variety of beading supplies for those who enjoy making their own jewelry. You can rent a beading tray for a day and take it to the park or hotel room. From their Brown County home Julie and her husband maintain an organic garden. Dried herbs from the garden are for sale and are also incorporated into the store’s handmade soaps and lotions. Julie also crochets soap bags and face cloths. Allen’s love of natural materials can be traced to her grandparents. They were rock hounds and instilled in her a curiosity for stones. Brown County Bead Company can be reached at (812) 988-6450 or <browncountybeadco@gmail.com>. 


Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 37


KNITTING continued from 24 Brenda Beers and Margie Hill enjoy an evening of knitting at The Clay Purl.

helping Ackerman with showing the sheep, and eventually they decided to join forces as business partners to create a yarn shop with a flock on site. Today, there are 94 sheep in the Sheep Street flock; mostly Shetlands, but also a few Merinos, three hulking Lincolns, and a hair sheep that’s kept as a pet (they’re generally raised for meat). There are two alpacas, four Great Pyrenees guard dogs, and a one-eyed cat named Pirate who presides over the shop. “Even when we have a lot of people, he’ll sit in the middle of the table, but he’ll leave the yarn alone,” de Caprariis said. With the renewed interest in fiber crafts, even historic arts like spinning are experiencing a comeback. Nancy doesn’t see spinning as a relic, but as a modern craft that allows people to customize their own yarn and get as close to the source as possible. other pole; yarn from longhaired Icelandic sheep, which Sheep Street has dozens of spinning wheels, knits quickly into a warm, thick sweater like the one she has both historic models and modern ones, and on display. looms for weaving. The introductory weaving Hayes has made it her mission to provide yarns for all class takes a full day, and students are given kinds of knitters, “For a grandma that’s knitting a baby three weeks to return to the studio as needed to blanket, we can accommodate her, and we also have the real finish their projects with guidance from Nancy funky, fun, expensive stuff,” including a festive novelty yarn and Tim. with leopard-print pompoms attached. “It’s long enough to get into a rhythm and Making fiber crafts can be altruistic; some people make see if you like doing it,” de Caprariis said. Hayes blankets for premature babies or stuffed animals for children enjoys spinning as well, and plans to start in need. Even the purchase of knitting supplies can be offering classes at The Clay Purl in the near charitable. Sheep Street sells a lot of “Manos del Uruguay” future. yarn, for example, spun and dyed by women in Uruguay There’s no need to shop online when you who were taught the trade as a way to lift themselves out of see the expansive, varied range of yarns these poverty. shops sell. De Caprariis said she has yarns from Hayes is proud to sell Serendipity-brand knitting needles every continent. Antarctica? Well, no, but she from Rhode Island; their decorative toppers are decorated does have some that comes from nearby the by mentally challenged people from the community, who make money that way. If you’re looking to knit local, you can buy yarn from Sheep Street’s own flock. Some of it is commercially spun for a more uniform appearance, and the rest is spun in-house. None of it has been dyed, but there is still a range of colors to pick from, from lightest beige to brown so dark it almost looks black. There’s even a candy-striped yarn with dark brown and creamy yarn spun together. The Clay Purl also carries local yarn from Whispering Pines Alpacas in Nashville. What shines through at both shops—and what you definitely can’t experience while shopping online—is the passion these women have for their work. “The best part is meeting people, meeting new knitters and creating new knitters, meeting people from all over the country,” Hayes said, “and having all the beautiful yarns!”  Spinning wheels at Sheep Street.

38 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


HOTEL NASHVILLE

• Accommodates 8 Guests • 2 Bedrooms and 2 Baths • Game Room w/ Pool Table • Cable TV–DVD Player • Fully-Equipped Kitchen • Central Heat and Air • Gas Fireplace • Gas Grill • Outdoor Hot Tub

BRICK LODGE 245 N. Jefferson St., Nashville (812) 988-8400 • (800) 848-6274 www.hotelnashville.com • Suites, Studios, Hot Tubs • Restaurant and Bar • Indoor Pool, Sauna, Whirlpool • Conference Facilities • Weddings and Receptions • Special Getaway Packages

1878 N. State Rd. 135, Nashville (812) 988-8400 • (800) 848-6274 www.bricklodge.com

NORTH HOUSE 194 N. Van Buren St., Nashville (812) 988-8400 • (800) 848-6274 www.northhousegetaway.com • Accommodates 8 Guests • 3 Bedrooms and 2 1/2 Baths • Cable TV–DVD Player • Fully-Equipped Kitchen • Central Heat and Air • Electric Fireplace • Secluded Hot Tub • Gas Grill

BROWN COUNTY

Hometown Proud Local Grocery Store Serving Beautiful Brown County Since 1975! Competitive Pricing No Cards or Membership Everyone Pays the Same Price

Organic Grocery • Dairy • Produce • Frozen Organically Grown Wines and Olive Oil

• Certified Ang us Beef • Large Beer an d Wine Section s • Picnic Suppli es • Full Service B akery/Deli • Custom Cake Decorating • Custom Deli T rays, Veggie Tra ys, Fruit Baskets, and Gift Baske ts

30 Hawthorne Dr. • Nashville • East SR 46 at light • 812-988-4546 • www.browncountyiga.com Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 39


40 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


Michael’s Massage Michael Rebman, Certified Therapist

the

Inn & Restaurant

A Charming 19th Century Style Inn and Restaurant

• 20 Guest Rooms, 3 Suites with Whirlpool Baths • Banquet and Conference Rooms for Retreats or Parties • Gift Certificates Available • Free Guest Parking Serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

104 South Jefferson St. • Nashville by appointment only

812-988-4447 www.michaels-massage.com

Since 1981 • Open 362 Days a Year

Find something special for you and your loved ones from our selection of

Quality Gifts & Collectibles including distinctive hand-painted Brown County ornaments and Locally-made pottery

Friendly, knowledgeable staff We ship every day Visit our website www.CarolsCrafts.com E-mail: Sales@CarolsCrafts.com 800-345-6388

Artists Colony Shops, S. Van Buren St., Nashville

Breakfast Buffet 7:30 am–10:30 am “Early Bird” Specials Mon.–Thurs. 3–5 pm At the corner of Van Buren and Franklin Streets in Nashville, Indiana

812-988-0600 • 800-737-0255

artistscolonyinn.com

Artists Colony Shops Toys and Games for All Ages Fea Featuring toys on ASTRA’s 2011 Best Toys for Kids List 201

AB Brown County Tradition Bro Located in the Artists Colony Shops 125 S. Van Buren St. – Nashville, IN www.browncountytoychest.com

Since 1972

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 41


C Cinnamon Roasted Almonds & Pecans

Salted Nuts R d Roasted Daily

C ashe ncy Mix epitas Peanuts Cashews, Fancy Mix, P Pepitas, Delicious Candies - Homemade Fudge Mail Orders - 812-988-7480

S.Van Buren (Shopper's Lane) Nashville

WE NOW DELIVER!

