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HOMES

DESIGN

LIVING

SHOPPING

FOOD

Heritage & Restoration

TENDING BAR WITH PASSION FAMILY SPACE IN AN OLDER HOME

RESTORING RIDEAU HALL

CONDO LIVING IN THE GLEBE

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Winter 2018

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> LIVING

60

22 RESTORATION Checking out the most recent restoration projects at Rideau Hall

32 CAPITAL COLOURS Making sense of Pantone’s colour of the year, Ultra Violet

> HOME

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10 DESIGNS ON HOME A home with artistic flair and preservation in the Glebe 13 IN STYLE When a home calls your name . . . 4 ottawaathome.ca WINTER 2018

53

24 CONDO LIVING A busy professional couple transition from a large Rockcliffe Park home to a contemporary space in the Glebe

06 EDITOR’S NOTE For the love of cocktails and the arts

FAMILY LIVING Ottawa At Home’s Jennifer Tackaberry shares her home life with readers

38 COVER OLD & NEW An older home evolves with facelifts to freshen up its original character

STREET STYLE The local coffee shop scene

45

TREASURES Open shelf display tips

46

NEW & NOTABLE Restoring the Ottawa Little Theatre and other tidbits of taste and lifestyle

48

NEIGHBOURHOOD ON THE MOVE A look into the Glebe

50

MY WAY What’s in store for two of Ottawa’s most popular outdoor markets?

53 FIT AT HOME Get stretching

18 STEP INSIDE The wonderful world of antiques

COVER PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

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55 GIVING BACK Meet the family behind Maddy’s Gala 68 BACK STORY The influence of Frank Lloyd Wright in the Nation’s Capital

> FOOD

57 FOOD THOUGHTS Tastes of St. Lucia

60 LET’S DISH Turning the glass on four of Ottawa’s finest bartenders 64 DINING OUT Upscale comfort food 67 PAULA’S BITES Sweet temptation of chocolate


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EDITOR’S NOTE

“Come, gentlemen, I hope we shall drink down all unkindness.” — WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

The art of drinking

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I’m really not much of a drinker, but . . . I do love a party and the look of a fancy cocktail excites me! My butler’s pantry at home is well stocked with liquor, liqueurs and a multitude of glasses to go along with an array of exotically-named beverages and creative libations. They may actually get dusted off and put to use a few times a year, and you might want to check the expiry date on some bottles. But, I do love the look of them on display – in my mind, a fully-stocked bar is like the finishing touch of a well-dressed home. The current mood of the world today sometimes calls for a stiff drink, which is perhaps why the bar scene is becoming one of the hottest lifestyle trends. The person serving those drinks garners great respect in the hospitality industry, and Paula Roy turned the glass on four highly-regarded bartenders around Ottawa to gain some personal insights into what makes a mixoligist tick. The newly revamped Zoe’s Lounge at the historic Chateau Laurier hotel was a fitting backdrop for this feature, which combines the trend with this issue’s theme of Heritage & Restoration. We also take a look at a variety of places rooted in history. Andrew King’s Back Story reveals Ottawa’s connections to famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, and the feature helps to explain why we see his influence dotted about the capital. In our New & Notable column, Sandy Connell takes us to the Ottawa Little Theatre which has recently been restored with great respect to its heritage. I have fond memories of this King Edward Street theatre from my youth. When we moved from Montreal to Ottawa in the late 1970s, my mother struggled to make the move easier for her two teenaged daughters with a penchant for dramatic arts. Time spent in workshops at the Ottawa Little Theatre was an ideal solution for me and my sister. The Ottawa community has made significant contributions to the arts in the past several years, which serves our society well. Discovering and preserving where you find joy is a powerful experience, and the arts offer a great escape from the world while allowing us to reflect on the past and be hopeful for the future. In reflection,

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ASK THE EXPERT EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Mary Taggart CREATIVE DIRECTOR Tanya Connolly-Holmes Caroline Mitchell, Assistant Showroom Manager Mondeau Bathroom & Kitchen

How can we ensure Q that our renovation will blend in with the look of our heritage home?

A

Two rooms that typically require updating in older homes are the kitchen and bathroom. But bringing them up-to-date doesn’t mean you have to compromise on the integrity of a home’s heritage. For the bathroom, opt for timeless pieces that suit other details of the home. Give your bathroom a spa-inspired feel with modern amenities like sinks, tubs and toilets and preserve the style of the home through classic fixtures and accessories. Small space is often an issue with heritage homes and there are many solutions on the market today to create a spa experience within a limited area. There are now options to install shower columns anywhere in your shower, without limiting yourself to the existing plumbing or outside walls. Sinks now come in many shapes and sizes to fit into any small space. For the kitchen, consider implementing an apron sink, which is high in style and functionality and well-suited to the architecture of an older home. Fireclay apron sinks bring a rustic feel to any contemporary or classic design. A stylish hood fan is a modern amenity that blends well into older homes. Modernize both spaces with accent pieces. Consider incorporating fixtures with wood accents and/or a black finish. Even bronze, champagne bronze or polished brass fixtures embrace the look of eras gone by, with a modern feel that will stand the test of time and blend seamlessly into your heritage home. Contact Caroline: cmitchell@mondeau.ca

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ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jane Whiting PHOTO EDITOR Mark Holleron FOOD EDITOR Paula Roy FOOD CONTRIBUTOR Korey Kealey STYLE/BEAUTY CONTRIBUTOR Melissa Shabinsky CONTRIBUTORS Catherine Clark, Vera Cody, Sandy Connell, Chloe Girvan, Rochelle James, Katie Hession, Andrew King, Lianne Laing, Ted Simpson PROOF READER Paula Roy WEB EDITOR Olivia Taggart ADVERTISING Jennifer Tackaberry PRODUCTION Celine Paquette, Regan Van Dusen ADMINISTRATION David Lindsay FINANCE MANAGER Danial Taggart PUBLISHER Mary Taggart PUBLISHED BY Ottawa At Home Media Inc. CONTACT US General inquiries: editor@ottawaathome.ca ADVERTISING advertising@ottawaathome.ca DIRECTOR OF NEWSSTAND Craig Sweetman SUBSCRIPTIONS admin@ottawaathome.ca CIRCULATION 30,000 copies printed 5 times per year 5-issue subscription $25.00

media inc.

Contents © 2018. Reproduction of advertisements or articles appearing in Ottawa At Home, in whole or in part, is forbidden without the written permission of the publisher. Ottawa At Home and Ottawa At Home Media Inc. shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with any advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement.


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HOME Designs On Home

DETAILED SIMPLICITY BY MARY TAGGART

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON


S

uzanne McCarthy started out as a volunteer for the Glebe House Tour & Tea over 10 years ago. Today, she chairs the committee of 11 women who work every fall to open the doors of inspiring homes in the area to support The Glebe Neighbourhood Activities Group. As a homeowner in the Glebe community, Suzanne documents her journey with a passion for food, flowers, décor and photography on her blog: suzanne-mccarthy.com. She shares a 120-year-old home with her husband, Simon Kennedy, and two of their three children. The 1,500 squarefoot home is ever evolving as each room is re-purposed to adapt to the lifestyle changes of a growing family. The home is a classic Glebe style; red brick with a welcoming front porch. While the entrance isn’t grand, Suzanne has cleverly made the space work for seasonal weather in Ottawa with purposeful baskets and hooks. A neutral colour

FACING PAGE: A GALLERY WALL BEHIND THE LIVING ROOM SOFA FEATURES PAINTINGS BY TIMOTHY MCCARTHY-KENNEDY, AND SUZANNE’S AUNT GERTRUDE DUFFY’S VERSION OF A MATISSE STILL LIFE. THIS PAGE CLOCKWISE: SUZANNE’S FONDNESS FOR ELEPHANTS INSPIRED HER TO TURN A TEA TOWEL INTO A DECORATIVE CUSHION; SUZANNE’S WHIMSICAL STYLE BLENDS WITH HER THOUGHTFUL DÉCOR; THE PAINTED BANISTER ADDS JUST THE RIGHT TOUCH OF COLOUR IN THE FRONT ENTRY WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 11


“I have a serious tendency towards de-cluttering and like spaces that are not overfilled. I’ll opt to decorate with flowers or things from nature, such as stones and shells, rather than objects and doodads.” — SUZANNE McCARTHY

THIS PAGE: MODERN AMENITIES IN THE KITCHEN ALLOW FOR GOURMET COOKING. THE USE OF ORIGINAL MATERIALS LIKE REPURPOSING THE FLOORING FOR THE ISLAND AND SHELVING HELPS TO MAINTAIN THE INTEGRITY OF THE HOME.

scheme adds some personality in the front hall, where the original banister is painted in just the right tone of grey so that it stands out as a decorative architectural detail without drawing too much attention in a small space. Door frames painted in a custom-mixed Farrow & Ball teal shade have the same detailed touch of colour to inject personality without overtaking the space. 12 ottawaathome.ca WINTER 2018

Simple decorative elements are a trademark of Suzanne’s personal style, with fresh flowers, natural influences and pops of colour as a staple in the wellorganized spaces. “I approach decorating with an eye toward simplicity,” she says. “I have a serious tendency towards decluttering and like spaces that are not overfilled. I’ll opt to decorate with flowers or things from nature, such as stones and

shells, rather than objects and doodads.” The main floor is comprised of three principal rooms where evidence of Suzanne’s talent for simplistic display is exhibited. A neutral-toned sofa is dressed with textiles including a pillow that Suzanne made from an elephantprint tea towel. Above the sofa, a gallery wall displays the talent of other members of the family, and includes a piece by Suzanne’s son Timothy McCarthyKennedy, who is a fine arts student at the University of Ottawa. Most of the kitchen has been renovated, restored and repurposed. Some of the original hardwood flooring has now become a part of the centre island, and has also been used as open shelving along one wall. A family with a passion for cooking needs modern amenities, but they blend well into the kitchen without overshadowing the original character of the room. The charm of a much-loved home that has been well preserved and cared for by only three previous homeowners is evident in every room. While modifications and enhancements were made by previous owners throughout the years, Suzanne and her family have contributed to the updating process since buying the century-old home in 2004. Each modification has complemented the integrity of a character home that reflects the traditions of one of Ottawa’s most established communities.


