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Top Line Quarterly Newsletter of the Ohio River Valley Llama Association

November 2013

Volume 26, Number 4

We came, we hiked, we conquered

McFarland’s Llama Farm…..3 generations committed to excellence! Pat Linkhorn ORVLA TopLine Editor 56032 Claysville Road Cumberland, OH 43732

Place Stamp Here


SPILLING THE BEANS ABOUT ME Let us know something about you. Send your responses to Topline editor at orvla01@windstream.net WHERE DID YOU GROW UP? FAMILY MEMBERS-

EDUCATION AND MEMORIES-

PETS AS A CHILD-

OCCUPATIONFAMILY LIFE AS AN ADULT-

WHEN DID YOU GET INTERESTED IN LLAMAS?

A legAcy born of love. Since 1995, Spittin’ Creek has been building a long line of high-quality, award winning pedigrees.

INTERESTING EXPERIENCES WITH YOUR LLAMAS- (FUNNY,GOOD,EMBARASSING)

Today, the tradition continues. Loved like family, our llamas are gentle, well trained and eager to please. Call us today to inquire about purchasing opportunities. - Greg & Debbie Shellabarger

OTHER ANIMALS THAT YOU OWN AND LOVE?

Pat Linkhorn shared with us this month. Will you be the next? Xenia, Ohio • P: 937-376-2980 • www.SpittinCreek.com


TOPLINE

TOPLINE A quarterly publication of the Ohio River Valley Llama Association ORVLA website: www.orvla.com Editor: Pat Linkhorn 740-9638-5041 orvla01@windstream.net

The opinions and articles in TOPLINE are views expressed of their authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of ORVLA or the newsletter editor. This newsletter and ORVLA will not be responsible for the opinion or validity of statements expressed by authors or advertisers, nor do we assume any responsibility for typographical errors in submitted articles. Members and friends of ORVLA are invited and encouraged to send articles, advertisements, editorials, letters or suggestions. The purpose of this newsletter is to provide information only and should not be considered as a substitute for professional advice. Neither ORVLA or the TOPLINE editor will be held responsible for any losses resulting from a reader’s failure to heed this caution.

Contents - November 2013 Articles

President’s Message 2 ALpacas on the Trail 4 Saying Good-bye is Never Easy 6 Should You Geld Your Pack Llamas? 8 Llamas in Parades 10 ORVLA Speaker Dr. Pam Walker 15 Spilling the Beans 16 Catching & Handling Llamas & Alpacas 18 ORVLA Fall Hike 22 2013 Hike Photos 23 Llama Driving in UK 30 Membershipn Application 31

SHOWS

EVENTS

MEETINGS

Calendar of Events

34

DEPARTMENTS ORVLA Board & Committees 2 Editor’s Message 3 Board Minutes 4 Sunshine Report 22 ORVLA Sponsored Veterinarians 31 Treasurer’s Report 32 Advertising Information 32

ORVLA belongs to a newsletter network. We may reprint articles from these newsletter, unless specifically noted by the author of the article. In turn, they may reprint articles that are submitted to our editor. If you write an article that you do ADVERTISERS not wish to have to have used elsewhere, please Hillcrest Llama Farm (Johnson) 5 indicate that to the editor when you submit your McFarland’s Llama Farm Back Cover work. Spittin’ Creek llamas & Alpacas Inside Front Cover Newsletter deadlines for articles and advertising (Shellabarger) are January 15 (February issue), April 15 (May issue), July 15 (August issue), and October 15 Plus 33 Business Card Ads (November issue). The next newsletter deadline is January 15, 2014

1

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE President’s Message

ORVLA Officers

Committees

BUDGET/FINANCE Kris Miller, Bill Safreed, Cindy PRESIDENT Fall is upon us and the llama/alpaca activiWilson, Darlene Sutton, board Bill Safreed (2014) ties and shows have concluded. Hope your liaisons 740-536-9385 year was a good one and you are looking ELECTION loghousellamas@hughes.net forward to the upcoming holiday season. Dustin Newton, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair Looking back, we had a good year with a VICE PRESIDENT 740-638-5041 great ORVLA Llama Show and the annual Tom Ross (2015) orvla01@windstream.net meeting and llama hike in Mt. Vernon. It 740-867-4267 seems our time together at shows and goodnewsllamas@zoominternet.net FIBER Doug Targett, board liaison events is all too short, so... Judy Ross & Gail SECRETARY Targett,Chairs Make it a point to join the ORVLA family at Cindy Wilson (2013) 740-867-4267, 937-689-8273

Fall 2013

the farm of Russ and Kris Miller for the annual Christmas dinner, white elephant fund raiser sale and a special guest speaker who will bring us up to date on all things llama medical. See this issue of Topline for all the details and get your registration sent. Get those sale donations dug out too.

