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a t ho me HOMES | DESIGN | LIVING | SHOPPING | FOOD

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HOME

LIVING

FOOD

10 DESIGNER AT HOME Jennifer McGahan’s lifestyle change

37 PROFILE Back to the business of beauty and coffee

57 FOOD THOUGHTS A cup of pie

14 COVER RENOVATION A yard with mounds of appeal 20 KITCHEN RENOVATION A Westboro area home reveals a dynamic new kitchen 24 SPOTLIGHT The transformation of an outdated home 28 SMALL SPACE RENOVATION A move back to Ottawa with the desire for the perfect house 33 CAPTIAL COLOURS Grounding space

38 PROFILE Patricia Boal juggling the news and family 40 PROFILE Adapting to changes in the world of athletics and medicine 42 PROFILE Turning the wheels of change 45 STEP INSIDE Alex Munter shares his work and some of his favourite things

58 DINING IN Ottawa’s pizza scene 63 LET’S DISH Connecting with the community 67 PAULA’S BITES Salad—all dressed up 68 FORWARD THINKING Food & entertainment at work

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EDITOR’S NOTE Back to Work

46 FALL FASHION Canadian style 49 NEW & NOTABLE Talent and creativity in Ottawa 53 GIVING BACK Helping those who might not otherwise find medical care

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54 GARDENING The gardens of Maplelawn Estate COVER PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

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EDITOR’S NOTE

At Home, In Ottawa

Life is only a reflection of what we allow ourselves to see”  —U N K N OW N

Here we are—back to work, back in print—and while it feels good, it also feels incredibly reflective. I recognize the privilege we have had to be able to stop work and take the time to figure out when moving forward would feel right. Today, as I write this, it feels right. Tomorrow? Well that might be another story! I have learned a lot during the restrictions of the pandemic, but perhaps the biggest lesson is that change is inevitable and adapting is essential. I am in awe of the people and businesses operating in the capital who have stepped up to get to work within the new (everevolving) norm. From our advertising clients to those reflected on the following pages—this city never stops impressing me. With thanks to a spring and summer spent close to home, I have been able to experience Ottawa a little deeper. I am proud of the foresight I had back in early April when I ordered myself a bike—one of the most coveted COVID-19 luxuries available, and I snagged a good one! My bike offered me freedom over the past several months. The freedom to walk out my door with purpose, even though I had no place to go! My rides offered the feeling of a mini vacation with routes that embraced the city’s proximity to water and bike trails shaded by nature. Now, as I spend more time at my desk—working remotely—with our team to bring Ottawa At Home to print, my purpose feels deeper and I am energized from this. We have decided to come back with a new look, reflective of our reflections. The logo created by our design team at AN Design is more representative of our commitment to showing off the innovative side of the Capital Region. Décor is always on the forefront of our minds, but the city we call home now stands out a little stronger. At home,

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Mary Taggart DESIGN & LAYOUT

AN Design Communications ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Jane Whiting PHOTOGRAPHER

Mark Holleron FOOD EDITOR

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Korey Kealey STYLE/BEAUTY CONTRIBUTOR

Melissa Shabinsky CONTRIBUTORS

Mary Ciancibello, Catherine Clark, Vera Cody, Sandy Connell, Dani-Elle Dubé, Chloe Girvan, Hollie Grace James, Tia Macpherson, Ted Simpson, Olivia Taggart PROOF READER

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General inquiries: editor@ottawaathome.ca DIRECTOR OF NEWSSTAND

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OTTAWA AT HOME MEDIA INC. Contents © 2020. Reproduction of advertisements or articles appearing in Ottawa At Home, in whole or in part, is forbidden without the written permission of the publisher. Ottawa At Home and Ottawa At Home Media Inc. shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with any advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement.

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k c i l S HOME Designer At Home

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y t i C BY MARY TAGGART  instagram @maryktaggart PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

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hen designer Jennifer McGahan sold her office building, a charming brick structure on Stittsville’s Main Street, in the fall of 2019 she had planned to create a new workspace from a stunning Echo Drive home—but then things changed. She let her staff go in the spring of 2020 as many projects for the respected interior decorator came to a halt. The plans for turning her basement into an office and sample room have been put on hold. But that doesn’t mean that the new home Jennifer is currently living in with her two sons isn’t being enjoyed to its potential. “I’m overlooking the canal, I can walk to Lansdowne for dinner and the Queensway is a kilometre away,” declares Jennifer who adds, “It’s a totally different lifestyle.”

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k THIS PAGE (LEFT) JENNIFER HAS EMBRACED THE EASE OF LOCATION IN HER CANAL AREA HOME (RIGHT) LUXURY DETAILING ON THE STOOLS AND HOOD FAN ADD ELEGANT DRAMA TO THE KITCHEN

HOME Designer At Home

Jennifer lived in Kanata for 20 years and that suited her perfectly when the kids were younger. Both boys played hockey, and living close to the arenas was a bonus, but that has altered. “My boys are done playing hockey and one is off to university—so my life has changed a lot. I have a ton of free time to enjoy my new neighbourhood now,” the talented designer offers. With an evolving decorating style, the new centrally-located home suited Jennifer’s leaning towards a more traditional space. “I still keep the look clean with all-white walls and minimal accessories, but I love the bones of an older home,” she reveals. Adding layers through texture helps to create a balance in style. Brass and high-end finishing details have been incorporated throughout the three-storey home.

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HOME Designer At Home As much as Jennifer was attracted to the stately look of the house, she was drawn to its need for renovation. It required a total overhaul, which is a designer’s dream come true. Her enthusiasm is evident. “What attracted me to this house was the fact that it had gorgeous architectural bones, and a killer location, but it hadn’t been updated since 1990. It sat on the market for seven months. These are the things I always look for because my skill set allows me to add value by renovating.” THIS PAGE (LEFT) GEOMETRIC TILES AND FINISHINGS ADD A MODERN TOUCH WITHIN A TRADITIONAL STYLE FACING PAGE (TOP) A WINE FRIDGE AND CAPPUCCINO MACHINE IN THE MASTER BEDROOM GIVE THE SPACE A LUXURIOUS RETREAT FEELING (BOTTOM) THE CANAL VIEWS ARE PART OF THE CHARM FOR JENNIFER

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HOME Designer At Home

While much of the renovation involved structural changes and updating, Jennifer included many luxuries in the process. The master bathroom boasts heated floors and marble throughout to lend itself to the European styling that the home was calling for. The bathrooms and kitchens were gutted and taken back to the studs. But the exterior wasn’t forgotten in the process. A new front door and black windows were included, along with necessities like a new roof, aluminum siding, and new fascia and soffits. The real fun happens in the third-floor master bedroom where Jennifer integrated a wine fridge and cappuccino machine. The area serves as a retreat for the busy mom and designer—look for her sipping wine on the balcony, embracing her view. “I love the third-floor balcony overlooking the canal. You can’t beat that view anywhere in the city,” she gushes. Jennifer continues to work on large-scale design projects, for more information visit jennifermcgahan.com

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HOME Backyard Renovation

Nourished Through Home BY CHLOE GIRVAN  twitter @Mom_interrupted PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

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HOMES Backyard Renovation

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HOME Backyard Renovation

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ack in 2011, Ottawa couple Matthew Ball and Fraser Valentine were contently settled in their new Westboro home, until a listing for a mid-century modern home in Rothwell Heights piqued their curiousity and led to a drive. Design, architecture and real estate enthusiasts, the couple recall feeling as though the house was strongly calling to them, just moments after entering the front door. Built by an architect in the late 1950s, Fraser says that the house was intentionally positioned on the property in a way that follows the light. “The sun rises outside of our bedroom and tracks around the house so that it remains sunny by the pool until late in the day. The seasonal views at any time of year are spectacular.� The large, lush property also fulfilled mutual dreams of a cottage, without many of the associated hassles of maintaining two residences. Despite succumbing to emotion as the main driver of their purchase, Matthew and Fraser also knew that the process of restoring the home and grounds would be very challenging and expensive, requiring a series of extensive renovations. 16  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2020


HOME Backyard Renovation

THIS PAGE (LEFT) CONTAINER GARDENS THRIVE IN THE LATE DAY SUN AROUND THE POOL AREA (BELOW) THE POOL DECK OFFERS A VARIETY OF SEATING OPTIONS FACING PAGE MATTHEW (LEFT) AND FRASER HAD LOTS OF OPPORTUNITY TO ENJOY THE OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE THIS SUMMER

The installation of a new septic system was an early project that entailed digging down eight feet into the front yard and removing of 60 tons of rock. Giving the expansive space a new manicured look using native plants, the couple hired local landscape designer, Ailsa Francis, to create a master plan for the property that would respect the look and feel of the house and neighbourhood. Ready to invest their own energy, Fraser and Matthew spent the summer of 2013 planting over 800 plants, placed by Ailsa, in hues of purple, yellow, white and pink. At least 300 thyme plants were selected to provide a low-maintenance ground cover which flowers in a beautiful bright pink, early in the summer. Renovations to the backyard included the addition of 400 plants, such as ferns, hellebores and groundcovers, to create a completely naturalized woodland garden. Welcoming touches of feeders and a

fountain invite birds, squirrels and a local fox to drop by when in need of sustenance. Asked why they chose to plant their gardens themselves, Fraser smiles. “Gardening is really the only thing I can do where I don’t think about anything except what I am doing. It is organic and doesn’t have to be perfect.” Matthew agrees. “As I get older, I find nature to be increasingly important and being outside, with my hands in the dirt, to be very grounding.” Offsetting the natural and serene tones of the property are pops of bright whimsical colour, such as robin egg blue chairs for the front porch and a bright yellow front door, painted by Matthew. “Our aesthetic has always been that we like what we like. We are not afraid of colour and don’t take ourselves too seriously.” With many projects behind them, Matthew says it was the construction of a new 1,500 square-foot pool deck that FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  17


