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American Indian University of Oklahoma Press

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American Indian Contents Archaeology & Anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Art & Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Biography & Memoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Politics & Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Chickasaw Press. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Bestsellers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

For more than eighty years, the University of Oklahoma Press has published award-winning books about American Indians and we are proud to bring to you our new American Indian catalog. The catalog features the newest titles from the University of Oklahoma Press and the Arthur H. Clark Company (an imprint of the University of Oklahoma Press). For a complete list of titles available from OU Press, please visit our website at oupress.com. We hope you enjoy this catalog and appreciate your continued support of the University of Oklahoma Press. Price and availability subject to change without notice.

University of Oklahoma Press o u p r e s s . c o m 路 OUPRESS b l o g . c o m


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Archaeology & Anthropology Yuchi Folklore Cultural ExprEssion in a southEastErn nativE amEriCan CommunitY

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Yuchi Folklore Cultural Expression in a Southeastern Native American Community By Jason Baird Jackson Contributions by Mary S. Linn $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4397-2 • 312 pages

Jason Baird JaCkson with ContriButions BY marY s. linn

Yuchi Folklore examines expressive genres and customs that have long been of special interest to Yuchi people themselves. Beginning with an overview of Yuchi history and ethnography, the book explores four categories of cultural expression: verbal or spoken art, material culture, cultural performance, and worldview. In describing oratory, food, architecture, and dance, Jackson visits and revisits the themes of cultural persistence and social interaction, initially between Yuchi and other peoples east of the Mississippi and now in northeastern Oklahoma. New

Transforming Ethnohistories Narrative, Meaning, and Community Edited by Sebastian Felix Braun Afterword by Raymond J. DeMallie $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4394-1 • 320 pages The contributors to this volume have been inspired in large part by the teaching and writing of distinguished ethnohistorian Raymond J. DeMallie, whose exemplary combination of ethnographic and archival research demonstrates the ways anthropology and history can work together to create an understanding of the past and the present. Transforming Ethnohistories comprises ten new avenues of ethnohistorical research ranging in topic from fiddling performances to environmental disturbance and spanning places from North Carolina to the Yukon. Native Performers in Wild West Shows From Buffalo Bill to Euro Disney By Linda Scarangella McNenly $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4281-4 • 280 pages Drawing on interviews with contemporary performers and descendants of twentieth-century performers, McNenly elicits insider perspectives to suggest new interpretations of their performances and experiences; she also uses these insights to analyze archival materials, especially photographs. Some Native performers saw Wild West shows not necessarily as demeaning, but rather as opportunities—for travel, for employment, for recognition, and for the preservation and expression of important cultural traditions. Arapaho Women’s Quillwork Motion, Life, and Creativity By Jeffrey D. Anderson $39.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4283-8 • 216 pages Anderson demonstrates how, through the action of creating quillwork, Arapaho women became central participants in ritual life, often studied as the exclusive domain of men. He also shows how quillwork challenges predominant Western concepts of art and creativity: adhering to sacred patterns passed down through generations of women, it emphasized not individual creativity, but meticulous repetition and social connectivity—an approach foreign to many outside observers.


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Patterns of Exchange Navajo Weavers and Traders By Teresa J. Wilkins $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4354-5 • 248 pages The Navajo rugs and textiles people admire and buy today are the result of many historical influences, particularly the interaction between Navajo weavers and the traders like John Lorenzo Hubbell who guided their production and controlled their sale. Wilkins traces how the relationships between generations of Navajo weavers and traders affected Navajo weaving. From the Hands of a Weaver Olympic Peninsula Basketry through Time Edited by Jacilee Wray Foreword by Jonathan B. Jarvis $45.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4245-6 • 264 pages Baskets designed primarily for carrying and storing food have been central to the daily life of the Klallam, Twana, Quinault, Quileute, Hoh, and Makah cultures of Olympic Peninsula for thousands of years. The authors of the essays collected here, who include Native people as well as academics, explore the commonalities among these cultures and discuss their distinct weaving styles and techniques. Mound Builders and Monument Makers of the Northern Great Lakes, 1200-1600 By Meghan C. L. Howey $45.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4288-3 • 320 pages Rising above the northern Michigan landscape, prehistoric burial mounds and circular earthen enclosures bear witness to the deep history of the region’s ancient indigenous peoples. These mounds and earthworks have long been treated as isolated finds and have never been connected to the social dynamics of the time in which they were constructed. In Mound Builders and Monument Makers of the Northern Great Lakes, 1200–1600, Meghan C. L. Howey uses archaeology to make this connection. Fort Clark and its Indian Neighbors A Trading Post on the Upper Missouri By W. Raymond Wood, William J. Hunt, Jr., and Randy H. Williams $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4213-5 • 328 pages Fort Clark was a thriving trading post between 1830 and 1860 in what is today western North Dakota, also served as a way station for artists, scientists, and other western chroniclers, including Maximilian of Wied, Karl Bodmer, and George Catlin, whose works are primary sources on the Mandan and Hidatsa Indians in the area. This book, by a team of anthropologists, is the first to integrate new archaeological evidence with the historical record. Wives and Husbands Gender and Age in Southern Arapaho History By Loretta Fowler $39.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4116-9 • 400 pages In Wives and Husbands, distinguished anthropologist Loretta Fowler deepens readers’ understanding of the gendered dimension of cultural encounters by exploring how the Arapaho gender system affected and was affected by the encounter with Americans as government officials, troops, missionaries, and settlers moved west into Arapaho country. Through the life stories of individual Arapahos, she vividly illustrates the experiences and actions of each cohort during a time when Americans tried to impose gender asymmetry and to undermine the Arapahos’ hierarchical age relations.


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Getting Good Crops Economic and Diplomatic Survival Strategies of the Montana Bitterroot Salish Indians, 1870–1891 By Robert J. Bigart $39.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4133-6 • 304 pages In 1870, the Bitterroot Salish Indians—called “Flatheads” by the first white explorers to encounter them—were a small tribe living on the western slope of the Northern Rocky Mountains in Montana Territory. Pressures on the Salish were intensifying during this time, from droughts and dwindling resources to aggressive neighboring tribes and Anglo-American expansion. In 1891, the economically impoverished Salish accepted government promises of assistance and retreated to the Flathead Reservation, more than sixty miles from their homeland. New in paperback

Buffalo Inc. American Indians and Economic Development By Sebastian Felix Braun $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4372-9 • 280 pages Some American Indian tribes on the Great Plains have turned to bison ranching in recent years as a culturally and ecologically sustainable economic development program. This book focuses on one enterprise on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation to determine whether such projects have fulfilled expectations and how they fit with traditional and contemporary Lakota values. Plains Apache Ethnobotany By Julia A. Jordan $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3968-5 • 240 pages Residents of the Great Plains since the early 1500s, the Apache people were well acquainted with the native flora of the region. In Plains Apache Ethnobotany, Julia A. Jordan documents more than 110 plant species valued by the Plains Apache and preserves a wealth of detail concerning traditional Apache collection, preparation, and use of these plant species for food, medicine, ritual, and material culture. “I Choose Life” Contemporary Medical and Religious Practices in the Navajo World By Maureen Trudelle Schwarz $50.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3941-8 $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-3961-6 • 384 pages For Navajo Indians, medical treatments such as surgery, blood transfusion and CPR conflict with their traditional understanding of health and wellbeing. This book investigates how Navajos navigate their medically and religiously pluralistic world while coping with illness. Schwarz reveals the ideological conflicts experienced by Navajo patients and the reasons behind the choices they make to promote their own health and healing.