We also look forward also to a new year with some new and old Directors on your Board. We want to support Debbie Arendas as she takes over the Show Superintendent responsibilities for the Ohio State Fair Llama and Fiber Show in 2014. If you haven’t been there in awhile, 2014 is the time to make your return. I hope you will also continue to support your local and state wide llama and alpaca shows and events into 2014. Your participation is badly needed to keep more shows from falling by the way side. Last order of business for the year, membership renewal! Without you and your participation we don’t have an organization. So get that membership sent and encourage your llama owning and loving friends to join too. See you at the Millers for one last “lama blast” of the year... ORVLA, where the fun goes on! Bill Safreed ORVLA November 2013

740-674-4513

silveyhollowfarm@hotmail.com

goodnewsllamas@zoominternet.net tgafarm@gotsky.com

HISTORIAN TREASURER Cindy Wilson, board liaison Kris Miller (2015) Jean Haumschild, Chair 614-879-3276 740-824-3120 millersfarmatdcsbcglobal.net frv@verizon.net MEMBERSHIP Fred Tarr, board liaison BOARD MEMBERS Libby Rush/Char Neel, Chairs 330-938-9935 Fred Tarr (2014) rushar01@sbcglobal.net 740-944-1647 ORVLA Web Page tarrhillllamas@windstream.net Janice Schilling, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair Dustin Newton(2015) 740-638-5041 419-884-2615 orvla01@windstream.net pinewoodllamas@hotmail.com PROGRAM Janice Schilling/Bill Safreed, board Janice Schilling (2013) liaisons 330-897-1243 PUBLICRELATIONS/MARKETING isllamas@dishmail.net Tom Ross/Doug Targett, board liaisons Darlene Sutton (2014) PUBLICATION/TopLine 330-868-6848 Cindy Wilson, board liaison RaDarLlamas@yahoo.com Pat Linkhorn, Chair orvla01@windstream.net Doug Targett (2013) SUNSHINE 937-689-8273 Cindy Wilson, board liaison tgafarm@gotsky.com Linda Pohle, Chair Visit us online! 740-943-3876 www.topline.com linda@thepohles.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pag- YOUTH es/The-Ohio-River-Valley-Llama- Dustin Newton, board liaison Deb Arendas, Chair Association llamadeb@aol.com 2

TOPLINE

Message from the Editor Hello Everyone, It’s that hectic time of year again. Only eight more Sundays until Christmas! That fact makes me feel more than a bit hectic since I never shop early. I have one gift bought and for me, that’s an accomplishment.

SAVE THE DATES

NOVEMBER 7-10, 2013 Hope you enjoy this newsletter. I like the articles I found LAMAS ON PARADE! GALA’S 26TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE in the other llama magazines and hope you do too. Thanks to all of you who have sent in your election ballots.

December 7, 2013 We really need some of you to send in your responses for Christmas Meeting at Kris our “Spilling the Beans” portion of this newsletter. Kris Miller’s farm Miller & Debbie Shellabarger & I have shared so ‘fess up people! We want to know more about you!

Triple H Farm Bev & Krystle Frye 3390 Millersburg Rd. Martinsburg, OH 43037 740-668-4845

3

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE President’s Message

ORVLA Officers

Committees

BUDGET/FINANCE Kris Miller, Bill Safreed, Cindy PRESIDENT Fall is upon us and the llama/alpaca activiWilson, Darlene Sutton, board Bill Safreed (2014) ties and shows have concluded. Hope your liaisons 740-536-9385 year was a good one and you are looking ELECTION loghousellamas@hughes.net forward to the upcoming holiday season. Dustin Newton, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair Looking back, we had a good year with a VICE PRESIDENT 740-638-5041 great ORVLA Llama Show and the annual Tom Ross (2015) orvla01@windstream.net meeting and llama hike in Mt. Vernon. It 740-867-4267 seems our time together at shows and goodnewsllamas@zoominternet.net FIBER Doug Targett, board liaison events is all too short, so... Judy Ross & Gail SECRETARY Targett,Chairs Make it a point to join the ORVLA family at Cindy Wilson (2013) 740-867-4267, 937-689-8273

Fall 2013

the farm of Russ and Kris Miller for the annual Christmas dinner, white elephant fund raiser sale and a special guest speaker who will bring us up to date on all things llama medical. See this issue of Topline for all the details and get your registration sent. Get those sale donations dug out too.

We also look forward also to a new year with some new and old Directors on your Board. We want to support Debbie Arendas as she takes over the Show Superintendent responsibilities for the Ohio State Fair Llama and Fiber Show in 2014. If you haven’t been there in awhile, 2014 is the time to make your return. I hope you will also continue to support your local and state wide llama and alpaca shows and events into 2014. Your participation is badly needed to keep more shows from falling by the way side. Last order of business for the year, membership renewal! Without you and your participation we don’t have an organization. So get that membership sent and encourage your llama owning and loving friends to join too. See you at the Millers for one last “lama blast” of the year... ORVLA, where the fun goes on! Bill Safreed ORVLA November 2013

740-674-4513

silveyhollowfarm@hotmail.com

goodnewsllamas@zoominternet.net tgafarm@gotsky.com

HISTORIAN TREASURER Cindy Wilson, board liaison Kris Miller (2015) Jean Haumschild, Chair 614-879-3276 740-824-3120 millersfarmatdcsbcglobal.net frv@verizon.net MEMBERSHIP Fred Tarr, board liaison BOARD MEMBERS Libby Rush/Char Neel, Chairs 330-938-9935 Fred Tarr (2014) rushar01@sbcglobal.net 740-944-1647 ORVLA Web Page tarrhillllamas@windstream.net Janice Schilling, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair Dustin Newton(2015) 740-638-5041 419-884-2615 orvla01@windstream.net pinewoodllamas@hotmail.com PROGRAM Janice Schilling/Bill Safreed, board Janice Schilling (2013) liaisons 330-897-1243 PUBLICRELATIONS/MARKETING isllamas@dishmail.net Tom Ross/Doug Targett, board liaisons Darlene Sutton (2014) PUBLICATION/TopLine 330-868-6848 Cindy Wilson, board liaison RaDarLlamas@yahoo.com Pat Linkhorn, Chair orvla01@windstream.net Doug Targett (2013) SUNSHINE 937-689-8273 Cindy Wilson, board liaison tgafarm@gotsky.com Linda Pohle, Chair Visit us online! 740-943-3876 www.topline.com linda@thepohles.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pag- YOUTH es/The-Ohio-River-Valley-Llama- Dustin Newton, board liaison Deb Arendas, Chair Association llamadeb@aol.com 2