HOMES Backyard Renovation

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ASK THE EXPERT PHOTOS WITH A VARIETY OF FLOWERS BLOOMING THROUGHOUT THE SEASON THERE IS ALWAYS SOMETHING TO OFFER TO DECORATE THE TABLE AND BRING COLOUR INTO THE YARD

Cecile Panet-Raymond, Merchandising Director, La-Z-Boy Home Furnishings and Décor

Q A

cemented their commitment to the home. “In 2016, we also upgraded the pool by replacing tired coping with limestone accented by one-inch-square aquamarine tile. It is absolutely gorgeous, and we now spend all summer outdoors. We both work downtown and by living a little further out of the core, I truly feel like I am at the cottage.” Fraser adds that the house and property also feel very different in the summer and that they live in it very differently during the warmer months. Firm believers in the joys of casual entertaining, the couple extend an annual open invitation to friends to join them at the pool on sunny, summer days. A thoughtful basement renovation now boasts a large butler kitchen, providing dedicated space for party essentials like platters, glasses and cutlery.

Given this past summer’s social and travel restrictions, Matthew and Fraser were more grateful than ever for their, “cottage in the city”. Choosing to take the month of July off together, they agreed to make minimal plans—apart from gardening projects and ample pool time. Thanks to the generous layout of their property, the couple were able to enjoy visits with a few friends and celebrate Matthew’s 50th birthday. Reflecting on their renovation journey, Fraser muses, “What is kind of neat about this house is that everything that we have done to restore and improve it has been very much for us. The goal was always to create a space that makes us feel good and nourishes us. What has been fascinating to watch is just how much other people really like coming here.”

How can I mix patterns within my décor?

Mixing colours & patterns can be overwhelming, but—when done right—the result is a cohesive, well-designed room. Start by editing your colour palette. First consider your space and then think about colours and patterns you love. Look at your wardrobe for inspiration. It’s easiest to work with things you love than to try to make something work. Once you have selected a fabric then choose one colour from within the pattern and then pick two to three more colours to work with from there. Scale and balance is crucial, two primary colours will compete and work against each other in a space just as two large scale patterns will fight against each other for attention. Start by selecting the larger print and work down from there by selecting something about half the scale, a third fabric choice might simply be a solid in a complementary colour. Always take the size of the room into consideration. Ideally limit the number of patterns to three to five and be sure to include solids and texture rather than overwhelm the space with pattern. CONTACT CECILE: cpr@lzb.ca FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  19


HOME Renovation Westboro BY DANI-ELLE DUBÉ  twitter instagram @danidmedia PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

Daring with

Vision Forget the idea of a safe and typical design concept with neutral colour palettes. If Ottawa couple Kelly Wilhelm and Blair Smith were going to renovate their kitchen, they knew they’d have to go bold—and go bold they did!

JASON, DENISE AND KELLY

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ut first, they needed an experienced team who could help bring their vision to life—and that team included Jason Bellaire and Denise Hulaj of StyleHaus Interiors. According to Jason it wasn’t just the generous budget of $100,000, but Kelly and Blair’s eagerness for adventure that made the project seamless. “It was great to be able to experiment with such an exaggerated and beautiful colour,” Jason said. “The clients were easygoing and wanted to have something design-forward, so delightful and whimsical.”

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HOMES Renovation Westboro

DESIGN-FORWARD IDEAS COME TOGETHER WITH A DELIGHTFUL OUTCOME

It was great to be able to experiment with such an exaggerated and beautiful colour. —

SOOTHING NEUTRALS BALANCE BOLD SELECTIONS

JASON BELLAIRE

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HOMES Renovation Westboro

BACKSTORY The Westboro house was built in the 1940s, so when it came to deciding what to do with the kitchen specifically, it was all about opening it up and putting a modern spin on it. As Blair looks It back his first wasongreat toimpression be able of the Ottawa house they moved to from Toronto in 2002, he recalls, “It to experiment with such was small but in really good shape.” Kelly added, “It had an exaggerated previously been flipped, so the personand before us bought it from the original owners and it was really beautiful colour. well maintained.” But the kitchen’s size remained an issue for the couple — who love to entertain. “The kitchen was quite small,” Jason JASON BELLAIRE said. “It had been renovated about ten years ago, but the cabinetry definitely needed to be updated, the countertops were laminate—it was feeling a little used and well-worn. It wasn’t really affective in terms of functionality and in terms of our family’s use.”

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HOME Renovation Westboro

I always loved the colour that we have—the blue and white colour palette in kitchens has always really appealed to me—but I also wanted it to be warm. That’s why the wood and textures are so important. — KELLY WILHELM

GETTING TO WORK

T H E R E S U LT S

To help in the process, they had Blair’s father—who is an architect—sketch up their renovation ideas. A major change included removing a bulkhead that went across the room, Jason explained. And while they would normally expose something like that in design, they felt this particular bulkhead was impeding on the space, making the kitchen feel smaller than it was. The only issue they had during renovations was the discovery of asbestos, which was removed. Other than that, Jason says it was a relatively easy renovation—one of the easiest he and Denise have ever done. The rest of the wish list included finding ways to make the space more functional, family- and party-friendly. They also wanted to turn the existing island into a peninsula, create more counter space, add lighting and switch the cabinetry—which was originally a light grey— to a “gentleman’s grey” (which came out to be more like a dark teal blue hue) and finish everything off with a chunky crown molding. “Kelly has a good eye,” Jason said. “She had some interesting artwork so there was already that sense of whimsy with her vision and how they live. So we wanted to reflect that in the kitchen and it’s quite a delightful, cheerful, unexpected kitchen when you walk into the house, but it still feels like it belongs.”

What resulted was a playful but harmonious mix of colours, textures and patterns. Bold choices might have been made, but comfort was not forgotten and still woven into the final concept. “I had a lot of time to think about this kitchen,” Kelly said. “I always loved the colour that we chose—the blue and white colour palette in kitchens has always really appealed to me—but I also wanted it to be warm. That’s why the wood and textures are so important.” A breakfast nook with a padded bench situated underneath a window was pulled together with mid-century wood furniture for texture, framed in blue-and-white patterned wallpaper, and combined with a brass light fixture featuring five large round bulbs hanging from the ceiling. Next to the nook, a large peninsula with a white countertop which extends to the end of the peninsula has room for three white and silver bar stools—parked neatly underneath on one side. The striking grey/blue cupboards with brass handles, plus a microwave, are located on the other. The cabinetry with the gleaming handles and knobs continues throughout the kitchen, balanced by lightcoloured wood flooring and accents on some drawers and a wine rack. There’s even a built-in bar, for all their entertaining needs. The kitchen’s facelift achieved was exactly what the couple had wished and hoped for—a daring new space that somehow seemed two times larger than before. “We were blown away,” Blair said. “We got the kitchen we wanted, for sure.”

TOP LEFT THE TILE DETAILING IS AN IMPORTANT DESIGN FEATURE THROUGHOUT THE KITCHEN TOP RIGHT CLEVER USE OF THE CORNER SPACE COMBINES FUNCTION WITH DESIGN BOTTOM LEFT THE BREAKFAST NOOK HAS A MID-CENTURY FEELING TO IT BOTTOM RIGHT A BAR TUCKS INTO THE HALLWAY OFF THE KITCHEN TO CREATE AN IDEAL ENTERTAINING FEATURE FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  23


HOME Spotlight

MODERN MILLENNIALS BY JANE WHITING PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

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hen the downtown condo they had rented for years was unexpectedly put on the market and quickly sold, a young Ottawa couple had a big decision to make. Rent another condo to continue their carefree, urban lifestyle or leap into home ownership? Newlyweds Jordan Vig and Jessica Whiting were keen to buy, but the timing was not great for first-time buyers. It was a hot seller’s market late last year with low inventory. After searching frantically for centrally-located homes in their price range, along came a little redbrick bungalow from the 1950s in the trending north Alta Vista area. Just days after viewing it, their offer was accepted in a competitive bidding process. They were ecstatic! “I liked the idea of a bungalow with a spacious main level and basement—plus a big back yard,” says Jordan who also valued the established neighbourhood which is close to his gym and many other conveniences at Train Yards. “We knew we were getting in pretty deep with all the renovation work it needed, but the house had so much potential to grow with us and be our home for years to come.” Jessica was excited by the opportunity to transform an outdated home that had not changed much in over 60 years and says, “It seemed the best of both worlds to blend the charm of an older home with modern design.” She credits their realtor, Sarah Wright, for managing their expectations in a difficult market and connecting them with local trade professionals. With absolutely no previous home-improvement experience, the couple definitely fall into the “more handsome than handy” category. Yet, they were fearlessly ambitious in their vision and amazingly resourceful on a cost-conscious budget. A policy advisor with Environment Canada, Jordan put his research skills to work to source products and services, while Jessica, a commercial real estate advisor with Colliers International, contributed her strong sense of style and understanding of the use of space. Together, they managed to put their own ideas into action to incorporate both of their design tastes.

