T and C Feb 1, 1972

Page 1

VICTORIOUS HOMECOMIN[l

HIRAM DEFEATED89T07I

PAGE 6

JOBSII !

PROSPECTS LOOKING BETTER

I . THE TAN
February 1, 1972 Westerville, Ohio Volume 54, No. 13
AND·CARDINAL

T & C CAMPUS BILLBOARD

Do you have an old textbook, Beach Boy record, or anything else you would like to sell? Put an ad in the T & C CAMPUS BILLBOARD! You may call 882-3601, Ext. 256, or write to the Tan & Cardinal, Otterbein College, Westerville, Ohio 43081. If you are a student, send it through the campus mail. And it doesn't have to be a for sale item. Wanted ads, messages, and various other trivia are also accepted. Why wait until Valentine's Day?

STUDENT RATES: 2 cents per word. 20 cent minimum charge.

COMMERCIAL RATES: 50 cents for 10 words or less, $1.00 for 11 to 25 words, and 50 cents for each additional 25 words or less. 25 cents extra per 25 words if you want bold face type.

The Tan and Cardinal would like to extend an invitation to alt governance committees to submit the minutes of their meetings to the T & C. This will enable us to keep up on newsworthy items that come up during those meet• ints.

There will be a meeting of the T & C staff Tuesday afternoon ( today ) at 4:00. Anyone who is interested in be• ing on the staff, please attend. This includes those presently on the staff also. ......

STUDENTS TO EXECUTE VARIOUS PROGRAMS ON YOUR CAMPUS. EXCELLENT PAY.

Write: CAMPUS SERVICES AGENCY 5534 50th Street Sandusky, Ohio 44870

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR LIBRARY TIMES

14 HOURS TOO SHORT?

Dear Editor:

Is 14 hours a day too short of a time for a library to be open? Why does the library need to stay open another hour or two for the few who get all psyched to begin work on their papers at 9:30 p.m. Maybe the library needs to be open late at night and closed during early morning (who wants to get up at 8:00 a.m. to go to the library).

Some might say they don't have time during the day to go to the Ii· brary. Those individuals should sit down and just look at the time they have misused. There are very few stu• dents who have classes and meetings, every day of the week, from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. If they do these students are trying to do too much and are already depriving themselves of learning. What would another hour of the library open do to improve this?

If one would learn to use his time right and not begin to study ½ hour before the library closes one would find that Otterbein is offering a learning en• vironment. One could then spend his evening resting, rapping with his friends,

and reviewing what he has learned so he can do better in class the next day.

A concerned student, Katherine Riley Hanby Hall

DISAPPOINTED AND DISGUSTED

DEAN VAN ARTl~LE IN BAD TASTE

Dear Editor:

I am both disappointed and disgusted that the article concerning Dean VanSant found a place in the T & C. To base an entire article on a personal attack filled with generalized accusations seems to be unwise; to include no statements from the person being judged is deplorable. The "pro-Van" comments which did appear were pale in comparison with Mr. Eversole's words and failed to compensate for the injustices done to the woman who has made Otterbein her life.

I welcome Mr. Eversole's concern for strength in our governance system but I cannot understand , why he feels that any unity can be fostered by focusing his sharp criticism on one per• son. Surely his energy could be better spent by lending positive support wnere

MESSAGE: Carolyn and Marilyn, You are beautiful. I love red hair. You're in my dreams nightly. Could one of you be mine? -N.A.

WANTED: Person to do typing, equa• tions, or drawings for camera-ready copy. Must be able to work at least three hours per week. Contact J. Taylor, Physics 224.

WANTED: One set of cheap bunk beds in good condition. Call 891-0733.

MESSAGE: Bob· See you on the 12th. I love you. -Cheryl

MESSAGE: HAPPY Bl RTHDAY, DOUG RIDDING!

MARRIED: Gail Williams, Arcady, to Dave Bloom, '72

it is needed.

But if Mr. Eversole's letter was in bad taste, even worse was the fact that the T & C turned the issue into a fea• tured article. One individual's personal opinion is a poor basis for an article of this dimension-especially when it ap• pears at the expense of another's dig• nity and feelings.

Sincerely,

HELP FIGHT POLLUTION

RECYCLINC' CENTER OPENED

Dear Editor:

On February 19, a recycling center will be opened in Westerville where people can drop off paper, cans and glass. The initial plans are for the center to be open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on a regular Saturday basis. We are planning to have interested vo• lunteers work two-hour shifts during the day with at least four people at the center at all times. Since the drop-off point will be at Gateway Super Market on State Street in the southern part of Westerville, we can use both volunteer drivers and colunteer collectors. To Continued on page 8 ·

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Published weekly during the academic year except holiday and examination periods by students of Otterbein College. Entered as second-class matter September 25, 1927, at the Post Office in Westerville, Ohio 43081, under the Act of l\llarch 3, 1879. Officeslocated in the ·Campus Center, 100 West Home Street, Westerville, Ohio 43081. Phone 882-3601, Ext. 256. Communication with the Editor and staff is best accomplished through the campus mail.

EDITORIAL BOARD

Editor - Pan Budd

Assistant Editor John Vernon

Assistant Editor - Charles Howe

Business Manager - Bonnie LeMay

Circulation Manager - Charle·s Ernst

DEPARTMENTS

The Campus:

Jane Calhoun, Reporter

Kathy Fox, Reporter

Benita Heath, Reporter

Charles Hankinson, Reporter

Charles Howe, Special Assignments

John Lloyd, Reporter

Goe!f Mayfild, Reporter

Bob Ready, Reporter

Governance:

Jamie Alexander, Senate

John Dietz, Reporter

Gary Smith, Reporter

Sports:

Robert Becker, Reporter

Mark Bixler, lntramurals

Ed Hartung, Reporter

John Mulkie, Reporter

Kathy Rook, Reporter

Gar Vance, Reporter

Columnists:

Tom Barlow, TANSTAAFL

Dan Budd, Deep

Tony Del Valle, At the Cinema

Brett Morehead, Brett on Sports

Ed Parks, A Black Perspective

Technical Staff:

Gail Griffith

Artists:

Charles Howe

Mary Anne Morrison

Photographers:

Tom Hastings

Bob Maust

Kim Wells

Advisor:

· Mike Rothgery

NEGLECTED BUILDINGS? 3

Last October, the Board of Trustees approved a "package" for construction and renovation of certain buildings on campus.

Towers Hall is due to get a new roof and be turned into a center for the administrative offices. The old library will be remodeled into a lecture hall and a small classroom

A new physical education-recreation facility for men and women is to be built just north of the present athletic field. It is to be circular and hold 2,000 people.

Alumni Gymnasium will then be remodeled for classroom space and faculty offices. The result will be comparable to the remodeling done on McFadden Hall.

Wonderful. But don't you feel you have left something out? What about the delapidated condition of Lambert Hall, Otterbein's answer to modern architecture? Maybe it should be turned over to the Psychology department so they can study maze behavior. Maybe the administration has plans for this structure. Maybe they have plans for the Association Building and the present Administration Building also. If so, they should be mentioned so the student body at least has the chance to find out what is going on.