TOPLINE

Message from the Editor Hello Everyone, It’s that hectic time of year again. Only eight more Sundays until Christmas! That fact makes me feel more than a bit hectic since I never shop early. I have one gift bought and for me, that’s an accomplishment.

SAVE THE DATES

NOVEMBER 7-10, 2013 Hope you enjoy this newsletter. I like the articles I found LAMAS ON PARADE! GALA’S 26TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE in the other llama magazines and hope you do too. Thanks to all of you who have sent in your election ballots.

December 7, 2013 We really need some of you to send in your responses for Christmas Meeting at Kris our “Spilling the Beans” portion of this newsletter. Kris Miller’s farm Miller & Debbie Shellabarger & I have shared so ‘fess up people! We want to know more about you!

Triple H Farm Bev & Krystle Frye 3390 Millersburg Rd. Martinsburg, OH 43037 740-668-4845

3

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE Board Minutes October 12, 2013 ORVLA Hike/Picnic Knox County Horse Park Mt. Vernon, OH

Present: Bill Safreed, Kris Miller, Fred Tarr, Dustin Newton and Cindy Wilson. Absent: Janice Schilling, Doug Targett, Darlene Sutton and Tom Ross. The meeting was called to order by President Bill Safreed. The Minutes were previously approved and published in Topline. Kris Miller distributed the Treasurer’s report. After review and discussion, Cindy Wilson made a motion to approve the Treasurer’s report. Fred Tarr seconded the motion. All in favor. Motion carried.

Krystal’s Fiber Kreations

The Christmas meeting will be held December 7, 2013 at Russ and Kris Miller’s farm. Dr. Pam Walker will be the guest speaker. This will be a catered event.

All things fiber! (Coming Soon) www.fiberkreations.org Krystal Linkhorn, Owner

The ORVLA show will be May 17, 2014. Janice Schilling has volunteered to be the Superintendent. At Janice’s request, the Board discussed possible judges for the show and will make recommendations to her. Char Neel and Libby Rush tendered their resignation as chairs of the membership committee effective November 1st. They have done a great job over the years and we will miss working with them. They will remain and help their replacement get acclimated. Kris Miller made a motion to cover Libby and Char’s expenses in heading up the Hike/Picnic in the amount of $200.00. Dustin Newton seconded the motion. All in favor. Motion carried. Cindy Wilson made a motion to donate $50.00 to the Knox County Horse Park in appreciation for the use of their facility. Fred Tarr seconded the motion. All in favor. Motion carried.

i H

lama Fa L t s e r rm llc Bob & Barb Johnson Chandlersville, Ohio

www.hillcrestllamas.net • Email: bljohnson4544@gmail.com Phone: (740) 674-4544

Fred Tarr made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Dustin Newton seconded the motion. All in favor. Meeting adjourned. Following the meeting Anne Hallowell gave a wonderful presentation and demonstration of packing with llamas. We then went for our hike; some with lamas, some without. Afterward we all had a nice picnic lunch. A great time was had by all in attendance. Thank you Char and Libby for all the work you’ve done putting this event together. Respectfully submitted, Cindy Wilson, secretary

ILR Show Division Champion

ILR Universal Awards Halter Champion

HF Stacey

HF Natalie

(Sired by Amici)

ORVLA November 2013

4

(Sired by Hard Rocks Limited Edition)

5

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE Board Minutes October 12, 2013 ORVLA Hike/Picnic Knox County Horse Park Mt. Vernon, OH

Present: Bill Safreed, Kris Miller, Fred Tarr, Dustin Newton and Cindy Wilson. Absent: Janice Schilling, Doug Targett, Darlene Sutton and Tom Ross. The meeting was called to order by President Bill Safreed. The Minutes were previously approved and published in Topline. Kris Miller distributed the Treasurer’s report. After review and discussion, Cindy Wilson made a motion to approve the Treasurer’s report. Fred Tarr seconded the motion. All in favor. Motion carried.

Krystal’s Fiber Kreations

The Christmas meeting will be held December 7, 2013 at Russ and Kris Miller’s farm. Dr. Pam Walker will be the guest speaker. This will be a catered event.