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DRAMATIC ARTWORK FROM LONDON, ONTARIO BASED ARTIST RHIANA MADELINE

HOME Spotlight

FEARLESS FIRST-TIME RENOVATORS Their first priority was gutting the postwar era kitchen and knocking down walls to create an open-concept space to flow into the dining room and living area. They hired Rene Page of Capital Home Building for his remodelling expertise to do most of the kitchen work. Jessica was committed to a bold and modern kitchen design. “In my job, I am constantly touring office spaces and I love the industrial feel of clean lines and a minimalist look,” she explains. “We went with matte-black, flat-fronted custom cabinets from Harpstone in Kemptville, adding two inches in height to accommodate Jordan’s six-foot-eightinch frame.” Euro Tile & Stone installed the raw concrete-looking quartz for the countertops and waterfall peninsula, as well as supplying the oversized Italian porcelain floor tiles and the stunning marble-styled backsplash. “Erika Gagne at Euro Tile was a wonderful help in bringing our design vision to life,” notes Jessica. Jordan worked with The WoodSource to create a custom beautiful 72 3 16 inch bar counter in rich walnut to connect the kitchen to the dining area, and boost the entertaining factor. The warm tones of natural walnut are repeated in floating shelf accents in the kitchen, adding a contrasting rustic vibe to the modern design. He was also responsible for scoring all the KitchenAid appliances from The Brick on Black Friday, and choosing a downdraft oven to avoid a range hood obstructing his view. Yes, Jordan is the cook! Many products were bought online. “I found a much greater selection of high-quality fixtures online at Lowes, like the matte-black kitchen faucet by Vigo which was not available in their store,” explains Jordan.

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Moving from a one-bedroom condo to a three-bedroom single home demands shopping for more furnishings. Jessica and Jordan loved adding new dining chairs from Artemano to their glass dining table, and spicing it up with a black Etta pendant light from Mobilia. A mid-century, grey-tufted sofa from Article (another online site) now sits proudly in the living room, along with finishing touches from LD Shoppe. THIS PAGE (RIGHT) THE ROUND DINETTE TABLE IS FROM HUDSON’S BAY, THE CHAIRS ARE FROM ARTEMANO (BELOW) JESSICA AND JORDAN TAKE TIME TO TOAST THEIR EFFORTS FACING PAGE THE SIDEBOARD BAR IS FROM STRUCTUBE

Personal sommelier. Our portfolio of authentic and individualistic wines has always been built on relationships. We’ve spent twenty years working directly with some of the world’s finest winemakers, carefully choosing remarkable wines from our favourite regions that we proudly share with others. But our focus on relationships doesn’t stop there. Our team knows what makes our portfolio so special. They’re available to help you select the perfect wines to your taste, find a new favourite, or discover what you’ve been missing. Trustworthy suggestions. Exceptional customer service. Shared passion. That’s how relationships are built: one conversation at a time.

A UNIQUE PORTFOLIO OF ESTATE AND ARTISAN WINES

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LAUREN HAYES-VAN DEN WEGHE / LAUREN@THEVINEAGENCY.CA / 613.240.3667

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In Ottawa, contact:

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Distinctive wines that reflect a sense of place and the character and passion of the winemaker. Shop online at theVineAgency.ca for home delivery. Please enjoy responsibly. N IVER


HOMES Spotlight

HANDS ON Eager to earn their “handy” badges, the couple did all their own painting—going with a monochromatic look of white-on-white in all rooms. While Jessica admits that decor is her preferred sphere, Jordan is currently taking it to another level by working alongside his renoexperienced father (a retired fire chief) to expand and fully renovate the main bathroom. In the process, he is learning the true meaning of “labour of love!” With many more renovation projects to complete, the happy first-time home owners are embracing the challenge of building the next stage of their lives together. FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  27


HOME In Style

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HOME In Style

DREAMING OF HOME BY MARY TAGGART PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

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aroline Andrews grew up in Ottawa and started her career in the nation’s capital where she realized her dreams in the print-media business as publisher of the Ottawa Business Journal and founding publisher of Ottawa At Home magazine. “I thought at the time I was living my dream—it was fantastic!” says the vibrant woman who would go on to fulfill even bigger dreams and greater accomplishments. A casual conversation with friends pushed her to pursue more work goals outside of Ottawa. “I remember sitting in my living room with close friends, Deb Cherry and John King, when Deb asked me what was next—what my BIG dream was? I smiled, sighed and replied that I wanted to be the publisher of national magazine brands,” recalls Caroline. Her dreams eventually became reality, albeit along a bumpy road! After Caroline moved from Ottawa to Toronto, she ended up as the publisher and VP of Hockey News, TV Guide, Canadian Home Workshop, Outdoor Canada, Style At Home, Canadian Gardening, Vancouver Magazine, Western Living, Canadian Living, Elle Canada, Next Home, Yellow Pages and Totem.

COMING HOME A move back to Ottawa was always Caroline’s ultimate dream, and brought her close to family and friends. In the fall of 2018, she left Toronto and called upon her pal, realtor John King, to find her a “dollhouse” which, in her mind, meant a small and manageable home with loads of charm. “I wanted something I could at least partially gut and glam up,” she states. After looking at over half a dozen properties that fell into this description, Caroline fell in love with a 1960s bungalow in Glabar Park, and the purchase was made in December of 2018. When she moved back to Ottawa, Caroline began working on obtaining her real-estate license. John not only found her a home but also offered her a job working with him and the team at Engel & Völkers, Ottawa, as Director of Operations, as well as a sales representative position. This brings Caroline to the other side of working within the home industry. “I’m very excited for this next career chapter. After many years of running décor, residential real estate and commercial real estate brands, I’m excited to be on the other side of helping people realize their dreams,” she enthuses. FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  29


SECTION Title

Dress Casual Sportswear Made in Europe

Available at:

199 Richmond Road (at Kirkwood Ave.) (613) 829-8313 info@erfisher.com FREE PARKING ON-SITE

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THIS PAGE (ABOVE) TOUCHES OF GLAMOUR ENHANCE THE ROMANTIC FEELING CAROLINE WAS STRIVING FOR IN THE MASTER BEDROOM FACING PAGE (TOP) LITTLE LUXURIES IN THE BATHROOM INCLUDE A DEEP SOAKING TUB (BOTTOM) THE SMALL KITCHEN IS EQUIPPED WITH GOURMET FEATURES


HOME In Style

I’m very excited for this next career chapter… I’m excited to be on the other side of helping people realize their dreams. —CAROLINE ANDREWS

AT HOME IMPROVEMENTS Caroline has kept busy both personally and professionally since her return to Ottawa. Renovations on her bungalow have been extensive. In support of her love for cooking, the kitchen was obviously at the top of her project list. While the existing kitchen was small, the galley layout lends itself to function, and the space was turned into a show-stopping gourmet kitchen. A back porch off the area was turned into a four-season breakfast nook to offer an expanded feeling to the room. Caroline isn’t one to shy away from the daring and drama of home décor. She chose exotic walnut hardwood for the floors and injected splashes of glamour throughout, including within a dramatic bathroom and in the romance-inspired master bedroom where wallpaper and custom wood detailing add a luxurious feeling. To offset the dramatic elements, she created an airy feeling of space by opening walls, and even removed the door between the hallway and den to allow for flow through. The dynamic go-getter couldn’t be happier and gushes that this home is her dream come true as she states, “It really is my dollhouse!” FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  31


VIRTUAL HOME TOUR

UPGRADE YOUR LIFE


grounding space

HOME Capital Colours

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3

PHOTO FROM CHAPLINS FURNITURE, UK

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BY MARY TAGGART instagram @maryktaggart twitter @ottawaathomemag

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he need to feel grounded within our space has never been more essential. The best way to do this is through colour selections that generate a serene environment with an airy feeling so that we don’t feel closed in. Paint colour trends are leaning towards earth tones in an effort to help us feel rooted. Find rich golden yellows, sage green, burnt orange and rust tones on furnishings and walls. While these colours are soothing, they also offer strength so that our space has the power to nourish and feed the need for connection.

With the current demand to maintain distance from people and working at home becoming a new norm, the desire to feel some sort of connection is strong. Décor that feels connected to the natural world can offer this. Elements of travel and objects designed from earthly inspirations are emerging as essential components within a well-dressed home.

