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Don and Cathey Humphreys Putting Millions Into Passion, International Experiences / 14

Incredible Impact / 6

Ultimate Gift / 8

Pickens Inspires Donors Again / 10

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BRANDING SUCCESS EXECUTIVE CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE Co-Chairs: Ross & Billie McKnight

Honorary Chair: T. Boone Pickens

Vice Chairs: John & Cheryl Clerico, Rick & Lerri Cooper, Steven & Jennifer Grigsby, Don & Cathey Humphreys, Malone & Amy Mitchell 3rd, Joe & Connie Mitchell, Don & Linda Nickles, Barry & Roxanne Pollard, Bill & Candye Spears, Carl & Marilynn Thoma, Chuck & Kim Watson

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION 400 South Monroe / Stillwater, OK 74074 / Ph. 800.622.4678 / Fax 405.385.5102 info@OSUgiving.com / OSUgiving.com Uniting Donor and University Passions and Priorities to Achieve Excellence

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DEAR OSU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS, We are honored to serve as campaign co-chairs and consider it a privilege to share these exciting updates about Branding Success. In this inaugural issue of our campaign newsletter, you will learn a little more about how we are advancing success. Our ambitious fundraising goals are already propelling us to our rightful place among the nation’s most prestigious land-grant institutions. This issue covers significant gifts from a variety of donors, progress made to date, a look back at our fall campaign meeting on Sept. 4, and a touching letter from a young lady who is seeing new doors open thanks to a scholarship. We are committed to the success of this campaign, and we hope you will step up and do whatever you can to help us surpass the $1 billion mark. Whatever amount, every gift makes a difference in the lives of current and future students. And because those students will change the world in a positive way, each donation is an investment in our future. Thank you for joining us on this transformational journey. GO POKES!

Ross and Billie McKnight Campaign Co-Chairs

SUCCESS ACCOMPLISHMENT ACHIEVEMENT TRIU

COMMITMENT HOPE TALENT ABI

AUDACITY TENACITY POWER SPIRIT FORTITUDE PER

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ORANGESCENE Âť

/ Susan G. Komen for the Cure founder Nancy Brinker (center) poses with Women for OSU Co-Student Philanthropists of the Year Rachel Branch (left) and Sara Roberts.

/ Marilynn Thoma (left) and Dr. Barbara Stoecker smile after the ceremony naming Stoecker the Marilynn Thoma Chair in Human Environmental Sciences.

/ Wayne Allen (right) presents Eric Gilbert with a W.W. Allen Scholars jacket.

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/ Branding Success honorary chairman T. Boone Pickens & Madeleine Pickens acknowledge the crowd.

/ Balloons and confetti fall in the Student Union Atrium at the public launch of Branding Success.

/ Cathey and Don Humphreys (center) with Michael S. Hyatt (left) and Dr. David Henneberry. To read more see page 14.

/ OSU President Burns Hargis stands next to First Cowgirl Ann Hargis as he announces a campaign milestone to a packed Boone Pickens Stadium.

/ Joe and Connie Mitchell (left) & Chuck and Kim Watson are all smiles as the Cowboys defeat Washington State.

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INCREDIBLE IMPACT DONORS ALREADY TRANSFORMING OSU WITH

THE $1 BILLION BRANDING SUCCESS CAMPAIGN is transforming OSU through the addition of significant resources. We are accelerating toward breakthroughs critically important to Oklahoma and the world. “This campaign will elevate our successes and our standing in the higher education community across this nation and around the world,” said OSU President Burns Hargis. The campaign will also: • Secure an unprecedented level of student scholarship support, inviting every able student to dream big, work hard and exceed expectations through life-changing opportunities. • More than double the number of endowed professorships and chairs, securing OSU’s ability to retain and recruit the world’s prized faculty and teachers. • Equip students and faculty with advanced facilities essential to community building and discovery in the 21st century, including an updated, expanded home for the Spears School of Business and performing arts center.