HOME InStyle

THE FOREVER HOME BY CHLOE GIRVAN @MOM_INTERRUPTED PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

THIS PAGE: THE FRONT DOOR FEATURES STAINED GLASS AND A HAND TURNED DOORBELL, BOTH AUTHENTIC TO THE VICTORIAN ERA, IN WHICH THE HOME WAS BUILT. THE FRONT HALL ARCHITECTURE EXTENDS THE PERIOD VIBE THAT IS CARRIED THROUGHOUT THE HOME. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 13


L

inda and Steve Warne’s decision to purchase a century-old home in Manotick might provide the perfect illustration of fate, persistence and hard work aligning to make a dream come true. Happily settled in a new home in Barrhaven, Linda was not expecting to fall madly in love with a house built in 1880 until it kept reappearing in her life. Convinced deep down that this property was meant to belong to her family, Linda began strategizing, dreaming and even buying furniture for real estate that she might never own. Steve came on board with the plan, and after they were able to sell their current residence for an appropriate price, the family commenced renovations and restoration on their newly-acquired rural haven. Thanks to Linda’s expertise as a professional stager and owner of Welcome Home Staging and design plus Steve’s construction capabilities, the couple was able to complete many improvement projects without outside assistance. The entire experience has provided ample fodder for Steve’s morning radio show, which he hosts at

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE: LINDA AND STEVE ON THE FRONT PORCH; THE LIVING ROOM INCLUDES A COMBINATION OF NEW FURNITURE AND VINTAGE FINDS. STEVE RIGGED A 1938 RCA FLOOR MODEL RADIO TO ACCOMMODATE THEIR SONOS SYSTEM; THE THIRD FLOOR BEDROOM FEATURES EXPOSED STONE WALLS; MODERN AMENITIES BLEND IN SUBTLY, SURROUNDED BY ANTIQUE PIECES

14 ottawaathome.ca WINTER 2018


“My co-hosts especially love using the cash register sound effect when discussing our most current household project.”— STEVE WARNE

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE: THE UPPER HALL IS SPACIOUS ENOUGH TO ALLOW FOR A ROOMY SITTING AREA; AN IRON BED IN THE MASTER BEDROOM LENDS ITSELF TO THE VINTAGE AIR OF THE DÉCOR; CLEVER USE OF AN UNUSED BEDROOM ALLOWS FOR A LARGE WALK- IN CLOSET THAT INCLUDES A LAUNDRY ROOM; A CLOSET OFF THE LIVING ROOM WAS TRANSFORMED INTO A MAIN FLOOR POWDER ROOM; TOP VIEW OF PERIOD ARCHITECTURE. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 15


TSN 1200 in Ottawa. “My co-hosts especially love using the cash register sound effect when discussing our most current household project.” Specialists were brought in for bigger jobs like installing new air conditioning, furnace, hot water heater, sump pump and septic system. Scheel Window & Door replaced over twenty windows, making the house efficient and “super cozy.” The stucco-covered upstairs walls were smoothed with drywall and painted in colours to make every interior view fresh and cheerful. New hardwood floors on the main level were warmed up with the help of Athens Rugs. Each well-curated room is a filled with a blend of new pieces and antique furnishings, acquired on beloved excursions and refinished by Steve. Crisp linens and textured fabrics in airy spaces complete the look and feel of the Warne’s modern farmhouse. Just through the original front door, a bright, high-ceilinged foyer and stately curved staircase are positioned to welcome and create awe in the masterpiece home. In the sunny living room, chunky windowsills were repurposed to hold objects and a multitude of glowing candles. A former closet, converted to a powder room by Steve, adds modern convenience, while a grand English armoire situated nearby holds coats and belongings. A collection of books and a vintage 1938 radio add character and personal history to the space. Renovations to the kitchen included installing a fresh backsplash and replacing a large modern island with a generous farmhouse-style table. A small fireplace now serves to create intimacy in this gathering space, positioned near to a treasured hutch, which was purchased for a song in Smiths Falls, says Linda. The upstairs master bedroom features stunning outdoor views and connects to a walk-in closet through a brilliantly-placed laundry room. Across a cheerful landing is son Michael’s restful and orderly room which is decorated “just the way he likes it.” Walls removed by previous owners expose the staircase leading to daughter Lindsay’s studio-style attic bedroom. Eight screened skylights, tin ceiling, exposed stone and slanted ceilings combine to create a dazzling paradise for dreaming, studying or spending time with friends. Located on three acres, half covered in trees, the home’s stone exterior and 16 ottawaathome.ca WINTER 2018


THIS PAGE: THE RENOVATED BATHROOM CARRIES ON THE ANTIQUE FEELING WITH A TIN INSPIRED CEILING AND VINTAGE STYLE BASIN SINK; THE BEDROOM COMBINES A FEELING OF PAST AND PRESENT TO TRANSITION EASILY OFF THE OPEN HALLWAY.

surroundings are essential to its allure. The Warne’s favourite outdoor areas include the lush gardens, a gazebo, and front porch with a twelve-foot church pew that was purchased at auction. Michael, who has autism, loves to walk the long freshly-paved driveway leading up to the house, and the family’s cat Oliver also enjoys his new freedom to roam and keep all woodland creatures at bay. In July, the Warnes will celebrate two years “just outside of town” and they couldn’t be

more content. When asked how she feels about their home, Linda cannot help but smile. “I still can’t believe that we are here and feel like I need to be pinched. I love everything about this house including its great energy. It is a perfect testimony to our taste and style and I am still enjoying the permission to be imperfect that comes with redesigning and styling an older home. I hope we live here forever.” WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 17


HOME Step Inside

ERNEST JOHNSON 18 ottawaathome.ca WINTER 2018


THE

extraordinary WORLD OF ANTIQUES BY VERA CODY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

A

telephone call thirty years ago from an attorney representing the estate of a family friend changed Ernest Johnson’s life forever. He was bequeathed numerous Victorian pieces of furniture for which he had no real need. With a British mother and Italian father, Ernest had a great understanding of the Old World from an early age, having grown up surrounded by antiques. But with no sense of the real value of these inherited pieces, he contacted recommended antique dealers to ascertain their age and worth. Not satisfied with their information, he began his quest to learn everything he could about the world of antiques. An active member of the Canadian Antique Dealers Association (CADA), Ernest prides himself on being selftaught. He is recognized as one of the preeminent antique dealers in the country, specializing in 18th to 20th century English, European, Asian Fine and Decorative Art. He started selling at the Ottawa Antique Market, then Bloomsbury Antiques. Ernest established his own storefront in the early 1990s across from

Rideau Hall; he also sold pieces at the Astrolabe Gallery. He is now back at the Ottawa Antique Market, a cooperative specializing in 20th century, mid-century modern furniture, decorative arts, estate jewellery, Canadiana, vintage clothing and textiles. Ernest also attracts buyers and sellers from all over the world via his website: ernestjohnsonantiques.com. What do you enjoy about the antiques business? Meeting people from all walks

WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 19


Old Ottawa

soon, only a footbridge away from Lansdowne

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of life and hearing about their pieces and how they came to possess them. There are a lot of surprises in this business. Clients ask me to come look at their items and I often expect to see something utilitarian, but what they actually have is extraordinary. Do you have favourite antiques at home? I like to surround myself with pieces that are well crafted, that amuse me, but also have a serious element to them. With my discerning eye they have to be very special. It is important to protect antiques and I keep the more sensitive pieces at home. I have an 18th century Italian Neapolitan commode in pristine condition, with its original Sienna marble top. It was discovered in a house that was being remodelled and when the existing plaster came down it was hidden behind a wall underneath the stairwell, secreted away. Do you think of a specific client when you find a piece? I buy something because I instinctually like it and hope it translates to my client base. I would never purchase something on the basis that I want to sell it to a specific person. If I come across items that I know someone collects I would of course contact them. No matter what a client buys, I afford them the opportunity to live with it for a few days to see if it fits in or not. It may look great on the sales floor, but may not work in their

home. I do not want anyone to have buyer’s remorse. How does someone integrate antiques into their home? Antiques don’t always have to blend in or complement your other furniture in terms of color or form. It is almost better that they juxtapose because it makes each piece stand out, which I like. I am not a decorator, but have helped decorate people’s homes with my pieces or from familiar sources that I know will suit their home environment. My younger clients cannot believe that a piece over 100 years old can be in such good shape. I tell them that antiques were handmade and created to last.

THIS PAGE CLOCKWISE: A FINE 19TH CENTURY INLAID MAHOGANY TEA CADDY, SIGNED BLOOMFIELD 1815, SITS AMONGST A VARIED COLLECTION OF ANTIQUE OBJECTS; THE STRIDING TIGER, A 19TH CENTURY BARBEDIENNE EDITION BRONZE BY ANTOINE LOUIS BARYE (1796-1875) HOLDS A PROMINENT PLACE NEXT TO A FINELY CARVED, GILDED 19TH CENTURY GILTWOOD BUDDHA, BURMESE CIRCA 1890 ;THE DIRECTOIRE PERIOD BRASS INLAID MAHOGANY SIDE CHAIR, FRANCE CIRCA 1800, IS ONE IN A COLLECTION OF SIX.