1. BONIFACE VESSELS EQ3, $34.99 EACH 2. INDIA YELLOW, NO. 66, FARROW & BALL 3. CAVERN CLAY, SW 7701, SHERWIN WILLIAMS FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  33


Blackwell Renovations: trusted to create forever homes

They say that if you want work done well, you should ask a busy person to do it. This is particularly true in the design-build industry, and Ryan Blackwell is living proof. Through his thriving firm, Blackwell Renovations, he brings passion and laser-focused attention to detail to every project. Having strategically expanded its team and capabilities over the past six years, the company can now tackle everything We stand out because of our from interior structural work, luxury renovations unwavering commitment to and additions to new ensuring that clients’ dreams home builds. It offers endto-end services, beginning are fulfilled.” with exploring the client’s — Ryan Blackwell vision; having architects, engineers, and interior designers create 3D drawings; working with the client to select the best materials and finishes; and then executing the planned work conscientiously and efficiently. Ryan’s unique philosophy of customer satisfaction is what sets Blackwell apart. As he explains, “Many companies provide similar services, but we stand out because of our unwavering commitment to ensuring that clients’ dreams are fulfilled”. Those who work for Ryan will attest to how high his expectations are, as he holds them to the same stringent craftsmanship standards he holds for himself. As Ryan says, “I put the client and their project above all else and treat their space as though it is my own home until completion. Our goal is to always exceed expectations.” Ryan notes that he places great emphasis on developing and managing productive relationships. “I have specific architects and designers I like to collaborate with, depending on whether the home is traditional,

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contemporary or ultra-modern. Blackwell Renovations excels at being flexible and agile, adapting to lots of different stylistic choices to honour the client’s vision.” The personal touch is paramount. With Ryan as the point of contact on all larger scale projects, he confirms, “Being responsive is extremely important to me, as is sticking to budgets and schedules. Should issues arise, I meet with the client immediately, break down the situation and my proposed remedy, and then work with them on a course of action. We operate in a fully transparent way to ensure 100% client satisfaction.” Sustainability is another focus area for Blackwell Renovations. “Particularly with energy efficiency and green building practices, I see continuing education as a big part of my job to be sure we can offer the best solutions for each project,” notes Ryan. Ryan says he is continually energized by people who are passionate about creating a home that is reflective of their tastes and enhances their lifestyle. “The Blackwell team shines at making spaces that are ultra-functional and stunningly beautiful, whether starting fresh on a new home or transforming an older one,” he elaborates. “In addition to maximizing space, we take care to accentuate the things that are important to each client. We take the time to ensure everything is done properly and our many satisfied clients know that Blackwell Renovations is the firm to be trusted to create a forever home, building quality spaces that last.” blackwellrenovations.ca

613-880-7050


LIVING Profile Business

FINDING THE

SILVER LINING DAMIEN (LEFT) AND WARREN

BY OLIVIA TAGGART PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

GET TO KNOW HeadQuarters is part beauty salon, part café, but full-on community-mindedness. With the spirit of inclusion as a staple, co-owner Warren Frederick, who oversees the restaurant, says, “We’re creating a community. It’s a safe space for people to come enjoy, be themselves and be entertained.”

WHAT’S ON OFFER? HeadQuarters, located on Clarence Street in the ByWard Market, prides itself on being a unique experience with quality restaurant food, homemade syrups for specialty cocktails, and talented stylists, including a barber.“I’ve never seen a salon, restaurant and cocktail bar in one space,” Warren said. “You can spend all day here and experience different people, cultures, flavours and styles.”

The initial idea to combine a hair salon and restaurant came to co-owner Damien Carvery, who oversees the hair salon, when he was sitting in a coffee shop that had an excess amount of space. “This would be an amazing hair salon and I would keep the coffee shop at the front,” Damien said of his initial idea. “I knew from the beginning that I would be able to push a product like food and alcohol, while clients spend the day with us.”

ADAPTING TO CHANGE When COVID-19 hit, both aspects of HeadQuarters were forced to close, but Warren and Damien didn’t always see that as a bad thing. “I think COVID helped us,” Warren said, “it made people think outside the box.” On the salon side, that meant taking on less clients when they reopened to ensure people felt safe in the space. On the restaurant side, after the city closed Clarence Street to vehicles, an extended

patio helped them serve more customers who want to experience what they are offering. “We have such a visually appealing place,” Warren claims—referring to their large patio filled with grass and plants. Damien added that he thinks closing Clarence Street to vehicles is something that should have happened sooner. “It’s great for business and encourages foot traffic.” COVID-19 has also shown Warren and Damien that their industries are moving towards what they refer to as ‘concept spaces’. “We cater not just to the services we provide on a daily basis,” Damien reveals as he referenced HeadQuarters’ white walls, movable glass wall, and furniture on wheels. 2020 has proved the importance of being flexible and adapting to changes in business, and with the ability to host private gatherings, co-owners Frederick and Carvery feel up to the task. FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  37


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ASK THE EXPERT

Elissa Vecchiola, Showroom Manager in Kanata, Mondeau Bathroom & Kitchen

Q A

Which shower system is right for us?

A shower system is considered the mainstay of the bathroom. Tapping into trends, while combining function, will ensure that your shower enhances the look of the room. Currently there is a rise in popularity for classic modern and urban industrial style finished with matte black and gold tones. Bringing this look throughout the bathroom— on the shower door, basin faucets and the tub filler will create a cohesiveness within the space. Once the style is established then think about function. There are several shower systems available. Finding the right one is all about personal preference. Rain head—A rain head shower mimics the feeling of rain. They come in several sizes and are typically mounted on a long wall arm to bring the head into the centre of the shower, or a ceiling arm that allows the water to fall straight down. For those seeking a firmer pressure it’s important to pair the rain head with a hand shower. Hand Shower—Every shower should have a hand-held option. They can be used with the rainshower, independently for a strong rinse and can offer multiple settings. It will double as a quick foot rinse, great for cleaning walls and grout — and it makes for an ideal dog wash! Body Jets—Select jets offering angle adjustment. People come in all shapes and sizes so one jet won’t fit all! We advise three to four jets per shower unit. CONTACT ELISSA: evecchiola@mondeau.ca

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News@

HOME

BY HOLLY GRACE JAMES PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

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seasoned reporter who has tackled her fair share of tough stories, Patricia Boal, co-anchor of CTV Ottawa’s News at Six, has admittedly never experienced anything quite like the COVID-19 pandemic during her twenty-six-year career. And the reality of the deadly virus grew much more palpable when it infiltrated her tight-knit family, infecting Patricia’s husband Gord Wilson. A colour commentator for Ottawa Senators broadcasts on TSN 1200, he had been covering the team’s road trip through San Jose, Anaheim and Los Angeles in mid-March. “The interesting thing is that he probably shouldn’t have been back at work or travelling at all because he had a minor heart attack in February,” explains Patricia. “But he was desperate to go back to work and he took the necessary precautions so that could happen.”


LIVING Profile Back at Work Postponement of the NHL season due to the coronavirus outbreak forced Gord’s premature return to Ottawa, and when he began complaining of known symptoms associated with the virus, including a persistent cough, Patricia persuaded her 59-year-old husband to get tested “just to rule it out.” The following day, news broke that one of the Ottawa Senators players present on the same plane as Gord had tested positive for COVID-19. Patricia explains that, while awaiting his test results, Gord became quite ill, with incessantly low energy and breathing difficulties, and the couple found themselves weighing the options of a trip to the hospital’s emergency room. “I was hoping we made the right call by not going to the hospital,” says Patricia. “I was reading all the worst case scenarios—people looking after their loved ones in apartments and waking up to find them passed out on the couch. It was nerve-wracking for sure.”

A positive COVID-19 test result eleven days later wasn’t exactly a huge surprise, she says, although an unexpected turn of events remained right around the corner for the news veteran. Required to isolate because of her possible exposure to the virus via her husband, Patricia found herself in quarantine for the requisite 14 days, leading to another first: she wouldn’t be anchoring the nightly flagship six o’clock news from CTV Ottawa’s station in the ByWard Market, but rather from her own backyard in the Stonebridge area of Barrhaven. “The snow was still out there and just melting and we have a dog, which revealed the dog poop in the grass,” she laughs. “But we took pictures and figured out a spot and the cameraman, who shot from a distance, came the next day. We did several broadcasts from the backyard, which was great. It was a nice, short commute! I never thought that I’d be able to work from home.”

The veteran anchor admits that, having occasionally day-dreamed about working from home, she’s learned not to take for granted the social, high-energy aspect of a newsroom, despite the fact that she’s still not a fan of the winter commute. “Short-term it was a wonderful option and really fun and I’m glad I could do it, but long-term there’s nothing quite like being in the studio, under the lights, with really great coworkers.” Patricia admits that juggling a full house, including the couple’s three children and a sick husband with a virus that was killing rising numbers worldwide, was one of the most stressful periods of her life. “It was just the most exhausting experience I think I’ve ever been through.” She says she didn’t have to look too far, however, to find a silver lining. “We went through one of the hardest things we’ve gone through as a family. But, we were together and sitting on the couch in the evening watching movies and just having that really uninterrupted chunk of family time that a lot of people don’t get.”

CLOCKWISE FROM PATRICIA IS JAKE, GORD, LINDSAY, AND JESSICA WILSON

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BY MARY TAGGART PHOTO BY TED SIMPSON

MEDICAL BACKING Dr. Andrew Marshall’s credentials are impressive and heavily weighted around sports medicine. He started in the military as a general practitioner and trained in orthopedics while there. When he retired from the military, adding sports medicine to his practice was a logical route to take. “Having an orthopedic surgeon who knew how to treat family medicine issues was seen as a positive for teams and at games,” Dr. Marshall says of his work with numerous sports teams and athletes. He is the co-owner of the Carleton Sport Medicine Clinic, as well as team physician for Carleton Ravens football team, the orthopedic lead for The Ottawa Redblacks football team, medical advisor for the World ParaVolley and he serves on the board of directors for the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine. 40  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2020


SECTION Title The doctor has seen first-hand the impact that COVID-19 has had on athletes. Aside from the loss of team spirit, he is sympathetic to the career implications that halting sports has had and says the loss of opportunity for players is significant. “At the university level the impact has been challenging as some athletes only have five years of eligibility, or age out, and the loss of a season also affects their being in school as they may graduate this year.”