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EDITORIAL
IN THIS ISSUE: Bl LLBOARD Page 2. BRETT ON SPORTS ..... ......................... Page 8. CAMPUS ........................•...............Page 4. EDITORIAL .............................. ....... Page 3. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ..................•..... Page 2. MEDIA ..................................•.....Page 15. NATIONAL OUTLOOK .............•..............Page 11. SPORTS Page 7.

CAMPUS JOB PROSPECTS LOOKING BETTER

HIRING IS UP FIVE PERCENT

The College Placement Council re• ported this week a survey of 835 em• plovers had found "the first upward movement in three years" in job pros• pects for college graduates. In an average of all disciplines, the cpuncil said, employers expect a• five percent in· crease in hiring. Employment gains are forecast at the Ph.D. and bachelor's level, but a decrease is expected at the master's degree level.

Employers said they plan to hire 910 Ph.D.'s, a 30 percent increase over the 700 hired last year. At the bachelor's level, 39,580 are to be hired, a nine percent gain over a year ago. Only 5,000 hires are expected at the master's level, a five percent decline from last year's 5,240. Two additional categor· ies, one unclassified as to degree and the other as to curriculum, show ex· pected decreases of three percent and two percent respectively. ·

Of the 835 employers, 239 said they plan to hire more graduates than last year, 363 expect to employ about the same number, and 233 anticipate few• er hires. The survey was conducted in December. All tolled, the employers plan to hire 57,550 college graduates compared to 54,870 last year.

Despite the over-all gain in employ• ment, the employers said they plan 13 percent fewer recruiting visits to cam• puses. Employers listed these reasons for this clevelopment: (1) higher accep· tance rates, cutting down on the need to interview a large number of candi• dates; (2) a large number of applications and of job-seekers who go direct· ly to personnel offices; and (3) referrals from other sources, such as returning servicemen.

"Competition will still be keen," said a council spokesman. "Students can't afford to sit back and wait for a job to come looking for them."

The 835 organizations in the study cover a broad range of employing groups in business, industry, and government, except for teaching positions. Prospects at all three degree levels, at

least in this group of employers, appear · brightest for those students majoring in engineering and business. including ac· counting. These are the "big volume" areas, the ones which will be recruited most heavily.

. In engineering, an increase of 10 percent is anticipated, with 12,250 openings versus 11,180 a year ago. A gain of nine percent is expected in the business disciplines, with 17,810 hires versus 16,310. A more sizable increase of 20 percent is anticipated in the cate• gory made up of the sciences, mathematics, and other technical disciplines but the volume is considerably lower, 4,120 openings versus 3,430.

On the darker side, prospects are not as good for students majoring in non technical disciplines other than business. Primarily, these are the stu· dents in liberal arts. They face the pros• pect of a three percent loss - 7,470 openings versus 7,690 a year ago.

At the bachelor's degree level, gains of 17 ~rcent (9,500 openings) and 11 percent_(14,900 openings) respectively are anticipated for engineering and business graduates.

In the master's categories, the em• ployment of engineers is expected to be about the same as last year. An in• crease of four percent i~ indicated for science, mathematics, and other technical majors, while a gain of three per• cent is expected for business graduates. As might be expected, the largest vol• ume in master's degree employment is in the MBA area, with 2,480 openings compared with 2,410 last year.

At the doctoral level, technical disdplines are the only ones with plus figures. The employers in the council study plan to hire 520 engineers with Ph.D. degrees, a 61 percent jump from last year when there were 324 open• ings. Candidates in the science, mathe· matics, and other technical disciplines can expect a seven percent increase in employment.

Of the 20 employer categories sur• veyed, 12 are planning to hire more college graduates this year. The cate· gories with the greatest number of

openings are banking-finance-insurance with over 8,000, and Federal Govern• ment with over 7,500. However, both categories are anticipating decreases of one percent from last year.

Other employer groups expecting to hire more than 5,000 candidates are merchandising (up two percent) and public accounting (up 35 percent). The research and consulting group also anticipates a 35 percent increase in hiring but this represents only 1,300 openings.

Additional employer groups fore• seeing significant increases are tire and rubber, 107 percent; electronics and instruments, ,34 percent; petroleum and products, 26 percent; glass, paper, and packaging, 25 percent; chemicals and drugs, 14 percent; and electrical ma• chinery and equipment, 11 percent. Some of these represent relatively few openings although the chemicals-drugs group covers more than 4,000 hires. Employer groups still anticipating significant drops in employment of college graduates this year are metals and metal products, 41 percent; utilities and transportation, 15 percent; nonprofit and educational institutions other than teaching, 14 percent; automotive and mechanical equipment, nine percent; and aerospace, seven percent.

JOBS IN EUROPE

t-OR ANY COLLEGE STUDENT

A summer job in Europe is available to any college student willing to work. As all of these summer jobs in Europe pay a standard wage-and most also provide free room and board-only a few weeks work earns more than enough to cover the cost of a round• trip youth fare ticket to Europe, plus extra money for traveling around Eur· ope before returning home.

Thousands of paying student jobs are available in European resorts, ho· tels, offices, shops, restaurants, factor• ies, hospitals, and on farms and con• struction sites. Most openings are lo·

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cated in Switzerland, Germany, France, England and Spain, but other jobs are available in other countries.

The Student Overseas Services (SOS) a Luxembourg student organization, · will obtain a job, work permit, visa, and any other necessary working papers for any American college student who applies. Applications should be submitted early enough to allow the SOS ample time to obtain the work permits and other necessary working papers.

Interested students may obtain ap· plication forms, job listings and de· scriptions, and the SOS Handbook on earning a trip to Europe by sending their name, address, educational insti• tution and $1 (for addressing, handling and postage) to SOS- USA, Box 5173, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93108.

WORLD CAMPUS AFLOAT PROGRAM TO CONTINUE

For the past 18 months, Chapman College and Mr. C.Y. Tung have been exploring the possibility of mounting an international seagoing university aboard the S.S. Seawise University, the former R.M.S. Queen Elizabeth. Mr. Tung had established Seawise foundations to purchase, refit and operate the vessel.

The tragic loss of that great ship by fire in Hong Kong harbor undoubtedly , will alter the long-range plans for im• plementing such an endeavor.

In the meantime, Chapman wi II continue its World Campus Afloat programs and will continue use of the current ship, the S. S. Universe Campus,. as its shipboard campus for an indefi• nite period. The Universe Campus, also owned by Seawise foundations and operated by Orient Overseas Line, is the former American ship, the S.S. Atlantic, commissioned in 1958 for the American Export lines. She has been refitted completely for Chapman's use, meets all maritime safety standards and is fully certified by the U.S. Coast Guard. It is the third ship to be used by World Campus Afloat in its seven year history of semesters at sea.

Universe Campus has just completed her first semester voyage in the service

of World Campus Afloat. Dean for that semester,,Dr. Desmond Bittinger, a reg• ular -Chapman College faculty member and a veteran of the WCA program, stated on his return that the Universe is an excellent ship for our- purposes.' Its size, 18,000 gross-tons, permits city docking in most ports of the world, making it both convenient and profitable for our students to use the ship for a dormitory while in port. It also incorporates appropriate enclosed space and deck areas for the classrooms, library, student union, housing, dining, recreation and other facilities necessary to the needs of college-level programs plus the ability to move the ship from port to port at desirable speeds.