All things fiber! (Coming Soon) www.fiberkreations.org Krystal Linkhorn, Owner

The ORVLA show will be May 17, 2014. Janice Schilling has volunteered to be the Superintendent. At Janice’s request, the Board discussed possible judges for the show and will make recommendations to her. Char Neel and Libby Rush tendered their resignation as chairs of the membership committee effective November 1st. They have done a great job over the years and we will miss working with them. They will remain and help their replacement get acclimated. Kris Miller made a motion to cover Libby and Char’s expenses in heading up the Hike/Picnic in the amount of $200.00. Dustin Newton seconded the motion. All in favor. Motion carried. Cindy Wilson made a motion to donate $50.00 to the Knox County Horse Park in appreciation for the use of their facility. Fred Tarr seconded the motion. All in favor. Motion carried.

i H

lama Fa L t s e r rm llc Bob & Barb Johnson Chandlersville, Ohio

www.hillcrestllamas.net • Email: bljohnson4544@gmail.com Phone: (740) 674-4544

Fred Tarr made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Dustin Newton seconded the motion. All in favor. Meeting adjourned. Following the meeting Anne Hallowell gave a wonderful presentation and demonstration of packing with llamas. We then went for our hike; some with lamas, some without. Afterward we all had a nice picnic lunch. A great time was had by all in attendance. Thank you Char and Libby for all the work you’ve done putting this event together. Respectfully submitted, Cindy Wilson, secretary

ILR Show Division Champion

ILR Universal Awards Halter Champion

HF Stacey

HF Natalie

(Sired by Amici)

ORVLA November 2013

4

(Sired by Hard Rocks Limited Edition)

5

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE Saying Goodbye is Never Easy

TOPLINE

by Dawn Lusk

Fusion….he came as a package deal over 11 years ago and was the best kid trainer ever! Oh sure, the kids thought they were the ones doing the training, but it was really him! He knew the drill and would only pretend to be learning as each new 4H’er had him as their project. He’d follow you to the ends of the earth and back if asked! His registered name was Lofty Pine Fusion, born April 22, 1996. It was 6:17 pm, I was in Cincinnati when I got the call that Fusion was down and when made to get up, his left front leg hung limp. Maybe it was just sprained, maybe he slipped on the barn floor, I thought….praying it wasn’t anything worse. Lloyd called the vet who came out and confirmed his suspicions… it was broken at the Radius, just below his shoulder. HOW on earth could this have happened??!! We’ll never know, he was 17, and as any geriatric, he could have had brittle bones. I made it home just after Dr. Kari had given him ‘the shot’ and was able to hold his head on my lap for quite some time before he finally breathed his last. I stroked his head and told him what a good boy he’d been all these years, how I was SO GOING TO MISS HIM… it was dark, the rest of the llamas were scattered around the field, kushed for the night… an owl called from a nearby tree….. Go ahead… go… it’s okay, I told him….. several more breaths and he was gone.

Lofty Pine Fusion 1996 - 2013

I wish we’d had time to gather all the kids that had taken him through the years so they could say good bye too. He finished his 4H career at the Ohio State Fair and the Champaign County Fair just days before, and as always, did an excellent job. Reunited with his pals that have gone on… each one is special, some just a little more than others. ORVLA November 2013

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7

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE Saying Goodbye is Never Easy

TOPLINE

by Dawn Lusk

Fusion….he came as a package deal over 11 years ago and was the best kid trainer ever! Oh sure, the kids thought they were the ones doing the training, but it was really him! He knew the drill and would only pretend to be learning as each new 4H’er had him as their project. He’d follow you to the ends of the earth and back if asked! His registered name was Lofty Pine Fusion, born April 22, 1996. It was 6:17 pm, I was in Cincinnati when I got the call that Fusion was down and when made to get up, his left front leg hung limp. Maybe it was just sprained, maybe he slipped on the barn floor, I thought….praying it wasn’t anything worse. Lloyd called the vet who came out and confirmed his suspicions… it was broken at the Radius, just below his shoulder. HOW on earth could this have happened??!! We’ll never know, he was 17, and as any geriatric, he could have had brittle bones. I made it home just after Dr. Kari had given him ‘the shot’ and was able to hold his head on my lap for quite some time before he finally breathed his last. I stroked his head and told him what a good boy he’d been all these years, how I was SO GOING TO MISS HIM… it was dark, the rest of the llamas were scattered around the field, kushed for the night… an owl called from a nearby tree….. Go ahead… go… it’s okay, I told him….. several more breaths and he was gone.

Lofty Pine Fusion 1996 - 2013

I wish we’d had time to gather all the kids that had taken him through the years so they could say good bye too. He finished his 4H career at the Ohio State Fair and the Champaign County Fair just days before, and as always, did an excellent job. Reunited with his pals that have gone on… each one is special, some just a little more than others. ORVLA November 2013