What does your future hold? From my early working years in menswear retail, to instructing tennis and then owning two catering companies, I have had a very interesting and satisfying life; it’s been an extraordinary journey. I happily found my passion in the magical world of antiques and am driven by what I do. The antiques business is hundreds of years old and I think it is going to continually reinvent itself. Things change constantly based on tastes, styles, needs and wants. It is never boring because there are so many layers to it. It is definitely not a get-rich business, rather more an addiction. but I know this world I discovered so many years ago is where I am meant to be. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 21


HOME Restoration

A MAJESTIC GATHERING BY ROCHELLE JAMES

PHOTOS BY SGT JOHANIE MAHEU, RIDEAU HALL

I

n 1838, stonemason Thomas McKay built a home for his family that would become a place for all Canadians for centuries to come. Nestled atop a winding path through 79 acres of forest steeped in rich and powerful history, Rideau Hall has become one of Canada’s most loved buildings. As the official residence and workplace of every governor general of Canada since 1867, Rideau Hall has hosted kings, queens, heads of state, and it is where exceptional Canadians are honoured for their bravery and achievements. Now home to Her Excellency, the Right Honourable Julie Payette, the 29th Governor General of Canada, Rideau Hall welcomes more than 200,000 visitors each year to its grounds and 22 ottawaathome.ca WINTER 2018

to tour its stately rooms. Over the years, various changes have been made to the majestic old building to meet the demands of modern times. Last year, the National Capital Commission (NCC) undertook several legacy projects to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation. The projects included the transformation of the iconic arrival area into a site for celebrations with the renewal of the forecourt and the rehabilitation of The Fountain of Hope. “These renovations are part of a longer term vision for Rideau Hall,” says Jamie Brown, project manager and landscape architect for the NCC. “They allow Rideau Hall to extend its ceremonial and cultural spaces outdoors with a capacity to

accommodate over 1,000 people.” The forecourt is where the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge launched their first Royal Tour together in Canada in 2011, and in 2015 it is where Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his cabinet were sworn in. The original fountain was built in 1982 to mark the International Year of Disabled Persons and named in honour of Terry Fox and his Marathon of Hope. But the asphalt structure was beginning to show signs of deterioration, and the preservation of the fountain’s complex systems can present a contradictory challenge for designers as the play of water over sculptured forms can often threaten a fountain’s long-term stability.


“For the design of the new forecourt, we had three goals to consider,” explains Jamie. “We had to make sure to follow the landscape guidelines for the ceremonial grounds of Rideau Hall; we had to respect and incorporate the heritage value of the residence; and we had to ensure we paid homage to the first fountain.” The result is a stunning array of engineering and beauty that harmoniously blends the dignity of the residence with today’s robust technology and safety regulations. The cylindrical design mirrors the classic contours of the storied circular drive, while being flush to the ground. With more than 70 programmable water jets, the new fountain also incorporates customizable lighting to showcase the facade of the residence, as well as to illuminate the forecourt. Rather than asphalt, granite was chosen because of its durability and its ability to withstand our Canadian climate. “At Rideau Hall, we are surrounded by the Canadian story, and the wonder that is the Canadian landscape,” says Christine MacIntyre, an executive director in the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General.

“This new entrance serves as an impressive and welcoming focal point for all seasons.” From the architecture of the doors of The Queen’s Entrance, to the inspiration taken from the art of the Group of Seven in the etched glass and woodwork of the doorframe, as well as the connection of indoor and outdoor elements in the forecourt, Rideau Hall is a delicate balance of formality and informality. To celebrate winter in the nation’s capital, Rideau Hall encourages visitors to skate amongst the trees and under the stars, and to walk the snow-covered paths. The Winter Pavilion, built in 1895 to store butter and cheese, now offers a crackling fire and a warm place to lace up skates. Skating has been a long-standing experience at Rideau Hall, since Lord Dufferin built the first rink in 1872.  Today, the public rink is made of natural ice with a refrigerated blanket that can last until the milder temperatures in March. “There is a real sense that history has come alive for all Canadians with these restorations,” says Christine. “Rideau Hall is, after all, a public space that belongs to everyone.”

ASK THE EXPERT

Marina Medina Kitchen & Bath Designer, Astro Design Centre

How can a kitchen Q renovation maintain an older home’s integrity while incorporating modern conveniences?

A

Renovation of an older home often creates the challenge of preserving the character and charm of a time-honoured building while introducing the conveniences expected from a modern kitchen. Millwork manufacturers offer a great selection of traditional and transitional cabinet door styles and finishing details that work well with classic architectural elements. New appliances can be panelled in order to successfully integrate high-performance technologies within the look of a classic kitchen. Going with a timeless, classic style doesn’t mean foregoing the elements that can improve convenience or functionality. Push-to-open mechanisms, and drawers with integrated charging stations are just a few of the many options for clever storage solutions. When feasible it is important to restore rather than replace some of the existing features that lend their charm to the space – such as windows, crown mouldings, ceiling details, existing brick or stone. Contact Marina: marina@astrodesigncentre.com 613-749-1902

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HOME Condo Living THIS PAGE: THE ETHANOL FIREPLACE DIVIDES THE LIVING AND DINING ROOM. THE BAKER FURNITURE, FROM CADIEUX INTERIORS, WAS BROUGHT OVER FROM THE ROCKCLIFFE PARK HOME.

SMART & SOPHISTICATED STYLE BY JANE WHITING PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

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M

oving from the leafy lanes of Rockcliffe Park to a tree-lined avenue in the Glebe is not very far in terms of distance from one upscale Ottawa neighbourhood to another. But, transitioning from a five-bedroom, family home in a quiet village enclave to a contemporary condo in a more urban locale is quite a lifestyle change. When the time came for a professional couple to explore new options, empty nesters Grant McDonald and Carol Devenny looked at condos in New Edinburgh and Westboro, before deciding to buy in the Glebe. They particularly liked the ability to customize the flexible space in a new four-storey building by Moda Developments, that offered 11 spacious condo units. The red-brick building blends well with older homes in the Glebe, and their new 2,400 square-foot condo is designed with smart, sophisticated style. While the home needed sufficient wall space to showcase the couple’s prized collection of Canadian art, “It was also about having a big, open area to fit our grand piano,” notes Carol.

THIS PAGE: GRANT AND CAROL MANAGED TO MAKE ROOM FOR THEIR BELOVED PIANO IN THE GRAND OPEN CONCEPT SPACE; THE SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL CHANDELIER WAS HAND-PICKED BY CAROL AND IS PERFECTLY POSITIONED ABOVE THE TRADITIONAL DINING ROOM TABLE. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 25


THIS PAGE: THE MIX OF WHITE WITH WALNUT WOODWORK ADDS DIMENSION AND WARMTH TO THE OPEN CONCEPT. FACING PAGE CLOCKWISE: A FOURTEEN-FOOT ISLAND FLOATS EASILY IN THE MAGNIFICENT SPACE WHILE A COZIER NOOK AT THE END OF THE KITCHEN PROVIDES A MORE INTIMATE DINING AREA.

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“Our lifestyle has changed in terms of how we shop and eat. We buy more food locally, go out more to restaurants on Bank Street, and like to walk to games at Lansdowne.” — GRANT MCDONALD

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THE CONDO DESIGN To help fit large landscapes by Gordon Harrison and other local artists into the décor, as well as maximize living space and natural light, they enlisted the skill of interior designer Penny Southam of Southam Design. “Penny came in and just ripped the layout plan apart, and gave us exactly what we wanted – and more,” says Grant. Carol laughs as she recalls that Penny

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BOTH GRANT AND CAROL HAVE BUSY PROFESSIONAL CAREERS. THEIR MORNING RITUAL IS SEAMLESS WITH WELLORGANIZED CLOSETS THAT OFFER HIS AND HER SECTIONS. SPECIAL FEATURES INCLUDE EASY GLIDE SHELVING AND LIGHTED RODS TO ENSURE A SMOOTH DRESSING ROUTINE. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 29


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looked at the closets and said, “I’m not a miracle worker!” But they both agree that she actually was, and not only utilized the available space very effectively, but worked closely with the building trades to customize it. In collaboration with Deslaurier Kitchens, Penny designed the huge open kitchen, and commissioned customized cabinetry by Handwerk Interiors, who were used in many areas of the home. Featuring white cabinetry framed with walnut accents, and minimal upper cabinets to allow for a clean, lighter feel, the kitchen is anchored by a 14-foot quartz-topped island that houses two wine fridges. A corner seating nook with built-in banquettes by Handwerk adds a cozy element and extra under-seat storage. The dining area has room for a long table that can easily sit 12-14, and is highlighted by a delicate chandelier of Swarovski crystals that Carol personally picked out. A wall of windows looks out onto the balcony on one side of the room, and a contemporary fireplace structure with an open flame, defines the space from the living room. “Penny suggested

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the ethanol fireplace to utilize a structural pillar and create a see-through feature,” explains Grant. While Carol and Grant are both piano players, they confess to not practicing too often. Still, the grand piano gets a work out when they bring in musicians for fundraising soirees, and the stylish living space with its open flow is ideal for entertaining a cultivated crowd. In the powder room, a Murano glass vanity bowl in turquoise blue takes pride of place and is another of Carol’s favourite pieces in her signature colour. Nearby, one of Grant’s favourite features is hidden in a closet. It’s what he calls, “the brains of the house,” and contains digital TV boxes and a smart home system, installed by Control Freak AV, to control HVAC, lights, sound and more, from multiple devices while at home or away. En route to the master bedroom, a custom walk-through closet with floor-toceiling cabinetry on both sides prompts a significant wow response. Envisioned by Penny with her innovative storage solutions, it leads to an impressive ensuite with back-to-back vanity sinks (not sideby-side). A second balcony off the private retreat is well positioned for their morning coffee.