Immediate plans call for the Universe Campus to depart Feb. 3 from New York, with a student body of approximately 450 and a faculty-staff of 65, for ports in Africa, India, the Orient and Japan, terminating May 26 at Los Angeles. Beginning in the summer of 1972, two summer educational voyages, oriented toward graduate or upper level students, businessmen, teachers and school administrators, church leaders and retired persons in oriental and south Pacific itineraries, are offered.

The fifteenth consecutive semester of what is still the world's only fullyaccredited, undergraduate, liberal arts program conducted aboard a ship will begin Sept. 3 at Los Angeles for ports in.the South Pacific, the Orient and Africa, returning to New York. The spring 1973 semester will depart New York in February and will journey around the world to Los Angeles.

BAND DIRECTOR PROMOTED

PHYS ED PROF GIVEN TENURE

Otterbein Academic Dean Roy Tur• ley, has announced the promotion of Gary Tirey, Otterbein director of bands to assistant professor of music. Richard Fishbaugh, assistant professor of physical education, has been granted tenure by the college.

Tirey, who came ot Otterbein in 1968, holds the B.M.E. from Capital University and the M.M.E. from Van-

derCook College of Music. As director of bands at Otterbein, he has re-established the Cardinal Marching Band, and has helped them achieve a reputation as one of Ohio's finest marching units. Fishbaugh, at Otterbein since 1966, holds a 8.S. in Ed. from Ohio Univer• sity and an M.S. from West Virginia University. He has been coach of the baseball team as well as classroom instructor.

BATTELLE SPEAKER

BRITAIN, AMERICA, & THE COMMON MARKET

Battelle Memorial Institute will present a guest lecture, "Britain Enters the Common Market: What Does It Mean to America?" at 8:30 p . m. on Wednesday, February 2, 1972. Mr. James R. Huntley, lecturer on international affairs, will discuss the implications for America of Britain's entry into the Common Market for Battelle's February Guest Series presentation. If you are interested in attending, please contact Professor Winkates, Ext. 226.

FORENSICS

OHIO UNIVERSITY DEBATE

January 21 and 22 Ross Taylor ( Junior - Kettering ) and Gary Alban (Freshman - Galena) represented Otterbein College at the 1804 Ohio Univer~ity Debate Tournament. This competition, which consistently attracts strong competition from all the Eastern and Midwestern states, had 43 colleges and universities from 10 states represented this year. Ross and Gary compiled a 4-2 win-loss record against Morris Harvey College, Eastern Michigan University, Wooster College, Capital University, Defiance College, and Fordham University.

QUIZ & QUILL

MR. CHANEY TO SPEAK

This Thursday at 7:30 in 1owers Room No. 1, Mr. Norman Chaney will present a talk on the subject of poetry. The event is sponsored by Quiz and Quill. Anyone who has attended the past two poetry forums and all other parties are urged to attend.

5

HOMECOMING

NANCY DRUMMOND SELECTED QUEEN

Excitement and disbelief seemed to be the tone of Saturday nights Winter Homecoming activities. In fact, there was so much disbelief that Cindy Bair, maid of honor, didn't even stay on campus for the event. In spite of this, however, Nancy Drummon, the Winter Homecoming Queen and Maria Marchi, first attendant, reigned over the second half of the game regally, but still dis• played great enthusiasm as they cheered on the basketball team who helped select them.

Traditionally, Varsity O has picked tlie three most outstanding sophomore girls for the queen and her court. Since the disbandment of the organization, Campus Programming Board was put in charge of the Homecoming activities. Therefore, CPB asked the basketball team, the indoor track team, and the wrestling team to vote for the girls they wanted as their queen and court.

As in past years, the search for the girls was done at half-time by a roving spotlight scanning the fans. This year's escorts were Gordy Warren, Nate Van Wey, and Porter Kauffman. Cindy Deyo, last year's queen, was also there to present Queen Nancy with roses.

The Homecoming evening was a very happy occasion for the queen and her court, and as Maria Marchi so aptly put her feelings: "Nothing could have made me more thrilled than to be chosen for this honor."

SUMMER IN JAPAN

EIGHT-WEEK SEMINAR

The Regional Council for lnterna· tional Education, which sponsors the Basel and Verona programs in which 0 tt er be in students participate, an• nounces a new program in Japan for the coming summer.

The program is open to all RCIE undergraduates interested in studying in Japan. Worth eight semester credit hours, it consists of an eight-week seminar running from late June to late August. The first four weeks of the seminar will be devoted to the understanding of Japanese culture through the combined perspectives of geography and history, art and religion, economics and political science. Students will attend lectures by both American and Japanese university professors who will stress an interdisciplinary approach to Japanese society. Visits to cultural and

historical sites and to Japanese homes, and meetings with Japanese students wi II also be included . Living arrangements are made in Japanese inns.

During the subsequent three weeks, students wi II pursue independent study and practical experience developing, with the assistance of the project director, ways to explore areas of Japanese life and culture of particular interest to them. A final week is free for the students to travel on their own in Japan or to other points in East Asia if they have funds. A paper is required of each student after his return to campus.

The cost of the program is around $1395 which includes round-trip travel between Oakland, California, and Japan, local travel, room and board, and tuition.

Or. O'Bear has pamphlets and application blanks.

Instruction is in English , but interested students may ~om1olt with Mr. Neff , Foreign lanyuilyc u , 1, ''-•"• for information about learning Japanese with the use of tapes in the Learning Resource Center.

STUDENTS INVITED

TO MODEL UN SECURITY COUNCIi,,_

Otterbein College students have been invited to send a delegation of three (3) to a Model UN Security Council at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh on March 24-25, 1972.

The Otterbein delegation Will represent Sierra Leone on the 15-member Council.

The cost per student will be about $10.00. Transportation roundtrip will be provided. If interested contact Professor James Winkates at Er.. 226.

CALENDAR CHANG~S ANNOUNCED

The follow in g events have been apJ hy h1 ,-alencar Committee and should be added to the Social Calendar : Sunday-Feb. 13 -1 to 4 p.m.-

Continued on page 14

6

OTTERS lROUNCE HIRAM BEHIND "BIG JOHN"

Otterbein's Cardinals, behind the hot shooting of Dwight "Big John" Miller, won their tenth game of the season Saturday night, an 89-71 decision over the Hiram Terriers before a winter homecoming crowd of about 1800.

Hiram trailing 43-38 at the half, chipped away at the 'Bein's lead and got within two points, 60-58, with 11.02 remaining in the game. Miller got hot as the Cards scored seven straight points, and Hiram never got close again, losing their sixth game in 14 decisions.

Don Manly and Jack Mehl led Otterbein in the first half, scoring 14 and 11 points respectively. With Mehl's drives and Manly's muscling layups, the 'Bein maintained a comfortable lead throughout the half.

Dwight Miller, hitting 71 % of his field goal attempts, was the leading scorer in the game with 26 points, most of these coming in the second half. Don Sullivan canned 13 to round out the balance of the Otter scoring. Mark Thorpe led the Hiram attack with 18 points.

Otterbein travels to Heidelberg tonight, and to Marietta Saturday in hopes of improving their 3-2 OC mark.

INTRAMURALS

The Fraternity Basket~all League saw a major shake-up last week as Sphinx, who was previously winless, upset the unbeaten league favorite Club by a score of 33-31. Club, having already come through two close calls earlier in the season, against The Frosh and Kings, was caught off-guard by the fired up Sphinx team. The "Green Machine" was lead by Dave Bremer and Guy Ditto. They controlled the Boards, and scored 14 and 11 points respectively.