56.6%

STUDENT SUPPORT / $283.3M GOAL / $500M

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$626M

COMMITTED TO BRANDING SUCCESS

• Invest in academic excellence with innovative, interdisciplinary programs that make the most of OSU’s considerable strengths. But the campaign is more than facts, figures and dreams of our future. It is already making a difference, with more than 56,000 donors combining to give more than $626 million since the campaign launched in December 2007. In less than three years of this seven-year effort, we are already beyond 62 percent of our goal. In the area of student support, OSU donors have committed $283 million. By surpassing 56 percent of the goal, we have added 433 scholarships and graduate fellowships. That number will continue to rise as OSU alumni and friends take advantage of the Pickens Legacy Scholarship Match, which multiplies qualifying donations (read more, page 10). Proportionally, our biggest success has been achieved in the area of faculty support. More than $176.6 million has been committed by donors, adding 118 endowed chairs and professorships to push OSU’s total to 278. These endowments empower the university to attract and retain the best educators. Even before these funds fulfill their potential, OSU has increased its research

88.3%

FACULTY SUPPORT / $176.6M GOAL / $200M


expenditures more than 57 percent since FY2006, from $103.8 million to $163.1 million, and raised its average faculty salary from $91,185 to $104,094, an increase of more than 14 percent. These endowments will be invaluable in our efforts.

and spawned such additions as the Riata Center for Entrepreneurship, the Veterans Entrepreneurship Program and the Cowboy Idea Hatchery. Put all of these pieces together and a picture emerges – an OSU that is more accessible, boasting preeminent professors and researchers, state-of-the-art buildings, and doing more to enrich the learning experiences of students and fulfill our land-grant mission to serve

We are also more than halfway toward our facility support goal. Donations and pledges total $124.7 million, more than 62 percent of the goal. The Student Union renovation is well underway, thanks in no small part to students THESE ARE PROMISING TIMES FOR OUR funding half of the project by voting to impose a $50 UNIVERSITY. WITHOUT QUESTION, I TRULY BELIEVE million fee on themselves. THE FUTURE IS BRIGHTER THAN EVER FOR Recent developments have seen architects selected to OKLAHOMA STATE. IT IS TIME, COWBOYS AND plan and design the new performing arts center COWGIRLS, FOR US TO REACH HIGHER AND RIDE and Spears School of FASTER AND FARTHER THAN EVER. Business building. Another campaign priority is an expansion of the Human Environmental Sciences building Finally, we are on schedule to achieve our program support goal with commitments totaling $41.4 million. Among the impressive additions is the OSU Entrepreneurship Program, which was made possible by the $56.2 million gift split between athletics and academics by Amy and Malone Mitchell 3rd. This program has propelled OSU to the forefront of entrepreneurship study and outreach

our state and nation. These changes are having an immediate impact, and by the completion of Branding Success, OSU will have advantages it never had before. We have raised our expectations and the bar, and our donors have more than met the challenge. We are doing what needs to be done, and with your help, we are succeeding. Read more about our progress at OSUgiving.com /////

41.4% 62.4%

FACILITY SUPPORT / $124.7M GOAL / $200M

PROGRAM SUPPORT / $41.4M GOAL / $100M

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ULTIMATE GIFT John Brammer’s estate gift plus Pickens Match creates a $3.7M transformational surprise for mechanical and aerospace engineering Oklahoma State University has been fortunate to benefit from many planned gifts, some of which come as surprises. But seldom do these gifts have the combined element of surprise and impact of that left by alumnus John Brammer. Brammer passed away unexpectedly in May 2008 and bequeathed his nearly $1.25 million retirement fund to the OSU Foundation. It was his first gift to the Foundation and one that will have a far-reaching impact for the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. The gift funds the John Brammer Endowed Professorship in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering for $250,000. That endowment will be tripled, with $250,000 coming from the T. Boone Pickens chair match funds and $250,000 coming from the legislature’s match of Pickens’ contribution. Professorships and chairs allow a college to attract and retain premier faculty by providing additional funding for salary, professional development, equipment, programs, student assistants and other teaching and research expenses. The remainder, more than $974,000, will go to the John Brammer Endowment in Mechanical Engineering for scholarships and graduate fellowships. That endowment will be tripled by the Pickens Legacy Scholarship

