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Dartmouth, Devon, UK 3420 Nicholas Hall, Castleford, W Yorks, UK 3421 Alan Cruise, Portskewett, Monmouthshire, UK 3422 David Phelps, Gundleton, Hants, UK 3423 Gerard Feraille, Weybridge, Surrey, UK 3424 Gary Farrer, Blackpool, Lancs, UK 3425 Peter Whitby, East Sheen, London, UK 3426 Neil Corner, Leyburn, N Yorks, UK 3427 Chris Kelly, Cape Town, South Africa 3428 Paul Hopes, Windlesham, Surrey, UK 3429 Nigel Burton, Thorpe in the Glebe, Notts, UK 3430 Kevin Eisbey, Perth, Western Australia 3431 Tom Knight, Altrincham, Cheshire, UK 3432 Jeremy Heath, Berkhamsted, Herts, UK 3433 Alister Thompson, Liss, Hants, UK 3434 Adrian Grumi, Potters Bar, Herts, UK 3435 John Hooper, Rowlands Castle, Hants, UK 3436 Woytek Kordel, Northwich, Cheshire, UK Many thanks to Tim Humphreys for introducing Julian Rothwell, Jean-Charles Bello for Mogens Vilhelmsen and Steve McCarthy for Gerard Feraille.

NEW MEMBERS

A Warm Welcome to the New Members who joined in June: 3397 Henry Philips, Bromley, Kent, UK 3398 Gellan Watt, Bournemouth, Dorset, UK 3399 Michael Lovegrove, Callow End, Worcs, UK 3400 Anthony Coghlan, Guildford, Surrey, UK 3401 H Harrington, Launceston, Cornwall, UK 3402 John Bishop, London, UK 3403 Ian Plater, North Barsham, Norfolk, UK 3404 Christopher Hook, Chandlers Ford, Hampshire, UK 3405 Julian Rothwell, Stamford, Lincs, UK 3406 Niall Sinclair, Heslington, N Yorks, UK (SI½ OTS 4R4460) 3407 Gary Caruolo, Dunedin, Florida, USA 3408 Robin Moore, Caterham, Surrey, UK 3409 Mogens Vilhelmsen, Montauroux, France 3410 Kevin Skuce, Hertford, Herts, UK 3411 Adrian Beal, Eastbourne, E Sussex, UK 3412 John Griffiths, Nelson, Mid Glamorgan, UK 3413 Lance James, Sheffield, S Yorks, UK 3414 Peter Fuller, Kallista, Victoria, Australia (SI OTS 850757) 3415 Mark Potter, Montrose, Angus, UK 3416 Russell Thompson, Burley in Wharfdale, W Yorks, UK 3417 Derek Luckhurst, Weymouth, Dorset, UK 3418 Richard Butler, Nossegem, Belgium 3429 David Burdett,

Jaguar Heritage launches stunning E-type DVD Imagine if you wanted to buy every original factory parts manual, workshop manual, handbook and sales document for your E-type, how long you would be hunting and how much you would spend. Then imagine trying to put together a complete collection of every factory document for all E-types – together with a good selection of photos and more. It would take a lifetime and cost thousands. Not any more – because it’s all on this DVD, for a very palatable £50 all in, even including microfiche parts catalogues which continued to be updated long after updates to printed lists stopped. There’s some pretty clever encryption and security to prevent it being copied or passed around – fair enough – but also it’s all linked up to a secure website now, and if you don’t want to use it on a desktop or laptop with DVD drive, you can allocate the licence to your tablet or smartphone and access it all via the internet. For a quick preview, take a look at jaguar.otpubs.com/JTP1004/. Mark Greer at OT Publications, who has devoted a lifetime to getting factory documentation digitised, reckons no other manufacturer offers such a comprehensive range of documents. We’d have to agree – it’s a first rate product, and there are others for other classic Jaguar models. See www.jaguarheritage.com/dvds. MM

Jaguar World News

y Jaguar’s Bloodhound Rapid Response F-TYPE, supporting the World Land Speed Record challenger, showed its mettle recently testing brake parachutes at over 180mph. y The Jaguar XE has won Telegraph Car of the Year and Best Business Car. y Jaguar Land Rover is working on ‘connected technology’ allowing its cars to report potholes and road damage to other cars, so they can adjust suspension settings to suit, and to local authorities. It will also allow driverless cars to avoid the damaged areas.

y Davy Jones, legendary US sports car racer and lead instructor with the Jaguar Performance Driving Academy, took the wheel of Larry Ligas’s legendary Predator Performance 1961 E-type in the 90-minute Historic Enduro race at the Brickyard Vintage Racing Invitational on June 13-14, as well as demonstrating current model Jaguars for the US market at this Jaguar-sponsored race meeting.

the e-type 37


Jaguar Heritage Manuals under the microscope Keeping up with car and computer technology By Doug Wolfire and Mark Greer

EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION

Jaguar Heritage have long supplied technical information on compact discs. Initially these were unsophisticated collections of page scans from factory material, but since there was nothing else published for the newer cars at the time, such as the X300 models, the CDs were very useful. Technology moves fast and Jaguar Heritage now sell updated DVDs and online resources. Jaguar Journal asked E-Type enthusiast and IT professional, Doug Wolfire of MadWolf Technologies LLC, to review the E-Type package created for Jaguar by Original Technical Publications (OTP). We didn’t give Doug much time or space, but his hands-on review threw up some issues which Jaguar Journal was not equipped to adjudicate. So we asked OTP boss Mark Greer to clarify and respond to Doug’s points, as the issues appeared significant enough that they needed an open airing. This is not a dispute, and Jaguar Journal takes no sides. We thank both Doug and Mark for their input and hope that future buyers and current DVD owners may each learn something from the accounts below, which have been lightly edited for space.