6

7

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

Should You Geld Your Pack Llamas? By Al Ellis

reprinted from The Rocky Mountain Llama and Alpaca Association newsletter

My wife and I originally started breeding to produce our own personal packers. It turned into a mission and a desire to provide jobs for our llama “boys” by introducing people to llama packing. We started outfitting about 14 years ago. Because of this we have been in the somewhat unique situation of needing all of the packers we were able to produce. Until recently our “boys” grew up and never left home, about 100 adult and teenage males, so we were able watch them throughout their career. From this we have reached a few interesting conclusions, one of which we discuss here. Don’t automatically geld your intended packers; this is an irreversible action and deserves careful consideration. It has generally been accepted that males who are not to be used for breeding should be gelded. Conventional wisdom used to believe intact males could neither live together in a herd, nor work together on the trail. That was a whole lot of bunk!! This is not to say there aren’t some parameters that need to be considered: age groupings, allotted space, fighting teeth, etc. However there can be a huge downside to gelding your packers: possible fallen pasterns and ‘long bone’. We see many cases where gelded packers are given early retirement due to fallen pasterns, the common term used to describe down in the fetlock, or hyperextension of the fetlock, or weak pastern. I acknowledge this problem is not universal, but it is widespread and serious, so why take the chance if you don’t have to. We all want our partners on the trail to be with us as long as possible, and it is a sad day when we have to leave them at home. In the past it was convenien and common practice to geld surplus males as early as 4 to 6 months of age. It was then discovered this early gelding caused the growth plates to remain open longer and resulted in llamas growing taller than their structure could support. This is the origin of the myth that tall llamas can’t work and will break down. These poor llamas along with others that didn’t meet the breeder’s goals (anything but packing) were marketed as packers. Of course, llamas being the wonderful creatures that they are, tried to do what they were asked, but the majority were physically incapable of extensive packing. Now it is recommended not to geld until the animals are full grown. This solved the growth problem, and this was the practice we followed. We only gelded the animals that were a little too aggressive in their group (12 to 20 intact males), never prior to 3 years old and up to 7 years old. It only took a few years for us to realize the geldings were starting to break down and their intact counterparts were going strong. We completely stopped gelding a number of years ago and every male we gelded ended up in early retirement, prior to 15 years of age and some at 12. With only a couple of exceptions, the intact males are capable of heavy duty work into their late teens. Arthritis, probably had something to do with long cold (lots of -30 F and beyond) winters and many years on the trail, pretty much sets the time for the “gold watch”, but most remain up on their pasterns their entire lives.

TOPLINE for them to settle a dispute when playing ends up with someone getting mad. One acre per llama up to 10 acres is a good rule of thumb. They also need plenty of room at the feeding areas, not too different from dominant females. Spending time on the trail together absolutely re-enforces their cohesiveness as a herd. The whole situation is much simpler if there are no females around. Age is important; keep them in their own age groups until age 4. The boys go through what we refer to as the terrible two’s, the equivalent of adolescence in human teenagers. They seem to constantly want to wrestle and chase each other. As they gain size and strength, it looks scary but we feel it really helps to develop their muscle. Their chests and thighs begin to feel like they are made of steel. This starts at age 2 to 2 ½ and lasts until 4 but some individuals take it to 6. If they are spending time on the trail together, age 4 is the norm. Even though they are approaching full grown and look tough as nails, they are just high school kids. And you don’t put high schools kids in the NFL. That is, don’t mix 4 year olds with older males. You also need to really keep on top of their fighting teeth. It would be nice if they all erupted at once, or at least if they all came out at the same time in each llama, but this doesn’t happen so it is usually several episodes of trimming. Don’t panic at the occasional dust ups, the speed and power they display is awesome. Fortunately serious injuries are extremely rare, and after the fight they are best buddies again. And one final note about fallen pasterns. It seems probable that pastern strength is affected by a combination of things; genetics, weight, nutrition, overall health, but an important component is obviously hormones. I kind of think sometimes we are on the edge of some deficiency, copper, boron, whatever, and the presence or lack of hormones tips the balance. Genetics could be playing two roles, structural weakness where nothing makes a difference, but also the ability to assimilate or thrive on diminished levels of some key nutrient or combo of nutrients. This could explain different outcomes in different parts of the country. While we don’t all agree on the importance of natural hormones, I think most of us agree grossly overweight llamas are almost certain to drop. Plenty of exercise is important, but carrying loads too heavy for the body structure will also cause a breakdown. A loaded llama should show no basic difference in their stride than when they aren’t carrying a load. Forget the old “percent of body weight” theory. Al and Sondra Ellis can be contacted at: Highline Trail Llamas, 8747 Hwy. 191 Box 8 Boulder, WY 82923 307-537-3310 hilntrllamas@wyoming.com www.LlamaAdventure.com or www.HighlineTrailLlamaSales.com

There are some considerations when keeping intact males. The main issue is having enough room ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

Should You Geld Your Pack Llamas? By Al Ellis

reprinted from The Rocky Mountain Llama and Alpaca Association newsletter

My wife and I originally started breeding to produce our own personal packers. It turned into a mission and a desire to provide jobs for our llama “boys” by introducing people to llama packing. We started outfitting about 14 years ago. Because of this we have been in the somewhat unique situation of needing all of the packers we were able to produce. Until recently our “boys” grew up and never left home, about 100 adult and teenage males, so we were able watch them throughout their career. From this we have reached a few interesting conclusions, one of which we discuss here. Don’t automatically geld your intended packers; this is an irreversible action and deserves careful consideration. It has generally been accepted that males who are not to be used for breeding should be gelded. Conventional wisdom used to believe intact males could neither live together in a herd, nor work together on the trail. That was a whole lot of bunk!! This is not to say there aren’t some parameters that need to be considered: age groupings, allotted space, fighting teeth, etc. However there can be a huge downside to gelding your packers: possible fallen pasterns and ‘long bone’. We see many cases where gelded packers are given early retirement due to fallen pasterns, the common term used to describe down in the fetlock, or hyperextension of the fetlock, or weak pastern. I acknowledge this problem is not universal, but it is widespread and serious, so why take the chance if you don’t have to. We all want our partners on the trail to be with us as long as possible, and it is a sad day when we have to leave them at home. In the past it was convenien and common practice to geld surplus males as early as 4 to 6 months of age. It was then discovered this early gelding caused the growth plates to remain open longer and resulted in llamas growing taller than their structure could support. This is the origin of the myth that tall llamas can’t work and will break down. These poor llamas along with others that didn’t meet the breeder’s goals (anything but packing) were marketed as packers. Of course, llamas being the wonderful creatures that they are, tried to do what they were asked, but the majority were physically incapable of extensive packing. Now it is recommended not to geld until the animals are full grown. This solved the growth problem, and this was the practice we followed. We only gelded the animals that were a little too aggressive in their group (12 to 20 intact males), never prior to 3 years old and up to 7 years old. It only took a few years for us to realize the geldings were starting to break down and their intact counterparts were going strong. We completely stopped gelding a number of years ago and every male we gelded ended up in early retirement, prior to 15 years of age and some at 12. With only a couple of exceptions, the intact males are capable of heavy duty work into their late teens. Arthritis, probably had something to do with long cold (lots of -30 F and beyond) winters and many years on the trail, pretty much sets the time for the “gold watch”, but most remain up on their pasterns their entire lives.