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Art & Photography New

Modern Spirit The Art of George Morrison By W. Jackson Rushing III and Kristin Makholm Foreword by Kay Walkingstick $39.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4392-7 $29.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4393-4 • 208 pages The work of Chippewa artist George Morrison (1919–2000) has enjoyed widespread critical acclaim. His paintings, drawings, prints, and sculptures have been displayed in numerous public and private exhibitions. Yet because Morrison’s artwork typically does not include overt references to his Indian heritage, it has stirred debate about what it means to be a Native American artist. This stunning catalogue, featuring 130 color and black-and-white images, showcases Morrison’s work across a spectrum of genres and media. New

Woody Crumbo Contributions by Minisa C. Halsey, Ruthe B. Jones, Carole Klein, Robert Perry, and Kimberly Roblin Photographs by Robert S. Cross $24.95s Paper • 978-0-9819799-5-3 • 148 pages Distributed for Gilcrease Museum Woodrow Wilson Crumbo and the oilman Thomas Gilcrease met for the first time at the Mayo Hotel in Tulsa in 1945. Gilcrease would eventually persuade the young Crumbo to join him as artist-in-residence at the nascent Thomas Gilcrease Museum. Potawatomi, French, and German by birth, Crumbo was orphaned young and fostered within various Native traditions. His genius knew no tribal borders, but he supported and promoted Indian art and artists throughout his life. New

Ernest L. Blumenschein The Life of an American Artist By Robert W. Larson and Carole B. Larson $29.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4334-7 • 384 pages Few who appreciate the visual arts or the American Southwest can behold the masterpieces Sangre de Cristo Mountains or Haystack, Taos Valley, 1927 or Bend in the River, 1941 and come away without a vivid image burned into memory. The creator of these and many other depictions of the Southwest and its people was Ernest L. Blumenschein, cofounder of the famous Taos art colony. This insightful, comprehensive biography examines the character and life experiences that made Blumenschein one of the foremost artists of the twentieth century. New

A Russian American Photographer in Tlingit Country Vincent Soboleff in Alaska By Sergei Kan $39.95s Cloth ^ 978-0-8061-4290-6 ^ 284 Pages This book is a rich record of life in small-town southeastern Alaska in the late 1800s and early 1900s. It is the first book to showcase the photographs of Vincent Soboleff, an amateur Russian American photographer whose community included Tlingit Indians from a nearby village as well as Russian Americans, so-called Creoles, who worked in a local fertilizer factory. Using a Kodak camera, Soboleff, the son of a Russian Orthodox priest, documented the life of this multiethnic parish at work and at play until 1920.


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The James T. Bialac Native American Art Collection Selected Works With essays by Christina E. Burke, W. Jackson Rushing III, Rennard Strickland, Christy Vezolles, Edwin L. Wade, and Mark Andrew White $60.00 Cloth • 978-0-8061-4299-9 $29.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4304-0 • 240 pages Published in cooperation with the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, University of Oklahoma One of the most important collections of modern Native American art assembled by one individual, the James T. Bialac Native American Art Collection is an encyclopedic compilation of easel paintings and three-dimensional works. Showcased in this stunning catalogue, the collection comprises nearly four thousand items, including drawings, sculptures, prints, kachinas, jewelry, ceramics, rattles, baskets, and textiles. Ledger Narratives The Plains Indian Drawings of the Lansburgh Collection at Dartmouth College Edited by Colin G. Calloway With contributions by Michael Paul Jordan, Vera B. Palmer, Joyce Szabo, Melanie Benson Taylor, and Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote $49.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4297-5 $29.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4298-2 • 296 pages The largest known collection of ledger art ever acquired by one individual is Mark Lansburgh’s diverse assemblage of more than 140 drawings, now held by the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College and catalogued in this important book. The Cheyennes, Crows, Kiowas, Lakotas, and other Plains peoples created the genre known as ledger art in the mid-nineteenth century. Before that time, these Indians had chronicled the heroic achievements of their warriors and chiefs on rock, buffalo robes, and tipi covers. Iroquois Art, Power, and History By Neal B. Keating $55.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3890-9 • 360 pages In this richly illustrated book, Neal B. Keating explores Iroquois visual expression through more than five thousand years, from its emergence in ancient North America into the early twenty-first century. Keating foregrounds the voices and visions of Iroquois peoples, revealing how they have continuously used visual expression to adapt creatively to shifting political and economic environments. The Eugene B. Adkins Collection Selected Works With contributions by Jane Ford Aebersold, Christina E. Burke, James Pick, B. Byron Price, W. Jackson Rushing III, Mary Jo Watson, and Mark A. White $60.00 Cloth • 978-0-8061-4100-8 $29.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4101-5 • 304 pages A native of Tulsa, Oklahoma, Eugene B. Adkins (1920–2006) spent nearly four decades acquiring his extraordinary collection of Native American and American southwestern art, including paintings, photographs, jewelry, baskets, textiles, and ceramics by many renowned artists and artisans. This stunning volume features full-color reproductions of significant works from the Adkins Collection.


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Plains Indian Art The Pioneering Work of John C. Ewers Edited by Jane Ewers Robinson $39.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3061-3 • 224 pages The study of Plains Indian art has been shaped by the expertise, wisdom, and inspired leadership of John Canfield Ewers (1909–97). Ewers’s publications have long been required reading for anyone interested in art and the cultures of the Plains peoples. This vividly illustrated collection of Ewers’s writings presents studies first published in American Indian Art Magazine and other periodicals between 1968 and 1992. Arapaho Journeys Photographs and Stories from the Wind River Reservation By Sara Wiles $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4158-9 • 256 pages In what is now Colorado and Wyoming, the Northern Arapahos thrived for centuries, connected by strong spirituality and kinship and community structures that allowed them to survive in the rugged environment. Wiles captures that life on film and in words in Arapaho Journeys, an inside look at thirty years on the Wind River Indian Reservation in central Wyoming. New in paperback

American Indians in British Art, 1700-1840 By Stephanie Pratt $21.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4200-5 • 228 pages Ask anyone the world over to identify a figure in buckskins with a feather bonnet, and the answer will be “Indian.” Many works of art produced by non-Native artists have reflected such a limited viewpoint. In American Indians in British Art, 1700–1840, Stephanie Pratt explores for the first time an artistic tradition that avoided simplification and that instead portrayed Native peoples in a surprisingly complex light. Life at the Kiowa, Comanche, and Wichita Agency The Photographs of Annette Ross Hume By Kristina L. Southwell and John R. Lovett $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4138-1 • 256 pages Anadarko, Oklahoma, bills itself today as the “Indian Capital of the Nation,” but it was a drowsy frontier village when budding photographer Annette Ross Hume arrived in 1890. Home to a federal agency charged with serving the many American Indian tribes in the area, the town burgeoned when the U.S. government auctioned off building lots at the turn of the twentieth century. Hume faithfully documented its explosive growth and the American Indians she encountered. Her extraordinary photographs are collected here for the first time. Blackfoot War Art Pictographs of the Reservation Period, 1880-2000 By L. James Dempsey $45.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3804-6 • 488 pages In this visually stunning survey, L. James Dempsey plumbs the breadth and depth of warrior representational art. Filled with 160 images of startling beauty and power, Blackfoot War Art tells how pictographs served as a record of both tribal and personal accomplishment.