In the second game of Thursday's action, Janda, paced by Doug Richards' 19 points, scored a 38-34defeat against previously winless R.C. Pizza. The wim enabled the Jonda men to jump into a second place tie with Country Club and Kings.

The big talk, however, has been about the Jones Boys, an independent, team, who is currently holding first place with 3-0 record. They picked up win number three on Thursday ~Y outrunning Zeta 42-37. Lead in•scoring by Tim laird and Steve Jones, The Jone's Boys have now established themselves as the team to beat.

The Saturday Morning League went pretty much as !xpected. The Ruckmoor picked up their third win by

handing the Maple Leafs a 35-30 set back.The band also remained unbeaten by narrowly escaping the James Gang 31-30, and Konetski, paced by Jeff Cox and Greg Miller, whipped the Pros from Dover 38-22.

Basketball action will continue this week. The Schedule is as follows: The Fraternity League on Tuesday and Thursday at 7:45 P.M., The Independent League on Wednesday at 8:00 P.M., The Saturday League on Saturday at 8:00 A.M.

Zeta and Club both remained undefeated in the bowling league as they whipped Kings and The Independents 4-0. Janda also won. They out scored Sphinx 3-1.

SPO:RTS
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0 CSTANDING Capital Wooster Wittenberg Ohio Wesleyan Baldwin Wallace Otterbein Muskingum Marietta Oberlin Kenyon WON LOST 6 5 4 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 0 0 1 3 3 2 3 3 3 5 Mt. Union Denison Heidelberg 2 2 0 5 5 6
COMMUNITY SHOE REPAIR F. M. Harris 27 W. Main Street ORTHOPEDIC & PRESCRIPTION WORK _ ' ,~~--------------~-----------------, 1 HARVEST TABLE BUFFET 1 (Smorgasbord) Reg. $2.50 $2 00 WITH THIS COUPON Monday - Saturday 4:00 - 8:30 Sunday 11 :00 - 8:00 Snyder's Old Worthington Inn One block north of Intersection Ats. 161 and 23 on High Street 885-6253 Sorry, not good for private banquets. · L-----------~~----~~---------~----~

HEIDELBERG, MARIETTA MEET OTTERS THIS WEEK

The Otterbein Fighting Cardinals having a rather difficult season thus far with last second losses to both Wittenberg and Capital, face what some would consider easy opposition this week, by traveling to Heidelberg, tonight and Marietta this coming Saturday night. Not so, according to Coach Tong who believes both teams can give the conference trouble especia.lly when playing in front of a home crowd.

Heidelberg which has been disappointing so far has had trouble in getting consistent shooting from their guards. Because of their shooting problem, the Student Princes have relied on tight offensive patterns with most of ' the shots coming from inside the key. Mark Fletcher is a forward who is very strong and drives to the basket well. Rick Buckosh a 6-5 center has been the man who has controlled the boards this season for the Student Princes.

Marietta is a very young basketball team that is improving each game . Just recently, the Pioneers defeated Muskingum in overtime, and lost to Ohio Wesleyan by two points. Marietta should be even better next year, with all five starters returning. Unlike Heidelberg. Marietta has two fine outside shooting guards in Howie Ames, and Rick Raden. Freshman Rick Eblin, an All-Ohioan from Waverly, along with

LETTERS

Continued from page 2 keep the amount of time spent by any individual to a minimum, we would like to have each volunteer work no more than once a month. This will require that we find at least 50 volunteers. Over 150 Otterbein students helped OPIAG to run a successful door· to-door canvass of Westerville last spr'ing ($1,600 were donated). Here is your chance to do something else positive in the fight against pollution and wasted natural resources. Please respond as soon as possible to Dr. Place at ext. 224 or 227 if you can help this important local project.

- Robert Place

6-7 center Tom Barnes do most of the rebounding for the Pioneers along with an adequate amount of scoring. Both games should be interesting contests for the Otters. However, I believe the Otters will win both games by at least

five points and the final re-suit will probably be closer to ten. (The Otters had great support at the Cap game. Students, please try to attend the away games in person and give OUR TEAM YOUR VOCAL SUPPORT!)

THE UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL,SCIENTIFIC A'ND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION

a specialized agency of the United Nations dedicated to peace and THE STUDENT AID SOCIETY

a non-profit non-political organization dedicated to helping students to help themselves offer

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STUDY ABROAD

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• Each copy is trilingual • 644 t'ages in English, French and Spanish

The most complete scholarship directory in the world lists more than 234 000 scholarships, fellowships, loans and grants in more than 1291 countries or territories! Tells who is eligible, fields of study, financial assistance, HOW, WHEN AND WHERE TO APPLY! Reflects the latest scholarship approach costed by financial need!

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More and more Americans are flocking overseas for summer vacations, and an increasing proportion is young Americans! With the price war now raging on overseas airfares, record-breaking numbers of young Americans will surge across Europe this summer! VACATION STUDY ABROAD tells how qualified people will go free! Provides inf<;>rmation on short co':'rses, seminars, summer schools, scholarships and travel grants ava ilable each year to students, teachers and other young people and adults planning to undertake study or training abroad during their vacations. These data were provided by some 500 organizations in 54 countries!

$ 5 value all for only $ 6

STUDENT AID SOCIETY membership dues. Services offered:

• Scholarship information service. Answers questions concerning scholarships worldwide!

• Travel service. Plans interesting tours to exotic lands!

• Reference Service.

Drafts term papers, essays, book reports, theses, etc. frequently using primary sources availabl~ only in_ the Library of Congress! We do not actually write the finished assignment since that would deprive the student of valuable educational experience and defeat the very purpose for

"Your reference service saved me much valuable rime which I put in on other subjects. Result: 5 As and t B. ''

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'7he Vantage Point" is a book put togerher by 5 ghost writers and edited by LBJ. Your reference service is elmost like my own personal ghort writer. "

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"The 3 reference bookl of which every ttudent needs penonaf copies are Study Abroad, a good dictionary and tht1$Burus. I got a $10,000 4-year scholarship from Study Abroad. " AR, Berkeley, Calif

writing for oneself in the first place. We will provide background information and bibliographies which rank with such toots as the Colle?,e Outline Series and encyclopaedia reference services available only with expensive sets. Limit of one draft at small additional charge, per semester per student in good standing. We cannot answer any question which we feel requires the advice of a doctor, lawyer, architect, engineer, or other licensed practitioner, nor can we advise concerning your finar,cial investments. Neither can we undertake market research or surveys or provide home study courses.

Gentl~men: I enclose $6 for Study Abroad, : Vacation Study Abroad and annual dues. 1

8 BRETT ON SPORTS ByBrettMoorehead ' •
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Student Aid Society, PO Box 39042 I Friendship Station, Washington, Q.C. 20016
Name ________ : Address I City, State ZiP---l -----------------------I •

Being behind by as much as 20 points in the first ten minutes, the Ohio Wesleyan Bishops fought back in the final four minutes to get as close as three points. But that was the best OWU could do. The final score favored Otterbein, 86-83.

Jackie Brown of the Bishops was "star of the night," totaling up 31 points. Brown hit on 13 of 32 action shots and five of five from the charity stripe. Ray Schmitt had a good night also. Schmitt had 22 points and was the game's leading rebounder with 20.