TOPLINE for them to settle a dispute when playing ends up with someone getting mad. One acre per llama up to 10 acres is a good rule of thumb. They also need plenty of room at the feeding areas, not too different from dominant females. Spending time on the trail together absolutely re-enforces their cohesiveness as a herd. The whole situation is much simpler if there are no females around. Age is important; keep them in their own age groups until age 4. The boys go through what we refer to as the terrible two’s, the equivalent of adolescence in human teenagers. They seem to constantly want to wrestle and chase each other. As they gain size and strength, it looks scary but we feel it really helps to develop their muscle. Their chests and thighs begin to feel like they are made of steel. This starts at age 2 to 2 ½ and lasts until 4 but some individuals take it to 6. If they are spending time on the trail together, age 4 is the norm. Even though they are approaching full grown and look tough as nails, they are just high school kids. And you don’t put high schools kids in the NFL. That is, don’t mix 4 year olds with older males. You also need to really keep on top of their fighting teeth. It would be nice if they all erupted at once, or at least if they all came out at the same time in each llama, but this doesn’t happen so it is usually several episodes of trimming. Don’t panic at the occasional dust ups, the speed and power they display is awesome. Fortunately serious injuries are extremely rare, and after the fight they are best buddies again. And one final note about fallen pasterns. It seems probable that pastern strength is affected by a combination of things; genetics, weight, nutrition, overall health, but an important component is obviously hormones. I kind of think sometimes we are on the edge of some deficiency, copper, boron, whatever, and the presence or lack of hormones tips the balance. Genetics could be playing two roles, structural weakness where nothing makes a difference, but also the ability to assimilate or thrive on diminished levels of some key nutrient or combo of nutrients. This could explain different outcomes in different parts of the country. While we don’t all agree on the importance of natural hormones, I think most of us agree grossly overweight llamas are almost certain to drop. Plenty of exercise is important, but carrying loads too heavy for the body structure will also cause a breakdown. A loaded llama should show no basic difference in their stride than when they aren’t carrying a load. Forget the old “percent of body weight” theory. Al and Sondra Ellis can be contacted at: Highline Trail Llamas, 8747 Hwy. 191 Box 8 Boulder, WY 82923 307-537-3310 hilntrllamas@wyoming.com www.LlamaAdventure.com or www.HighlineTrailLlamaSales.com

There are some considerations when keeping intact males. The main issue is having enough room ORVLA November 2013

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Llamas in Parades

This article was reprinted from the GALA Newsletter, August 2013 by Vicky Southwick

Everybody loves a parade, and parades are an excellent way to showcase your llamas and present a positive image to the public. While this sounds as though it would be so easy to just jump in and go, there are a few key factors which will make the experience far more positive for both the llamas, their handlers, and anyone who interacts with them along the way. There will be occasions where your participation is requested by a member of the parade committee or perhaps the superintendent, and there will occasions where you are seeking permission to participate. There are a few considerations in either case. If you have been invited, make sure it is an “official” invitation and everyone knows you are coming! It is usually pretty easy to find out who is charged with the overall event coordination and give them a quick call or send an e-mail (read receipt requested) to verify plans. Some parades have themes so if it is not plainly stated, it is worth inquiring. Also ask if there are any judging rules. Some parades have trophies for specific entries. Remember that many parades these days are fundraising events for various charities or perhaps even the township itself. Clarify how event fees are determined. If the initial plan is to participate as the “XY 4-H club” as well as the SSLA (for instance), that could well generate two fees. It may be that the group needs to be registered under one “banner” or the other. Then the group can determine if/how each sub-group wants to distinguish themselves (t-shirts, banners, flags, etc). The idea here is one entry fee! If you are submitting an application through a web site or other means, if acknowledgement is not received at least 3-4 weeks prior to the event, follow up to ensure all is in order. Sometimes “the committee” is in a quandary regarding whether llamas should participate at all – this is your chance to present your case! If the parade is going to have an announcer then prepare a short bulleted overview of basic information. Never let them “freelance” as the last thing anyone wants to hear is “look at all those llamas and they SPIT!” Pre-Planning/Parade Line-up Once you have confirmed your participation, it will be important to determine where the organizers have planned to place llamas in the parade. The earlier you know that the better, as there are several situations which can make for a miserable experience and you want to be able to negotiate before plans are set. Sometimes the application will have a space to designate “special requirements”, etc so obviously a good place to enter that info and request a call to discuss. One tip is to look on their website (if there is one) to check participants in previous events. That should give you an idea regarding what you will need to steer away from. When we neglected to realize that a small town night parade consisted of quite a number of decorated driving lawn mowers, a bit of last minute scrambling was required prior to the line-up! ORVLA November 2013

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Considerations for placement As far forward as you can get is best, although many parade coordinators don’t want anything that poops up front. More in regards to that later, but the best thing about being in front is shorter staging time, and you can see the parade since you can stand at the end and watch the remaining participants pass by. It also makes it far easier for the organizer to juggle the groups since we usually come up with a fair number of potential “issues” in regards to placement. Fire engines or other vehicles which may turn their sirens on and off can be rather startling if they are in close proximity.