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Lanterns on the Prairie The Blackfeet Photographs of Walter McClintock Edited by Steven L. Grafe $60.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4022-3 $34.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4029-2 • 336 pages In 1896, a young easterner named Walter McClintock arrived on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. A forest survey had brought him to Montana, but a chance encounter with a part-Blackfeet scout led him instead to a career as a chronicler of Plains Indian life. McClintock is now well known as the author of two books about his experiences among the Blackfeet, but only a few of his photographs have ever been published. This volume features biographical and interpretive essays about McClintock’s life and work and presents more than one hundred of his little-known images. In Contemporary Rhythm The Art of Ernest L. Blumenschein By Peter H. Hassrick and Elizabeth J. Cunningham $34.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-3948-7 • 416 pages The definitive retrospective on Ernest L. Blumenschein (1874–1960), one of the founders of the Taos Society of Artists and perhaps the most accomplished of all the painters associated with that organization. Reproducing masterworks from a new exhibit along with additional works and historical photographs, this volume forms the most comprehensive assemblage of his paintings ever published. A Northern Cheyenne Album Photographs by Thomas B. Marquis Edited by Margot Liberty Commentary by John Woodenlegs $29.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-3893-0 • 304 pages A Northern Cheyenne Album presents a rare series of never-before-published photographs that document the lives of tribal people on the reservation during the early twentieth-century—a period of rapid change. Reservation physician and expert photographer Thomas B. Marquis captured Northern Cheyenne life in numerous images taken from 1926 to 1935. After 1960, former tribal president John Woodenlegs and others interviewed tribal elders and, drawing on tape recordings, composed the photos’ lively captions. Margot Liberty, editor of this volume, has added her own descriptions, filling in details of Northern Cheyenne culture and history from a scholar’s viewpoint.

Biography & Memoir New

A Cheyenne Voice The Complete John Stands In Timber Interviews By John Stands In Timber and Margot Liberty $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4379-8 • 504 pages A Cheyenne Voice contains the complete transcribed interviews conducted by anthropologist Margot Liberty with Northern Cheyenne elder John Stands In Timber (1882–1967). Recorded by Liberty in 1958 and 1959 when she was a schoolteacher on the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in southeastern Montana, the interviews were the basis of the well-known 1967 book Cheyenne Memories. While that volume is a noteworthy edited version of the interviews, this volume presents them word for word, in their entirety, for the first time.


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Under the Eagle Samuel Holiday, Navajo Code Talker By Samuel Holiday and Robert S. McPherson $19.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4389-7 • 288 pages Samuel Holiday was one of a small group of Navajo men enlisted by the Marine Corps during World War II to use their native language to transmit secret communications on the battlefield. Based on extensive interviews with Robert S. McPherson, Under the Eagle is Holiday’s vivid account of his own story. It is the only book-length oral history of a Navajo code talker in which the narrator relates his experiences in his own voice and words. New

Blackfoot Redemption A Blood Indian’s Story of Murder, Confinement, and Imperfect Justice By William E. Farr $29.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4287-6 • 344 pages Blackfoot Redemption is the riveting account of a Canadian Blackfoot known as Spopee and his unusual and haunting story. To reconstruct the events of Spopee’s life—at first traceable only through bits and pieces of information— William E. Farr conducted exhaustive archival research, digging deeply into government documents and institutional reports to build a coherent and accurate narrative and, through this reconstruction, win back one Indian’s life and identity. Twenty Thousand Mornings An Autobiography By John Joseph Mathews Edited and with an introduction by Susan Kalter $29.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4253-1 • 352 pages When John Joseph Mathews began his career as a writer in the 1930s, he was one of only a small number of Native American authors writing for a national audience. Today he is widely recognized as a founder and shaper of twentiethcentury Native American literature. Twenty Thousand Mornings is Mathews’s intimate chronicle of his formative years. Valentine T. McGillycuddy Army Surgeon, Agent to the Sioux By Candy Moulton $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-87062-389-9 • 288 pages Published by The Arthur H. Clark Company On a September day in 1877, hundreds of Sioux and soldiers at Camp Robinson crowded around a fatally injured Lakota leader. A young doctor forced his way through the crowd, only to see the victim fading before him. It was the famed Crazy Horse. From intense moments like this to encounters with such legendary western figures as Calamity Jane and Red Cloud, Valentine T. McGillycuddy’s life encapsulated key events in American history that changed the lives of Native people forever. Mangas Coloradas Chief of the Chiricahua Apaches By Edwin R. Sweeney $32.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4239-5• 608 pages Mangas Coloradas led his Chiricahua Apache people for almost forty years. During the last years of Mangas’s life, he and his son-in-law Cochise led an assault against white settlement in Apacheria that made the two of them the most feared warriors in the Southwest. In this first full-length biography of the legendary chief, Ed Sweeney vividly portrays the Apache culture in which Mangas rose to power and the conflict with Americans that led to his brutal death.


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A Navajo Legacy The Life and Teachings of John Holiday By John Holiday and Robert McPherson $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4176-3 • 420 pages For almost ninety years, Navajo medicine man John Holiday has watched the sun rise over the rock formations of his home in Monument Valley. Author and scholar Robert S. McPherson interviewed Holiday extensively and in A Navajo Legacy records his full and fascinating life. Chief Loco Apache Peacemaker By Bud Shapard $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4047-6 • 376 pages Jlin-tay-i-tith, better known as Loco, was the only Apache leader to make a lasting peace with both Americans and Mexicans. Yet most historians have ignored his efforts, and some Chiricahua descendants have branded him as fainthearted despite his well-known valor in combat. In this engaging biography, Bud Shapard tells the story of this important but overlooked chief against the backdrop of the harrowing Apache wars and eventual removal of the tribe from its homeland to prison camps in Florida, Alabama, and Oklahoma. Pipestone My Life in an Indian Boarding School By Adam Fortunate Eagle $19.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4114-5 • 248 pages Best known as a leader of the Indian takeover of Alcatraz Island in 1969, Adam Fortunate Eagle now offers an unforgettable memoir of his years as a young student at Pipestone Indian Boarding School in Minnesota. In this rare firsthand account, Fortunate Eagle lives up to his reputation as a “contrary warrior” by disproving the popular view of Indian boarding schools as bleak and prisonlike. N. Scott Momaday Remembering Ancestors, Earth, and Traditions An Annotated Bio-bibliography By Phyllis S. Morgan $60.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4054-4 • 400 pages N. Scott Momaday, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of House Made of Dawn (1969) and National Medal of Arts awardee, is the elder statesman of Native American literature and a major twentieth-century American author. This volume marks the most comprehensive resource available on Momaday. Along with an insightful new biography, it offers extensive, up-to-date bibliographies of his own work and the work of others about him. Nicholas Black Elk Medicine Man, Missionary, Mystic By Michael F. Steltenkamp $24.95 Cloth • 978-0-8061-4063-6 • 256 pages Since its publication in 1932, Black Elk Speaks has moved countless readers to appreciate the American Indian world that it described. John Neihardt’s popular narrative addressed the youth and early adulthood of Black Elk, an Oglala Sioux religious elder. Michael F. Steltenkamp now provides the first full interpretive biography of Black Elk, distilling in one volume what is known of this American Indian wisdom keeper whose life has helped guide others.