PIZZA KING

BUY ONE 16” extra large pizza GET ONE 1/2 OFF* *with coupon

Dine-In or Carry-Out

988-8887

51 E. Chestnut St. • Salt Creek Plaza • Nashville, IN

www.pizzakingnashville.com

FREE in-store demos!

Main Street Shoppes Old School Way & Main Visit our website for class schedules www.wishfulthinking-in.com • 812-988-7009

Art Glass • Photography • Jewelryy • Clothing …and more

37th Annual

Uncle Pen Days Sept. 21–24, 2011

by Mark Blackwell

E

very year is a good year for the annual fall Bluegrass festival out at Bean Blossom but this year will be extra-special with an emphasis on celebrating the legacy of Bill Monroe in the 100th anniversary of his birth. Mr. Bill left this Earth back in 1996 but he left us a legacy of music and a spirit of down home neighborliness that lives on in the festival tradition that he began. A lot has changed over the years at the Bill Monroe Memorial Music Park, as it is now known, but practically every change has been an improvement and has built upon a solid foundation of wonderful memories and great music. This year’s festival will add another chapter to the book of Bean Blossom Bluegrass history. Bill Monroe established a Bluegrass Hall of Fame and Museum as a tangible reminder and tribute to the musicians who helped develop and disseminate the music that he originated. This year’s honoree is Mandolin player and tenor vocalist Curly Seckler. With a career that spans 75 years and includes working with such notables as Bill’s brother Charlie Monroe in the 1930s, Jim and Jesse, the Stanley Brothers, and most especially Flatt and Scruggs and the Foggy Mountain Boys. Curly signed on with Lester and Earl in 1949 and stayed with them into the 1960s. After taking a break from performing in the sixties, Curly found himself once again playing mandolin and singing harmony with Lester Flatt in the Nashville Grass in 1973 and continued until 1979, when Lester passed away. Curly assumed leadership of the Nashville Grass

LODGE on the MOUNTAIN Two Secluded Guest Rooms Overlooking a Private Lake

Convenient to Nashville/Bloomington

We are behind the courthouse in Nashville • (812) 988-0210 42 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

LS

A SPECI

FRI.&SAT.—BUY ONE get 2nd 1/2 OFF SUN.–THURS.—BUY ONE get ONE FREE (Excludes Sept.–Nov.)

812-988-6429 www.browncountylogcabins.com


Festival

and the

Bluegrass Hall of Fame and continued with the band up to 1994 when he retired. Like a lot of folks who retire, Curly could not just rest on his many accomplishments, he continued to write songs and make special guest appearances and record. If there is anyone deserving of this tribute it is surely the man whose great tenor voice can still be heard on recordings of “Roll In My Sweet Baby’s Arms” and “Salty Dog.” Curly Seckler will be immortalized as a member of the Hall of Fame on September 24. You can witness the occasion as a ticket-holding attendee of this year’s festival.

NIGHT

OWL’S

Night Owl's Beading Café invites to you enjoy our fresh, varied menu of healthy food, delectable desserts, locally roasted coffees, and custom blended smoothies.

Another benefit of the festival is that you can get up close and personal with some of the greatest musicians in Bluegrass music— Jesse McReynolds, Ralph Stanley, James King, Bobby Osborne (they will all be there this year), and more at the shelter on top of the hill. I always enjoy getting say “Howdy” and having a little conversation with some of my Bluegrass heroes. Some of the other “heroes” include: Ronnie Reno and the Reno Tradition, Randy Waller and the Country Gentlemen, Pine Mountain Railroad, James Monroe and the Midnight Ramblers, The Wildwood Valley Boys, Larry Cordle and Lonesome Standard Time, Karl Shifflett and the Big Country Show, The Grascals, and many more—30 plus bands altogether. In addition to talking to my favorite performers, I also enjoy Continued on 43

Beading Café We have a large inventory of gemstones, pearls, wood and shell beads. We also offer silver jewelry, custom pieces, and a comprehensive line of silver findings.

Join us for a variety of music on Wednesday through Saturday nights in the “Owl's Nest” on our back deck. Check us out on Facebook

Located at the corner of S. Jefferson and W. Main St., Nashville’s Village Green • (812) 720-0072 Open Wednesday and Thursday Noon to 11:00 pm; Friday and Saturday Noon to 1:00 am

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 43


UNCLE PEN DAYS continued from 43

- established 1891

Oldest family owned business in Brown County

One Stop Grocery Shopping

Grocery • Meat • Deli • Beer/Wine Produce • Lottery • BUFFET PIZZAS Visa • Discover • MasterCard accepted Open Daily 8 - 8, 8 - 6 Sunday

Bean Blossom • 988-4629

BEAN BLOSSOM Restaurant Good Food, Good Service, Good Prices

All-You-Can-Eat

Catfish on Friday Nights Daily Specials Breakfast Served All Day

Bean Blossom SR 135 North • 988-1147 Open 7 days a week

saying “Howdy” to the folks I meet at Bean Blossom. It’s always good to meet new people and it’s pretty easy to make new friends—we already have music in common. If you play a guitar, banjo, mandolin, fiddle or bass it’s not hard to find an impromptu “parking lot” or camp-site band to jam with. And if you don’t play an instrument the bands are happy if you just show up with a pair of ears and a little enthusiasm. I think that a lot of the improvements to the campgrounds over the years were done just to make it a little easier on the “jammers.” After you have been up all day listening to top tier Bluegrass from the concert stage, attended a few workshops, eaten your way down Vendor’s Row and then played “Blue Moon of Kentucky until the wee hours, you shouldn’t have to get behind the wheel of a vehicle. No, it makes more sense to just climb into your tent, camper or RV knowing that you can get a hot shower right there in the campground. Not only are hot showers available but you can get electrical hookups, potable water, and a dump station or your RV or camper. For the younger crowd, or those hardy souls who just like to rough it, there are primitive camp sites (but you can still get a hot shower and clean water). And if you wind up forgetting something the park has a dandy little camp store. Tickets are $25 for Wednesday, $30 for Thursday, and $35 apiece for Friday and Saturday or you can come for the whole 4 days for $105, camping is a little extra. Go ahead and give ’em a call at 1-800-414-4677 or go online at <www.BeanBlossom.us> to make your reservations. I know you won’t regret it. 