Dwight Miller and Jack Mehl were the Otterbein leading scorers with 22 each. Don Manly's field goal percent• age suffered (42%), but made nine of nine free throws, and ended up with 19 'points. The last Otter in double figures was Steve Traylor with 12. Dave Main, playing very little, did a nice job and ended up with six points. Barry Shirg had three points and Don Sullivan had two.

Otterbein was plagued with fouls \ and turnovers in the second quarter. This gave OWU time to play "catch up ball." They ran out of time, however, losing the contest and dropping their record to six and six over all, four and two in the conference.

Statistics show that Otterbein shot 61 times (making 25) to OWU's 79 times (making 32). The shoe was on

the other foot in the freethrow bracket. The 'Bein attempted 46 and made 36 (78.3%) to the Bishop's 26 attempts

making 19 (73%). Rebounds were very close, Otterbein held the edge 48 to 46.

JV BASKETBALL

Otterbein's Junior Varsity Basketball team, with two good weeks of action, has upped its season slate 'to 7-4.

During the week of January 16-22, Otterbein won over Denison 79-39 and Lockbourne Air Force Base 80-79. These were the most impressive outings of the season for the cagers. The modest win streak ended in Bexley, however, as Capital surged to a 71-55 triumph.

Otterbein got back in the winning · column against Ohio Wesleyan as they stopped the battling Bishops 67-57. Jeff Link keyed the Cardinal assult with 19 points as Jim Reed added balance with 15 markers.

Then on Saturday, January 28, the JV's buried Ohio State UniversityNewark branch, 80-42. The contest started out slowly and OSU really never got going. Otterbein wasn't playing in top form but it wasn't necessary. In the first half, OSU managed only a frigid 21 % from the field. In the second half that average improved, but by then the contest was decided.

Jim Reed and Bob Deckard, each

with 12 points, led a balanced scoring attack in which everyone scored for the homecoming crowd.

Tonight, the JV's travel to Heidelberg, and Saturday, they face the Ohio Institute of Technology in a home game with a 7:30 tipoff.

Transcendental meditation was once limited to followers of the Maharishi Mehesh Yogi. The technique is now being used by thousands of people across the country, and may help to replace the use of drugs for "turning off" the outside world, according to Science Digest for February. Two researchers at the Harvard Medical School have found that physiological changes similar to those occurring during sleep take place when a person uses this technique. A _ preliminary study showed that students who used meditation gave up drugs because the latter were no longer pleasant. Meditation may also have widespread use for reducing hypertension and chest pains.

I
NOT TOUGH ENOUGH 9
OWU
NAME GP ~INS. FGM PGA PCT. FTM PTA RESS AVE. PF-D PTS AVE. 19.7 17.7 17.9 11.8 ' Jack Mehl 14 486:07 104 214 Dwight Miller 14 476:09 95 199 Don Manly 14 450:06 95 137 Steve Traylor 14 517:50 54 128 Don Sullivan 14 473:44 19 55 Dave Main 12 98:56 6 10 Barry Schirg 12 83:14 7 15 Bob Melberth 12 50:18 8 17 Ron Stemen 9 36:31 2 9 ' Gene Frazier 11 40:57 5 11 Steve Kinser 8 34:28 3 14 Glen Horner 1 1 :42 1 1 Bob Deckard 6 19:35 3 8 Jeff Link 3 33:36 0 2 Jim Reed 5 25:40 4 6 Bob Clever 7 32:16 3 8 Team Rebounds Otterbein Totals 14 844 ,Opponent Totals 14 977 48.6 68 95 47.7 58 70 69.3 60 73 42.2 57 72 34.5 37 61 60.0 27 34 46.7 6 9 47.1 4 5 22.2 9 12 45.5 1 4 21.4 3 4 100.0 0 0 37.5 2 2 0.0 0 0 66.7 1 6 37.5 3 6 48.4 335 444 42.0 237 352 128 9.1 99 7.0 131 9.4 51 3.6 56 4.0 22 1.8 6 0.5 17. 1.4 3 0.4 16 1.5 11 1.4 0 0.0 3 0.4 0 0.0 10 2.3 15 1.5 87 659 47.0 547 39.0 44-X 276 33-1 248 54-3 250 35-0 165 56-3 75 4-0 38 8-0 20 9-1 20 12-0 15 8-0 11 7-0 ' 9 0-0 2 2-0 8 0-0 0 3-0 9 5-0 9 281 1153 305 1059 5.4 3.2 1.7 1.6 1.7 1.0 1.1 2.0 1.3 0.0 1.8 1.2 82.3 75.6
* * *

SENATE ABSENTEES ANNOUNCED

Beginning this week and continuing throughout the year, the, Tan and Card· inal wi II be publishing the names of those Senate members who do not show up for the meetings. This weeks compilation lists the members of Senate according to the number of absences from the six meetings so far this year.

The T & C hopes that the publishing of these lists will help the Otterbein Community in selecting next spring those people they feel will be competent as their representatives in the college government.

Robert Agler

Francis Balley (Alumnl)

Richard Chamberlain

Sheila Cooley

Richard Fishbaugh

Franklin Frost

Ursula Holtermann

Tommy Price

Edwin Roush (Trustee)

Kelvin Shiu

William Steck (Trustee)

William Troop (Trust. "J )

Virginia Weaston (Alumni)