THE URBANE LIFESTYLE In addition to enjoying a roof-top terrace on the fourth floor where they can mingle with their condo neighbours, the easy accessibility of the Glebe is a major attraction for the couple. Carol can walk to work and likes the multi-generational aspect of the community where she says, “There is always something going on.” “Our lifestyle has changed in terms of how we shop and eat,” explains Grant. “We buy more food locally, go out more to restaurants on Bank Street, and like to walk to games at Lansdowne.” Clearly, Grant and Carol have planned their perfect home – a sophisticated space for an urbane couple in an upbeat, urban neighbourhood. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE: A MURANO GLASS SINK COMPLIMENTS THE COLOURS IN A GORDON HARRISON PAINTING IN THE HALL ADJACENT TO THE POWDER ROOM; FROSTED GLASS IS A FEATURE THAT KEEPS THE ENSUITE SPACE BRIGHT AND SOPHISTICATED. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 31


IMAGE COURTESY COVET-HOUSE 32 ottawaathome.ca WINTER 2018


HOME Capital Colours

ALL-INCLUSIVE COLOUR BY MARY TAGGART LIFESTYLE & DECOR EXPERT maryktaggart @ottawaathomemag

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he Pantone Colour Institute has chosen Ultra Violet as the colour of the year for 2018. For those in the design world, there is much speculation and anticipation over which shade will dominate the style scene each year. Pantone offers a unified way of communicating colour. Their team of experts scours the globe annually before selecting the colour of the year, and the choice often stirs controversy. This year the debate was less about the choice and more about whether violet was officially purple or a colour of its own. To be clear, violet stems from purple, yet has its own powers. Coincidentally, colour experts had been divided in their predictions as anticipation for the 2018 choice grew. Many guessed red to be the next on-trend shade and others predicted blue – in some ways both were right! Ultra Violet is a fine blend of both red and blue, infused with white to create the deeply-striking tone of purple that will rule the fashion and décor scene over the next year. The versatility of a combination of both cool and warm colours coming together to create violet embraces the power of positivity and sends an uplifting message. Blue offers stability, while red stimulates and lifts the spirit. When merged, the two have great possibilities as the deep tone is grounded

in confident strength, yet brings cosmic influences to create some mystique in any space that incorporates Ultra Violet. Trends in décor point to tone-on-tone palettes that make room for colourful pops. Grey is the ideal backdrop for purple and provides the right dose of contemporary luxury to balance a space with violet accents. Adding purple to your décor and wardrobe will bring some allure into your style while offering an uplifting message to those around you. Choosing to tone down purple to bring in violet, will alleviate some of the strength to create a space with greater appeal. Colour psychology preaches the benefit of bringing purple into décor, yet often warns of its stimulating powers. Ultra Violet is slightly quieter than a true purple which is often associated with wealth and royalty. Violet has a much more all-inclusive aura surrounding it, which is exactly what the world needs right now. As violet appeals to both men and women, this choice is also on target with a societal atmosphere seeking balance, equality and inclusiveness. The shade had a powerful influence over style in the 60s and 70s, so its resurgence answers the call for change in the world’s social climate. Bring violet into your personal and design style with confidence – it will do a world of good.

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HOME Family Living

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HAVING IT ALL BY MARY TAGGART

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

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ennifer Tackaberry handles sales and client relations for Ottawa At Home, but her tasks within her own home are even greater. She balances a busy work schedule with an even more hectic home life where she, and her husband Todd are active parents to three energetic daughters. Jennifer is an avid volunteer with her daughters’ sports teams as well as a sports enthusiast herself. The hands-on mom relishes family time. This often includes mealtimes together in a space that has to easily transform from a homework station to an elegant setting for entertaining friends and family. The Tackaberrys purchased their Wellington Village area home from the British High Commission in 2008. While the traditional style, centre-hall plan house had been well maintained, the aesthetics were outdated. Jennifer describes the previous décor as “heavy” with its wall-to-wall sea-foam green carpet and grand-scale print draperies. So when the Tackaberrys went to work to breathe life into the space, their priority was to open up the small foyer, remove all carpeting, redo the hardwood flooring and paint throughout. Over the years, the existing space didn’t work for the family, and in 2014 they took their renovations further by opening up the kitchen and dining room area. Jennifer worked with Stefania Crilly from Spruce Design along with Kitchens by Design, to transform the space to better suit their lifestyle. Jennifer’s biggest impetus for change stemmed from the fact that her girls used the dining room as their homework and project area. “When I was in the kitchen I couldn’t see the girls in the dining room,” Jennifer says of the separate and more formal FACING PAGE: JENNIFER EASILY TURNS HER DINING ROOM FROM HOMEWORK STATION TO ELEGANT ENTERTAINING SPACE. THE TRANSITIONAL BRASS CHANDELIER IS FROM SEA GULL LIGHTING. THIS PAGE, TOP: THE ARCHED DOORWAY IS AN ORIGINAL FEATURE. BELOW: THE EXISTING BUILT-IN BUFFET CONTRIBUTES TO THE CLASSIC CHARM AND FUNCTION IN THE DINING ROOM. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 35


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space that was true to the design of its era. “We wanted it to be open concept where we could all be together.” The modifications maintained the integrity of the original character by retaining some significant details like the arched opening from the hall to the dining room. A built-in buffet, within a nook in the dining room window, was left to preserve the home’s original charm, while contributing to the room’s function. Today, Jennifer has exactly what she needs from their home. “There is enough space for me to work on my laptop while the kids are working on their homework. It lets us all be in one space without being on top of each other.” The most recent update connects the kitchen to an outdoor living space that lends itself to the Tackaberry’s active lifestyle. A sizeable backyard is fully equipped for entertaining and hosting après sporting activities, when the hot tub is particularly appreciated. The family bought their Wellington Village area home to be closer to friends who already lived in one of the city’s most sought-after neighbourhoods. Like many homeowners, their first priority was finding a home in an area that would suit their family. But as many houses in well-established neighbourhoods tend to be older, it often means compromising between modern homes designed for active family living and a desired location. Ultimately, the Tackaberrys managed to adapt the space to meet their family needs and accommodate their lifestyle, while preserving the charming appeal of an older home. FACING PAGE: SHAKER CABINETS COMBINED WITH QUARTZ COUNTER TOPS IN THE KITCHEN OFFER A CLEAN AESTHETIC WITHIN THE TRADITIONAL STYLE HOME TO CREATE A MODERN FEELING THROUGHOUT. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE: THE CARRERA MARBLE SUBWAY TILE BACKSPLASH IS FROM SALTILLO; JENNIFER USES THE KITCHEN AS A WORKSPACE; THE BAR FRIDGE USUALLY HOLDS DRINKS FOR THE KIDS AND KOMBUCHA FOR MOM AND DAD. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 37


HOME Old & New

STYLE EVER LASTING BY JANE WHITING

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON


INTEGRATING PRIORITIES

L

iving in one of Ottawa’s popular, wellestablished neighbourhoods that is conveniently close to downtown is high on the list for many homeowners. But this often means buying an older home that needs major renovations. Typically, it involves a total rebuild or complete gut to transform the place into a modern space. Yet, in the case of a 1920s Tudor-style home in Wellington West, each room has been carefully renovated over time to integrate contemporary style within the home’s traditional design. When a busy and active family of four moved in18 years ago, the home evolved with them, changing and adapting to their lives in well-planned stages. The most recent series of renovations to the four-bedroom home focussed on the kitchen with a combined family room, and a formal living room. Over 30 years ago, previous owners had built an addition to contain the kitchen, and family room which was updated when the current family moved in. Now with both kids away at university, it was time for another facelift to bring in new elements to freshen up the space.

A FRESH AND MODERN KITCHEN

THIS PAGE: THE NEW KITCHEN WAS DESIGNED TO INCORPORATE THE ORIGINAL BRICK WALL, THE CHERNER TABLE IS FROM A MODERN SPACE AND LIGHT FIXTURE ABOVE IS FROM RESTORATION HARDWARE.

With Sirois & Sons as the general contractor, the first thing to go was the terracotta-tiled floor that spread from the front door to the hallways and throughout the kitchen. Not only did it bring a dark and dated presence to the home, it was cold and hard on the feet. It was replaced in the entry and hallways with hardwood flooring to match WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 39


THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE: THE BUTLER’S PANTRY FEATURES GRAPHITE MARBLE AND OFFERS PLENTY OF STORAGE WITHIN AN ELEGANT SPACE; LIVING ROOM FURNITURE FROM CADIEUX INTERIORS, DRAPERIES FROM ROSE DRAPERIES & INTERIORS; THE NEW HERRINGBONE PATTERNED HARDWOOD BLENDS BEAUTIFULLY WITH THE EXISTING FLOORING; A CHAGALL LITHOGRAPH HANGS ABOVE THE REVAMPED FIREPLACE.

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the original floors of the living and dining room, but laid in a herringbone pattern. For their kitchen’s second facelift, the homeowners wanted a more modern, cleaner look and installed large, grey floor tiles. They opted to keep the red brick hearth around the stove, the crown moulding and baseboards to maintain some character elements alongside the new, contemporary-style cabinetry and features. The custom cabinets by Irpinia Kitchens were constructed from solid wood inside and out, with a pale putty-coloured finish. Dark granite countertops were replaced with white Caesarstone, and a new undermount sink sits in a peninsular countertop which includes a sit-up bar with stools. A corner pantry was moved


to make room for built-in cabinetry with leaded-glass doors and glass shelving, giving a lighter feel to the space. To add some eclectic touches, a midcentury Cherner table and matching chairs share kitchen space with a funky collage by a Montreal artist who creates artwork from recycled street garbage. The room mixes a variety of different styles together in an innovative way to give an overall impression of a modern kitchen in a chic-café setting. For enhanced light and brightness, all the roman shades were removed from the windows, as well as curtains from the patio doors. The light grey décor was carried through to the family room on the walls and furnishings.