POTTERY • WOODWORKING WEAVING • BASKETS • JEWELRY PAINTING • MIXED MEDIA • GOURDS STAINED GLASS • LAMPWORK RUGS • HANDWOVEN CLOTHING PHOTOGRAPHY • SILK SCARVES

BrownCountyStudioTour.com MEDIA SPONSORS MAPS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSITE, AT THE VISITOR’S CENTER (800-276-9995) AND LOCAL BUSINESSES

44 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


THE FIREPLACE CENTER

Complete line of: • Wood Stoves and Inserts • Gas Stoves and Inserts • Fireplaces Your first step to Energy INDEPENDENT LIVING

Homestead

WEAVING STUDIO

Visit us on the Studio Tours

812-336-2053 1-800-344-3967 1210 W. 2nd St. Bloomington TheFireplaceCenter.net

Open 11 to 5 most days

Southeastern Brown County 6285 Hamilton Creek Rd. Columbus, Indiana 47201

812-988-8622 Quality Handwovens www.homesteadweaver.com by Chris Gustin chris@homesteadweaver.com

Antiques and Fine Gifts Discover a Casual Elegance

Home of the Unique and Unusual

4741 E. SR 46 Bloomington • 812-332-5662 20 minutes from Brown County “Your friends in the house by the side of the road”

Country Mouse Weaving Studio

Original designs in precious metal clays accented with lampwork beads and semi-precious stones Classes available year-round in: PMC Clays, Jewelry Techniques and Wire Wrapping OPEN ALL YEAR · TUESDAY–SUNDAY · 10 –5 1650 Salt Creek Rd · Nashville, IN 47448 · 812-988-8378

ARTISTS – CHERI and DALLAS PLATTER

www.cheriplatter.com

Look for our Spears Pottery location Downtown next to the Nashville House

Take part in our new hands-on Raku pottery glazing

Pottery by Larry Spears

Joan Haab Hand Woven Chenille Designer Garments

7965 Rinnie Seitz Road • Nashville, IN • (812) 988-7920

Open Weds., Thurs., Fri. and by appt. • countrymouseweavery@gmail.com

Also available at Brown County Craft Gallery and Spears Gallery in Nashville

Open Daily 10–5

5110 St. Rd. 135 S. • Nashville, IN 47448 (on your way to Story) • 812.988.1287 Shop on-line, too, at www.spearsgallery.com

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 45


Male Instinct “A Different Spin on a Man’s Store”

• Northern Sportswear • Premier Garden • Ultimo Fragrance • Life is Crap Tees • Knives • Military 75 South Van Buren St. • Nashville, IN • (812) 988-1964

Visit

10 miles north of Nashville on scenic State Road 135

Morgantown Serving Central Indiana for 40 Year s Since 1971

Visit our website

www.theclockconnection.com Lay-a-way and Gift Certificates available 75 W. Washington St. P.O. Box 29 Morgantown, IN 46160-0029 812-597-5414 Tues.–Sat. 11–5 pm (closed Sun. & Mon.)

Fabric & Notions s ‛ y d A 79 W. Washington St. Morgantown, IN

812.597.0578 • www.adysfabrics.com Learn a Special Project by Request BOMs, Retreats and Monthly Clubs Fabrics • Threads • Classes • Kits • Notions Patterns • Quilting • Sewing • Redwork Embroidery • Long Arm Quilting Available Hours: Mon.–Sat. 10 to 5 • open Weds. till 8:00pm

46 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

Knitting, Weaving, Spinning

Classes, Yarns, Fleeces, Books, Equipment Weds. 6-8:30; Thurs, Fri., Sat. 10–5; Sun. 1–5; Closed Mon. & Tues.

2.5 miles west of Morgantown SR 252 (now at the farm)


BONE APPETIT BAKERY For Dogs

• Quality all-natural treats since 1997 • Over 20 wholesome varieties from low-fat to wheat and corn free • Fancy Gourmet and Seasonal Snacks • Barkingood Boutique

Bring this ad get a FREE bag of DOGS WELCOME! (812) 988-0305 natural dog treats 211 S. Van Buren St. (behind Shell station) with your $10 purchase www.barkingood.com

Regional Au Authors and Subjects Brown County Books Br Nature Guides Cookbooks Fiction Non-fiction Open All Year Genealogy 45 S. Jefferson Nashville Children’s Books 812-988-0202

5

6

11

BOOK STORE

551 E. St. Road 46 Nashville, Indiana Half mile from downtown New Management Pet Friendly Smoking rooms–limited availability

(812) 988-1149

www.SaltCreekInn.com

Cottage Accommodations in the Heart of Nashville

Innkeeper 812-720-0222

Bob & Chris Kirlin 26 Honeysuckle Ln. • Nashville, IN

www.honeysucklecottageofnashvilleindiana.com

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 47


Ferrer Gallery

T

by Lee Edgren

he spirit of life flows through the Ferrer Gallery, from the colorful walls, to the creations of more than 30 area artists working in a variety of art and craft mediums, traditional to contemporary. Located at the top of a wide flight of stairs in the Village Green Building, 61 W. Main, the light-filled gallery space is home to the art studios of Dixie and Dick Ferrer and textile artist Barb Brooke Davis. There, art creation, art education, and art for sale are joyfully intertwined in the gallery. “People come here to capture and purchase the essence of Brown County,” Dixie Ferrer says. “That’s what we offer.” The gallery is unique in many ways, she adds, displaying and selling the art of more local and area artists than any other Brown County gallery. Ferrer Gallery is built on relationships. Underlying the many strong human relationships represented in the gallery, there is a pervasive relationship to the spiritual world, most easily seen through Dixie’s “Artful Spirit” figures and Dick’s paintings that reference Native American legends. The three artists draw heavily on the past, both personal and collective. Best known for her ethereal mixed media collage paintings, Dixie has recently explored—in small oil paintings— the spirit of Koi that awakened within her during her first Reiki experience. Dick’s acrylic paintings have been inspired by his immersion in Native American experiences and in what is slipping away with the passage of time. He has recently turned his love of the vanishing landscape in the direction of plein-aire painting.

48 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

Artist Dixie Ferrer. photos by Greg Clarke

Continued on 50


Visit our Morgantown Location

Your Headquarters for the Great Outdoors • Camping Supplies: • Fishing Tackle Tents, Camping Lights, • Horse Tack Sleeping Bags, Grills, • RV Replacement Parts Fire Starters, Coleman Heaters and Lanterns, Cooking Utensils • Huge Selection of Carhartt Clothing • Lodge Cast Iron Cookware Salt Creek Plaza • Nashville

(812) 988-8888

www.BearHardware.com Mon.–Sat. 7:30am–7:00pm Sun 10:00am–4:00pm

We Fill Propane Tanks

Pit Bull L EATHER CO. Fierce gear for bikers... and anyone along for the ride!

HOOSIER BUDDY offers more than 100

different kinds of ice cold beer, a large selection of domestic and imported wines (from Boone's Farm to Dom Perignon), and all your favorite spirits. Plus, we carry ice, snacks, and other party supplies. Located at the Junction of HWYs 46 and 135 in Nashville

Motorcycle Apparel: •Jackets •Saddle Bags •Chaps •Fork Bags •Vests •T-Bags •Gloves

Handbags & Wallets T-Shirts: •Biker •Music

Sunglasses & Goggles

•Colts •Attitude, etc.