IMPACTING LIVES Dr. Marshall has strong ties with both the Olympics and Paralympics as the CMO of the Canadian Paralympic Team, Tokyo 2020. He was in Japan in February doing a final site visit when that country went into lockdown. He then returned to Canada and operated for one last time in mid-March before the hospital closed to all surgeries except for emergency cases. His sports medicine clinic closed around the time that universities shut down, so he has been personally, professionally as well as emotionally impacted—given his dedication to athletics. “It was a devastating thing, after watching teams qualify for the games weeks before, for the decision to be made that Canada would not attend, and ultimately that the Olympics would be postponed until 2021,” states the compassionate surgeon.

LOOKING AHEAD However, he does see some of the positives, especially for athletes who have been in recovery from injuries and surgeries to have had the opportunity to heal, and for athletes overall to be given the chance to focus on mental preparation and training. But, he acknowledges the difficulty for players and teammates to be working in isolation. Dr. Marshall notes that there have been fewer injuries and accidents, which is always a good thing, but the benefits of sport and physical fitness is significant for society as a whole—both physically and mentally. “Through a gradual and stepwise approach, I am optimistic we can get back to being fit and healthy and allow athletes the ability to train and compete in a safe environment,” he adds hopefully. FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  41


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ASK THE EXPERT

Julia Enriquez, Designer, Astro Design Centre

Q A

How can I mix metals within my décor?

With a vast array of metals to choose from—and with each offering its own appeal—it can be tricky to bring them into your home, especially when the goal is to include more than just one. Bronze, brass, nickel, matte black and chrome are all popular selections right now. If your goal is to include more than one, you’ll want to follow a few rules. Mixing metals can be a fun experiment, but it does require some planning and structure. The mixing needs to look deliberate, not random. We recommend picking one main metal colour to focus on and then using an opposite colour as an accent or focal point. Finishes should help connect a room to other spaces; to maintain a sense of cohesion, use two or, at most, three metal finishes throughout your home. Choose a primary base. Metals have cool or warm hues based on their undertones. Cool metals like chrome, stainless steel, nickel and pewter complement almost any style or colour and function as classic, neutral elements. Given their timeless appeal, cool metals are the perfect primary finish, especially for fixtures you expect to keep for a while. The idea of spreading the metals throughout is all about creating balance and harmony. When the correct balance is achieved, as with any décor project, the look will result in a stunning and versatile space with just the right amount of elegance.

CONTACT JULIA ENRIQUEZ: Julia@astrodesigncentre.com 42  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2020

GATHERING BY OLIVIA TAGGART PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

GET TO KNOW Wheelhouse Cycle is a spin studio with a focus on movement and inclusivity. Nadine Hogan, co-owner of Wheelhouse, is proud of the open-hearted space they have created. “We’re a welcoming, progressive, diverse and safe place for marginalized people in our community,” she proclaims. “Whoever you are and however you present, you have a place here.”

WHAT’S ON OFFER? In April 2014, Nadine and Wheelhouse coowner Heather Andrews were introduced by a mutual friend. It happened that they

had both wanted to open a fitness studio in Ottawa. After seeing spin studios in Calgary, prior to her move to Ottawa, Heather knew that spin was missing in Ottawa. “We didn’t know each other very well, but we decided to keep going until something didn’t feel right,” Heather said of working with Nadine. “It never felt wrong, so we just kept going.” They both wanted to offer something that was about more than just burning calories. “It was about your mental health,” Nadine explained. “It’s about movement and not punishment.”


NADINE (LEFT) & HEATHER

SECTION Title 66 Iber Rd., Stittsville, ON

info@logsend.com

613-831-9333

logsend.com

ADAPTING TO CHANGE When COVID-19 hit, Wheelhouse, like every other fitness facility, was forced to close completely. “We immediately lost 97% of our revenue,” Nadine said. Their first pivot was renting out their spin bikes for online classes. People would rent a bike and participate in a live class from their home. “I kicked and screamed but we needed to do it,” Nadine said about moving online. Even though they made the switch to go online, they knew they needed to do more to survive. Heather recalled brainstorming sessions with her wife, and they realized they needed a big space in order to open in person again. They found a warehouse space on Spruce Street and knew it was exactly what they needed. With the ability to safely space bikes two metres apart, they quickly began to change the empty space into the community they have built over the last six years. Although the space is different and free from the usual amenities on offer at Wheelhouse, Nadine and Heather have realized that ultimately people want to gather. “There’s a powerful pull to be a community and gather.” Heather states. “We’ve grown a lot and realized things don’t need to be perfect,” Nadine acknowledges. “I like that this place is a bit rougher and more like us. We’re far from perfect humans, even though we work hard on ourselves.”

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Design Office and Show Room 77 Holland Avenue (613)721-8195 inquiries@yardsunlimited.com www.yardsunlimited.com FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  43


2020


LIVING Step Inside

SOME OF ALEX’S FAVOURITE THINGS Subject in school: Geography Animal: Our Boston terrier Lola Snack: Chocolate TV Show: Homeland Musician: Lady Gaga

A Champion of Family Health BY VERA CODY PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

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s current President and CEO of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), Alex Munter is proud to be at the helm of one of only a few standalone pediatric hospitals in Canada. It is also a hospital that has doubled in size, added two new wings and quadrupled its research infrastructure and was named by Forbes Magazine as the best place to work in Canadian healthcare in 2016 and 2017 in the nine years of his stewardship. Alex graduated from the University of Ottawa with a Bachelor of Social Sciences and followed that with a Master of Science/Political Science from the London School of Economics. With a growing interest in local politics, he was elected as City and Regional Councillor and led committees responsible for health and social services between 1991 and 2003. He then took a hiatus from politics, and was and was hired as a political reporter for the Ottawa Citizen as well as a visiting professor of Social Sciences at

the University of Ottawa and Concordia University in Montreal. After obtaining professional designations and experience in the health field, Alex is now striving to expand services, improve access and make CHEO a digital health leader. The father of a 20-month-old son believes personal happiness comes from a balance between finding purpose and pleasure in life, and for him, it has always come from working to improve things for the greater good. How has your career path evolved? I started out creating and owning the Kanata Kourier monthly local newspaper at the age of fourteen, which began in my home basement. Journalism led to a career in local government where I was responsible for health and social services which ultimately led to this career. What do you enjoy the most and what are the challenges? The ability to make a positive difference for kids is incredibly rewarding. There is more triumph

when lives are changed and saved here. However, there is no greater tragedy than the loss of a child. It is critical to bring calm to difficult situations and remember that the children and their families are our first priority. How are you handling the coronavirus issue at CHEO? Our response has rapidly evolved and changed through the pandemic. Today’s answer will be different than tomorrow’s. Whether creating Canada’s first pediatric virtual Emergency Department, providing emergency respite for families of children with special needs, or a developing a drive-thru diabetes clinic to ensure the best care for our children and youth, these kid-friendly services are a true testament to the concern and care everyone at CHEO has for the children, youth and families we serve. And this is on top of safety. If anyone needs to come to CHEO, they should know that they are in the best hands—we know how to control diseases. We do it all the time, not just during COVID-19. FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  45


LIVING F  ashion CASUAL EDGE

A more casual lifestyle doesn’t mean your footwear has to suffer! Add some metallic edge to compete your not-so-basic look. ROSE GOLD SNEAKERS AND METALLIC LOAFERS: L’INTERVALLE

TIMELESS ELEGANCE

Sometimes, all it takes to feel elegant is a timeless piece. A chain link or delicate wrap bracelet elevates any look. WRAP BRACELET: STRUT JEWELRY

DOUBLE DUTY

Less shopping means transforming staples! Look for new ways to wear items originally saved for the office, like pairing a crop top with a pencil skirt! WINDOW PANE SKIRT AND CROP TURTLENECK: REBECCAROWE.COM

TOP AND SKIRT: SIMONS, ICÔNE BRAND SWEATER COAT: NADYA TOTO PUMPS: L’INTERVALLE PURSE: AZURE LAZULI

Style Love BY MARY CIANCIBELLO  INSTAGRAM @maryciancibellostyle PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIA MACPHERSON

The changing world may have impacted our fashion habits, but our love for style has remained. As many of us turn to local and Canadian retailers, we are reinventing our looks in a comfortably chic way. 46  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2020


LIVING F  ashion MASK UP

“Flatten the curve, not your style”. The catchy tag line of an Ottawa-owned mask company proves that protecting yourself and others doesn’t have to be boring. VERSACE PRINT AND ANIMAL PRINT MASKS: ABOUTFACE-MASKS.COM

UNIQUE CREWNECKS

Wear art in the most fashionable way. Local designers create the most unique pieces that are anything but your average crewneck.

THESE BOOTS ARE MADE FOR...

...turning heads! Coloured snake-skin is on point this season, and these ankle booties are the perfect way to pull off the trend.