LIVING ROOM MAKEOVER A back hall connects the kitchen with the dining room on one side and living room on the other. Years ago, it became the perfect spot to install a butler’s pantry, but it needed an update. So, it got the same cabinetry treatment as the kitchen with leaded-glass door panels and a new marble counter. It was also better organized for storage and flow.

Interior designer Susan Firestone worked on the living room makeover to convert the former Ralph Lauren style in dark green and burgundy to a classic and timeless décor. After removing the stippled ceiling and installing pot lighting, the walls were painted in a heritage-beige tone by Benjamin Moore. Susan designed a new wood mantel and marble hearth for the wood-burning fireplace, which casts a rich, warm glow over the stylish room. They invested in quality carpets from Elte and fine furnishings from Cadieux in neutral shades and clean lines, to complete the marvelous makeover. Two occasional chairs were especially chosen for their attractive upholstered backs that face towards the entrance of the room. The homeowners say they are much happier with the new look and functionality of the updated living areas. Their approach to let the family home evolve with them allowed the time to renovate each room in the right way, without constant doovers. It’s a plan which worked well to combine a traditional home with a classic contemporary appeal that will last for many years to come.

ASK THE EXPERT

Vicky Paquette C.I.D. Senior sales associate Vesta

Why is it important Q to select your stone countertops first?

A

As the heart of the home, the kitchen is also action central. You want it to be beautiful and welcoming, to reflect your unique personal lifestyle. In design, a principle with broad application is to create your vision by starting with inspiration; then you can design and decorate your project with intention. Let your stone countertop choice be your inspiration. From this choice, complementing it becomes an easy road map to marry all of your other finishing selections. Every other finish can be tailored to your specifications. Today’s market offers diversity in cabinet finishes, flooring options, backsplash alternatives, and a paint palette that can be created to your exact specification. All these elements can be adapted to your project. By starting with your stone countertop choice, you are giving yourself the widest range of options in incorporating the hardest working area of your home into the overall visual appeal of your home for a unified look to kitchen décor. Contact Vicky: vicky@vestamarble.com 613-733-9098

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WHO: Brian Tong, Professional Dance/ Creative Director WHERE: Ministry of Coffee (Hintonburg)

ESPRESSO YOURSELF

“Having a cup of coffee at Ministry of Coffee is like a hug from the inside. I find the food, drinks and late-night vibe so calming. Beyond the amazing baristas, staff and ambience, to me, it has become a symbol of new beginnings in this neighbourhood that I grew up in.”

LIVING Street Style

“Arlington Five has been a favourite spot since it first opened. The warm and cozy environment is inviting and the staff are incredibly friendly. Although the hot drinks are always great, it’s the baked goods and delicious sandwiches that keep us coming back. They are out of this world! ” WHO: Jen Zaret, with daughter Marlowe WHERE: Arlington Five

PHOTOGRAPHY AND TEXT BY KATIE HESSION @YOWCITYSTYLE

“I really appreciate how Bridgehead Coffee caters to different dietary preferences and I’m a huge fan of their soy lattes and quinoa and sweet-potato wrap. The food is so fresh and made with such great ingredients that you feel like you’re eating right from someone’s kitchen at home.” WHO: Whitney Enns, with daughter Aria WHERE: Bridgehead on Carling

Ottawa’s independent coffee scene is percolating with new cafes and small-batch roasters, and there are some very knowledgeable, artistic baristas in town. We even have an annual latte art competition in March! We caught up with some Ottawa caffeine lovers in their favourite local coffee shops and asked them what keeps bringing them back for more.

“Common Eatery is definitely one of my most favorite places to go in the city. Whether it be for a latte on a Monday morning or a cocktail on a Friday evening, it offers such a nice mix of daytime and night-time space to relax and inspire the soul. I fell in love with it because of the vibe and aesthetic it has, a combination of artsy and unique. Totally my style and my kind of place!” WHO: Emma Rose Fox, Student WHERE: Common Eatery WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 43


ENRICHING LIVES At eQ Homes, we’re committed to being the builder of choice, and to enriching the lives of your family by creating great communities in which to live, work and play.

Discover our fabulous new home communities for yourself, including eQuinelle in Kemptville, Fernbank Crossing in Stittsville, Clarence Crossing in Rockland, and Greystone Village in Old Ottawa East.

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eqhomes.ca E. & O.E.


LIVING with Treasures

VARY HEIGHT

Collections & DISPLAY BY MARY TAGGART PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

O

COLOUR SCHEME

CREATE SPACE

STAY CLEAR

pen shelving can cause a problem with décor. These areas attract clutter and simply become exposed storage for miscellaneous stuff. But when objects are artfully displayed the shelves serve the purpose of showcasing a homeowner’s personality to reveal beloved objects. Putting together a collection of books, photographs, framed mementos and simple treasures offer intrigue in décor. The look of curated collections lends itself to vintage style. Weekends scouring flea markets, garage sales or the desire to repurpose meaningful pieces from your past are attributed to decorative details that inject personality into space. Creating vignettes within shelving areas or on tabletops serves as artful expression. Decorators are taught to think in terms of three when it comes to displaying objects but this is only a guideline. Consider the items, their size and the space they are placed within to base your composition from and create an eye-catching decorative display using found objects. Follow a few simple rules to ensure that your display is based on style, not storage. • •

• • •

Create space between objects Arrange like-minded pieces together. Topical Books combined with objects of the same ilk work beautifully together. Follow a colour scheme so that the items flow together rather than fight for attention. Vary the height of the objects Create groupings rather than a line-up of items Be wary of height; never have an object skimming the top of the shelf.

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LIVING New & Notable

DINING, THEATRICS AND WELLNESS BY SANDY CONNELL IMAGES SUPPLIED

WELCOME TO SOIRÉE Dine in a private garden dome under the stars along the Rideau Canal this spring. Veuve Cliquot Ponsardin, Dinner4Four, and Desjardins have partnered to bring the next big pop-up dining experience to Ottawa. Inspired by the Coppa Club in London, England, this monthlong dining event will feature an elegant fourcourse meal paired with wine and champagne served to you in a beautiful lush garden-themed dome at the Terrace on the Canal. Chef Michael Blackie of NEXT Restaurant, Ottawa’s Kin Vineyards and Big Rig Brewery are responsible for designing the delicious menu that offers a variety of dietary options. Welcome to Soiree will run for 30 days beginning Sunday April 29. Limited dinner reservations for ten domes will be available at 5pm, 7 pm, and 9 pm daily. Tickets for the event go on sale on Friday, February 17 at 11 am and are expected to sell out quickly. Visit at dinner4four.ca.

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GAIA WELLNESS RETREAT

OTTAWA LITTLE THEATRE

THE GRAND HOTEL The transformation of The Grand Hotel in Carleton Place honours the beautiful and grandiose history of the building at the corner of Lake Avenue East and Bridge Street. Rod Scribner and Steve Moodie, who have been in the restaurant and venue management business in Ottawa for 30 years, have partnered with Janice Mathers and Joel Schramek, owners of Evermore Weddings and Events in Almonte, to open The Grand Hotel as a luxury wedding and event venue. Originally the Mississippi Hotel, the historic building has been lovingly restored to offer a 1,200-square-foot bridal suite with ensuite and two fireplaces, 15 tastefullydesigned hotel rooms, a large private lounge, and a gorgeous banquet hall, all with an elegant early-1900s vibe. The venue features fine dining in The Grand Dining Room as well as an old-English-style pub, The Smith & Barrel. Gourmet cuisine is prepared by accomplished executive chef Jordan Forester, previously of West End Bistro in Ottawa. Visit The Grand Hotel at 7 Bridge Street, Carleton Place.

BUILDING ON COMMUNITY In Recognition of the historical significance of the church as a community gathering place, developer ModBox is incorporating St Charles Church into its residential project, Marché St Charles Market. Linebox Studios developed a design plan for the site that resulted in an impressive residential address within the heart of Beechwood Village. With 54 uniquely designed, horizontal homes and three stunning town homes wrapping the original church structure, the new design honours the neoclassical architecture of the church. Plans for the old St. Charles Church building include an exciting marketplace and restaurant to recreate the feeling of community within the heritage-designated building.

CLAUDETTE GRAVEL

Experience the renewed energy that accompanies the Ottawa Little Theatre’s Renew the Building Campaign as the theatre embarks on its 105th season. Ottawa Little Theatre has been a vital part of the Ottawa Arts community since 1913, making it the longest running community theatre in Canada. Located in the heart of downtown at the corner of King Edward Avenue and Besserer Street, the current building opened in 1972 and over the past two years has undergone major renovations. The final phase of this work, Renew the Building Act IV: Interior Renovation and Accessibility campaign, brought much needed improvements to the theatre’s interior. Cate Proctor, managing director at OLT and Robin Riddihough, chair of the Archive Committee, are both thrilled with the results, saying the new design and colour scheme serve to modernize the space while maintaining its traditional tone. In addition, the new seating and improved accessibility make the theatre experience more comfortable for patrons. As part of the renovation, the OLT partnered with the Ottawa Catholic School Board, to have the original 467 theatrestyle seats refurbished and donated to the Notre Dame High School auditorium. Visit ottawalittletheatre.ca or contact the box office at 613-233-8948.