Hours: Mon.–Thurs. 8–10, Fri. and Sat. 8–11

20 N. Van Buren (across from courthouse) P.O. Box 398 • Nashville IN 47448 812-988-6007 • e-mail: pbl101@sbcglobal.net

(812) 988-2267

Sponsor Miracle Ride for Riley Hospital for Children

Hoosier Buddy reminds you to drink responsibly • Don't Drink and Drive •

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Become our Facebook fan and learn about NEW ARRIVALS and WEEKLY SPECIALS

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 49


FERRER GALLERY continued from 48 seems like art education at all. For example, the gallery displayed the And Barb Brooke Davis’s pillows, work of eight different gourd artists bags, and hangings are all reat one time, so that visitors could workings of old materials, especially see how many approaches to gourd antique wool. Extensive hand work, art there could be. felting, and hand dyeing transform “We are into education,” Dixie vintage fabrics into current notes. “We want to make people accessories. comfortable with art. They can The Gallery is constantly come in and watch us work, ask changing, revolving with the questions, learn about what we seasons and responding to the are doing, and even take classes if works of the artists it represents. In they like.” Dixie is convinced that August, Ferrer Gallery became the everyone is creative—it is just a exclusive Nashville retailer of Oak matter of awakening, playing, and Grove Pottery, created by artists Tom allowing. Her beginner classes are and Judy Prichard. The other newest all about learning to simply enjoy artists are Don and Carol Madvig, the process of creating. owners of Sleeping Dog Studio, Fall is the Ferrers’ favorite makers of one-of-a-kind mixed season. The studio is decorated media cards, clocks, boxes, frames, with corn stalks and pumpkins. and three-dimensional collages. The Barb displays her signature line of Prichards and the Madvigs will be pumpkin pillows. And This October the featured artists for September, the fall gourd art and jewelry of with an opening reception from 5 Rosie Bolte and the hand built to 8 p.m. September 10, during the ceramic sculpture of Rita Jackson Second Saturday Art Walk. and Ben Jackson will be featured, Ferrer Gallery is always open along with the paintings of Dick for the Second Saturday Art Walk. Ferrer, whose fall scenes and fall Often there are special exhibits colors naturally come forth in the that coincide with the walk. These gallery at that time. exhibits sometimes offer incidental “We know people come to art education, so subtle that it hardly start their Christmas and holiday

shopping in the fall. So we try to have an abundance of our artists’ best work from fall through the holidays. We often see the same people year after year,” Dixie notes. “They become curious, then they become collectors, and they enjoy shopping in a space that is bright and comfortable and relaxed.” The Ferrer Gallery started 10 years ago in the same building with just two little rooms. The Ferrers had their teaching studio and their personal studio on the third floor. When they had the opportunity to take the large second floor space, there was no hesitation, even though they had been offered several ground level locations. “We love this building. The gallery is a little tucked away, but we think of ourselves as a hidden treasure. We love the art energy that has always been here. We might miss some traffic, but we know we attract people who are seriously interested in art.” Complete information on the Ferrer gallery artists, hours, and classes is available at <www. ferrergallery.com>. 

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50 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


Hidden Valley Inn

Escape to Country Elegance. Warm and inviting all suite hotel with fully equipped kitchenettes. Located in the heart of historic downtown Nashville. HVI provides exceptional service and affordable value in an atmosphere that is conducive to peace of mind and relaxation for our guests. Call today for our weekday specials.

201 North Van Buren Street • Nashville, IN (812) 988-9000 or (877) 988-9099 www.hiddenvalleyinn.net

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into

Comfort Inn

Comfort

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Fine Pipes and Tobaccos Themed T-Shirts Premium Cigars Great Gifts for Guys Enjoy Beautiful Brown County, Indiana! This award-winning hotel offers a quiet getaway with its quaint and rustic lobby, free breakfast, complimentary high speed internet, indoor pool, fitness room and whirlpool suites. Trolley available to downtown Nashville. 75 W Chestnut, St Rd 46

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Spraguehotels.com/Sprague-comfort-inn-nashville

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 51


Rhythms of Brown County R by Henry Swain

hythm is the ingredient that identifies life. When our heart stops beating life ends. There are larger rhythms in our universe of which we are a part. It is important that we understand the rhythms of the community in which we live and adjust our own personal rhythms so that they are harmonious with those of the community. The rhythms of every community are unique. What are some of the factors that determine the rhythms here? Location would be the first and perhaps the most important. We are located in the temperate zone in the middle section of the United States. Our location guarantees the rhythms of changing climate each season which affect our economy and our well being. Brown County is a tourist destination, an arts community, a retirement magnet, where over half its working population is employed outside the county. During spring, summer, and fall Nashville breathes tourists with a predictable rhythm. From 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. it is difficult to find a parking space on the village streets. Just recently some cafés have changed their hours to be open until midnight and even later, but the majority of the town quiets

down around 10:00 p.m. In the dead of winter, activity slows to a pace that fits the abbreviated daylight hours. Since over half our working population is employed outside the county, we are subject to the rhythm of the daily commute. The modest county population of only 15,000 frees us of the horrible rhythms of delays which urban commuters experience. Our tourist based economy follows the rhythms of the seasons. The Chamber of Commerce had to change its fiscal year from January 1 to July 1. It was difficult to renew yearly membership dues in January when many shops struggled to pay the rent. Successful tourist-related businesses have learned to discipline their expectations and take into account that all months are not like October. They also must plan for economic down-turns in the national economy. Tourists still come, but their buying behavior changes.

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812-988-7950 • Open 7 days a week 52 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


Not many people come to live in Brown County because of the opportunity to make a lot of money. Judy Berg opened the Book Loft business when she and her husband retired here because she loved books and her customers that love books. Her husband Hank remarked that Judy didn’t expect to make a lot of money from the enterprise and had succeeded in that beyond her expectations. I’ve observed people are drawn to Brown County because of its more relaxed rhythms. You can become as busy in your activities as you want but there is no pressure to do so. When I have a crisis, I stop for a moment and ask, “Is this something I will be worrying about a year from now?” Most worries that come unexpectedly never seem as urgent and demanding when viewed from a distance of time. I served on a committee that met weekly during the construction of our library. The masonry contractor who bid the stone contract was upset that a local stone supplier was not delivering the stone in sufficient quantities for his crew. I asked if he had talked with the supplier. He said he had and that his excuse was that he and his buddy had taken a day to go fishing. I suggested the best thing for him to do would be to go fishing with them. He was not accustomed to dealing with a supplier who was willing to balance pleasure with profit. The mason learned that to work in Brown County you had to understand the local rhythms and adapt to them. The library was finished on time. I don’t know if the stone suppliers caught any fish that day. Brown County is a great place to live if you learn to be compatible with its rhythms. 