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A gift like this is transformational. It allows us to become so much better in critical areas. It will be remembered in perpetuity in his name. Students and faculty will know who John Brammer was, but more importantly, they will have an understanding of what his gift has allowed us to do, both on the teaching side and on the learning side with students. It will transform lives. It will give them opportunities they never would have had. DR . L A R RY HOBE RO C K Professor and head, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

Match (read more, page 10), producing more than $146,000 annually in new student support. These funds will help attract high-quality doctoral students as well as support undergraduates in a variety of ways, including study abroad. Add that together and the total impact of Brammer’s surprise gift is nearly $3.7 million. “Wouldn’t we like to have more people like John Brammer?” said Dr. Karl Reid, dean of the College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology. “Seldom do we have such flexibility with a donation and seldom do we have such an opportunity because we can multiply that gift thanks to the generosity of Mr. Pickens. We’ve had very few gifts come in this way, as a surprise, that will have the impact that it does.” Brammer grew up in Pryor, Okla., before graduating from OSU with a mechanical engineering degree in 1965. He later earned an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of New Mexico. He spent more than 30 years at Sandia National Laboratories,

a government-owned/contractor-operated facility that develops science-based technologies supporting national security. Among his many projects was an isotopic power generator used to power lunar surface equipment packages on the Apollo 12, 13 and 14 missions. In his spare time and eventual retirement, he enjoyed outdoor activities – cross-country skiing, spelunking in the lava tubes of western New Mexico, mountain climbing in the French Alps near Chamonix, France, hiking to see the Incan ruins of Machu Picchu in Peru, and touring Germany, Greece and the Holy Land. His love of hunting and fishing led him to work parttime in a number of sporting goods stores to keep up with the latest equipment and to maintain contacts for places to hunt and fish. He pursued antelope and coyote in New Mexico, oryx at the White Sands Missile Range, peccary in Mexico, cape buffalo in Mozambique, and bear, caribou, elk, fish and moose in Alaska and Canada. He also loved his alma mater, which will be transformed thanks to this donation. /////

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PICKENS INSPIRES DONORS AGAIN For the second time, T. Boone Pickens has announced a $100 million challenge gift , and for the second time, generous OSU alumni and friends are responding in record numbers . The Pickens Legacy Scholarship Match (PLSM) was announced at the Branding Success launch event on Feb. 26, when Pickens illustrated his enduring generosity to his alma mater by committing to a transformational gift from his estate. Now, Pickens has announced an expansion to the matching program that is allowing donors to leverage scholarship gifts with up to a 2:1 match.

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You all are lucky with me because you’ve got a guy who loves the school more than anything, and I am very competitive. You know me – I want to be the best in everything we do at Oklahoma State. We are not going to be second to anyone either academically or athletically. T. B O O N E P I C K E N S

A LOOK INSIDE THE EXPANDED MATCHING OPPORTUNITY: OUTRIGHT GIFTS TO BE MATCHED 2:1 The largest match is for outright gifts of cash, stock or other assets totaling at least $50,000 for new or existing scholarship/fellowship endowments made before the Feb. 26 deadline. These gifts will be matched 2:1, so a $50,000 outright gift will lead to an endowment of $150,000 once Boone’s estate gift is realized. PLEDGES OF UP TO FIVE YEARS MATCHED 1.5:1 Pledges, with commitments totaling at least $50,000 for new or existing scholarship/fellowship endowments, over no more than five years, will be matched 1.5:1. So a pledge of $100,000 will produce an endowment of $250,000 after the realization of Boone’s estate gift. Both of the aforementioned options include the opportunity for multiple donors to band together to qualify for the match, as long as their gifts go into one endowment. DEFERRED GIFTS + ANNUAL JUMPSTART GIFTS MATCHED 1:1 There is also a 1:1 match for planned gifts of at least $200,000. To qualify, the donor must commit to making contributions over a period not to exceed 10 years that totals at least 50 percent of the estate gift. So a $200,000 planned gift would qualify if the donor jumpstarted the scholarship by paying $100,000 over the following 10 years. Boone’s program would match all of the donor’s $300,000 in this scenario, leading to a total impact of $600,000.