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Warrior Nations The United States and Indian Peoples By Robert L. Nichols $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4382-8 • 256 pages During the century following George Washington’s presidency, the United States fought at least forty wars with various Indian tribes. Nichols writes about the fights between the United States and the Shawnee, Miami, and Delaware tribes in the Ohio Valley, the Creek in Alabama, the Arikara in South Dakota, the Sauk and Fox in Illinois and Wisconsin, the Dakota Sioux in Minnesota, the Cheyenne and Arapaho in Colorado, the Apache in New Mexico and Arizona, and the Nez Perce in Oregon and Idaho. New

An Osage Journey to Europe, 1827-1830 Three French Accounts Edited and Translated by William Least Heat-Moon & James K. Wallace $29.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4403-0 • 168 pages In 1827 six Osage people—four men and two women—traveled to Europe escorted by three Americans. Their visit was big news in France, where three short publications about the travelers appeared almost immediately. Virtually lost since the 1830s, all three accounts are gathered, translated, and annotated here for the first time in English. Among the earliest writings devoted to Osage history and culture, these works provide unique insights into Osage life and especially into European perceptions of American Indians. Columns of Vengeance Soldiers, Sioux, and the Punitive Expeditions, 1863-1864 By Paul N. Beck $34.95s Cloth · 978-0-8061-4344-6 In Columns of Vengeance, historian Paul N. Beck offers a reappraisal of the Punitive Expeditions of 1863 and 1864, the U.S. Army’s response to the Dakota War of 1862. Rather than relying only on the official records of the commanding officers involved, Beck presents a much fuller picture of the conflict by consulting the letters, diaries, and personal accounts of the common soldiers who took part in the expeditions, as well as rare personal narratives from the Dakotas. New in paperback

Indian Tribes of Oklahoma A Guide By Blue Clark $29.95 Cloth • 978-0-8061-4060-5 • 416 pages $19.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4061-2 • 416 pages Oklahoma is home to nearly forty American Indian tribes, and it includes the largest Native population of any state. As a result, many Americans think of the state as “Indian Country.” For more than half a century readers have turned to Muriel H. Wright’s A Guide to the Indian Tribes of Oklahoma as the authoritative source for information on the state’s Native peoples. Now Blue Clark, an enrolled member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, has rendered a completely new guide that reflects the drastic transformation of Indian Country in recent years. Contours of a People Metis Family, Mobility, and History Edited by Nicole St-Onge, Carolyn Podruchny, and Brenda Macdougall $39.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4279-1 • 456 pages What does it mean to be Metis? How do the Metis understand their world, and how do family, community, and location shape their consciousness? Such questions inform this collection of essays on the northwestern North American people of mixed European and Native ancestry. Volume editors Nicole St-Onge, Carolyn Podruchny, and Brenda Macdougall go beyond the concern with race and ethnicity to offer new ways of thinking about Metis identity.


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American Indians and the Mass Media Edited by Meta G. Carstarphen and John P. Sanchez $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4234-0 • 312 pages Most American Indians today live in urban areas, but the mass media still rely on Indian imagery stuck in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The essays collected in American Indians and the Mass Media explore Native experience and the mainstream media’s impact on American Indian histories, cultures, and communities. From Cochise to Geronimo The Chiricahua Apaches, 1874–1886 By Edwin R. Sweeney $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4272-2 • 720 pages In the decade after the death of their revered chief Cochise in 1874, the Chiricahua Apaches struggled to survive as a people and their relations with the U.S. government further deteriorated. In From Cochise to Geronimo, Edwin R. Sweeney builds on his previous biographies of Chiricahua leaders Cochise and Mangas Coloradas to offer a definitive history of the turbulent period between Cochise’s death and Geronimo’s surrender in 1886. Cherokee Nation in the Civil War By Clarissa W. Confer $16.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4267-8 • 216 pages The Cherokee Nation in the Civil War shows how the Cherokee people, who had only just begun to recover from the ordeal of removal, faced an equally devastating upheaval in the Civil War. Clarissa W. Confer illustrates how the Cherokee Nation, with its sovereign status and distinct culture, had a wartime experience unlike that of any other group of people—and suffered perhaps the greatest losses of land, population, and sovereignty. Indian Blues American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879–1934 By John W. Troutman $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4269-2 • 320 pages From the late nineteenth century through the 1920s, the U.S. government sought to control practices of music on reservations and in Indian boarding schools. At the same time, Native singers, dancers, and musicians created new opportunities through musical performance to resist and manipulate those same policy initiatives. Why did the practice of music generate fear among government officials and opportunity for Native peoples? “John Troutman brilliantly explores the emergence of a new world of Native music and dance in the early 1900s. Long awaited and well worth the wait, this book makes a major contribution to the literature on twentieth-century politics and culture.” Philip J. Deloria, author of Playing India The Peyote Cult Fifth Edition, Enlarged By Weston La Barre $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-2214-4 • 356 pages For half a century, readers on peyotism have devoured Weston La Barre’s fascinating original study, which began when the author, at age twenty-four, studied the rites of fifteen American Indian tribes that use Lophophora williamsii, the small, spineless, carrot-shaped peyote cactus growing in the Rio Grande Valley and southward. This new edition of La Barre’s classic study includes 334 new entries in the latest of his highly valued bibliographical essays on works relating to peyote. 


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The Peyote Road Religious Freedom and the Native American Church By Thomas C. Maroukis $29.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4109-1 $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061- 4323-1 • 296 pages Despite challenges by the federal government to restrict the use of Peyote, the Native American Church, which uses the hallucinogenic cactus as a religious sacrament, has become the largest indigenous denomination among American Indians today. The Peyote Road examines the history of the NAC, including its legal struggles to defend the controversial use of peyote. “Maroukis is a keen observer of contemporary Peyotism.”—Journal of American History New in paperback