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Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 53


Fall Nut Crop E

by Jim Eagleman

ach spring, I look up at the white oak and hickory trees as I pass. By May, if the frail flowers appear at all among the new leaves, I predict to myself there may be some kind of nut crop to follow. Like any fruit or nut crop, or nectar, the flower must first occur to begin my anticipation. But often overlooked, it takes more than a casual inspection—the trees’ flowers aren’t the showy types I’ll see at my feet as weather warms. Nor are they particularly aromatic. Called “inconspicuous” in some tree books, the tree flowers appear as long strands that dangle in the wind, eventually landing on the forest floor—or the driveway, lawn furniture, and windshield. A leaf blower eventually removes them from the gravel by spring cleaning. I suspect most homeowners consider them a nuisance. But the good news is they’ll have the beauty of the oak, along with beech, hickory, or walnut trees to admire the rest of the year. Collectively called the mast crop, the hickory nuts, beech nuts, walnuts, and the oak’s acorns produce a supply of best nuts for man and wildlife. To Brown Countians—and like the spring Morel—they are a free bonus we can enjoy each fall by just living near the woods. Flowers on these nut trees are monoecious, meaning male and female flowers occur on the same tree. Like corn, the staminate (male) flowers are long and full of stamens producing pollen that drifts or is carried by bugs onto the (usually lower) female (pistillate) flowers. This arrangement can work well in times of cool, spring temperatures when insects are slow or limited—the pollen merely drifts along. If rains

54 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

persist, or cold snaps occur, flowering is reduced and poor nut production can be expected. In the case of the walnut, the flower parts are quite close to increase the chances of fertilization. Male and female parts on separate flowers, whether on the same plant or not, differ from “perfect flowers” found on most fruit trees. Here wind is the chief means in pollination, but insects like bees, beetles, and flies find them worth investigating. Who hasn’t seen the closeup spring calendar pictures of the pollencovered honey bee visiting the apple or peach orchard?

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Think of the energy it takes trees to produce an abundance of nuts, in addition to leaves, annual growth, and gas exchange. No wonder it’s not an annual event where we are bombarded with hickory nuts or acorns pelting the roof or driveway. If you recall, the white oak near your house will produce bushels of acorns every few years, not every year. Same with the other mast trees. Botanists suspect the trees conserve during the off years to prepare for the next bumper crop. I frequently get calls asking why hickory nuts are falling prematurely. This summer, they began dropping from some trees by mid-August. Small and poorly formed, the nuts are aborted usually to save energy in the form of soil nutrients and water for sustenance, or maintenance. But there’s no waste, I noticed—even poor nuts are consumed by opportunist squirrels and turkey. Deer hunters will claim it is a belly full of acorns they find when field-dressing a fall deer. The high protein diet of nuts may be the only good food for winter wildlife to utilize. When we see a yearly abundance of any animal, it usually points back to a well-filled “pantry”; conversely, lesser wildlife numbers signal a struggle to find adequate food. Knowing to watch for results of high quality mast, nature lovers can nearly always assume the animals will exploit this readily-available food source. A professor attempting to explain the connection to some wildlife students once said, “…any good biologist is also a good botanist.” These words have served me well in my continual fascination and amazement of the wonders of nature. Collecting hickory nuts this fall? Try this recipe for a hickory nut pie, adapted by Clyde William Ickes III from a traditional recipe using pecans in the Deaf Smith Country Cookbook. Old Fashioned Hickory Molasses Pie 1 ½ cups unsulfured molasses 4 beaten eggs 2 tablespoons flour ½ teaspoons salt ½ teaspoons nutmeg 1 tablespoon butter 1 cup hickory nuts, finely chopped 1 unbaked pie crust Set oven to 350° F.

Fold together the first six ingredients. When the ingredients are well blended, stir in the hickory nuts. Pour into the pie crust and bake for 35–45 minutes. 

Holiday

Getaway

in BROWN COUNTY Shopping ~ Dining ~ Entertainment

November 24 to December 29, 2011

The Holiday 2-Night

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2-day/2-night overnight stay, plus $30 restaurant voucher, plus $10 breakfast coupon

$169* (2 nights–Sun. to Wed. arrival) $189* (2 nights–Thurs. or Sat. arrival) $209* (2 nights–Friday arrival)

Celebrate the Season at the 200+ shops, galleries, and theater Visit www.browncounty.com for a list of Holiday Events On site: Year-round Pool / Playground / Game Room Tennis Courts / Shuffleboard / Miniature Golf / Basketball Volleyball / Horseshoes / Bocce / Ping Pong / Board Games Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge

State Road 46 East in Nashville, IN

800-772-5249 www.browncountyinn.com Advance reservation and deposit required. Limited number packages available. Above offers valid based on availability, for arrival from Nov. 24 to Dec. 29, 2011. Not valid for group room bookings beyond 4 rooms per stay. Children (up to age 17) stay free with parents – Max occ. per room is 2 adults/2 child. *Add 12% sales tax to all rates (food vouchers are not taxable)

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 55


Are You an Antique?

D

by Mark Blackwell

id you know Brown County has about a dozen Antique stores chocked full of old and interesting stuff? Antique stores were like cultural museums when I was young, but now that I’m older, they’re more like the back room of my cabin. I was in an antique store not too long ago and saw a dinette set identical to the one I sat at as a child. It got thrown out as soon as Pop got better work. I reckon, if you live long enough, about everything that starts out as the common artifacts of everyday life become “junk,” then “classic,” and then “vintage,” and finally gets designated as “antique.” It’s not hard to chart the progress of an object through these stages. First off, you start to do a job with a handsaw you bought to build some bookcases, and then you discover you need some screws or hinges or something for the new job that forces you to go to the hardware store. Once you are there, you decide it might be good to look around a little, just to reacquaint yourself with the layout. There, in the power tool aisle is a new circular saw—ON SALE. How could the hardware people know that a circular saw would be the one thing that would save you time, give you smoother, more accurate cuts, and improve the quality of your project? A man would be a fool not to want to save time, add more polish to his work, and SAVE MONEY. You come home with your new power saw and the old handsaw finds a semi-permanent position on the shop wall. A few years (maybe a couple of decades) pass and one day that sweet woman you live with comes to you with the notion that she is gonna officiate over a yard sale. A smart man says, “That’s a great idea, Honey,” and

heads out to the garage. Something has to be offered up as a sacrifice to the inevitable—so there goes the old handsaw. Then a woman goes home and says “Look what I got at a yard sale for $3—it’ll be a perfect decoration in the den.” And the saw gets a new wall. By and by, the couple-with-the-rustic-den grow old and pass on to their great reward. There is an estate auction and the handsaw, now seventy-five or eighty years old, becomes the property of an antique dealer and gets displayed, hangin’ on another wall. The only difference is the intended use and the perceived value.