Nestled in the Gatineau Hills on the shores of Petit Lac Usher, the Gaia Wellness Retreat provides a tranquil natural escape from the hustle and bustle of day-to-day life. Billie Lynn Hillis and John Armstrong are cofounders of the retreat, originally established in 1993 by Robert Hay of Rama Lotus Centre as The Yoga Garden Retreat. Their vision is to provide an environment that will inspire guests on their journey towards health and wellness. Experienced yoga instructors and wellness practioners offer diverse classes in yoga, mindfulness and wellness, guiding your journey towards spiritual transformation and personal growth. Located just 45 minutes from downtown Ottawa near Wakefield, QC, the centre is a 55-acre property which offers a serene and calming escape from the city with the added bonus of a 100% vegan restaurant. The centre is open year-round so that guests can enjoy all nature has to offer throughout the seasons. Yoga classes, corporate retreats and weekend events are some of the options available. Visit at gaiawellnessretreat.com

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LIVING Neighbourhood on the Move

THEN

THE GLEBE

BY TED SIMPSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

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The Glebe is an odd name for a neighbourhood. It sounds fun, and rolls off the tongue nicely, but it’s not readily apparent what the word refers to or means. While glebe is an old English word that we don’t use conversationally anymore, it basically just means church land. The area’s history began in 1837 when it was known as The Glebe Lands of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church – quite a mouthful of a name. In 1870, the land was opened up for development and Ottawa real estate agents of the time took to shortening the title to The Glebe. The area was quickly developed into one of Ottawa’s first suburban neighbourhoods. At the same time, Lansdowne Park began to take shape, and soon hosted the first annual Central Canada Exhibition in 1888. This established the area as a destination neighbourhood.


NOW The Glebe is bordered on the south and east by the Rideau Canal, by the Queensway on the north and Bronson Avenue to the west. It’s best known now as a hub for shopping and entertainment, and for being home to some of the city’s wealthiest residents.

BUSINESS Business in the Glebe consists of two experiences: a traditional main street along Bank, and the newly-constructed Lansdowne Park. Along Bank Street, a unique collection of small businesses provide everything from health and wellness to fashion and fine dining. The vibe is very traditional, with elegant store fronts and signage, and shops that cater to both the luxurious and niche markets. Lansdowne offers exciting options with something for everyone packed into a very small footprint. A football stadium, hockey arena and movie theatre draw crowds on a regular basis, and an array of retail and restaurant businesses keep those crowds satisfied. The complex plays host to the City Folk and Escapade music festivals, along with a rotation of unique markets and community events.

TIM desCLOUDS

PEOPLE AND HOUSING This is where the Glebe gets very unique! While many people from all over the city visit the neighbourhood for a football game, and to shop or eat, there is one overwhelming demographic of Glebe – many residents are wealthy. While most urban neighbourhoods present a mixed bag of people from differing economic classes, the Glebe boasts a median household income of $208,275, compared to a city wide average of $118,388. The dominant professions of Glebe residents are education, law and government service. And over 80% are university educated.

Real estate agent Ian Charlebois, whose office is located in the Glebe, says people are drawn to the neighbourhood for its feeling of elegance and prestige. “People want to have the lifestyle of living downtown, while having three or four bedrooms, a finished basement, a backyard that’s large enough to have a nice deck, even a pool.” The neighbourhood gels with active residents, everything is walkable and the nearby Rideau Canal and Paterson’s Creek offer some of the finest green space available inside the city centre. O’Connor Street has recently been updated with cycling infrastructure through to Fifth Avenue. Driving this sense of elegance is the unique housing offered by the Glebe. Because the area was originally built as a suburb, the lots are larger than in some other central communities and the houses tend to be bigger as well. “Typically the Glebe has those big frontages and depth of lots,” says Ian. “The frontages, in comparison to other areas downtown, are second to none.” Of course, prestige comes at a price, with the current housing prices ranging from $850,000 and $930,000, according to Ian. For many, life in the Glebe is about having the luxuries and convenience of living in the heart of the city, without the sacrifices some associate with urban dwelling. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 49


LIVING My Way

MARKET FOR OPPORTUNITY BY MARY TAGGART

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

C

onsidered to be the birthplace of Ottawa, the ByWard Market was laidout by Lt. Col. John By in 1826 as a trading post for the contractors, suppliers and workers who were building the Rideau Canal system. Bytown was incorporated in 1847, while Ottawa was incorporated in 1855. In the late 1800s, the ByWard Market established the beginning of commerce in Ottawa. Today, the area is a mixture of tourist attractions, market stalls, shops, nightlife and restaurants that serve to maintain the historical integrity. Yet, some of the original flavour has been lost with an eclectic mix of use. Further west, the Parkdale Market also has deep roots in Ottawa with a strip of vendors tucked into an area just west of Parkdale Avenue and north of Wellington Street. The market is open seven-days a week from April to October, with fruit, vegetable and flower vendors.

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“I’m truly looking forward to working with Councillor Leiper, Dennis Van Staalduinen at the BIA and Matt Whitehead of the Wellington Community Association on nearterm programing/ operational wins like tree maintenance and lighting in the park.” — JEFF DARWIN

Jeff Darwin, Executive Director of Marchés d’Ottawa Markets, is tasked with revitalizing and preserving both the ByWard and Parkdale markets. The mandate for managing these areas is to provide a diverse market that celebrates the heritage and culture of its communities, with a true market spirit that gives priority to local vendors. Jeff has strong roots in Ottawa. His father, Howard Darwin was a wellknown businessman who purchased the franchise for the Ottawa 67s’ hockey club and ultimately contributed to the development of the Ottawa Civic Centre at Lansdowne Park. Jeff has written a book about his fathers challenging childhood and dynamic career called, The Ten Count. Growing up in Queensway Terrace South, Jeff worked several odd jobs for his father and had an upbringing that helped to develop his community-minded spirit. Jeff and his wife Wendy purchased their first home in Wellington West, and their lifestyle included many trips to the nearby Parkdale Market. Today his office sits in the heart of the ByWard Market at 55 Market Square. While Jeff has a pulse on what keeps a good market thriving, he is open to suggestions and contributions from the city. He intends to work with volunteer boards, the BIA and members of the community at large. Jeff doesn’t see any big challenges with the Parkdale Market, and says he is excited about the growth of opportunities. “I’m truly looking forward to working with Councillor Leiper, Dennis Van Staalduinen at the BIA and Matt Whitehead of the Wellington Community Association on near-term programing/operational wins like tree maintenance and lighting in the park.” Local artist, historian and Ottawa At Home contributor Andrew King is on board to help with the preservation of historical elements of the markets to reimagine their logos and create some fresh branding. Currently, public feedback includes the desire for a continued commitment to food vendors and enhanced experiences with the potential for a Christmas market and possibly a carousel for children. Jeff considers all of these to be areas with opportunities.


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LIVING Fit At Home

Stretch it out BY LIANNE LAING @LIANNELAING PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

Whether you’re hitting the gym, heading out for a ski, or going for a skate on the canal, it’s crucial to stretch before and after the activity. A dynamic stretch is your best pre-workout option. This type of stretch requires active muscular effort like swinging legs forward and backwards or twisting the torso from side to side. The movement helps to increase mobility and blood supply and can help decrease the risk of injury. In the cooldown stage, static stretches, where the movements are held in position for at least 10-30 seconds, are ideal.

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DYNAMIC STRETCHING 1 + 2 START TO CREATE MOVEMENT BY STANDING ON ONE LEG Swing the other back and forth. Start slow and don’t force the leg to go higher than it wants too. Use a chair, railing or wall for balance. 10-12 swings per leg. 3 + 4 BEND OVER TO GET YOUR HANDS TOUCHING THE GROUND TO FEEL A DEEP STRETCH IN THE BACK OF YOUR LEG. Don’t hold the position- come up stretching your hands to the sky and then back down. Stay in a down position and twist the body from side to side, turning the body and reaching arm to the sky (as shown).

STATIC STRETCHING: 5 THE LYING GLUTE STRETCH- While lying on your back, cross one leg over the other and bring them towards the body by pulling on the bottom leg. Hold at least 30 seconds and then change legs.

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2

3 4

6 THE PIGEON POSE OPENS THE HIPS AND WORKS THE HIP FLEXOR- Depending on your flexibility you can either have your bottom leg at a 90 degree angle or bring the leg underneath you (as shown)….For a deeper stretch bring your elbows to the ground and hang out for at least 30 seconds.

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LIVING Giving Back

HANNAH, DEAN AND JEANINE OTTO. PHOTO BY DEREK BOEHM

MOVING FORWARD By Catherine Clark @catherinejclark

I

n the summer of 2007, Dean and Jeanine Otto’s five-year-old daughter Maddy died at Roger Neilson House after a brief and sudden illness. The devastated couple and their sevenyear-old daughter Hannah began attending bereavement counselling at the pediatric palliative and respite care facility located on the grounds of CHEO. They credit that counselling with allowing them to begin to deal with the “new normal” of their lives. “We only spent six hours in Roger Neilson House with Maddy, but it was the bereavement counselling afterward that really helped us,” says Dean. “You can give up, or you can strive to move forward,” he

continues. “We chose to go forward.” As the couple began to rebuild their lives around the void that Maddy’s death had left behind, they discussed with Hannah and with friends what they could do to honour her memory. The idea for Maddy’s Gala was born! What started eleven years ago as a small event attended by friends and family to generate funds for Roger Neilson House, has grown into an annual powerhouse fundraising evening. So far, it has raised almost $600,000 for the facility. Initially, the couple thought the event might last a year or two, but the community rallied behind it, and Maddy’s Gala has taken on a life of its own. “Regular people and big sponsors alike step forward to make a difference – they all want to be involved,” says Jeanine. “It’s definitely an emotional evening,

especially the speeches and slide presentation at the beginning,” notes Dean. “But it’s a fun night, too.” What the couple find particularly gratifying is that other Roger Neilson House families attend the event. Not just those who have lost a child at the facility, but also those whose children are still actively receiving care. “People always focus so much on the birth of a child, and rightly so,” concludes Dean. “A child going out of this world is something no one ever wants to see, but if it has to happen, it should happen at Roger Neilson House.” Dean and Jeanine are forever grateful for what Roger Neilson House did for them. “It was there when we needed it,” Jeanine says simply. And thanks to their incredible work with Maddy’s Gala, the couple are ensuring that countless other families - just like their own - will have the support they need to choose to move forward with their lives. Maddy’s Gala takes place at the Brookstreet Hotel on February 17, 2018. WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 55


The Benefits of a Muskoka Kitchen

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FOOD Food Thoughts

Bringing home the flavours of

SAINT LUCIA

By Korey Kealey @foodthought kitchenkonnected

T

his winter, I had the opportunity to visit the beautiful island of Saint Lucia in the Caribbean. I managed to learn some simple recipes that will help to recapture the tropical flavours and bring some Caribbean heat to the capital. Find mangoes, passion fruit, Asian celery, soursop, salted codfish, breadfruit, laurel, ugli fruit and other St. Lucian staples at Produce Depot and Farm Boy to recreate the island flavours here at home.