Indian Alliances and the Spanish in the Southwest, 750–1750 By William B. Carter $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4302-6 • 328 pages When considering the history of the Southwest, scholars have typically viewed Apaches, Navajos, and other Athapaskans as marauders who preyed on Pueblo towns and Spanish settlements. William Carter now offers a multilayered reassessment of historical events and environmental and social change to show how mutually supportive networks among Native peoples created alliances in the centuries before and after Spanish settlement. “Carter synthesizes a millennia of archaeology, ethnology, and history about Athapaskan and Puebloan peoples to offer a fresh vision of the region.”— James F. Brooks, author of Captives and Cousins: Slavery, Kinship, and Community in the Southwest Borderlands The Southern Cheyennes By Donald J. Berthrong $29.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-1199-5 • 484 pages After nearly two centuries of fighting for their lands, the Cheyennes were forced in the eighteenth century to shift their range from the Minnesota River Valley to the central and southern plains. Their turbulent, colorful history as related by Thomas J. Berthrong will interest the general reader, historian, and anthropologist alike. Bashful No Longer An Alaskan Eskimo Ethnohistory, 1778–1988 By Wendell H. Oswalt $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4250-0 • 292 pages Bashful No Longer—based on Russian-American Company records; writings of traders, missionaries, and explorers; newspaper accounts; and fieldwork conducted by the author—documents and describes the cultural change among the Kuskokwim Eskimos as first the Russians and then the Americans settled among them. First Manhattans A History of the Indians of Greater New York By Robert S. Grumet $19.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4163-3 • 288 pages The Indian sale of Manhattan is one of the world’s most cherished legends. Few people know that the Indians who made the fabled sale were Munsees whose ancestral homeland lay between the lower Hudson and upper Delaware river valleys. The story of the Munsee people has long lain unnoticed in broader histories of the Delaware Nation. First Manhattans, a concise and lively distillation of the author’s comprehensive The Munsee Indians, resurrects the lost history of this forgotten people, from their earliest contacts with Europeans to their final expulsion just before the American Revolution.


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h 2012 New Mexico/Arizona Book Awards—Multicultural (winner)

Jar of Severed Hands The Spanish Deportation of Apache Prisoners of War, 1770-1810 By Mark Santiago $29.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4177-0 • 264 pages More than two centuries after the Coronado Expedition first set foot in the region, the northern frontier of New Spain in the late 1770s was still under attack by Apache raiders. Mark Santiago’s gripping account of Spanish efforts to subdue the Apaches illuminates larger cultural and political issues in the colonial period of the Southwest and northern Mexico. New in paperback

The Northern Cheyenne Exodus in History and Memory By James N. Leiker and Ramon Powers $19.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4370-5 • 272 pages The exodus of the Northern Cheyennes in 1878 and 1879, an attempt to flee from Indian Territory to their Montana homeland, is an important event in American Indian history. More than a century later, the story remains familiar because it has been told by historians and novelists, and on film. In The Northern Cheyenne Exodus in History and Memory, James N. Leiker and Ramon Powers explore how the event has been remembered, told, and retold. “Exceptionally well-written. . . . The authors do not sacrifice the power of the story itself . . . one of the most dramatic, touching, and disturbing of its time.”—Elliott West, author of The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story Alaska A History By Claus-M. Naske and Herman E. Slotnick $39.95 Cloth • 978-0-8061-4040-7 • 520 pages The largest by far of the fifty states, Alaska is also the state of greatest mystery and diversity. And, as Claus-M. Naske and Herman E. Slotnick show in this comprehensive survey, the history of Alaska’s peoples and the development of its economy have matched the diversity of its land- and seascapes. Alaska: A History begins by examining the region’s geography and the Native peoples who inhabited it for thousands of years before the first Europeans arrived. Winning the West with Words Language and Conquest in the Lower Great Lakes By James J. Buss $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4214-2 • 420 pages Indian Removal was a process both physical and symbolic, accomplished not only at gunpoint but also through language. In the Midwest, white settlers came to speak and write of Indians in the past tense, even though they were still present. Winning the West with Words explores the ways nineteenth-century Anglo-Americans used language, rhetoric, and narrative to claim cultural ownership of the region that comprises present-day Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. The Unkechaug Indians A History By John A. Strong $29.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4212-8 • 352 pages Few people may realize that Long Island is still home to American Indians, the region’s original inhabitants. One of the oldest reservations in the United States—the Poospatuck Reservation—is located in Suffolk County, the densely populated eastern extreme of the greater New York area. The Unkechaug Indians, known also by the name of their reservation, are recognized by the State of New York but not by the federal government. This narrative account— written by a noted authority on the Algonquin peoples of Long Island—is the first comprehensive history of the Unkechaug Indians.


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Red Power Rising The National Indian Youth Council and the Origins of Native Activism By Bradley Shreve $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4178-7 • 288 pages During the 1960s, American Indian youth were swept up in a movement called Red Power—a civil rights struggle fueled by intertribal activism. While some define the movement as militant and others see it as peaceful, there is one common assumption about its history: Red Power began with the Indian takeover of Alcatraz in 1969. Or did it? Taking Indian Lands The Cherokee (Jerome) Commission, 1889–1893 By William T. Hagan $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4236-4 • 352 pages Authorized by Congress in 1889, the Cherokee Commission was formed to negotiate the purchase of huge areas of land from the Cherokees, Ioways, Pawnees, Poncas, Tonakawas, Wichitas, Cheyennes, Arapahos, Sac and Fox, and other tribes in Indian Territory. Whatever the hoped-for effects, the coerced sales opened to white settlement the vast “unused” expanses of land that had been held communally by the tribes. In Taking Indian Lands, William T. Hagan presents a detailed and disturbing account of the deliberations between the Cherokee Commission and the tribes. Tribal Wars of the Southern Plains By Stan Hoig $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4201-2 • 352 pages Tribal Wars of the Southern Plains is a comprehensive account of Indian conflicts in the area between the Platte River and the Rio Grande, from the first written reports of the Spaniards in the sixteenth century through the United StatesCheyenne Battle of the Sand Hills in 1875. The reader follows the exploits and defeats of such chiefs as Lone Wolf, Satanta, Black Kettle, and Dull Knife as they signed treaties, led attacks, battled for land, and defended their villages in the huge region. A Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest Third Edition By Robert H. Ruby, John A. Brown, and Cary C. Collins $26.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4024-7 • 448 pages The Native peoples of the Pacific Northwest inhabit a vast region extending from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean, and from California to British Columbia. For more than two decades, A Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest has served as a standard reference on these diverse peoples. Now, in the wake of renewed tribal self-determination, this revised edition reflects the many recent political, economic, and cultural developments shaping these Native communities. Dreaming with the Ancestors Black Seminole Women in Texas and Mexico By Shirley Boteler Mock $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4053-7 • 400 pages Indian freedmen and their descendants have garnered much public and scholarly attention, but women’s roles have largely been absent from that discussion. Now a scholar who gained an insider’s perspective into the Black Seminole community in Texas and Mexico offers a rare and vivid picture of these women and their contributions. In Dreaming with the Ancestors, Shirley Boteler Mock explores the role that Black Seminole women have played in shaping and perpetuating a culture born of African roots and shaped by southeastern Native American and Mexican influences.


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War Party in Blue Pawnee Scouts in the U.S. Army By Mark van de Logt $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4139-8 • 368 pages Between 1864 and 1877, during the height of the Plains Indian wars, Pawnee Indian scouts rendered invaluable service to the United States Army. They led missions deep into contested territory, tracked resisting bands, spearheaded attacks against enemy camps, and on more than one occasion saved American troops from disaster on the field of battle. In War Party in Blue, Mark van de Logt tells the story of the Pawnee scouts from their perspective, detailing the battles in which they served and recounting hitherto neglected episodes. Beyond Bear’s Paw The Nez Perce Indians in Canada By Jerome A. Greene $24.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4068-1 • 264 pages In the fall of 1877, Nez Perce (Nimiipuu) Indians were desperately fleeing U.S. Army troops. After a 1,700-mile journey across Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana, the Nez Perces headed for the Canadian border, hoping to find refuge in the land of the White Mother, Queen Victoria. But the army caught up with them at the Bear’s Paw Mountains in northern Montana, and following a devastating battle, Chief Joseph and most of his people surrendered.