DOUG’S REVIEW

Jaguar Heritage is known for producing quality products, so I was eagerly awaiting the opportunity to take their new E-Type Series DVD manual for a whirl. I had relied heavily on my old ‘dead-tree’ version of the Bentley manual during my own car’s rebuild, and was primed to look for the advantages of the electronic version. I must say, however, that the older manual and I were attached at the hip; it was carried in my pack to and from work, and earned a spot on my bedside table for late-night reading. Notwithstanding an appreciation for the old book, I also MAY–JUNE 2016

understood the potential advantages of having resource materials in electronic form, with the benefits of enhanced search, the possibility of links to go to outside resources and access to subsequent factory release notes – all delivered without greasy thumbprints. The package from Heritage contains the original technical publications for the Series I, 2 and 3 E-Types – the same as was supplied for dealer servicing, parts sales and owner maintenance when the vehicles were new. However, in order to protect all the copyrights, the installation is a tad involved, requiring a reasonably modern operating system (i.e. Windows 2000 or later/Mac OS X 10.7 or above/Mac iOS 5.01 and above/Android 4.0 and above). It also requires administrator rights to allow installation of license and viewer, a DVD drive and an internet connection for downloading of the license key file and SafeGuard™ viewer. Further, the documents themselves are protected in PDC format and require a (supplied) activation code, which allows for navigation to the documents within the system interface. The license (key code) can be removed from one system and used on another device; but the LockLizard™ protected documents can only be accessed from one device at a time. You also need an email account to receive the key and additional installation instructions. If you need to install it on a different computer, you must retain the license file. Original Technical Publications produced the DVD and include a section which supplies access via a link to a knowledge database for anyone having questions with operation of the system and the protection. Unfortunately, I was unable to access the database from the link, but was able to go directly to http:// locklizardkb.com/. Once installed, the navigation and background windows are simple to use. 33


WORKSHOP & TECHNICAL RE: DOUG’S REVIEW From: Mark To: Peter Some general background for your readers: IT aspects

What you get for your money and effort is a very rich resource. The manuals resemble the original books, but are powerfully augmented by the search feature. Searching in one of the owner’s manuals for the word ‘flywheel’ quickly surfaced two references, a clickable detail text line, and with one of them, the torque settings. Clicking the link brings you to the page. Really quite nice. Digging deeper past the standard manuals, are the parts guides. Although useable, there seems to have been too much static or noise during the scanning to render all the images clearly. For pure readability, the actual parts books may be better, but the convenience of having the plates on a split screen with the part numbers adds greatly to the usability. Additional information is contained in the supplemental sections. Here, we find both UK and US advertisements for every model, which are very entertaining. Also included are official Jaguar press releases, which are a delight to read. For each model there are what appear to be every service bulletin offered. Bulletin No. I. 031 referenced a pinch bolt that could come loose on the lower steering knuckle! (Jaguar recommended staking the bolt head in two places). I expect there are other gems buried in here as well. Also supplied within the supplemental information section are dedicated manuals like the A/C System 34

and Power Assist manuals, which were not present in my Bentley book. There are also references like the Lucas Technical Series Fault Diagnosis 44-page manual and the 21-page Smiths – The Care of Instruments guide. And then, as if by mistake, there is the “Strictly Private and Confidential (for use of distributors and dealers only) Guarantee Repair Labour Schedule for Jaguar ‘E’ Type Models.” For those interested, Operation A/1 – Remove and Replace engine and gearbox unit (complete operation) is set for 12 hours. I think it took me more like 12 days. As expected, there are also a rich set of Jaguar Heritage links to the many offerings on the Heritage site and a gallery of E-Type glamor shots. In total, there is such a wealth of information that the only way to effectively sponge it up and get it on a disk is by using an automated process. Unfortunately a few oddities jump out. My big ‘gotcha’ moment was when I saw a reference manual for the elusive S 1½, only to find that what surfaces is the 2+2. I also found that schematics, like the wiring diagrams, don’t have the same clarity as the original printed manuals due to the scan quality. Perhaps more time and effort could have spent producing better copy. In conclusion, I will keep my manuals, and refer to them often, but the OTP product is a fine addition to any enthusiast’s library.