CREWNECK: ANAYA ARTS

SNAKESKIN ANKLE BOOTIES: MAISON BÉDARD READY IN A ZOOM

Update your “ZOOM meeting” looks in a hurry with simple accessories like these bow brooches. They can be worn on your suit jacket lapel, or place one at the collar of your blouse. BROOCHES: SIMONS

WRAPPED IN STYLISH COMFORT

When the temperature drops, every fashionista secretly rejoices. We love draping ourselves in luxurious layers. SWEATER COAT: NADYA TOTO

GEOMETRICALLY CHIC

Take your bag game to the next level with these luxury handbags, sustainably made in Canada. HANDMADE BAGS: AZURE LAZULI FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  47


WE ARE OPEN

Book your appointment & view our catalogue online


ocal LLOVE

LIVING New & Notable

L BY SANDY CONNELL

From sweet treats to inspiring reading, find talent and ingenuity within the National Capital Region

MYSTERIOUSLY LOCAL Dark August is a debut novel for Ottawa based, awardwinning screenwriter and director Katie Tallo. In 2012, Katie was inspired to begin writing novels, but was struggling with how to get started. She came across Stephen King’s On Writing, and his simple straightforward advice struck a chord. Released this summer to rave reviews, Dark August is a fast-paced thriller set in the Wellington West neighbourhood of Ottawa that will leave readers guessing until the final and startling conclusion. Find Dark August at all major bookstores.

VIRTUALLY SWEET After starting a family, entrepreneur Erin Kergen decided to leave her career in event marketing and public relations to start an artisan market and micro bakery in Water Valley, Alberta. Pickle & Myrrh is a virtual farm stand now based at her home in Merrickville, Ontario. With a creative flair, an eye for beautiful things, and a passion for tasting new and different foods, Erin has made a name for herself in different local boutique retail shops in Ottawa and the surrounding area. Be sure to check out the sea salt caramels and caramel sauce at pickleandmyrrh.com

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Perfectly Matched Custom Home Home Design Design Imagine how exceptional your newly designed space could be if you collaborate with an expert in design!

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ttawa homeowner Andrina and Jim Rockwell’s basement was in the final stages of construction. There was some built-in cabinetry and a new neutral wall colour. At this stage, a ping pong table and open space were enjoyed by their young children and dog Stella. The goal was to create a stylish yet practical & cozy room where the whole family could ‘hang out’ and relax.

IN-HOME CONSULTATION The Rockwells had heard about the in-home design program and wanted to take advantage of this complimentary service. After browsing the furniture and selecting some fabrics at the La-Z-Boy store in Gloucester, it was time for the inhome meeting. Our design team accurately measured the basement and took the time to understand their needs and vision for the room.

BEFORE

AFTER CONCEPT REVEAL At an in-store presentation days later, the Rockwells were able to visualize what their basement would look like through a design board—this included fabrics and accessories, plus a detailed 3D model of the floor plan.

B EF OR E

The basement was our first experience with La-ZBoy design services, and the room quickly became our family’s favourite room in our house... the space was so beautiful, we had them also design our living and dining room - Andrina Rockwell UNIQUELY CUSTOMIZED SPACE The Collins sectional featuring deep, wide seats, was big on comfort and style. Its charcoal grey fabric was part of the iClean™ line that repel stains and is easy to clean. The Haven chair provided reclining comfort for TV viewing. A polka dot fabric ottoman added a whimsical touch and some table space or extra seating. The basement became a relaxing escape from the everyday stresses of life. Stella and the whole family loved spending their leisure time in this space!

LIVING & DINING ROOM DESIGN Eight months later, the Rockwells were ready to makeover the living and dining rooms. They were dealing with very dark furniture, an old couch and an inherited dining set. The living room's art had their preferred colour palette but was too small for the high ceilinged wall. The painting now displays perfectly on the smaller wall in the dining room. After trusting our design team with their wish for a more upscale and timeless décor, the Rockwells were thrilled with the results!

Let us help you customize your space to match your needs and express your style and personality. Book an in-store or virtual appointment today! INDEPENDENTLY CANADIAN OWNED & OPERATED

AFTER

Ottawa-East • Ottawa-West • Kanata • Kingston stylemeetscomfort.ca • 613-749-0001


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ASK THE EXPERT COMMUNITY BRANDING Astro Design Centre, the award-winning kitchen and bathroom design store, has announced an innovative initiative to support local businesses dealing with restrictions due to COVID-19. The Ottawa Thriving Together campaign aims to bring Ottawa’s business community together and expand brand awareness of eligible local vendors through Astro’s showroom. The campaign enables small businesses, such as Dala Décor, to display products at Astro’s showroom and promote a cross-brand exposure using social media platforms. Find the community-minded showroom at 1818 Woodward Dr.

Jodie Matthiesen, President, Hubert’s Fireplace Consultation + Design

Q A

MOTIVATIONAL READING Fearless. Girls with Dreams, Women with Vision is a collection of inspiring true stories from Janice McDonald, who is an Ottawa-area entrepreneur, speaker and director and host of the Fearless Women Podcast. The book brings together the stories of extraordinary women from Canada and around the world as they reflect on their youth to look back at the defining moments in their lives that set them on their paths to leadership. Find the book at Costco stores, Amazon and Chapters.

Why choose a STÛV wood burning unit?

A wood burning fireplace conjures the comforts of home. The sight, aroma and sound of burning logs beg for an evening spent reading by the fire or a family game night lit with the flame. This feeling can be achieved with the addition of a STÛV unit. With their streamlined design, STÛV units come in a variety of sizes and the sleek styling fits easily into a contemporary space while the authenticity of the fireplace itself works beautifully in a traditional home too. The goal of the design and installation is ease and simplicity so that enjoying the benefits happens quickly. The heating benefits are notable as well. With a high-performance combustion system and outside air intake connector, there is assurance of a cleaner and more efficient quality of air flow. Finding a fireplace that is environmentally friendly has become much easier today. In particular, STÛV 16 units use a combustion technique that offers efficiency while eliminating environmental impact. With no damper to deal with this unit is the ultimate in user friendly; simply light the logs and enjoy. The 16 line up is offered as a freestand stove, on a podium or with h-base for integrated log storage. Design integration is limitless. CONTACT JODIE: HubertsFireplaces@outlook.com

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LIVING Giving Back

FILLING IN THE GAP BY CATHERINE CLARK twitter instagram @catherinejclark

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vonne Ying has two big jobs. She is a paediatric plastic surgeon at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and an associate professor at the University of Ottawa’s Department of Surgery. But it is her volunteer work with the Ottawa Surgical Outreach Clinic that has a particular impact on her own life, and on the lives of hundreds of Ottawa’s most marginalized citizens. The Clinic delivers free outpatient care in collaboration with the Sandy Hill Community Health Centre—which provides space and supplies at no charge. “We do minor procedures with local anesthesia—biopsies, wound care, injuries with lacerations,” describes Yvonne, who notes that the clinic—which she founded—is geared towards inner-city patients, those who are uninsured and those who can’t or won’t be seen through traditional routes at the hospital. “Surgical access in low and middleincome countries is why I went in to medicine, but then I realized that my own

PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

community still has patients who cannot access care,” says Yvonne. “We try to help those who otherwise fall through the cracks in our health care system,” she explains. “We treat patients who have no legal standing in the country—those who are not a refugee, but not yet a citizen—or homeless patients who do not have insurance because they do not have a health card.” She adds that, “We also treat people who have had such tough situations in hospital that they don’t see it as a place to get better. It can be very stressful for them to know they need help but not be able to get it.” The clinic takes outpatient referrals from family doctors, nurse practitioners, or health care professionals who know the patient cannot afford the hospital bill,

although Yvonne is careful to emphasize that no hospital in Canada will turn a patient away in an emergency. “But even if a doctor or surgeon waives their fee, you will still get a hospital bill if you do not have insurance,” says Yvonne. “We are really proud of our health care system and I am appreciative of my role as a surgeon where 99 per cent of the time I don’t have to worry about whether my patient can afford my care,” concludes Yvonne. “But as a surgeon, I believe that everyone should have access. These patients are just as important as the other patients I treat and they are the most vulnerable in our community.” For more information, please call the Sandy Hill Community Health Centre at 613-569-3484 or email yying@cheo.on.ca FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  53


SMELL ROSES

LIVING C  ommunity Gardening

THE

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WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY TED SIMPSON  instagram @Ted_613

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ucked away on the western edge of Westboro, only steps from a busy thoroughfare, surrounded by stone walls that have shielded against the passage of time for over 100 years, lies a hidden gem. It’s a living sanctuary of flora and fauna that reflects all the colours of the rainbow, called Maplelawn Garden. The Maplelawn Estate was originally built for the Thomson family, back in the early 1830s. What remains today is the historic house which is currently occupied by the Keg Manor restaurant, and the walled flower garden. The entire property is now owned by the NCC and is designated a national historic site. The garden at Maplelawn is unique for its design as a European-style walled garden that was built in the New World. Maplelawn is the only example of a pre-Confederation, Canadian walled garden to have survived to present times with so little changed. In 1995, Canadian landscape historian, Edwinna von Baeyer, wrote: “The walls of Maplelawn are a living treasure. The property’s timeless beauty and repose have survived through years of financial difficulties, changes of owner, urban encroachment, and the pressures of changing horticultural styles. We have very few landscapes in Canada that can claim such a long existence without major changes.” Even after another 25 years of roaring development nearby, that statement remains true today, though the garden gets by with a little help from friends. A group of volunteers formed The Friends of Maplelawn Garden in 1993. The movement was spearheaded by Ann Falkner and Nancy Smith, who led a group of passionate gardeners towards the goal of maintaining the garden the way it was originally designed so many years ago.