Literature

Renaissance

The NaTive americaN Literary imagination and achievement

Edi tEd by A lAn R. VEliE And A. RobER t lEE

New

The Native American Renaissance Literary Imagination and Achievement Edited by Alan R. Velie and A. Robert Lee $29.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4402-3 • 368 pages The outpouring of Native American literature that followed the publication of N. Scott Momaday’s Pulitzer Prize–winning House Made of Dawn in 1968 continues unabated. Fiction and poetry, autobiography and discursive writing from such writers as James Welch, Gerald Vizenor, and Leslie Marmon Silko constitute what critic Kenneth Lincoln in 1983 termed the Native American Renaissance. This collection of essays takes the measure of that efflorescence. New

Literacy and Intellectual Life in the Cherokee Nation, 1820-1906 By James W. Parins $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4399-6 • 296 pages Many Anglo-Americans in the nineteenth century regarded Indian tribes as little more than illiterate bands of savages in need of “civilizing.” In Literacy and Intellectual Life in the Cherokee Nation, 1820–1906, James W. Parins traces the rise of bilingual literacy and intellectual life in the Cherokee Nation during the nineteenth century—a time of intense social and political turmoil for the tribe. available again

Happy Hunting Grounds By Stanley Vestal $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-1543-6 • 240 pages Here is a story, in thinly disguised fictional form, of Plains Indians, especially a Cheyenne chief, Whirlwind—his manner of life, his beliefs, and particularly, his love of his son. The villain is a Mandan who is given refuge in the Cheyenne camp and then wreaks havoc with the lives of his hosts. He causes a battle with the Sioux, steals the chief’s favorite wife, and slays the chief’s young son. Whirlwind’s revenge for the death of his beloved son provides a dramatic climax.


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The People Who Stayed Southeastern Indian Writing After Removal By Geary Hobson, Janet McAdams, and Kathryn Walkiewicz $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4136-7 • 404 pages The two-hundred-year-old myth of the “vanishing” American Indian still holds some credence in the American Southeast, the region from which tens of thousands of Indians were relocated after passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. Yet, as the editors of this volume amply demonstrate, a significant Indian population remained behind after those massive relocations. Pushing the Bear After the Trail of Tears By Diane Glancy $14.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4069-8 • 176 pages Pushing the Bear: After the Trail of Tears tells the story of the Cherokees’ resettlement in the hard years following Removal, a story never before explored in fiction. In this sequel to her popular 1996 novel Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears, author Diane Glancy continues the tale of Cherokee brothers O-ga-na-ya and Knobowtee and their families, as well the Reverend Jesse Bushyhead, a Cherokee Christian minister. The book follows their travails in Indian Territory as they attempt to build cabins, raise crops, and adjust to new realities. On Native Ground Memoirs and Impressions By Jim Barnes $16.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4092-6 • 296 pages On Native Ground takes us from Jim Barnes’s boyhood in rural southeastern Oklahoma during the Great Depression and World War II through his mature years as an internationally recognized poet. Of Choctaw and Welsh ancestry, Barnes is often identified as a Native American poet. He emphasizes his desire to be recognized for his art, not his blood. Yet he speaks eloquently here of his attachment to his “native ground,” the Choctaw region in Oklahoma—for him “the land where memory dwells.” Muting White Noise Native American and European American Novel Traditions By James H. Cox $29.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3679-0 $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4021-6 • 352 pages In Muting White Noise, James H. Cox considers how Native authors have liberated our imaginations from colonial narratives. Cox takes his title from Sherman Alexie, for whom the white noise of a television set represents the white mass-produced culture that mutes American Indian voices. Cox foregrounds the work of Native intellectuals in his readings of the American Indian novel tradition. He thereby develops a critical perspective from which to re-see the role played by the Euro-American novel tradition in justifying and enabling colonialism. Three Plays The Indolent Boys, Children of the Sun, and The Moon in Two Windows By N. Scott Momaday $24.95 Cloth • 978-0-8061-3828-2 • 224 pages Long a leading figure in American literature, N. Scott Momaday is perhaps best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning House Made of Dawn and his celebration of his Kiowa ancestry, The Way to Rainy Mountain. Momaday has also made his mark in theatre through two plays and a screenplay. Published here for the first time, they display his signature talent for interweaving oral and literary traditions.


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Language New

Manhattan to Minisink American Indian Place Names of Greater New York and Vicinity By Robert S. Grumet $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4336-1 • 296 pages Manhattan to Minisink provides the histories of more than five hundred place names in the Greater New York area, including the five boroughs, western Long Island, the New York counties north of the city, and parts of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut. Robert S. Grumet, a leading ethnohistorian specializing in the region’s Indian peoples, draws on his meticulous research and deep knowledge to determine the origins of Native, and Native-sounding, place names. New

Native American Placenames of the Southwest A Handbook for Travelers By William Bright Edited by Alice Anderton & Sean O’Neill $19.95 Paper • 978-0-8061-4311-8 • 174 pages Written by distinguished linguist William Bright, the handbook is organized alphabetically, and its entries for places—including towns, cities, counties, parks, and geographic landmarks—are concise and easy to read. Entries give the state and county, along with all available information on pronunciation, the name of the language from which the name derives, the name’s literal meaning, and relevant history. In their introduction to the handbook, editors Alice Anderton and Sean O’Neill provide easy-to-understand pronunciation keys for English and Native languages. New in paperback

The Cherokee Syllabary Writing the People’s Perseverance By Ellen Cushman $19.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4220-3 • 256 pages $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4373-6 • 256 pages In 1821, Sequoyah, a Cherokee metalworker and inventor, introduced a writing system that he had been developing for more than a decade. His creation—the Cherokee syllabary—helped his people learn to read and write within five years and became a principal part of their identity. This groundbreaking study traces the creation, dissemination, and evolution of Sequoyah’s syllabary from script to print to digital forms. Breaking with conventional understanding, author Ellen Cushman shows that the syllabary was not based on alphabetic writing, as is often thought, but rather on Cherokee syllables and, more importantly, on Cherokee meanings. Telling Stories in the Face of Danger Language Renewal in Native American Communities Edited by Paul V. Kroskrity $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4227-2 • 288 pages The contributors to this volume explore Native American storytelling both as a response to and a symptom of language endangerment. The essays show how traditional stories, and their nontraditional written descendants, such as poetry and graphic novels, help to maintain Native cultures and languages.