Donors have responded en masse to Pickens’ challenge, with more than 500 donors collectively giving more than $35M. Already more than 105 new endowed scholarships have been established and 93 existing endowed scholarships have received additional funding as a result of the Pickens initiative. One of the biggest gifts came from a man who did not even attend OSU. C. Hubert Gragg of Newkirk was a lifelong friend of the late Gov. Henry Bellmon. Gragg gave $1 million in honor of his friend, including $250,000 to support the Bellmon Program Endowment. The other $750,000 went to the Bellmon Scholarship Endowment and qualified for the 2:1. Thus the total impact is $1.75 million to support scholar development at OSU, one of Bellmon’s passions. One example of donors banding together is the alumni of the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, who have set a goal of $1 million, encouraging 1,000 donors to give $1,000 each. A gift from the Oklahoma Youth Expo and Touchstone Energy endowed a $50,000 scholarship in the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. While Pickens’ visionary match continues to inspire these donors and more than 100 others, the greatest impact is felt by current and future students, who are receiving new opportunities to pursue a quality education at OSU. The amazing generosity of our donors continues to improve the quality and accessibility of the university.

To learn more about this unique matching opportunity and to see the Pickens Legacy Scholarship Match honor roll, visit www.OSUgiving.com/PickensMatch. /////

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philanthropic partnership Gas Processors and Bartlett Family Unite for Scholarships - With Pickens Match, the Impact is $300,000 for the Natural Gas Compression Program (NGCP) Two prominent Oklahoma-based entities combined to present a $150,000 check to Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology in Okmulgee to benefit the natural gas compression program. The donation creates an endowment for scholarships for NGCP students.

GPSA has watched the OSUIT program provide valuable employees to the industry. The GPSA education committee believes this donation is a prudent investment for OSUIT, today’s youth and the future of the natural gas industry. “GPSA’s relationship with OSUIT extends over many years, and we are pleased to continue supporting such an extraordinary program,” said Chris Lindenberg, GPSA President. “Our immediate interest is to provide students with an opportunity to receive the top-notch training that has made this school standout, but we also view this as a long-term investment in the future of our industry. It came as especially good news that our gift qualified for matching funds, allowing us to further extend our reach.” Gary Bartlett is president of the Tulsa-based Bartlett Equipment Co. that his father, Pete Bartlett - an OSU alumnus - founded in 1951.

The Gas Processors Suppliers Association “The Bartlett family has a history of supporting OSUIT and its made half the donation, students. My father’s legacy has always been about giving back with rest coming from to the school and this industry, which were both so important in the Pat and F.M. “Pete” Bartlett family. Both are his life. On behalf of my mother and the rest of our family, it is our Tulsa groups with long pleasure to participate in this contribution.” and historic ties to the natural gas industry. The Bartlett family contributed before the Pickens GPA and GPSA have provided scholarships to OSUIT’s Legacy Scholarship Match; however, GPSA’s donaNGCP students over the years, and many of their tion will be matched 2:1, bringing the total impact to respective member companies have assisted the $300,000 in endowed funds. program with in-kind contributions of equipment and services. The GPA is the non-profit trade association The NGCP is OSUIT’s largest program, boasting for the natural gas industry, and its member compaa 100-percent employment rate for those who nies produce, process, gather, transport and market complete the training. The funding will provide qualinatural gas and natural gas liquids. The GPSA is an fied, trained technicians to the midstream industry for organization of about 350 companies engaged in years to come. meeting the supply and service needs of the natural gas and gas processing industries. /////

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DESPITE YOUTH, PRICE VALUES GIVING BACK ASHLEY PRICE (’04 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING) IS NOT A TYPICAL 29-YEAR-OLD, WHICH IS NOT SURPRISING CONSIDERING SHE WASN’T A TYPICAL 19-YEAR-OLD.