I changed to this solution with the introduction of the Volvo DVD range in 2011, because I was looking for something ‘future-proof.’ The original Jaguar CD-ROMs were not copy-protected, which was a huge mistake. For the CDs that ran from 2005 through 2009, we used industrystandard Hexalock™ software. They were remastered to DVD in 2010 using Truscont™, as Hexalock was incompatible with Windows Vista or later versions of Acrobat. These DVDs were compatible with Windows 2000, XP, Vista, 7 and 8, as well as Acrobat 7, 8, 9 and X. Both Hexalock and Truscont’s solution involved encrypting the disc and neither were compatible with the Mac OS. In an effort to find a solution that was future-proof, could be used for an online version and that would keep us going when DVDs become obsolete, I decided to head where we are today – which makes it a software product. I don’t see the solution as ‘heavy.’ All it requires is a simple 1–2–3 process. You read the instructions on the packaging (or under the ‘Activation’ tab on the interface) and you’re done – but yes, it’s not quite like opening a book first time. Just so you know, the steps are: 1. Register the product using your name plus the activation code that comes with the disc. This creates an account for you, gives you access to the publication and generates a registration email that is sent to you. 2. Install (run) the appropriate viewer (i.e. follow the installation instructions and links provided in the email). 3. Authenticate your license via a link in the email (select open). You will get a message that this has MAY–JUNE 2016


been successful. You are now okay to view files. Here are video links to the process: Windows: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=5bdZTEvpW8k Mac OSX: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=3bzpYwe9mxI User aspects I think we are at a crossroads. Today’s classic car owners are usually older than typical social media users. All of us are struggling with how to get the next generation interested and keeping the cars alive. The OTP products keep the information alive and suit most current and future owners. Every day, more people expect digital information just a click away, rather than books on a shelf. I will send you an email tomorrow about things Doug wasn’t aware of, or perhaps missed. I appreciate you letting me see the article.

RE: RE:DOUG’S REVIEW From: Mark To: Peter Some notes on Doug’s review: “Original Technical Publications produced the DVD and includes a section which supplies access via a link to a knowledge database for those that may be having questions with operation of the system and the protection. Unfortunately, I was unable to access the database directly from the link, but was able to navigate to it by going directly to http://locklizardkb.com/.” The DVD link works fine – I just tested in Windows and Mac OSX with multiple browsers. There are references on the packaging, on the registration page, and links from the interface to our Frequently Asked Questions (see http://bit.ly/ O1l83r). “The manuals resemble the original books, but are powerfully augmented by the Search feature. Searching in one of the owner’s manuals for the MAY–JUNE 2016

word ‘flywheel’ quickly surfaced two references, a clickable detail text line, and with one of them, the torque settings. Clicking the link brings you to the page. Really quite nice.”

is fine (even zooming in with the reader). Customers received an A3 version in the original handbook. This schematic is in page 8 in the Series 1 handbook in the owner’s manual section.

Search is fine but Doug perhaps missed that each document is indexed or ‘bookmarked’ like a contents section. A click on each bookmark takes you to the desired subject/ page in that document.

The article refers to the products as DVDs, but I think that limits it. Perhaps because of time or space constraints, there was no mention or review of the online feature, which is a big feature of the package overall. Did the instruction card disappear before you gave it to Doug? Here is a quote from the text we give resellers:

“Although useable, there seems to have been too much static or noise during the scanning to render all the images clearly. For pure readability, the actual parts books may be better, but the convenience of having the plates on a split screen with the part numbers adds greatly to the usability.” Each publication includes scanned versions of the parts books as well as the microfiche (which is film). This is stated in the link within the navigation that a user would select. I include both because the microfiche were updated later than the parts books, so where both exist the microfiche would be more accurate and complete. Doug is reviewing the microfiche and calling it a parts book. I mention this because a lot of time and expense was spent getting the best quality possible, so knocking scan quality wouldn’t be accurate. “My big ‘gotcha’ moment was when I saw a reference manual for the elusive S 1½ only to find that what surfaces is the 2+2. I also found that schematics, like the wiring diagrams, don’t have the same clarity as the original printed manuals due to the scan quality. Perhaps more time and effort could have spent producing better copy.” There is no ‘gotcha’ moment. Doug clicked the wrong button (2+2 instead of Series 1½). As for the schematics comment, I am not sure what they look like in a Bentley manual because we used a factory service manual. In the Series 1 manual an A3 schematic was reduced and rotated to fit on an A4 page. The scan quality

“Online Access Option/Feature In addition to the DVD, each OTP product now includes an “online access” card inside the packaging. The card includes some additional text and instructions, as well as the URL or web address required to access the content from a personal computer (Mac OSX or Windows) or a tablet or handheld device (Mac iOS, Windows or Android).” As for usability, OTP products provide registered customers with a single license for one device and if they register their personal computer they can access both the DVD and the information online via that device. If a customer registers their handheld device (iPad, tablet or hybrid) they would only have access on that device once the viewer is installed and the license is authenticated. Using the OTPs on a handheld greatly enhances the experience, especially on an iPad where you can swipe quickly through pages, zoom in on things and the information, with a wifi connection, becomes truly portable. You could even take it on the road with you.

CONCLUSION

Both Mark and Doug make valid points, of course. DVDs and online resources aren’t as simple as a book, but you can’t search a book by word, or carry a whole library of related books in your pocket. The answer is clear – buy both! 35


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