Gary Coburn

Keith Crane

.At Heutteman

Dave Mack

Rolf Neumann

Allen Rink

James Share

Don Sullivan

Curt Tong

Robert Turner

Stephanie Wilkin

Jeanne Willis

Steve Bilikam

Joseph Camplgotto

Dorothy Coon

Melencio Cua

Les Donehua

Earl Hassenpflug

Joyce Karsko

Jack Mehl

Duffy Oelberg

Greg Prowell

Doug Ridding

Michael Rothgery

Gary D. Smith

Ronald Tucker

Elwyn Williams

James Winkates

Etsley Witt

Keith Witt

Micheel Kish

James Barr

Debbie Betham

John Codella

Albert German10n

J. Hopfengardnar

Shirley Liu

Woodrow Macke

Allan Martin

Rose Moore

Jarry Sellman

Keith Shoemaker

Bill Smucker

Fred Thayer

Gary Tirey

Chester Turner John Wilber

Elmer Yoest

Debbie Ayers

James Balley

Phillp Bernhart

Doneld Bultheup

Paul Butcher

Lyle Capell

Jack Dickey

Patty EIUott

Charles Ernst

Jemas Fogg

Betsy Hetrick Young Koo

Roger Lensmen

Arnold Leonerd

Beth LeSeuer

Mary

10
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McCeulsky Marjorie Miller Eddie Parks Jena Racster Virgil Raver Kathie Reese Jarry Schmidt Vicki Sinclair Mildred Stauffer Roger Tremaine John Ward Carol Whitehouse Roger Wiley Myra Wolfe Debra Andrews Lyle Barkhymer Pam Beatty Rodney Bolton Debbie Boring Michael Bridgman Joseph Cantrell James Carr Norman Chaney Tom Clark John Coulter Lynde Deffenbaugh Charles Dodrill Mary Everhart Karen Fiedler Ross Fleming Lillian Frank John Hamilton William Hamllton Bert Horn Karol Kahrs Thomas Kerr Jung Lee Paulette Loop Rex Ogle William Pasters (Alumni) Jacque Poe Kathy Pratt Brett Reardon James Recob Mike Romanoff Barbare Samuels Diana Sanford Margaret Sayers James Scattergood Nancy Scott Sylvia Vance Linda Vaughn Lucia Villalon 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Doug Yeakel 1 Paul Ackert 0 Chester Addington 0 William Amy 0 John Becker 0 Mark Bi,cler 0 Denial Budd 0 Leslie Burrell 0 Robert Clarke 0 Larry Co,c 0 Merilyn Dav 0 Roger Deibel 0 Lawrence Frank 0 Jack George 0 James Grissinger 0 Douglas Gyorke 0 Harold Hancock 0 Michael Herschler 0 Elaine Hobart 0 Mabel Joyce 0 John Laubach 0 Albert Lovejoy 0 Thomas McFadden 0 Virginia Mellott 0 George Millar 0 Keith MIiier 0 Roger Neff 0 Eliiabath O'Bear 0 George Phinney 0 Robert Place 0 John Pysarchuk 0 Mark Schantz 0 John Taylor 0 Thomas Tegenkamp 0 Roy Turley 0 Jo Ann Tyler 0 JoAnne VanSant 0 Timothy Wells 0 RC PIZZA 13 E. M.AIN 882-7710 OPEN 7 NIGHTS A WEEK SUNDAY THRU THURS. 12:00 P.M. FRL & SAL - 1:00.A M. · ....••.....•.....•••...•....... , :---- . RC PIZZA . . • .. ! : I: .. 50e! off on Large Pizza 35e off on Small Pizza i GOOD FEB. 1, 2, 3. I : e.l~:~F.~f!':~ !w.·~L• ~11 P:C\VJ ••• • , . I r.,,

GEORGE CORLEY WALLACE: NOT THE KING, MORE LIKE A POWERFUL PAWN

This is the first in a series of articles examining the 1972 presidential aspirants. It is not this writer's intention to sway anyone's opinion toward any one candidate. I only hope to explain, as objectively as I possibly can, the candidates past record and current beliefs. From there, every voter must decide for himself.

George Corley Wallace could be described as a product of the American dream. From the rags of a small Alabaman cotton farm, he rose to the riches and importance of a state governorship. Now, once again, he is a candidate for the presidency of this country.

George Wallace was born on August 25, 1919 in the small town of Clio, Alabama. His father owned a small cotton farm, which had to be sold after his death during the depression. George had to work all during high school, yet

was a member of the university debat• int team, and a member of the law school's honor court.

Mr. Wallace was a volunteer for pilot training in the Army Air Force in 1942, but was stricken with spinal meningitis. He later entered flying en• gineers school, and was sent to the Pa· cific as a member of a 8-29 bomber unit with the 20th Air Force Division. The boss of the 20th, which dropped the bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, was none other than Mr. Wallace's '68 Vice Presidential running mate, General Curtis E. LeMay. Wallace was discharged in 1945 as a sergeant. He had won the Air Force Medal, and the Bronze Star for his part in the air offensive against Japan.

Politics:

After the war he was appointed Assistant Attorney General of Alabama.

In 1946, at the age of 27, he was elect~ to the State Legislature. At this time he also practiced law in Claylon, Alabama. During his six years in the Alabama legislature, George was voted an outstanding legislator by the Press Corps. He was famous for his Trade School Act of '48 and his Industrial Act of '52 which was given credit for creating over 100,000 new jobs in Alabama.

As a delegate to the 1948 Democratic Convention, Mr. Wallace opposed the civil rights plank. He claimed that it was shoved through by the "Northern Libs," which included the then mayor of Minneapolis, H• ·bert H. Humphrey.

able rating from the AFL-CIO, and had the support of some prominent Alabama Negroes. The Newspapers · portrayed him as a moderate.

Things had changed by 1962, when he once again ran for Governor. This time he ran on a militantly segregationist platform. U.S. News & World Report wrote that he now,' reportedly, had the support of the Ku Klux Klan. Mr. Wallace came out of the primary as the front runner in a field of seven. He won the election with 55.9% of the vot~. At his inauguration on January 14, 1963, the new governor pledged "Segregation now-segregation tomorrow-and segregation forever."

Mr. Wallace rose quickly to national attention when he "stood in the school house door' ' in an effort to block admission of two Negroes to the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa in 1963. He finally stepped aside in compliance with a federal court order. On three seperate occasions, during 1963, President John F. Kennedy had to call in the National Guard or threaten to call in the Army. In 1965, President Johnson called in the National Guardto protect Civil Rights demonstraters on a march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. Mr. Wallace described the period as follows: "These were perilous days in the Southland. Alabama and other states were sat upon by professional agitators, revolutionary integration groups, and finally, reminiscent of the 1867 Reconstruction era, by the Federal Government itself."

sti II found ti me to be on the high school debate team, be quarterback on the football team, and assume the respon· sibilities of being the president of the senior class. For you sports nuts, he was also the Golden Gloves Champ in the bantam weight for two years.

He worked his way through college and law school. He received his LLB. degree in 1942. While in college, he

Mr. Wallace was appointed to a state judgeship and served until 1959. During this time, he sentenced a white man to life imprisonment for killing a Negro. This was the first time that there was such a conviction in many years.

Wallace was one of fourteen candidates for the Governorship of Alabama in 1958. He became one of two men in a runoff, which he later lost to State Attorney General John Patterson. During the campaign Mr. Wallace disavowed the Ku Klux Klan, got a favor-

Wallace fought the official guide1ines issued by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare for f o r c i b I e integration of hospitals, schools and other federally aided institutions. He signed a state law in 1966 declaring the federal guidelines to be null and void. A federal court overruled this law in 1967. Mr. Wallace said the state would obey an order to integrate 99 school districts, but "we don't like it."

' Since the governor of Alabama can: not succeed himself, Mrs. Wallace fol-

I I NATIONAL OUTLOOK 11

lowed her husband to the number one job in Alabama. Her term in office, al· though cut short due to her fatal ill· ness, followed closely that of her hus· band's.

During these offices, Mr. Wallace claims his accomplishments to be: $600 million in highway improvements, one new state university and 29 junior col· leges and trade schools, teacher salaries went up 44%, free text books were given to all students in grades 1· 12, state employees received pay increases and free hospitalization coverage, and he sold th'e governors limousine and two yachts and cut his expenditures by $100,000.

In 1968 Mr. Wallace carried his initiatives and beliefs to the level of the presidential candidacy. Mr. Wallace, unhappy with his Democratic Party, formed a coalition headed by himself. The American Independent Party (AIP) became a new force that was not to be dealt with lightly. His platform, in brief, stood for: restoration of State's Rights, condemnation of the past two Civil Rights Acts, periodic reconformation of Supreme and U.S. Court of Appeals Justices, full support for law and order, a federal works program to provide em· ployment for all employable citizens, an immediate 60% increase in Social Security payments to be followed by cost of living changes, revision of the tax structure to ease the load on small and middle income families, remove tax exemption for foundations and in: stitutions, increase farm price supports, refrain government from coersive action in strike settlements, development of mass transit systems in urban areas, complete support of the United Nations, deny foreign aid to countries that oppose U.S. military actions, if peaceful negotiations in Viet Nam failthen initiate a military conclusion through the use of conventional wea• pons, and last, but not least, to assure the military superiority of the country with a strong national defense.