Melchior Marionette Mario ionettt Theatre

Sept. Schedule: “Comedy Cabaret on Strings”

Serving Brown County

Sat. Sept. 3, 17, 24 (closed Sept. 10)

Free Popcorn! Showtimes 1:00 and 3:00 extra times in October Westside of S. Van Buren St. Downtown Nashville

Oct. Schedule: “Slightly Haunted Puppet Theatre” October 1–30 All Sat. and Sun. plus shows on Thurs. Oct. 20, Fri. Oct. 21 and Fri. Oc.t 28

800-849-4853 • peewnkle@earthlink.net kl hl k • www.melchiormarionettes.com

56 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

McDonald’s ®

501 E. SR 46 Nashville, IN.


What started out as a well-crafted, useful $9.50 tool, degenerated to a half-forgotten dust gatherer, not worth $5, and finally got upgraded to antique status with a price tag of $25. The antique progression isn’t limited to handsaws. Take for example a cabinet model Victrola circa 1925. I was given one back in about 1960. It was only thirtyfive years old but we had entered the age of Hi-Fi and the Victrola had washed up on the shores of if-youdon’t -want-it-we’ll-take-it-to-the-dump. So, I took it. I thought it was a beautiful machine and it introduced me to the music of Bix Beiderbecke and Bessie Smith. I guess what really makes an antique is not just age but how well the item was designed, how well it was built, and whether it might still have value. When I take inventory here at the cabin I see a Singer treadle sewing machine that’s coming up on its 100th birthday. It is constructed of a six drawer oak cabinet that houses a simple but beautifully designed machine that still does everything that it was advertised to do. It serves as a decorative piece right now but if the electric goes out for good, or I defect to the Amish, it can still be of use. I’ve got quite a few things around me that could be classified as antiques—and no, I don’t mean you, Sweetie-pie. I’ve got a cane bottom chair that my great-great Grandpap built and a rocker that my dad was rocked in as a baby. Out in the barn I’ve got an old corn-sheller and some very old hand planes and draw knives that are still good looking and useful. I wonder if anybody is gonna feel affinity for a fifty year old circular saw. Antiques have an important place in reminding us of who we were and what was important to us as a culture. I worry about our e-culture where music, literature, and even history are stored in a digital cloud somewhere. I have a hard time picturing the antique store of the future stocked with early twenty-first century i-pods, cell phones, or treadmills that were designed to be instantly obsolete. I wonder if folks in the future will be able to look at the current crop of artifacts with nostalgia. The reminders of our past serve as a good metaphor for being human. I don’t mind becoming an antique as long as I can be considered well-designed, useful, and still of some value to somebody. I encourage you all to check out some of Brown County’s fine antique establishments and to work on becoming well-loved antiques yourselves. 

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CornerstoneInn.com Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 57


Sorghum

B

rown County’s sorghum mills are some of the most photographed and painted images of Brown County. Some call it sugar cane, while others refer to sorghum as the cane of the north. To botanists it is known as Sorghum bicolor. Regardless of what you call it, sorghum is a household word in the Midwest and has, since the 1850s, been a leading substitute for sugar in kitchen recipes. Sugar made from cane was commonplace in the southern states prior to the Civil War and was a treasured item in the northern states when imported from those warmer climates. But with the onset of the war and blockades of rivers and ports, sugar and molasses became scarce. By then sorghum had been found to grow well north of South Carolina and the U.S. Patent Office distributed free packets of sorghum seed to anyone who wrote for a sample. Hundreds of northern farmers did. It didn’t take long for sorghum to be considered a “universal” food staple with a reputation that it could cure any case of hunger in man or beast. Some even believed the syrup pressed from the cane was nearly as nutritious as meat and was a pretty good substitute for it. Even the seeds of the plant were ground into a meal for making a wholesome brown bread. One

by Joanne Nesbit writer of Civil War years wrote that the land was “submerged in sorghum”. It sweetened coffee, tea and all desserts of the time. Sorghum candy became the national confection. For a while sorghum flour was mixed with wheat flour to make a brown loaf that tasted a lot like rye bread. However, when even flour became scarce, the most hardy of sorghum bread (using only sorghum meal) was made in both the Union and Confederate prisons. That bread some described as “black as a stove-pipe and sour when it came from the oven. The leaves of the sorghum stalks were peeled off for fodder and the stalks or canes were taken to a mill for crushing where it was ground between vertical or horizontal rollers powered by animals or steam power and the resulting juices reduced over slow heat to a syrup/molasses. In 1860 Indiana produced 881,049 gallons of sorghum syrup coming in second to Iowa. But ten years later Indiana led the nation in producing sorghum syrup with 2,026,212 gallons. By 1880 Missouri took over top spot nearly doubling Indiana’s output. Sorghum is still prominent in Brown County with a number of mills using animal power to crush the cane. After processing, these mills offer the syrup for sale. One of those mills still operating is Kelps Pumpkin Patch located 7 miles east of Nashville on SR 46. This year the operation will be holding a festival October 1 and 2. Admission is free. Check with the Brown County Convention and Visitors Bureau for more opportunities to witness the sorghum processing An 1862 recipe for sorghum cake reads: “One pint of sour cream or buttermilk, one half teacupfull of butter or sweet lard, one pint of sorghum molasses, one egg, one teaspoonfull of soda, two of cream tartar, or two table spoonfuls of good cider vinegar; mix in a batter, pour into pans, and bake in a quick oven.” 

Co-op Gallery of

Local and Original Fine Art and Crafts

45 S. Jefferson, Nashville, IN (812) 988-6888 • www.hoosierartist.net 58 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011


Treat Your Family The Art and Soul of Nashville

Enjoy the Vistas

Brown County

Art Guild

Stay the Night

812-340-8480 www.hilltopsuites.com www.browncountycabins.com

Featuring

The Marie Goth Collection and works by 50 Contemporary Member Artists visit www.BrownCountyArtGuild.org for our seasonal hours 48 South Van Buren Street in the historic Minor House PO Box 324 • Nashville, IN 47448 • (812) 988-6185

Amy Greely

NEW LEAF in Nashville, IN Featuring locally handcrafted jewelry by owner Amy Greely. An eclectic mix of creative items from local, regional, and global artists. Located in Calvin Place, Franklin & Van Buren (812) 988-1058 • www.amygreely.com

the Historic

art gallery Quiet of Eventide · Adolph Shulz

Jewelry Designs

NEW LEAF

• SINCE 1954 •

Monday–Saturday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm Sunday Noon to 5:00 pm Free Parking and Admission

Brown County’s original art gallery, established in 1926, offers works for sale by Gallery Association members in the Main Hall, plus consigned old Indiana art. The newly remodeled exhibition space now includes the Indiana Heritage Arts Gallery, featuring many of Indiana’s top professional artists. Browse our gallery where you will find the work of the early art colony masters, many of whom founded the Gallery and the original art association. Main Street and Artist Drive · Two blocks east of the Courthouse