“Of all the students I’ve known, she was probably the most professional,” said Karl Reid, dean of the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology. “At 19 or 20, her demeanor was that of a much more experienced professional.” Price is now an experienced professional, having worked for ConocoPhillips for six years. She is doing commercial work for the corporation in Perth, Australia, after previously serving in Darwin, Australia, following more than four years at the corporate headquarters in Houston. The Dallas native began giving back to her alma mater in 2006 and increased her donations this year with a $50,000 commitment -- $25,000 coming from her and $25,000 coming from the generous ConocoPhillips matching gift plan -- to endow the Price CEAT Legacy Scholarship. That $50,000 will be matched 1.5:1 by the Pickens Legacy Scholarship Match, bringing the endowment to $125,000 and leading to an annual $6,250 scholarship for engineering students. Price said she gives back because she is so grateful for the support she received in school. Between the Phillips Scholars Program, which later became the ConocoPhillips Spirit Scholars Program, her legacy waiver and other scholarships, her education was fully funded.

I was very lucky. It made the whole college process so much easier knowing I had that financial support, not having to amass loans or rely on my parents to make a large financial commitment. That way I could focus on my studies and activities and enjoy the college experience. To have a chance to hopefully have that impact on someone else – to make a difference in them getting to come to college and remove some of that stress and financial requirement through a scholarship – seemed like a good opportunity to me. Her scholarship is for out-of-state CEAT students, with preference given to legacies and then women. She said she especially wanted to help students who, like her, chose to follow in the footsteps of their parents and grandparents even though they would be paying non-resident tuition. “It’s been something really special to share with my family,” Price said. “I think that’s important to recruit our legacies and help to support them.” To be so philanthropic at such a young age is rare. In fact, Reid, who has been dean of CEAT since 1986, said he has never seen another donor give so much so early. /////

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Don & Cathey Humphreys were honored with induction into the Bennett Fellows Program.

Don and Cathey Humphreys putting millions into passion, international experiences DON (’71 industrial engineering) and CATHEY HUMPHREYS are big believers in the value of living and studying abroad. Don, senior vice president and treasurer of ExxonMobil, has been fortunate to live many places during his career, including Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, for almost four years. Their three daughters – Megan, Melissa and Mary – had their first international experience there, with classmates from countries around the world including Malaysia, Japan, Korea, Europe and the Middle East. “We really loved that experience,” said Don, who followed his OSU degree with a 1976 master’s in business administration from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. “Each of our daughters wrote one of her college essays about her experience in Malaysia. While attending college, each of them took advantage of study-abroad programs. What we saw was that when you have the motivation to go overseas, you will have a great experience. “It takes courage to jump outside of your sphere of comfort to get on an airplane, go to a different place, live in a different setting, study in a different kind of school and potentially speak a different language.

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When a student is willing to take on this type of challenge, it is a tremendous boost to the individual’s sense of independence and self-confidence.” To motivate and enable more students to exhibit that courage and experience studying abroad, the couple is making a $6 million gift to OSU. Half of that is an outright gift to fund study-abroad professorships across the university. This $3 million is eligible for a pair of matches – $3 million from T. Boone Pickens’ 2008 gift and $3 million from the Oklahoma State Legislature. Thus the initial gift was maximized to have a $9 million impact. An additional $2 million will come from an estate gift for study-abroad scholarships. That will be doubled by the Pickens Legacy Scholarship Match. The Humphreys are also giving an additional $1 million to jump start these scholarships for OSU students today, and that $1 million will also be matched. Thus this gift has a total impact of $15 million, propelling the university forward in its goal to provide every student with an international experience during their college career.