IMAGES SUPPLIED WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 57


CHEF LWANGA’S TIP: To prepare mango, remove outer skin and slice each side of the mango into 1/2 inch (1-1/4 cm) thick slices until you encounter the pit. Cut the flat oval slices into 1/2 inch (1-1/2 cm) julienne strips then dice the strips into small even pieces.

“From the lush tropical surroundings to the vibrancy of the people at the annual Food and Rum Festival, St Lucia was an inspiring travel and taste destination.” — KOREY KEALEY

CLASSIC MANGO SALSA

PREP TIME: 15 minutes MAKES: 3 cups (750 mL) 1-2 large mangoes, peeled, julienned and diced (about 2-1/2 cup/ 625 mL - see Chef Lwanga’s tip) 1/3 cup (80 mL) finely-minced Asian celery 1/4 cup (60 mL) finely-minced red pepper 58 ottawaathome.ca WINTER 2018

2 tbsp (30 mL) finely-chopped onions 2 cloves garlic, grated 2 tsp (10 mL) minced fresh oregano 3 tbsp (45 mL) vegetable oil 1 tbsp (15 mL) each of white vinegar and cane sugar 1/2 tsp (2-1/2 mL) sea salt 1/4 tsp (1-1/2 mL) freshly ground black pepper In large bowl place finely diced mango. On large cutting board combine the prepared celery, pepper, onion, garlic and oregano; with chef’s knife, chop all the ingredients again to ensure an even chop then transfer to bowl with mango. Add oil, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper; stir well and adjust seasoning to taste. Refrigerate up to 2 days.

PHOTO BY CYBELLE BROWN

Chef Lwanga picks mangoes from the tree right outside The Mango Tree Restaurant’s kitchen, which is situated over the Caribbean Sea. Lwanga effortlessly transforms the magnificent fruit into a multitude of signature dishes. This salsa will warm up even the coldest day in Canada. Serve with your favourite panfried fish or chicken, garnish soup, flavour a wrap or scoop with tortilla chips.


CHEF LWANGA’S TIP: To make your own strongflavored passion fruit juice, crush the pulp of 8 passion fruit and mix with 2 cups (500 mL) water; strain through fine mesh sieve.

FAMOUS TI PONCHE At Stonefield Villa Resort and Spa, it’s “farm to bar” with the famous Ti Ponche meaning “little punch” in Creole! Juicy, delicious limes grow in abundance in St. Lucia, but don’t let the orange flesh confuse you, they are both tart and slightly sweet like the typical limes we find in North America. Because it is so hot in St. Lucia, the ice melts in a flash, but you may want to top it up with a splash of soda to dilute that punch.

2-3 tbsp (30-45 mL) freshly squeezed lime juice 2 oz (30-60 mL) aged white rum 1-2 tbsp (15-30 mL) honey Mix ingredients in highball glass, stir and add ice; garnish with lime wedge or wheel.

COCONUT CHEESECAKE WITH PASSIONFRUIT DRIZZLE Cheesecake is a popular dish in every St Lucian restaurant and the best vehicle for fabulous toppings from rum-infused caramelized bananas to a vibrant passion fruit drizzle. Use molds or ramekins that are 1-inch (2½ cm) deep and 2 inches (5 cm) in diameter.

PREP TIME: 20 minutes COOK TIME: 45 minutes MAKES: 16 CHEESECAKE 2 tbsp (30 mL) cornstarch 1-1/2 lb (680g) cream cheese, room temperature 1-1/2 cups (375 mL) cane sugar 1 cup (250 mL) 35% cream 1-1/2 cups (375 mL) fresh coconut milk 5 eggs 1 tsp (5 mL) pure almond extract CRUST 1/2 cup (125 mL) butter, melted 225 g digestive biscuits or graham crackers, finely crushed.

In small bowl, combine butter and biscuit crumbs; divide evenly between 16 molds; press lightly and set aside. In large bowl, beat cream cheese and sugar for about three minutes; add eggs, coconut milk, cream, almond extract and cornstarch; beat an additional 5 mins or until light and fluffy. Pour into prepared molds; place in boiling water bath. Bake at 350F (180C) for 5 minutes; lower temperature to 300F (150C) bake for 35 mins. Allow to cool then refrigerate up to 3 days.Serve with favourite topping.

PASSION FRUIT DRIZZLE 2 cups passion fruit juice (see Chef Lwanga’s tip) 1-1/2 cup (375 mL) sugar 1 cup (250 mL) water 1/2 cup (125 mL) white wine 1 tsp (5 mL) sea salt Put all ingredients in a pan and bring to a boil, then cool. Drizzle over cheesecake. Refrigerate up to 1 week. Recipes courtesy of Stonefield Villa and Spa Resort WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 59


FOOD Let’s Dish

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE GLASS BY PAULA ROY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

From spirit selection through to the final garnishing flourish, bartending is a time-honoured ritual that, done right, produces multi-sensory delights. Four of Ottawa’s busiest bartenders share insights with Ottawa At Home.

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PAUL SAUCIER AT ZOE’S, CHATEAU LAURIER

STATESMAN COCKTAIL

A retired tech entrepreneur turned bartender, Paul developed a passion for well-crafted cocktails while travelling the world. The historic and recently refurbished Zoe’s Lounge, at the Fairmont Chateau Laurier, nourishes his thirst for mixology. The vibe? At Zoe’s I get to fulfill my dream of working in an elegant cocktail bar that offers the glamour of the retro scene but with a contemporary flair.

What makes your cocktails special? The way they tantalize the senses, like our Statesman cocktail, served in a smokebox with cedar and spices that blend well with the drink. When you open the box, the beautiful aromas entice you immediately.   Favourite drinkers to serve? The journey-takers who are open to exploring and put their faith into the bartender’s hands. What’s in your glass? As a purist who loves the classics it’s either an Old Fashioned, a whiskey sour or a Sidecar.

Favourite ingredients? Housemade bitters and house-infused spirits. Our culinary team works with us to create some magical ingredients.

STEPHEN FLOOD AT RIVIERA

Having tended bar in Ottawa for over twenty years, Stephen’s inventive approach to cocktails has helped to put the upscale Riviera restaurant, housed in a former Sparks Street bank building, on the map for drinks that are as impressive as the food. The vibe? Walking into this space is like being transported to another time. I wanted our cocktail list to reflect that in this building’s bygone era, people would have been sipping Manhattans and whiskey sours from elegant coupes. What’s in your glass? Often, a Negroni. This seemingly simple three-ingredient drink has infinite

power to surprise, as different gins and vermouths all bring different botanicals and aromatics to the dance. What has changed? Everything is fresh now and people care more now about what’s in their glass so we get to serve ever more beautiful things and even work directly with the people who make today’s mixology products. Favourite drinker to serve? Someone ready to step outside their comfort zone and savour something unexpected created especially for them. For me, it’s always fun to improvise.

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ELANA LEVITAN AT TOWN RESTAURANT A hospitality industry veteran who’s been bartending for fifteen years, Elana enjoys capitalizing on her theatre training behind the bar at the chic, lively Town, because mixing drinks is like being on stage, performing. What’s in your glass? I’m into aromatized wine and liqueur, so vermouth and amaro, both great fits with Town’s focus on Italian food. I prefer Mezcal for sipping and gin for making cocktails.   What makes your cocktails special? I make my own cordials, infusions, bitters and shrubs and enjoy using lots of seasonal ingredients, to fit with Town’s seasonal food. I harvest rhubarb,

spruce tips, thyme and Concord grapes from my property and make these the focal points of cocktails. Favourite drinks to make? Classics like Manhattans and martinis, crafted with care and attention. I also have a ton of fun making original cocktails because it gives me an opportunity to share something new and unique with people.    What’s changed? Cocktails have become increasingly trendy over the past decade or so and more people are enthusiastic about trying new things and enjoying craft spirits.

LAWRENCE BUCKLEY AT THE CHATEAU LAFAYETTE Lawrence has been bartending at The Laff, Ottawa’s oldest tavern, for 30 years, arriving as the new bass player for the house band and never leaving. Established in 1849, the Chateau Lafayette has evolved from its roots but still attracts people from all walks of life including ordinary folk, politicians and celebrities. The vibe? With liquor added to the menu about 25 years ago we now see a different clientele at night but during the day it’s still a tavern, mostly drawing tourists and locals in for a cold beer.

62 ottawaathome.ca WINTER 2018

Fond memory? One summer two young guys came in, intoxicated. I used my standard line, “Sorry, I can’t serve you today, come back another day.” I caught them guzzling another patron’s unattended beer as they left, so I chased them down the street and managed to boot one of them in the rear end. What he loves? I am a real people person and love to find a point of connection with everyone I serve. My job is as much about making people feel welcome and helping them have a laugh or two as it is about serving drinks.