812-988-4609 · www.browncountyartgallery.org

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 59


Abe Martin by Julia Pearson

A

be Martin was born on the tip of Kin Hubbard’s pencil as he wrote for the Indianapolis News, first appearing on December 17, 1904. Another Hoosier personality, James Whitcomb Riley, was inspired by old Abe: “Abe Martin!—dad-burn his old picture! P’tends he’s a Brown County fixture—a kind of comical mixture—of hoss-sense and no sense at all!” Hubbard no doubt found Brown County the perfect homestead for Abe, even before he visited here himself in a 1905 auto trip. “As a setting for Abe Martin I selected Brown County, a rugged almost mountainous, wooded section of Indiana without telegraphic or railroad connections—a county whose natives for the most part subsist by blackberrying, sassafras-mining, and basket-making. On some of the more fertile slopes the Kiefer pear thrives.” The train that traversed a 10 mile corner of the county came a year too late for Abe to arrive by train. Instead, the cartoon of February 4, 1905 showed Abe—“By cracky”—in a wagon piled high with his worldly domestic goods, after proclaiming the day before for Hubbard’s readers: “I’m goin’ ter move ter Brown County tomorrow.” Hubbard, who was named Frank McKinney Hubbard, grew up with a father who published the Bellefontaine (Ohio) Examiner—in the family since 1830. Hubbard said the newspaper and the first circus he attended at age five captured his heart for life. He quit school before finishing the seventh grade, but went on to experience the work world in many arenas before creating the Abe Martin character that landed him in the Ohio Journalism Hall of Fame in 1939, and the Indiana Journalism Hall of Fame in 1967. Some of the jobs were: apprentice photographer at the Examiner, clerk at the post office in Bellefontaine

60 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

(where he penciled sketches right on envelopes), silhouette artist, bread wagon driver, amusement park turnstile monitor, minstrel show stager, and other newspaper positions. In 1901 he joined the News and stayed until the day he died. He attended political conventions and occasionally toured Indiana with political celebrities. Abe Martin was developed out of a group of sketches from the Roosevelt-Parker campaign in 1904. The Abe Martin feature included a one-column drawing and two unrelated sentences of homespun philosophy in Hoosier dialect. For twenty-five years, it was a standard of the back page of the News. The first volume of Abe Martin selections was published in 1906, and others were published annually until 1929. A complete collection can be found at the Lilly Library at Indiana University. Abe Martin went into syndication in 1910, expanding the influence of the country sage to over 200 cities. An unexpected tribute to Abe Martin’s popularity occurred in 1923 while Hubbard was attending the Ziegfeld Follies in New York. Will Rogers introduced him from the audience and the crowd immediately gave him a standing ovation. When Hubbard died on December 26, 1930 at the age of 62, the flags flew at half mast at both City Hall and the State House in Indianapolis. Will Rogers remarked, “No man in our generation was within a mile of him.” The News ran a three-column headline on Hubbard’s death on the front page with a long tribute and a two-column portrait. On the back page were three Abe Martin drawings that Hubbard had prepared for use on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Tributes by cartoonists and editorial writers from all over the country followed. Abe Martin is immortalized by his lanky figure draped over the sign greeting people as they enter the town of Nashville. The Abe Martin Lodge and the guest cabins named for his Brown County neighbors are the destination for many visitors to the Brown County State Park’s immense natural beauty. Kin Hubbard Ridge was the site of the Park’s dedication in May, 1932. As the Brown County Historical Society anticipates a new History Center in Nashville, Abe Martin is the natural choice for a signature doll that represents Brown County. A doll contest is underway, and an exhibit of the doll entries will be on display at the Traditional Arts Building at 46 East Gould Street from September through October. Long live Abe Martin! 


If you like us for Lunch you’ll love us for Dinner • Vegetarian Specials • Homemade Soups, etc. • From the Grille–Sizzling Steaks, Chops, Salmon • Herbed Baked Chicken • Fresh, Delicious Healthy Garden & Spinach Salads • Homemade Cheesecake & other Scrumptious Desserts • Flavored Ice Teas • Fruit Pizzas • Kiwi & Mango Coolers • Herb Barn Lemonade • Sassafras Tea • Iced Creamy Mochas

Get Your Life Back!

Relaxing, Integrated Massage Customized to Fit Your Needs

Linda Thomas licensed massage therapist h Over 20 Years of Experience

Serving outstanding evening fare on the patio or inside Tuesday – Saturday • 5 PM – 8 PM

BODY • MIND • SPIRIT

Lunch Every Day •11 AM – 4 PM

www.browncountymassage.com

812-988-2004

812-988-6707 • 812-327-3791 104 South Jefferson Street in Nashville

Southern Indiana’s premier cabin furnishing store

’s Trolly Come eat up in “Hog’s Heaven” ~our new deck~ Trolly’s own

Hickory-Smoked Pork BBQ

Hot Dogs • Sausages • Brats Lemon Shake-ups North Van Buren and Gould Streets in Nashville Indiana • 988-4273

We offer fine hickory furniture, along with reclaimed barnwood, pine, white and red cedar, sassafras, walnut, and aspen. Many pieces are handcrafted by local artisans. We also have upholstered sofas and chairs. Accessories include quilts and bedding, candles, picture frames, artwork, dinnerware, and lighting.

4413 E. State Road 46 in Gnaw Bone 812-988-0500 • www.bigriveronline.com Open Tues.–Sat. 10 to 5, Sun. 10 to 4 ; Closed Monday (or by appt.)

Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 61


What a trip to the country is all about!

Gifts for home and happiness French Country Décor Locally Made Items • Quilts Brown County Redware Pottery Madeline’s Famous Soy Candles Calvin Place, Van Buren & Franklin Streets Nashville, IN 812.988.6301 Like us on Facebook @ Madeline’s French Country

Knives Swords Sling Shots Blow Guns OPEN ALL YEAR

Growing Over 50 Varieties of Apples! Beautiful Venue for weddings, parties, Friendly Farm Animals and receptions Playground with Fudge Shop and Ice Cream Parlor Super Slide and Baked Goods made from scratch Bamboo Maze Jams, Honey, Gift Items open Mon.-Sat. 9 – 7 Sun. 10 – 7

317-878-9317 www.apple-works.com

(Sample Tasting)

Estate Jewelry Antiques Paintingg

Large Selection of Nostalgic Metal Signs Peace Frogs Merchandise

Things are Hoppin’ at J Bob’s

Purses

BEDAZZLED JEWELRY Quality Jewelry at Affordable Prices Large Selection of Rings and Necklace Sets Glass Necklace and Earring Sets 16 N. Van Buren Street (812) 988-6844 Nashville North of stoplight downtown

62 Our Brown County • Sept./Oct. 2011

Things you can’t find anywhere else! 39 E. Franklin St. (next to train) in Nashville

Painting Lessons available, call for times 812-988-4091• cathyscorner@att.net Also buying estate and vintage jewelry gold and silver (will travel).


Brown County Winery

7 Days a Week Year Round

Nashville’s only Guest Ranch

2 Locations:

Winery and Tasting Room in Gnaw Bone

Downtown Nashville le Tasting Room

5 minutes East of Nashville 4520 State Road 46 East 812-988-6144 • 888-298-2984

Corner of Main Street and Old School Way 812-988-8646

...because a campfire 11-room inn helps you see things 1 vacation home in a different light. TM Public trail rides New ZIP LINES! Family reunions Women’s retreats Kids’ horse retreats Murder mysteries Lighted basketball court Playground equipment Hiking and relaxation Perfect for group outings!