Llamas will often spook horses so we ask that they be separated for the safety of all participants. This is usually not an issue as most have horses near the back. The discussion needs to extend to staging locations as well to ensure they are not in close proximity there either as they will spend far longer in staging than in the actual parade! In front of the high school band is also not a great place to be – the trumpets and drums can be jarring to some llamas and they are so jumpy and nervous nobody has a good time. The aforementioned lawn mowers, the local hot rod club or even a motorcycle contingent as everybody feels compelled to repeatedly rev their engines. Most parades request that groups refrain from throwing out candy or other items but there are still some parades which allow this. If that’s the case you want to ensure some distance because if they are throwing out candy or small toys, kids run into the street from the sides, usually screaming. We participated in a large parade where a group threw out “glitter poppers”. The unexpected popping noise was quite disrupting and it was cause for worry as the animals tried to head for the hills. An unprepared handler could have easily lost control of their animal. NOTE If you are participating in a night parade for the first time, each and every one of these “gotchas” are enhanced and you can also add: ensure you are not positioned right behind the strobing police lights! Not only are the lights alarming to many animals but the police enjoy letting off a few periodic “whoops” as well! Parking & Staging Depending on the size of the parade and the experience of the Coordinator, arrangements can become an interesting discussion. They need to understand that they will be “x” number of trucks/trailers that need pull through access and a bit of elbow room. Trying to navigate a parking lot full of cars without enough room to tie animals to the sides of the trailer or set up a portable pen is a disaster in the making. Ensure you understand the route you are to take as streets are often blocked off well in advance of the parade. Ensure you are aware if there is a charge for parking so you can be appropriately prepared. You may have an assigned parking area but if not, it is best to get there early and stake out a place where you can establish a quiet area to prep the llamas. They draw a crowd anyway but it 11

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

Llamas in Parades

This article was reprinted from the GALA Newsletter, August 2013 by Vicky Southwick

Everybody loves a parade, and parades are an excellent way to showcase your llamas and present a positive image to the public. While this sounds as though it would be so easy to just jump in and go, there are a few key factors which will make the experience far more positive for both the llamas, their handlers, and anyone who interacts with them along the way. There will be occasions where your participation is requested by a member of the parade committee or perhaps the superintendent, and there will occasions where you are seeking permission to participate. There are a few considerations in either case. If you have been invited, make sure it is an “official” invitation and everyone knows you are coming! It is usually pretty easy to find out who is charged with the overall event coordination and give them a quick call or send an e-mail (read receipt requested) to verify plans. Some parades have themes so if it is not plainly stated, it is worth inquiring. Also ask if there are any judging rules. Some parades have trophies for specific entries. Remember that many parades these days are fundraising events for various charities or perhaps even the township itself. Clarify how event fees are determined. If the initial plan is to participate as the “XY 4-H club” as well as the SSLA (for instance), that could well generate two fees. It may be that the group needs to be registered under one “banner” or the other. Then the group can determine if/how each sub-group wants to distinguish themselves (t-shirts, banners, flags, etc). The idea here is one entry fee! If you are submitting an application through a web site or other means, if acknowledgement is not received at least 3-4 weeks prior to the event, follow up to ensure all is in order. Sometimes “the committee” is in a quandary regarding whether llamas should participate at all – this is your chance to present your case! If the parade is going to have an announcer then prepare a short bulleted overview of basic information. Never let them “freelance” as the last thing anyone wants to hear is “look at all those llamas and they SPIT!” Pre-Planning/Parade Line-up Once you have confirmed your participation, it will be important to determine where the organizers have planned to place llamas in the parade. The earlier you know that the better, as there are several situations which can make for a miserable experience and you want to be able to negotiate before plans are set. Sometimes the application will have a space to designate “special requirements”, etc so obviously a good place to enter that info and request a call to discuss. One tip is to look on their website (if there is one) to check participants in previous events. That should give you an idea regarding what you will need to steer away from. When we neglected to realize that a small town night parade consisted of quite a number of decorated driving lawn mowers, a bit of last minute scrambling was required prior to the line-up! ORVLA November 2013

10

TOPLINE

Considerations for placement As far forward as you can get is best, although many parade coordinators don’t want anything that poops up front. More in regards to that later, but the best thing about being in front is shorter staging time, and you can see the parade since you can stand at the end and watch the remaining participants pass by. It also makes it far easier for the organizer to juggle the groups since we usually come up with a fair number of potential “issues” in regards to placement. Fire engines or other vehicles which may turn their sirens on and off can be rather startling if they are in close proximity.