WHAT COMES TO MIND WHEN A CUSTOMER ORDERS . . . Gin Martini : “Crisp, floral or aromatic?” – Stephen

Beer : “How about something local?”– Lawrence

Napa Cab : “You know what you like!” – Elana

Double Grey Goose on the rocks: “Rough day?”– Paul

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FOOD Dining Out

CA FÉ

M Y

E US HO

CONTEMPORARY comfort food BY PAULA ROY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

Comfort foods have long been cherished for their ability to nourish and sustain us. Their magical properties are not lost on professional chefs, who find ever more inventive ways to offer comfort along with elegance and flair. Three highly-acclaimed local restaurateurs share memories of comfort food as well as thoughts on what they believe makes for a comforting meal.

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UZ O R

ST OF

Chef Briana says that her comfort food typically consists of dishes characterized by umami, a rich and savory element often described as the fifth taste (after salty, sour, bitter and sweet). “My mom was really big on cooking from scratch so the most comforting foods I remember enjoying as a child are whole roasted fish and roasted vegetables, usually with delicious glazes and rich broths.” She explains that comfort food does not necessarily have to be traditional; it can be more refined and offer both an intensity of flavour and a rich mouth feel. “The idea of comfort has a lot to do with the people with whom you are enjoying a meal; however, the deliciousness of the food also plays a key role in bringing people together and enhancing the experience.” The success of Briana’s vegan restaurant in Hintonburg proves that it is possible to serve hearty, comforting dishes without meat. “We sometimes draw inspiration from favourite childhood flavours as we prepare exquisite vegetable dishes. By adding spices or smoke, a vegan dish can be truly evocative of meaty dishes that people may have grown up with.” A good example is her top-prize winning dish for Ottawa’s Gold Medal Plates competition that you will find on Café My House’s winter tasting menu. Composed of a bevy of flavourful elements, just a few of which include smoked mushrooms in a kombu and charred onion broth, the dish comes with a delicate, flavourful fennel and coriander-spiced brown rice cracker perched on top. It is truly a delight for all the senses.

A

FA I

BRIANA KIM, CAFÉ MY HOUSE

JASON SAWISION, STOFA Chef Jason says that when he was growing up, his Chinese mom did most of the cooking, so it is her dishes he usually associates with comfort. Her meals were robust, drawing from a mix of cuisines, including shepherd’s pie, chili and scented roast chicken, which remains a favourite to this day. Meanwhile, his dad is Ukrainian/Russian so at his grandmother’s house he enjoyed lots of meat dishes, pierogis and Borscht. “I think comfort food is something that brings back fond memories of people or places and hits multiple levels of your soul. We gravitate to comfort food, especially in the winter, because it warms us up, it’s satisfying and feels like you are enjoying something that was prepared with care.” Stofa’s winter menu is packed with hearty elements. “Our goal is to ensure people leave here both comforted and wellnourished. Jason feels that sweet spices especially evoke fond food memories while star anise, fennel, and garam masala add a deep flavour intensity to dishes. Currently on offer is a whole-roasted quail stuffed with chicken farce, served with walnut cocoa nib crumble, vanilla parsnip puree, pomegranate and more. With its rich flavours and contrasting textures, it’s as delicious as it is comforting.

CHEF WALID EL-TAWEL, FAIROUZ Chef Walid believes that comfort food is universal, evoking togetherness and sharing. He has fond memories of his childhood in Ottawa, gathering around the table with many others. “It was the atmosphere that I found comforting, perhaps even more so than the food,” he recalls. At the heritage Centretown mansion that is home to Fairouz, Walid and his team serve up food that is as beautiful as it is delicious. At Fairouz, the family-style plates on their Sofra menu encourage the sharing of good food and conversation. Walid also likes to marry Canadian ingredients with those of Middle Eastern countries to makes his food approachable for diners who may not be familiar with the more exotic flavours. “Cinnamon is a very evocative spice in so many cultures. I also enjoy layering flavours and incorporating preserved ingredients like eggplants, peppers and lemons, all of which add to a dish’s comfort factor.” One of Walid’s favourite comfort foods is koosa mahshi, a stuffed zucchini dish. At Fairouz, it features dried mint, rice, ground lamb, minced tomato, onion and more, in an upscale version of a popular Middle Eastern dish that is both satisfying and flavourful.

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FOOD Paula’s Bites

Sweet

TEMPTATION PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

By Paula Roy Paula’s Bites

@paulajroy

These adorable little gluten-free cakes are simple to prepare and irresistibly delicious. They’re great on their own with just a dusting of icing sugar, but even more tempting when topped with mocha ganache.

MINI BROWNIE CAKES WITH MOCHA GANACHE INGREDIENTS 1/4 cup (60 mL) butter 1/2 cup (125 mL) dark chocolate chips 2 eggs 2 tbsp (30 mL) granulated sugar 1/2 tsp (2.5 mL) vanilla 1 tsp (5 mL) espresso powder * 1/4 cup (60 mL) 35% whipping cream 1/2 cup (125 mL) dark chocolate chips Icing sugar, fresh raspberries and whole coffee beans, to garnish  * Find espresso powder at specialty food shops or substitute with 2 teaspoons (10 mL) instant coffee granules. METHOD Preheat oven to 350F. Lightly grease two 4-inch (10 cm) springform pan(s) or one 6-inch (15 cm) pan. Place pans on a baking sheet and set aside. In a medium-sized bowl, microwave butter and ½ cup chocolate chips on medium power for about a minute and a half, in 30-second increments, stirring

after each interval until chocolate is completely melted and mixture is smooth. Set aside. In a separate, smaller bowl, beat eggs and sugar with an electric mixer on high speed for 3 minutes, until mixture is frothy and pale yellow. Beat in vanilla. Fold egg mixture into chocolate mixture one-half at a time, combining gently until evenly blended. Spoon batter into prepared pan(s). Bake for 14-15 minutes for smaller pans or 17-19 minutes for larger. Centre should be set (not jiggly when you wiggle the baking tray), but still soft. Let cakes cool in pan(s) for 20 minutes then remove from pan(s). When completely cooled, cakes can be placed in an airtight container and stored at room temperature for up to 2 days, or frozen

for up to a month. Five minutes before serving, make ganache by putting the espresso powder and whipping cream in a microwave-safe jug or measuring cup. Stir to dissolve powder then bring just to a boil over medium-high heat in the microwave. Add the 1/2 cup of chocolate chips, but do not stir. Let stand 5 minutes then stir until smooth. Put cakes on serving plates and pour most of the ganache on top, reserving some to decorate the plates. Thin the remaining ganache with a little more whipping cream and drizzle decoratively on the plates. Garnish with fresh raspberries, a few coffee beans and a dusting of icing sugar. Serves 2

WINTER 2018 ottawaathome.ca 67


LIVING Back Story

LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE By Andrew King @twitandrewking

F

rancis Conroy Sullivan was born in Kingston, Ontario in 1882, but would soon leave the Limestone City at the age of eighteen to work in Ottawa as a draftsman in the offices of Moses Chamberlain Edey. Edey was a prominent Ottawa architect who designed the Aberdeen Pavilion at Lansdowne Park and Ottawa’s first department store, the Daly Building, which was also one of the few Chicago-style buildings in Canada. It was during his time with Edey that Sullivan met an American architect by the name of Frank Lloyd Wright. Sharing a like-minded design sense, Sullivan soon found himself moving to Chicago to work for several months with Wright at his Oak Park Studio. The young Ottawa architect and Wright became friends and worked together on the latter’s Prairie Style of architecture, recognizable by its one or two-storey designs using one-storey projections, an open floor plan, lowpitched roofs with wide overhangs and strong horizontal lines. These design principles are what Sullivan brought back to Ottawa with him in 1911 when he opened his own independent architecture practice. His firm in Ottawa created some of this city’s, and maybe even Canada’s, only examples

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of Prairie Style architecture inspired by Wright, the master of that style. Sullivan worked in Ottawa for five very productive years between 1911 and 1916, producing significant Ottawa area structures. These included The School House Lofts (formerly Ecole du Sacré Coeur) in Hintonburg, The Pembroke Public Library and countless other residential apartments, homes and public buildings in Ottawa, as well as a very distinctly designed church out on Dwyer Hill Road. Sullivan is also rumoured to have been responsible for designing those cool concrete and metal lamp posts lining Island Park Drive. During this time, he also collaborated with Wright to design the Banff National Park Pavilion and the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, both since demolished.

THE SULLIVAN HOUSE

In 1913, with his business booming, Sullivan built his own unique home in Sandy Hill. Sullivan’s trademark was similar to Wright’s Prairie Style, except in contrast to his horizontal themes. Instead, Sullivan used a strong vertical aesthetic, including his own home which is still standing at 346 Somerset Street East.

Known for a quick temper and a bristling attitude, Sullivan began to lose important Ottawa contracts and moved into designing military hospitals for the Canadian Department of Defense. By the 1920s, while working a gig at City Hall designing the Lindenlea Housing Project, Sullivan decided to move back to Chicago to become chief architect for the Chicago Public School Board. However, Sullivan’s health was deteriorating along with his personal life as his wife and four children took a back seat to his career. Back in in America, his old friend Wright became aware that Sullivan was not doing so well and invited his colleague to live with him in Arizona to recover. Yet the inspiring forces of the famous architect and the desert air were not enough to save the ailing Sullivan. Wright arrived home one day to find his friend lying on the floor in a pool of blood. Sullivan was rushed to hospital, but died shortly after at age 47 on April 4, 1929. This was the second time Wright had returned home to tragedy. 15 years earlier his girlfriend and her two children, along with six others, were murdered in the home with an axe by a male servant, who later set the house on fire and attempted to kill himself by swallowing hydrochloric acid. Wright personally arranged for his friend’s remains to be returned to Kingston, where Sullivan was buried in an unmarked grave. It seems an ironically sad end for someone who designed some of Ottawa’s most unique and distinguished structures to be buried under absolutely no structure at all.


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