Complimentary Wine Tasting

Gift Shop • Cheese • Gourmet Food Items

www.browncountywinery.com Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Fishing Nightly campfires Hayrides Team building Low ropes course Weddings Church events Guest horse stalling Riding area 54 acres of land

812-988-0085 888-94-RANCH (79624)

1292 State Road 135 South Three miles east of Nashville www.rawhideranchusa.com

Prints, Jewelry, Frames, Metal Signs and Gifts

Local Landmark Prints, Brown County Photos, Beatles, Marilyn Monroe, Bands, Sports Teams

Made in Minutes!

PERSONALIZED SPORTS PRINTS ~ GREAT GIFTS Stadium Prints: NFL, MLB, some College Locker Room: Current NFL, MLB, NHL, some College Quality Jewelry at Affordable Prices Large Selection of Bracelets and Necklace Sets

In Old Colonial Building across from the Courthouse 812-988-4898 • www.mainstreetimagesonline.com

Not a member? Not a problem! Stop in at the co-op for fresh, delicious, affordable food - to eat in or take away. 3220 E THIRD ST

near College Mall

419 E KIRKWOOD

right up the alley

316 W SIXTH ST

2 blocks west of courthouse square

BLOOMINGTON IN BLOOMINGFOODS.COOP

Your locally grown co-op since 1976 Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 63


Our Brown County BOOKKEEPING & PAYROLL

AUTO - TIRE, REPAIR, TOW NAME YOUR CATEGORY

BANKING

Precise Books and Payroll Inc. Small Business Bookkeeping and Payroll Services

• Reconciliation • Financial Statements • Payroll Preparation • Payroll Taxes • Personal and Business Taxes

Paint & Bodyy

The Strength of Big, The Service of Small 189 Commercial Drive, Nashville, IN 47448 812.988.1200

“Friendly, accurate, and fast service.” (812) 988-4031 • Nashville www.precisebooks and payroll.com

Kristina Terrill

Full Collision Repair 24-Hour Towing Bring in this ad get

EYE CARE NAME YOUR CATEGORY

$5 OFF ANY SERVICE

GAS / CONVENIENCE

EYE CARE of Brown County

Garage

8461 N. SR 135

GAS & DIESEL

Full Mechanical Garage

Fountain Drinks Fishing Bait & Equipment Convenience Items

Brakes, Engine, Transmission “Big to Small, We Do it All!”

812-597-4623 • Open 7 Days/Week

1814 N. St. Rd. 135 • Nashville

812-988-7518

Owners Ray and Debbie Guffey

AUTO - TIRE, REPAIR, TOW Dr. David Gerchak O.D.

Brown County Tire

TIRE

(812) 988-3963 Evening and Weekend Appointments Available

24 hr. Wrecker Service

&

812-988-8473

Auto

Emergency Eye Care Available

Repair

Medical Building at Nashville YMCA

27 Salt Creek Rd (Intersection SR 46) Nashville

(Behind Comfort Inn)103 Willow Street

HAIR

HEALTH

HEALTH FOR “U”

VALUABLE COUPON

Wild Hair

146 E. Main St. Nashville 812-988-9890

Walk-Ins Welcome stylist: Tabitha Davis stylist/owner: Susie Woodall

812-988-4599 4933 N. SR 135 Nashville (Bean Blossom) Mon. – Fri. 9 – 5; Sat. 9 to Noon; Evenings by appt.

Limit 3.

1 issue (2 months)

Single Block $50 Double Block

72

Must have coupon for discount. Expires 10/31/11.

Save $2.00 on Gel, Roll-On, Spray, or Wipes “Indiana Raw Honey sold here!” WOODWORKING

YOUR CATEGORY

published bi-monthly

Mon.–Sat. 9 am to 4 pm, Sun. 11 am to 4 pm

6 months 10% OFF*

annual

20% OFF*

ROBERT J. ADAIR FINE WOODWORKING

$135

$240

Handmade Doors and Furniture and High-end Carpentry

194

345

812.837.9363 812.360.5236

*amounts reflect discount

30 years experience SHOP/OFFICE

MOBILE


Services Directory FURNITURE MAKING NAME YOUR CATEGORY

ADIRONDACK

Style Furniture

by

SR

INSURANCE

BRIGHT & WILLIAMSON Insurance Agency Auto • Home • Business Health • Life • Bonds 24 N. Jefferson St. • P.O. Box 698 • Nashville, IN 47448

Bob Gredy Sr. (812) 988-2275 fax: 988-7670 home: 988-7185

Made to Last

INSURANCE

Right Here in Brown County Chairs Rockers Side Tables Footstools For Info: 812-988-9267 REAL ESTATE

Jane Gore Realty “Personalized, Not Franchised” Serving Brown County Since 1982 jane.gore@sbcglobal.net www.janegorerealty.com

(812) 988-6512 cell: (812) 325-5419

91 W. Gould St. P.O. Box 9 • Nashville, IN 47448

AUTO • HOME • LIFE BUSINESS Christy McGinley

146 E. Main St. Redbud Terrace Nashville, Indiana

812-988-6399

cmcginley@farmersagent.com

TRASH REMOVAL

LOG HOME SERVICES

Knight’s

• Log Cabin Repairs • Chinking & Repair • New Construction • Cabin Inspections

Trash Removal

Residential • Commercial 15 yd Roll-Off Service (812) 988-8000

(812) 988-2689 3497 Clay Lick Rd. • Nashville

TREE SERVICE

REAL ESTATE

Pruning • Planting Removals Disease Diagnosis and Treatment Matt Baldwin ISA Certified Arborist #IN-3202a

(812) 988-9998

www.browncountyhomes.com

WELLNESS

REAL ESTATE

RE/MAX Team

Brown County YMCA

Brown County Property Management Locally Established / Internationally Recognized

877-988-4485 Email: margd@remax.net MargAndBrendaTeam.com Corner of E. Main Street and Artist Dr. in Nashville, IN 47448

FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT FOR HEALTHY LIVING FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

The Brown County YMCA is located behind the Comfort Inn

812-988-9622 • www.browncountyymca.org


Nashville, Indiana’s #1 Fun Attraction

COPPERHEAD CREEK

GEM MINE Pan for Gems Fossils Arrowheads

Fun and Educational for All Ages

At the

BROWN COUNTY

ROCK and FOSSIL SHOP

Just North of the Courthouse 79 N. Van Buren ~ (812) 988-2422 www.visitbrowncounty.com/welcome.asp


Sept./Oct. 2011 • Our Brown County 67


Our shop is bursting with flavor!

Watch us make… Free box of popcorn with mention of this ad

· Over 20 flavors of our Creamy Fudge · 50 flavors of Gourmet Popcorn · All-natural Gelato and Ice Cream

175 South Van Buren in Possum Trot Complex

812-988-0709 · nashvillefudgekitchen.com