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Choctaw Language and Culture Chahta Anumpa, Volume 2 By Marcia Haag and Henry Willis $26.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-3855-8 • 184 pages Building on the foundations laid by the first volume, this follow-up text presents a more advanced linguistic study of Oklahoma Choctaw, accompanied by short stories and anecdotes written by Choctaws in their native language. Volume 2 of Choctaw Language and Culture is designed to help teachers and students alike further their understanding of Choctaw by working with and mastering grammatically complex examples of its use. It marks the first such advanced textbook of Choctaw as well as the first easily available reference grammar for teachers. Intermediate Creek Mvskoke Emponvkv Hokkolat By Pamela Innes, Linda Alexander, and Bertha Tilkens $29.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-3996-8 • 352 pages For those who have progressed beyond introductory lessons, Intermediate Creek offers an expanded understanding of the language and culture of the Muskogee (Creek) and Seminole Indians. The first advanced textbook for the language, this book builds on the grammatical principles set forth in the authors’ earlier book, Beginning Creek: Mvskoke Emponvkv, providing students with knowledge crucial to mastering more complex linguistic constructions.

Politics & Law New

Claiming Tribal idenTiTy The Five Tribes and The PoliTiCs oF Federal aCknowledgmenT

mark edwin miller Foreword by ChadwiCk CornTassel smiTh

Claiming Tribal Identity The Five Tribes and the Politics of Federal Acknowledgment By Mark E. Miller Foreword by Chadwick Corntassel Smith $29.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4378-1 • 480 pages Who counts as an American Indian? Which groups qualify as Indian tribes? These questions have become increasingly complex in the past several decades, and federal legislation and the rise of tribal-owned casinos have raised the stakes in the ongoing debate. In this study, Mark Edwin Miller describes how and why dozens of previously unrecognized tribal groups in the southeastern states have sought, and sometimes won, recognition, often to the dismay of the Five Tribes—the Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Creeks, and Seminoles. New

A Gathering of Statesmen Records of the Choctaw Council Meetings, 1826-1828 By Peter P. Pitchlynn Translated and edited by Marcia Haag and Henry Willis Introduction by Clara S. Kidwell $29.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4349-1 • 176 pages The early decades of the nineteenth century brought intense political turmoil and cultural change for the Choctaw Indians. While they still lived on their native lands in central Mississippi, they would soon be forcibly removed to Oklahoma. This book makes available for the first time a key legal document from this turbulent period in Choctaw history.


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Oklahoma’s Indian New Deal By Jon S. Blackman $24.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4351-4 • 236 pages The Oklahoma Indian Welfare Act (OIWA), passed by Congress in 1936, brought Oklahoma Indians under all of the IRA’s provisions, but included other measures that applied only to Oklahoma’s tribal population. This first book-length history of the OIWA explains the law’s origins, enactment, implementation, and impact, and shows how the act played a unique role in the Indian New Deal. Buying America from the Indians Johnson v. McIntosh and the History of Native Land Rights By Blake A. Watson $45.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4244-9 • 254 pages Johnson v. McIntosh and its impact offers a comprehensive historical and legal overview of Native land rights since the European discovery of the New World. Watson sets the case in rich historical context. After tracing AngloAmerican views of Native land rights to their European roots, Watson explains how speculative ventures in Native lands affected not only Indian peoples themselves but the causes and outcomes of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, and ratification of the Articles of Confederation. He then focuses on the transactions at issue in Johnson between the Illinois and Piankeshaw Indians, who sold their homelands, and the future shareholders of the United Illinois and Wabash Land Companies. American Indians and the Fight for Equal Voting Rights By Laughlin McDonald $26.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4240-1 • 362 pages The struggle for voting rights was not limited to African Americans in the South. American Indians also faced discrimination at the polls and still do today. This book explores their fight for equal voting rights and carefully documents how non-Indian officials have tried to maintain dominance over Native peoples despite the rights they are guaranteed as American citizens. “A rich and spirited account detailing how Native peoples have utilized the 1965 Voting Rights Act and the talents of ACLU attorneys to fight for the right to vote.”—David E. Wilkins, co-author of Uneven Ground: American Indian Sovereignty and Federal Law The Seminole Nation in Oklahoma A Legal History By L. Susan Work $45.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-4089-6 • 376 pages When it adopted a new constitution in 1969, the Seminole Nation was the first of the Five Tribes in Oklahoma to formally reorganize its government. In the face of an American legal system that sought either to destroy its nationhood or to impede its self-government, the Seminole Nation tenaciously retained its internal autonomy, cultural vitality, and economic subsistence. Here, L. Susan Work draws on her experience as a tribal attorney to present the first legal history of the twentieth-century Seminole Nation. The Choctaws in Oklahoma From Tribe to Nation, 1855-1970 By Clara Sue Kidwell $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4006-3 • 344 pages The Choctaws in Oklahoma begins with the Choctaws’ removal from Mississippi to Indian Territory in the 1830s and then traces the history of the tribe’s subsequent efforts to retain and expand its rights and to reassert tribal sovereignty in the late twentieth century. This book illustrates the Choctaws’ remarkable success in asserting their sovereignty and establishing a national identity in the face of seemingly insurmountable legal obstacles.


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Peyote vs. the State Religious Freedom on Trial By Garrett Epps $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4026-1 • 296 pages With the grace of a novel, this book chronicles the six-year duel between two remarkable men with different visions of religious freedom in America. Neither sought the conflict. Al Smith, a substance-abuse counselor to Native Americans, wanted only to earn a living. Dave Frohnmayer, the attorney general of Oregon, was planning his gubernatorial campaign and seeking care for his desperately ill daughters. But before this constitutional confrontation was over, Frohnmayer and Smith twice asked the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether the First Amendment protects the right of American Indians to seek and worship God through the use of peyote. The Court finally said no. On the Drafting of Tribal Constitutions By Felix S. Cohen Edited by David E. Wilkins $34.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3806-0 • 200 pages Felix Cohen (1907–1953) was a leading architect of the Indian New Deal and steadfast champion of American Indian rights. Appointed to the Department of the Interior in 1933, he helped draft the Indian Reorganization Act (1934) and chaired a committee charged with assisting tribes in organizing their governments. His “Basic Memorandum on Drafting of Tribal Constitutions,” submitted in November 1934, provided practical guidelines for that effort. Forced Federalism Contemporary Challenges to Indigenous Nationhood By Jeff Corntassel and Richard C. Witmer II $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-4191-6 • 280 pages Over the past twenty years, American Indian policy has shifted from selfdetermination to “Forced Federalism” as indigenous nations in the United States have encountered new threats from state and local tribes over such issues as taxation, gaming, and homeland security. This book demonstrates how today’s indigenous nations have taken unprecedented steps to reorient themselves politically in response to such challenges to their sovereignty. Cash, Color, and Colonialism The Politics of Tribal Acknowledgment By Renée Ann Cramer $24.95s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3671-4 $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-3987-6 • 256 pages Within the context of U.S.-Indian law, federal acknowledgment establishes a trust relationship between an Indian tribe and the U.S. government. Some tribes, however, have not been federally acknowledged, or, in more common language, “recognized.” In Cash, Color, and Colonialism, Reneé Ann Cramer offers a comprehensive analysis of the federal acknowledgment process, placing it in historical, legal, and social context.