SHELLEY AT WORK Gardening LIVING Community IN THE GARDEN

Now in her third season of volunteering at Maplelawn, Shelley Chambers first arrived to pursue her developing curiosity for gardening. “I would say that I was fairly amateur when I first started there. I didn’t know a lot about gardening, so I was placed with two people who were more experienced volunteers, and they’ve been great teachers,” says Shelley. “I love to walk around and see what other volunteers are working on. There’s lots of mingling and visiting—you learn a lot from everybody at the garden and make such nice friends.” With around two dozen members, The Friends of Maplelawn Garden are as much a social club as a gardening team. Of the original members, seven of them still tend the garden in 2020. The volunteers congregate mostly on Tuesdays and Sundays, tending to their assigned sections, pulling weeds, pruning and being present as nature runs its course through the seasons. “The nicest time is when you start out at the beginning of the season, fresh from the winter,” says Shelley. “Then every week that you return there is new growth—new flowers begin their lives as older ones come to their end—and the garden builds to its peak time.” Of course the reason for the garden, with all the work that goes into it, is for it to be enjoyed by the people. Maplelawn is open for the public to come and go as they please from dawn till dusk, every day from the start of April until the end of October. Especially in these strange days that we find ourselves living through, the opportunity to simply “stop and smell the roses” can be good for the heart and the mind. And for many of us without a garden of our own, Maplelawn can provide that escape. “We really love it when visitors come in and often they’ll ask questions—everyone here is very welcoming and happy to take their time and talk to people about the garden,” says Shelley. “We want people to visit and enjoy the garden.”

FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  55


L I V E LIFE NO W

M U S K O K A C A B I N E T R Y I S A V A I L A B L E A T:


FOOD Food Thoughts

Tart & Sweet

Prep time: 10 minutes Bake time: 6 minutes Cook time: 8–10 minutes Refrigeration time: 3–24 hours Serves: 4–6

INGREDIENTS 1 cup (250 mL) graham cracker crumbs 2 tbsp (30 mL) granulated sugar ¼ cup (50 mL) butter, melted ¾ cups (175 mL) freshly squeezed lime juice (about 5 limes) 2 tbsp (30 mL) corn starch 1 can (14 oz/397g) sweetened condensed milk 1 egg 1 egg yolk 2 tbsp (30 mL) 35% whipping cream 3 tbsp (45 mL) lime zest, divided ¾ cup (175 mL) whipped cream for serving

METHOD 1. Preheat oven to 350ºF (175ºC). In small bowl combine crumbs, sugar and butter. Spread mixture onto baking tray, bake 5–6 minutes or until golden; set aside. 2. In medium bowl whisk corn starch into lime juice until smooth; whisk in condensed milk, egg, egg yolk and 2 tbsp (30 mL) whipping cream until smooth. 3. Transfer to saucepan and cook over medium-high heat until bubbling; reduce heat to medium-low and continue stirring until mixture thickens, about 8 minutes. PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

BY KOREY KEALEY twitter @foodthought instagram @KoreyKealey

IP KOREY’S T RATURE E P M E T M USE ROO MOST E H T LIMES FOR ES IN IM L K JUICE. SOA ER BEFORE WARM WAT THEY JUICING IF L ARE CO D.

Hang on to the tastes of summer with this rich, classic dessert. No need to worry about cutting the perfect piece of pie when served in a glass.

4. Remove from heat; stir in 2 tbsp (30 mL) of the lime zest and allow to cool.

ASSEMBLE 1. In stemmed glassware of choice, add 2 tbsp (30 mL) toasted graham mixture, followed by ¼ cup (50 mL) lime custard and topped with 2 tbsp (30 mL) whipped cream. 2. Garnish with remaining lime zest and graham crumbs. 3. Refrigerate until ready to serve. FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  57


FOOD Dining In

A

f H o e i s c i tory l S

BY PAULA ROY

58  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2020


FOOD Dining In

A

beloved food all around the world, pizza’s origins trace back to ancient times when topped flatbreads were consumed by many different cultures. The first documented use of the word pizza was in 997 CE and the precursor to the modern pizza first appeared in the 1700s in Naples, Italy, when starving peasants topped their focaccia with fresh tomatoes. Italian immigrants began making and serving pizza in New York City at the turn of the last century.

1953 1960 2000

now

The 1953 Dean Martin hit song “That’s Amore” helped to popularize the pizza pie which made its way to Ottawa later that same year and was first featured at Imbro’s on Rideau Street. The Prescott on Preston Street added pizza to its menu in 1956, followed in 1958 by the Miss Westgate restaurant near Hampton Park.

Pizza became popular in Ottawa through grocery store sales, but it took a while for dedicated establishments—often called pizza parlours—to gain a local foothold. Yet, by the mid to late 1960s, some early pizza pioneers like Cicero’s and Fat Albert’s were well established. Cicero’s grew to 11 local stores and became a fixture at Ottawa’s Central Canada Exhibition (or SuperEX) as well as carnivals across the country. Today, there are hundreds of pizza purveyors across our region.

While pizza had a temporary dip in popularity during the low-carb trend of the early 2000s, it rebounded well with an expanded array of crusts and toppings to satisfy both traditional pizza lovers and those looking for healthier options. According to a 2018 trade study by Canadian Pizza magazine, more than 8,000 restaurants serve pizza in this country, with $4-billion of pizza sales representing almost 10% of the total foodservices industry, and 75% of Canadians reporting that they eat pizza at least once per month.

The capital’s enduring love affair with pizza mirrors the rest of the world; it is estimated that five billion pizzas are now sold annually around the globe. Whether thin- or thick-crust, cauliflower or flour-based, with vegan or conventional cheese on top, there is a slice for just about every taste to be found in our region. Here is a sampling to whet your appetite.

FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  59


FOOD Dining In

WEST SIDE Moe’s World Famous Newport Restaurant in Westboro boasts one of the city’s most extensive pizza menus, with 21 thick-crust and 17 thin-crust gourmet options. There are lots of family-friendly choices plus unusual ones such as the Seafood Lover, with tomato sauce, shrimp, crab meat, mussels and garlic. Heartbreakers in Hintonburg is one of the city’s newest pizza spots. Their short, but sweet, thin-crust gourmet menu includes meat and vegetarian options, with vegan cheese available. They also offer a drizzle of honey as a deluxe add-on; it’s delicious! Farinella on Rochester Street sells takeout pizzas by the half-metre or metre. Authentic Roman-style thincrust creations come in a variety of vegetarian and meaty combinations, including the Romana, a white pizza with pancetta, grilled marinated artichokes, black pepper, pecorino and mozzarella.

OUT OF TOWN Piz’za-za in Gatineau offers over two dozen kinds of thick-crust pizza including familiar favourites plus inventive ones such as the Danoise, featuring Emmental cheese, and the Escargots Forestier with pesto, snails, mushrooms, roasted garlic, mozzarella and parmesan. Neat Coffee Shop in Burnstown serves up scrumptious thin-crust, wood-fired pizzas named for famous performers, such as the Weird Al with pesto, brie, sliced pear and arugula, and the John Lennon featuring spicy chilli pesto, roasted chicken, marinated tomatoes, green olives and mozzarella. Pizza All’Antica in Manotick offers a base menu of wood-fired, thin-crust pizzas, plus weekly specials such as the Pizza Patate featuring mozzarella, homemade nut-free pesto, oven roasted potatoes, grated parmigiano, prosciutto cotto. For extra zip, buy a jar of Nonna’s La Bomba hot pepper spread. Jumbo Pizza in Rockland has a dazzling array of toppings on its extensive menu, including smoked meat, pickles, deep-fried cheese curds, chicken wings, pierogis and more. Thick crusts can be plain, stuffed with bacon, cheese or hotdogs and are also available in keto and gluten-free versions.

60  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2020


FOOD Dining In

CENTRAL La Bottega Nicastro in the ByWard Market is run by fifthgeneration Italian food purveyors. Their ready-to-bake Margherita pizzas are great for stocking the freezer, or have your own pizza party at home with their four pizza kits (classic, cheese lovers, Italian salumi or vegetarian). The Grand in the ByWard Market makes thin-crust, wood-fired, red and white sauced pizzas including vegetarian and vegan options. Gluten-friendly crusts are also available plus three different make-at-home pizza kits. The Zingara includes hot salami, bufala mozzarella, fresh basil, oregano and shaved parmesan. Cumberland Pizza in Sandy Hill offers primarily thickcrust pizzas; a gluten-free crust is available. The Lebanese meatpie-style pizza includes ground beef, tomatoes, onions and mozzarella; the Gyro pesto thin-crust comes with gyro meat, sundried tomatoes, red onions, black olives and feta.

VANIER Lorenzo’s Pizzeria in Vanier is known for its chewy, thick crusts and generous portions of cheese. Popular pies include the Fajita Pizza with chicken, black olives and hot peppers as well as the Chef’s Special with sliced sirloin steak, mushrooms, green peppers and onions. Louis’ Restaurant and Pizza in Vanier sells mostly traditionally-topped, thick-crust pizzas, though they will make a thinner crust by request; a gluten-free crust is also available. Their recently-launched takeout pizza kits have been a runaway success.