We will become known as an institution that produces students capable of dealing with the world, of working in a multicultural environment, with the capacity necessary to perform well on the job. DR. DAVID HENNEBERRY, interim associate vice president of international studies and outreach “Don is a dear friend from our time as fraternity brothers at OSU, and I’m thrilled he and Cathey are doing so much for the university,” said OSU President Burns Hargis. “They appreciate how valuable it is for young men and women to broaden their horizons by traveling throughout the world, and their incredible generosity gives our students many more opportunities to have a meaningful study-abroad experience. They are making an amazing impact on OSU.”

Dr. David Henneberry, interim associate vice president of international studies and outreach, said this gift will address the No. 1 barrier to students gaining an international experience – financial concerns. “We will become known as an institution that produces students capable of dealing with the world, of working in a multicultural environment, with the capacity necessary to perform well on the job,” Henneberry said.

The Humphreys hope their gift will help provide for longer study-abroad experiences. They feel a semester or year outside of one’s native country is much more enlightening than just a week or two.

One student who can speak to the value of study abroad is Maggie Jackson, an English senior who has studied in Prague and Nepal. “Study abroad gave me a sense of independence that otherwise I wouldn’t have been able to have,” Jackson said. “I learned to make friends of all different types of people. It opened all kinds of doors and changed the person that I am. I’m much more open to different people and cultures.”

“These students will learn some very important lessons. Seeing the world through other people’s perspectives is very enlightening,” said Cathey, who graduated from OU and then worked at OSU’s Spears School of Business after she and Don were married in 1970. “That makes you pause and think about how you deal with others.”

Don and Cathey are great believers in the power of education and have said on many occasions, “Investing in education, whether for yourself, your children, or someone else who needs help, is the best investment anyone can make.”

The pair of Pickens match gifts provided the Humphreys the opportunity to have a greater impact than they had originally dreamed. That encouraged them to make their gift now to capitalize on these unique matching programs.

To see how you can make a difference in the lives of OSU students, visit OSUgiving.com. /////

“It’s fantastic,” Don added. “I can’t thank Boone enough for making this available to OSU. I think it’s just an absolutely fabulous opportunity.”

Study abroad gave me a sense of independence that I wouldn’t otherwise have been able to have. It opened doors and changed the person that I am. MAGGIE JACKSON, Nepal 2010

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DEAR MR. AND MRS. JOHN AND CAROLINE LINEHAN, Two years ago, I packed my car with everything I owned and left Wichita, Kansas, and everything I had ever known. What was my destination? Stillwater, Oklahoma, was at the end of my map. That day, I moved into Booker Hall. Since that day I have overcome many obstacles; however, I would not be where I am today without people like you. Thank you for helping me obtain my goals. The John C. and Caroline S. Linehan Endowed Scholarship of $2,000 not only allows me to continue my education, but helps me after I graduate by keeping my student loans as low as possible. Unfortunately my family is not in a position to help me pay for school so I rely completely on scholarships, grants, loans and my own source of income. This scholarship means so much to me. Many students don’t understand the value of a dollar. Unfortunately, I have grown up with a childhood that made me understand. My parents divorced before my 5th grade year. After that, I took care of the laundry, cooking, cleaning and ranch chores to help my dad and brother. Hard work was my outlet. To this day I still work full-time and enjoy intramural sports while majoring in secondary education. I plan on teaching senior English for college preparation, and coaching women’s basketball as well as distance track and field. These decisions were strongly influenced by people who helped me at Goddard High School. My senior English teacher helped me achieve a 31 ACT score on my English section, but most importantly helped me understand the demands of a college-level course. I hope to be able to give my future students the same support she gave me. I hope this letter lets you understand a little about me and who I am and aspire to be. I could write pages, but this letter isn’t about me. It’s about your generosity and love for OSU and its students. I just hope you can understand how your scholarship can change a life. God has blessed me, so I pray and believe you will be blessed in return. There are not enough thanks in this world to show my appreciation, but thank you. Sincerely yours,

Anna Leigh

Pistol Pete 123 Cowboy Way Stillwater, OK 74074

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Fall 2010 Campaign Newsletter