University of Oklahoma Press

Order by phone: 800-627-7377 or 405-325-2000 order by fax: 800-735-0476 or 405-364-5798 order online: oupress.com


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Roots of Resistance A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico By Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz $19.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-3833-6 • 224 pages In New Mexico—once a Spanish colony, then part of Mexico—Pueblo Indians and descendants of Spanish- and Mexican-era settlers still think of themselves as distinct peoples, each with a dynamic history. At the core of these persistent cultural identities is each group’s historical relationship to the others and to the land, a connection that changed dramatically when the United States wrested control of the region from Mexico in 1848. “Underscores the centrality of land questions for this vital and diverse section of the United States—questions that continue to energize public discourse, state politics, and cultural reflections.”—Juan Gómez-Quiñones, author of Roots of Chicano Politics, 1600–1940 Uneven Ground American Indian Sovereignty and Federal Law By David E. Wilkins and K. Tsianina Lomawaima $26.95s Paper • 978-0-8061-3395-9 • 336 pages In the early 1970s, the federal government began recognizing selfdetermination for American Indian nations. As sovereign entities, Indian nations have been able to establish policies concerning health care, education, religious freedom, law enforcement, gaming, and taxation. David E. Wilkins and K. Tsianina Lomawaima discuss how the political rights and sovereign status of Indian nations have variously been respected, ignored, terminated, and unilaterally modified by federal lawmakers as a result of the ambivalent political and legal status of tribes under western law. The Indian Reorganization Act Congresses and Bills By Vine Deloria, Jr. $75.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3398-0 • 464 pages In 1934, Commissioner of Indian Affairs John Collier began a series of “congresses” with American Indians to discuss his proposed federal bill for granting self-government to tribal reservations. In The Indian Reorganization Act, Vine Deloria, Jr., compiled the actual historical records of those congresses and made available important documents of the premier years of reform in federal Indian policy as well as the bill itself. “This book provides new insights into John Collier’s personality and, more important, it offers the reader a firsthand account of how indigenous people responded to Collier’s proposal.”—David Wilkins, coauthor of Uneven Ground: American Indian Sovereignty and Federal Law

Payment must accompany orders from individuals. For domestic orders, please add $5.00 USPS shipping for the first book and $1.50 for each additional book. For UPS/Priority shipping, add $8.00 for the first book, and $2.00 for each additional book. For international orders, including Canada, add $15.00 USPS shipping for the first book, and $10.00 for each additional book. Residents of Oklahoma must include 8.25% sales tax. Canadian orders add 5% GST. We accept checks, money orders, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express.


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Chickasaw Press New

Footprints Still Whispering in the Wind By Margie Testerman $20.00s Cloth • 978-1-935684-11-4 • 80 pages Footprints Still Whispering in the Wind showcases Testerman’s work as a tribute to her Chickasaw people and to the natural world that influences every aspect of their lives. Additionally, each poem is interpreted and illustrated by a Chickasaw child. These illustrations beautifully complement Margie Testerman’s poetry, while offering us insight into the vibrant imaginations of today’s children of the Chickasaw Nation. New

Riding Out the Storm 19th Century Chickasaw Governors; Their Lives and Intellectual Legacy By Phillip C. Morgan $20.00s Cloth • 978-2-935684-10-7 • 200 pages Riding Out the Storm: 19th-Century Chickasaw Governors, Their Lives and Intellectual Legacy profiles the lives of three nineteenth-century Chickasaw governors— Cyrus Harris, Winchester Colbert, and William L. Byrd—in a different way. Revealing the three leaders not merely as historic politicians, but as human beings, Phillip Carroll Morgan portrays their personal and political lives against literary backdrops relating directly to their experiences. New

Chikasha Stories Volume 3: Shared Wisdom By Glenda Galvan Illustrator Jeannie Barbour $30.00 Cloth • 978-1-935684-09-1 • 96 pages Chikasha Stories, Volume Three: Shared Wisdom, completes Galvan and Barbour’s invaluable series. Guaranteed to delight readers young and old, these stories— told in both Chickasaw and English—serve as a valuable introduction to the Chickasaw language. Shared Wisdom also highlights the value placed on storytellers and reveals why their role is so honored in the Chickasaw Nation. Chikasha Stories Volume Two: Shared Voices By Glenda Galvan Illustrations by Jeannie Barbour $36.00 Cloth • 978-1-935684-08-4 • 96 pages When the idea of presenting Chickasaw stories in written form was first suggested by tribal elder and storyteller Glenda Galvan, it quickly became apparent that not all of those stories would fit in one book. Shared Voices carries on the tradition of the first volume with six new tales, illustrated with original artworks by award-winning Chickasaw artist Jeannie Barbour. Anompilbashsha’ Asilhha’ Holisso Chickasaw Prayer Book By the Chickasaw Language Committee With Joshua D. Hinson, John P. Dyson, and Pamela Munro $36.00s Leather Bound • 978-1-935684-06-0 • 200 pages Anompilbashsha’ Asilhha’ Holisso: Chickasaw Prayer Book includes topical prayers, readings, and selected passages from the Holy Bible (King James Version) presented in a bilingual Chickasaw and English format.


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Chickasaw Lives Volume Four: Tribal Mosaic By Richard Green $24.00s Cloth • 978-1-935684-07-7 • 200 pages Richard Green presents twenty-six essays in six categories, representing a wide range of topics—from eighteenth and nineteenth century sketches, to books and treasures, and revivals. Readers are treated to stories that include a Chickasaw citizen’s struggle with the aftermath of the 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, an exploration of the mystique surrounding the tradition of Chickasaw warriors, and a Chickasaw tribal donation to the United States to help fund the construction of the Washington Monument in the 1800s. Ilimpa’chi’ (We’re Gonna Eat!) A Chickasaw Cookbook By JoAnn Ellis and Vicki M. Penner $30.00s Cloth • 978-1-935684-03-9 • 160 pages Recipes, reminiscences, and lessons in Chickasaw lifeways are the main ingredients in Ilimpa’chi’ (We’re Gonna Eat!): A Chickasaw Cookbook. Well-known Chickasaw cooks JoAnn Ellis and Vicki M. Penner share more than forty recipes, accompanied by scenes from their lives spent cooking, eating, and growing up around foods prepared in Chickasaw kitchens and over outdoor cooking fires. Chikasha Stories Volume One: Shared Spirit By Glenda Galvan Illustrated by Jeannie Barbour $36.00s Cloth • 978-1-935684-04-6 • 96 pages In Chikasha Stories, Volume One: Shared Spirit, premier Chickasaw storyteller and tribal elder Glenda Galvan tells traditional stories drawn from the tribe’s oral traditions. Illustrating the tales are original artworks by award-winning Chickasaw artist Jeannie Barbour. This long-awaited and much-needed volume, a groundbreaking work for the Chickasaw Press, is the first of an important series of books intended to revive and maintain the storytelling tradition so vital to the roots of Chickasaw and Native culture. Dynamic Chickasaw Women By Phillip C. Morgan and Judy G. Parker $24.00s Cloth • 978-1-935684-05-3 • 192 pages It has become tradition for Chickasaw governor Bill Anoatubby to open his public addresses with a tribute to the unconquered and unconquerable warriors and to the dynamic women of the Chickasaw Nation. Researched and written by Phillip C. Morgan and Judy G. Parker, Dynamic Chickasaw Women presents biographies of carefully chosen dynamic women from the histories of Indian Removal, Indian Territory, and early Oklahoma statehood.


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2013 American Indian Catalog  

Catalog of New and previously published American Indian related titles.

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