Such an appeal "snow balled'' into much more support than was first anticipated. By the time the election was over, Mr. Wallace had accounted for approximately 13% of the popular vote, and he carried the five southern states. He almost succeeded in throwing the election into the House of Representa· tives.

In 1970 Mr. Wallace narrowly defeated his opponent, the incumbent Governor, Albert Preston Brewer. However, the three percentage point victory was enough. George Wallace now has the base that he needs for another grasp at the presidency. After the Alabaman inauguration, he lost no time in attacking President Nixon's administration: "The Republican Party knows it cannot win without the South in the next election, if Mr. Nixon don't give us back our schools, why, Wallace might have to run again in 1972."

This is exactly what happened. George Wallace has already entered several Democratic Primaries. The one to watch is Florida. Here, Mr. Wallace has a real chance to carry the state, which might indeed change the complexion of the race. Such a win could quiet some of the more vocal Democratic candidates. It might also force the present a d m i n i strati on into strengthening its already apparent "Southern Strategy."

There is little and probably no

chance that George Wallace will have any great effect on the Democratic Convention in Miami this summer. However, the possibility of reactivating Mr. Wallace's own American lndepen• dent Party is great. The November election, will most likely find another plurality victor. Thus, Mr. Wallace's dream of deadlocking the electoral college and barbaining off his holdings to the highest bidder is still a strong possibility.

You need not concern yourself with ideas of a President George Corley Wal• lace. But, at the same time, don't toss him off as a nonexistant entity. Mr. Wallace is very real. Even this far before the November election, he is receiving 10 to 12 percent of the votes cast in the latest Gallup survey on American Voters.

George Wallace may only be a pawn in the game of chess. But, come next November-when the field is narrowed down, so that only the Kings remainit may just be that the one little remaining pawn shall decide the outcome of the election.

12
~--~ ~~_:-. :·--.,;~·--~ •,~-.. _;,_.:~ >,;: _•; :. ": :-·'-·-·· r"-'•-• •, • •'

SAFETY& HYGEINE

NEW MANUAL READY

The Industrial Commission of Ohio's Division of Safety and Hygeine has announced that it is re-issuing its wellreceived "Industrial Arts and Vocational Education Safety Manual" and is currently making distribution of the popular illustrated safety book to shops in high schools, junior high schools, vocational, training and instruction shops, and colleges and universities.

Commenting on the reprinting and much broader dissemination, Industrial Commission Chairman M. Holland Krise stated that , "In recognition of the new patterns in education which are now emerging, the safety manual will be distributed to all industrial arts and vocational education facilities on every level in the state and not just to high schools as has been the case in the past.

"It has become apparent," Mr. Krise continued, "that there will be a much greater demand for skilled workers in the future and if Ohio is to meet this challenge we must make the necessary realignment of our educational priorities now, and we must de, it in the safest possible manner."

Mr. Krise went on to note that while the safety manual will help students learn the safe way of doing things and help protect them in school, it wi II also have the long-range benefit of making the entire industrial establishment in Ohio more safety conscious as more and more new employees go on the job having already been safety educated and oriented.

"And with this increased safety consciousness," Mr. Krise concluded, "will come even higher standards of safety and a reduction in accidents."

NEW-LOOK ARMY DOES ABOUT-FACE

The 1011owing article is from the New York Times of January 23, 1972.

The short, happy life of the newlook Army recruit ended last week as the military performed an abrupt about face.

Intent upon enticing young men into a hoped-for all-volunteer force, the

Army a year ago had loosened up on some age-old rules: Beer machines were installed in barracks, the barracks themselves were divided into private cubicles complete with curtains, the rigors of physical training were reduced and more emphasis placed on clas~room endeavor. But the results proved disappointing, for the brass and even for some of the recruits themselves.

Starting Feb. 14, it will be the old Army again-a return to the open, drab dormitories and the "daily dozen," said an Army spolesman. And a survey taken at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., indicated that two out of three recruits said the training had not been as strenuous as they'd expected; one out of five said he wanted more exercise.

WHERE WERE THE PROTESTERS

DURING THE INDIA-PAKISTAN WAR?

MINOR IN FLYING

The Air Force ROTC Detachment at Otterbein is now acceptin~ applications for the Air Force ROTC two-year program. This progra leads to an Air Force commission in just two years. Uuring this time you will receive $100 a month and may qualify for a two-year AFROTC scholarship and free flying lessons. If you have two years of college remaining at the graduate or undergraduate level or a combination of both, you may be eligible for this program. Begin by taking the Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) on Feb. 5 at 10:00 a.m in the AFROTC office. For more information contact Captain Showell at 882-3601, Ext. 303, or drop by the AFROTr. office in Towers Hall, Room 15.

U. S. AIR FORCE ROTC

i '
13

CAMPUS

Calendar

Continued fr~m page 6

Mayne Hall Open House

Wednesday-Feb. 16 - 6:00 p.m.-

CamP_us Movie at Campus Center

Friday & Saturday - February 18 & 19 - (7:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Friday & 9 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Saturday) - Campus Crusade for Christ Retreat.

Friday - Feb. 25 - 10:00 p.m.Kappa Phi Omega pajama party for cledges

Tuesday - February 29 - 5:00 p.m. Alpha Lambda Delta Initiation.

Friday - March 3 - 8:00 p.m.Campus Movie - Science Hall

Saturday - March 4 - 2:00 p.m.

Home Economics Cl ub Style Show at Campus Center.

Saturday - March 4 - 8:30 p.m.-

Pi Kappa Phi Coed.

Friday - April 7 • 7 :00 p.m. • Kappa Phi Omega Hell Night & pajama party

Saturday - April 8 · 8:30 p.m.Pi Kappa Phi Coed.

-Saturday - -April 15 · 8:00 p.m.-

Campus Movie• Science Half

Friday - April 21 • 8:00 p.m. -

Campus Movie • Science Hall

Saturday - April 22 - 8:30 p.m. -

Pi Kappa Phi Coed.

Saturday -- May 6 - 8:00 p.m. -

Campus Movie • Science Half

Friday - May 12 - 8:00 p.m. -

Campus Movie• Science Ha!I

The following events have been cancelled:

January 29 - Tau Delta Coed

February 16 · Thrift Shop Book Sale.

February 26 - Panhellenic Council Formal

"WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?"

Columbus' only Repertory Theatre is opening its 1972 season with the box-office and movie hit "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" This drama, hailed by critics as a crucial event in the birth of contemporary theatre, will be presented at the First Unitarian Church, - 93 W. Weisheimer on Friday, Saturday, Sunday evenings at 8:00 on the consecutive weekends of February 4,5,6, , and February 11, 12,13. The public is cordially invited. Tickets are $2.00, $1.25 for students, and can be reserved by calling the First Unitarian Church (267-4946) Feb. 1,2,3 • 8,9, 10 from

6-9 p.m. or purchased at the door ½ hour before curtain time.

"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" will open a month long Festival of the Arts for Columbus residents at First Unitarian. The church feels fortunate to have this gifted group of actors perform as part of the Festival. The remaining weekends will include nights of poetry, dance, music, and drama. An exhibit of art by local artists will be on display within the church February 19 through March 5. Contact the First Unitarian Church for further information.