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS Anthony’s in the Glebe and Hintonburg have menu variations, but both offer authentic Neapolitan thin-crust, wood-fired pizzas including red and white sauce versions. Particularly popular is the Rustica with tomato sauce, cherry tomatoes, mozzarella, arugula, shaved parmesan and prosciutto. Fiazza Fresh Fired is in Barrhaven, Westboro and the ByWard Market. A set thin-crust menu is enhanced by customized possibilities; it’s popular among vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free pizza lovers. Toppings include local delights such as Luciano’s spicy sausage and Alfredo sauce from Les Fougères. Gabriel Pizza is a made-in-Ottawa chain with more than 30 locations. Popular thick-crust creations include the Pineapple Express with pineapple, chorizo, jalapeños and mozzarella, and the Texas Bold ‘Em with bacon, hot peppers, chicken, red onion, mozzarella and Texas wing sauce. JoJo’s Pizzeria has three Stittsville and Kanata locations. Thick crusts are regular, whole wheat and gluten-free with vegan pizzas and monthly specials. The Shawarma Pizza with garlic sauce, chicken, tomato, turnip, pickles and lettuce is a tasty creation not seen elsewhere.

FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  61


FOOD Let’s Dish

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FOOD Let’s Dish

QUENCHING CONNECTIONS BY PAULA ROY PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

I

t took several leaps of faith to get Chi Houron to where she is today. The 2019 opening of The Thirsty Maiden, her popular Stittsville coffee shop, was just one of the gutsy moves on her road to success. But for Chi, her driving force isn’t necessarily making money; it’s about building a sense of community among a strong, loyal customer base. Prior to opening your shop, what professional experience did you have? I worked in food and beverage while in university. When I graduated, I decided to move to Ottawa rather than returning home to Toronto. I was a young AfricanAmerican female with a lot of drive and ambition. I took a fast-track law clerk program at Algonquin and worked in a legal office where I found that I had lots of skills and a true hunger to connect with people that was not being fulfilled. I ended up managing a few restaurants before being hired as the food and beverage manager at Brookstreet Hotel. What important lessons helped shape your vision for The Thirsty Maiden? One of my mandates at Brookstreet was to revitalize the onsite coffee shop. Leveraging my creativity, the innovations I implemented led to solid revenue growth and transformed B Café into a place that was fun and exciting. The majority of our clients were coming from nearby hightech offices, eagerly visiting the café each day to see what was new. I realized that building relationships with customers and creating a buzz about an establishment was what I really loved to do. What were your key principles as you developed your business plan? I was certain the model I developed at Brookstreet would be perfect for bringing

something special to my community. I love the small-town feel in Stittsville, so I wanted to make a cozy place where people could gather and enjoy the surprise of a comfortable oasis in the middle of a business park. What is the significance of The Thirsty Maiden name? I hope it’s something that stays on people’s minds and makes them curious. Thirsty represents the idea that your thirst is never quite quenched in life, which for me means always challenging myself and moving forward. And Maiden comes from the fact I am often described as a force to be reckoned with, plus I love the Norse mythology of fierce warrior maidens. Is the café’s funky décor reflective of you? This space definitely evokes who I am—I have eclectic tastes and I had fun finding all the pieces. I wanted the café to appeal to a broad range of people, so I intentionally designed it to be warm, with lots of plants and furnishings that offer a sense of luxury and comfort. What do you love most about running your business? My favourite part is forging connections with customers and my team members. I currently have an allfemale team and I love seeing young talent that’s just as hungry as I am; it’s fun to fuel their enthusiasm and offer mentorship. Having a strong, well-trained team now means I can spend more time reaching my community, giving back, looking at growing the business and finding new projects. What does community feel like to you as a businessperson? It feels like family—without whom we would not have survived this year. When the pandemic drove everyone home the community

still kept purchasing online gift cards and placing generous food and drink orders for pickup and delivery. They had almost a year of tasting what it was like to have a community coffee shop and they didn’t want to lose it. Being able to still enjoy our offerings gave people a sense of normalcy at a time of so much uncertainty. I showed up for them and they showed up for me. What plans do you have for the future? I know I must keep evolving to stay relevant. This means refreshing the décor, adding new vendors and making customers hungry to come back to see what’s new. We might expand to add a co-working space. I’d also like to look at doing more events like weddings and offering live music, both of which could work well as this is a licensed venue. I am always thinking about ways to grow and transform my business, and I will always be ready to adapt to keep my community happy and engaged. FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  63


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FOOD Paula’s Bites

BY PAULA ROY twitter instagram @paulajroy

METHOD 1. Preheat oven to 300ºF. Brush the insides of four muffin pans (or use paper liners) or five 2-inch cheesecake pans with canola oil and set aside. 2. In a small bowl, mix cornflake crumbs with melted butter, salt and pepper. Firmly press a tablespoon (15 mL) of mixture into the bottom of each muffin cup or mini cheesecake pan. Bake in centre of preheated oven for 8 minutes; remove pan from oven (leave oven on).

PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

Savoury Cheesecake Salad Cheesecake is often considered a dessert item, but savoury ones are just as delightful and make the perfect garnish for a green salad. To prepare these cheesecakes, use a regular-sized muffin tin or look for 2-inch (5 cm) mini-cheesecake pans with removable bottoms. They can be made ahead and stored in an airtight container in the fridge for two days, or in the freezer for up to a month.

INGREDIENTS ⅓ cup (90 mL) cornflake crumbs, panko or dry gluten-free breadcrumbs 5 tsp (25 mL) butter, melted

1

tsp (5 mL) all-purpose flour (regular or gluten-free)

¼ tsp (1.25 mL) each kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tbsp (30 mL) finely chopped sundried tomatoes 1

tbsp (15 mL) finely chopped fresh basil

Fresh basil leaves or microgreens to garnish

SALAD 4 cups mixed greens, washed and dried

¼ tsp (1.25 mL) each salt and pepper

2 tbsp (30 mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice

¼ cup (55 g) softened cream cheese

¼ tsp (1.25 mL) each salt and pepper

1

1 tsp (5 mL) Dijon mustard

egg

¼ cup (60 mL) sour cream

¼ cup (60 mL) olive oil

3. In a medium bowl, beat cream cheese for 2 minutes with an electric mixer, until light and fluffy. Add the egg and beat until smooth (about 1 minute). Beat in the sour cream; add the flour, salt and pepper and beat again. Gently stir in sundried tomatoes and fresh basil. 4. Divide cheesecake batter evenly between the pans, spooning gently over the base (a small cookie scoop is ideal for this job). 5. Bake 14–16 minutes, until filling is set (jiggle pan to test). Place pan on wire rack and let cool to room temperature; refrigerate until cold. If not serving the same day, place in an airtight container. 6. Just before serving, put prepared salad greens in a large bowl. Combine lemon juice, Dijon, salt and pepper in a small jar with a tight lid. Shake vigorously; add olive oil and shake again. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. Drizzle dressing over greens and toss gently; divide greens among 4 small serving plates. 7. Run a thin-bladed knife around the edge of each cheesecake to loosen it from the pan and gently lift out. Place one cheesecake on top of each salad and garnish with a fresh basil leaf or several microgreens before serving. Makes 4 salads; recipe can easily be multiplied. FALL 2020 ottawaathome.ca  67


FORWARD THINKING

Making It Work BY SANDY CONNELL

The restaurant and event industry has been hit hard in 2020, but the creative juices continue to flow with virtual celebrations and creative ways to offer up in-person experiences. PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

ALL ABOUT THE VIBE Neil Gowe was part of the original Luxe Bistro crew when it first opened. He worked there for 13 years, first as a server, then sommelier and eventually a beverage manager for all the Firestone Group restaurants. He left to open his own restaurants, but stayed on as a wine consultant with Luxe until December of 2019. The Luxe vibe is in his blood and recently he became its new owner. “I always loved the atmosphere of Luxe. I loved the location. It just has a great energy about it,” he offers enthusiastically while also recognizing the trials he faces as a restaurant owner right now. “I think the biggest challenge is the unknown. We can’t really plan for what we can’t control. But I also see that the industry is becoming more and more innovative with ways to create and sustain business in these challenging times.” The one thing industry professionals can control is their passion for food, wine and hospitality. Neil is optimistic that this, coupled with Luxe’s established reputation as a go-to steakhouse at a corner of York Street, in the ByWard Market, will help it to thrive for years to come.

PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

CREATIVE SPACE Wellington West is home to a creative new event and culinary market space called Parlour. Located at 1319 Wellington St. West, Parlour is a 4,000 square-foot event space in a recently renovated 1922 brick building with a (pre-COVID) capacity of 250 people. Erin Clatney (above), of DISH Catering, and her daughters, Charlotte DePonte and Cleo Clatney, have partnered in this family-run initiative to address the need for a mid-sized transformable venue in Ottawa for corporate, social and community-based initiatives. For now, Parlour is hosting private events of up to 50 people and will be turning the space into a purveyors’ market. An outdoor food shack and grill by in-house caterer, DISH, offers casual takeaway food with curated wines and beer to go, or guests can grab a seat on the cozy tree-lined patio courtyard behind the building on Grange Avenue. Bookings made at hello@parlourplace.ca.

GOOD WISHES ONLY Blackbook Lifestyle, co-owned by James Jefferson (seated on the right) and Daniel Mackinnon, is celebrating 10 years in 2020. As one of the leading event planners in the nation’s capital they want to plan a party, but that will have to wait. For now, they’ll simply take “good wishes.”

PHOTO BY JAMES PARK 68  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2020

Connect with them on social @blackbooklifestyle to wish them a happy anniversary!


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Ottawa At Home | Fall 2020  

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