14
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WOBN

TUESDAY

5:26 SIGN ON

6:27 BE STILL & KNOW

6:30 SERENADE IN BLUE

6:00 SILHOUETTE

6:30 NEWS-15

6:45 HUMOR IN THE NEWS

7:00 TOP OF THE POPS

8:00 OTTERBEIN BASKETBALL-THE OTTERS TRAVEL TO TIFFIN TO TAKE ON HEIDELBERG COLLEGE JOIN BRETT MOOREHEAD, CRAIG PARSONS,PAM HILL ANO MIKE WASYLIK FOR ALL THE ACTION

10:00 NEWS

10:05 STRAWBERRY HILL with STAN TAYLOR TONIGHT'S GUEST MIKE FARLEY

11:00 NEWS· 15

11:16 HELIX

12:00 THE NEW UNTITLED SHOW with GARY BRADSHAW & STEPHEN DEW SPOTLIGHT! NG THE GRATEFUL DEAD

WEDNESDAY

5:26 SIGN ON

5:27 BE STILL & KNOW

5:30 AMBASSADORS FOR CHRIST

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC TIME 6:00 POWER LINE 6:30 NEWS-15

6:46 RADIO-CANADA PRESENTS NORTH BY SEA

7:00 STORY OF JAZZ

8:00 NEWS

8:05 GENERATION GAP with Or. GRISS TONIGHT HAWAII CALLS

8:30 THE PAM & DEE SHOW WITH POP ROCK

9:00' NEWS

9:05 THE SLICK JAM FACTORY with GAR VANCE

10:00 NEWS

10:05 THE MCFARREN THING with BILL MCFARREN FEATURING TOP40

11:00 NEWS-15

11:15 V.0.I.C.E. PRESENTS "FRATERNITY AND SORORITY PLEDGING"

12:00 JAZZ NIGHT TRAIN with CRAIG PARSONS RIDING WITH BILL EVANS ANO OSCAR PETERSON

THURSDAY

5:26 SIGN ON

5:27 BE STILL& KNOW

5:30 ORIENTAL MUSIC

6:00 SERENADE IN BLUE

6:30 NEWS-15

6:45 SPORTS WHIRL with JEFF & CATHY

7:00 IT'S A WOMAN'S WORLD with JANE CALHOUN & JO ALICE BAILEY

7:16 BRITISH LIFE with CRAIG PARSONS VENT URE TO 10 DOWNING STREET AND TO AN ENGILSH PUB

7:30 MEANDERING IN MELODY with DAVE HAMMOND

8:00 NEWS

8:05 THE SWEET LEAF SHOW with CRAIG

WORKS BY BERIO, DIAMOND, ANO SATIE

11 :00 NEWS - 15

11:15 V.0.I.C.E,-"OTTEROOLLIES OR HUMAN BEINGS" SEXISM AT OTTERBEIN COLLEGE

THIS WEEK'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS

TONIGHT: 6:30, CBS News with Walter Cronkite. 8:30, The Advocates scrutinize Japanese-American relations on channel 34.

WEDNESDAY: 6:30, CBS News with Walter Cronkite. 8:00, Public Affair/· Election '12 reports from Iowa on channel 34. 10:00, XI Olympic Winter Games begin • with ceremonies from Sapporo, Japan, on channel 4.

THURSDAY: 6:30, CBS News with Walter Cronkite. 10:00, XI Olympic Winter Games on channel 4.

FRIDAY: 6;30, CBS News with Walter Cronkite. 8:30, "M," a classic psychological thriller with Peter Lorre on channel 34. 8:30 XI Olympic Winter Games on channel 4. 11 :30, Chiller presents two all-time favorites-Return of Dr. Mabuse and The Flying Seroent.

MEDIA
FM 15
PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE 91.5
SCHNEIDER
THE ROLLING STONES 9:00 NEWS 9:05 SPOTLIGHT with BRUCE FLINCHBAUGH & GREG VAWTER FALLS ON STEPHEN STILLS 10:00 NEWS 10:05 SOMETHING IN THE AIR with THOM HEAVEY TONIGHT JERRY REED 11:00 NEWS - 15 11:15 HELIX 12:00 THE QUIET PLACE with TOM APPLEGATE EASY LISTENING FRIDAY 5:56 SIGN ON 5:57 BE STILL & KNOW 6:00 ROCK PERSPECTIVES 6:30 NEWS· 15 6:45 OTTERBEIN SPORTSLINE with DEB & BILL 7:00 THE CHILDREN'S STORY HOUR 8:00 NEWS 8:05 TOP OF THE POPS 9:00 NEWS 9:05 TOP OF THE POPS 10:00 NEWS 10:05 TOP OF THE POPS 11:00 NEWS· 15 11:16 SIGN OFF SATURDAY 5:56 SIGN ON '5:57 BE STILL & KNOW 6:00 WITNESS with LARRY BOR· MUTH 6:30 NEWS -15 6:45 TRAVEL IN SONG 7:00 TOP OF THE POPS 8:00 OTTERBEIN BASKETBALL ACTION TAKES PLACE IN MAR IETTA 10:00 NEWS 10:05 TOP OF THE POPS 11:00 NEWS - 15 11:16 SIGN OFF SUNDAY 9:30 SUNDAY MORNING CHURCH 5:56 SIGN ON 5:57 BE STILL & KNOW 6:00 CAMPUS CRUSADE 6:16 NAVY PRESENTS 6:30 NEWS· 16 6:45 GERMAN PRESS REVIEW 7:00 YOUR OTHER EAR with GEOFF MAYFIELD & MARK CUNNING• HAM SAN FRANCISCO-ROOT OF THE ROCK REVOLUTION 8:00 NEWS 8:05 BROADWAY TONIGHT with DEBBIE BOWSHER 9:00 NEWS 9:05 SO WHAT'S NEW? with DAN BUSH 10:00 NEWS 10:05 THE LISTENING ROOM with MAUr<Y NEWBURGER TONIGHT
CHARLESTON & BRUCE
FEATURING
FREE PREGNANCY COUNSELING AND INFO CALL (COLLECT) IN OHIO 216/229-4444 WOMEN'S MEDICAL ~SSISTANCE 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. 7 days (NO FEE REQUIRED)

OPEN FORUM with PRESIDENT KERR

DATE •• THURSD~Y , FEBRUARY 3

TIME •.10 P.M. TO ???

PLACE •• DAVIS ANNEX LOUNGE

All students are invited and encouraged to bring concerns and questions.

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!!

Sponsored by Men's Residence Hall Council

ENJOY WORKING WITH PEOPLE?

APPLY NOW FOR A COUNSELORS POSITION IN THE MEN'S RESIDENCE HALL PROGRAM

QUALIFICATIONS:

I - IN GOOD ACADEMIC AND SOCIAL STANDING WITH OTTERBEIN

2 - PRESENT FRESHMEN, SOPHOMORES. AND JUNIORS ARE ELIGIBLE

APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS ••

I - STUDENT CENTER DESK

2 - STUDENT PERSONNEL OFFICE

3 - MR. VAUGHN, GARST HALL

4. MR. RYAN, DAVIS HALL Applications

be returned to the Student
Office
, , I •
must
Personnel
prior to 5:00 p.m., Friday, February 11, 1972. Monday thru Saturday, 4 p.m . to 8:30 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.
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