Llamas will often spook horses so we ask that they be separated for the safety of all participants. This is usually not an issue as most have horses near the back. The discussion needs to extend to staging locations as well to ensure they are not in close proximity there either as they will spend far longer in staging than in the actual parade! In front of the high school band is also not a great place to be – the trumpets and drums can be jarring to some llamas and they are so jumpy and nervous nobody has a good time. The aforementioned lawn mowers, the local hot rod club or even a motorcycle contingent as everybody feels compelled to repeatedly rev their engines. Most parades request that groups refrain from throwing out candy or other items but there are still some parades which allow this. If that’s the case you want to ensure some distance because if they are throwing out candy or small toys, kids run into the street from the sides, usually screaming. We participated in a large parade where a group threw out “glitter poppers”. The unexpected popping noise was quite disrupting and it was cause for worry as the animals tried to head for the hills. An unprepared handler could have easily lost control of their animal. NOTE If you are participating in a night parade for the first time, each and every one of these “gotchas” are enhanced and you can also add: ensure you are not positioned right behind the strobing police lights! Not only are the lights alarming to many animals but the police enjoy letting off a few periodic “whoops” as well! Parking & Staging Depending on the size of the parade and the experience of the Coordinator, arrangements can become an interesting discussion. They need to understand that they will be “x” number of trucks/trailers that need pull through access and a bit of elbow room. Trying to navigate a parking lot full of cars without enough room to tie animals to the sides of the trailer or set up a portable pen is a disaster in the making. Ensure you understand the route you are to take as streets are often blocked off well in advance of the parade. Ensure you are aware if there is a charge for parking so you can be appropriately prepared. You may have an assigned parking area but if not, it is best to get there early and stake out a place where you can establish a quiet area to prep the llamas. They draw a crowd anyway but it 11

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

can be extremely distracting when you have a lot of animals to get ready. Often we ask a volunteer to do “crowd control” to keep everyone back from the animals and answer questions. It often works well to present one or two calmer animals to those assembled so they take the brunt of all of that and the interactions can be more easily managed. Remember that the average person is NOT livestock savvy and will approach an animal from behind to pet them or allow their children to pull the wool on their hips and back legs – all an invitation to a potential kick. Even an animal who is not prone to kicking might offer up a surprise!

TOPLINE

better (fore and aft), especially if the material is thin. That way the llama is not distracted by anything shifting or flapping on a windy day. Ensure the straps are made of something that will not catch the wool (old men’s ties are nice!) they are long enough and that wool is not being pulled or skin being pinched where they tie. Repeat that check in the staging area and during the parade route if the llama gets jumpy.

It is best not to allow the public to offer any treats to the llamas at any time as the last thing we want is a spitting war!

If you have moved on to a more challenging costume then be sure to practice with the llama at home ahead of time. Pack saddles make a fantastic base but if that is not feasible, pool noodles come in handy when placed horizontally on either side to keep all weight directly off the animal’s spine. Also, keep in mind anything that dangles off the costume may get tangled in the llama’s wool and things dangling in front of their knees will often cause them to kick.

At home prep This could (and probably should) be stripped out, enhanced and used as an entirely separate companion article.

Likewise, if you intend for them to wear a hat, be certain to practice with that as well. Velcro attachments to the halter help keep things in place but be certain any holes cut for ears do not allow the base of their ears to touch – cut extra wide so if anything shifts they won’t shake it off.

Basically if the llama is comfortable, the llama walker and the crowd will enjoy the parade. Start with basics – perhaps a lightweight decorated felt “blanket”. For seasonal parades you can go to Michaels or most other craft shops and buy large decorated felt bags that can be sewn together at the top and arranged to hang down on each side of the animal. You can place something inside to weight them a bit at the bottom or puff them out. Some folks have sewn throw rugs together.

If you use safety pins, place them so they will not poke the llama if accidentally opend. We tape the ends to prevent this.

If the llama has experience with packs, there is nothing the matter with decorating those as you can carry all sorts of snacks and drinks to make the waiting around go faster! If not using a pack saddle, make sure each costume has at least one strap to secure it – two are

When you put things on the halter keep in mind what ramifications there might be if the llama shook its head or put its head down. Not only do you want to be certain anything on the side of the halter will not whack the llama in the eyes but you also don’t want it dragged thru the poop pile when they lean down to check things out! Bag all components of a single costume together and label with the llama’s name. That way you can just hand off a bag to someone and they can get them ready. Bring a “costume emergency kit” with pins, tape, cable ties, scissors, etc. Contents will depend upon the costumes and their construction. Just assume something will come undone! The handlers should consider layering as it can be freezing while you are standing around early in the morning but warms up considerably once the sun comes out. For really big (i.e. long) parades, we try to have at least one animal with decorated packs so we can throw all our stuff in there. Bring a container of poop to establish a poop pile. Parade management If you have a large number of inexperienced volunteers, while waiting in the staging area for the parade to start, go over llama safety and parade guidelines with the entire group. Remind the walkers to watch behind them, and for those following to safeguard the ones in front. People have been known to pop out of the crowd grabbing at the wool for souvenirs. The llama would bounce around and the walker would have to calm the situation. Review the parade rules which usually restrict stopping and talking to the crowd during the parade.

ORVLA November 2013

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can be extremely distracting when you have a lot of animals to get ready. Often we ask a volunteer to do “crowd control” to keep everyone back from the animals and answer questions. It often works well to present one or two calmer animals to those assembled so they take the brunt of all of that and the interactions can be more easily managed. Remember that the average person is NOT livestock savvy and will approach an animal from behind to pet them or allow their children to pull the wool on their hips and back legs – all an invitation to a potential kick. Even an animal who is not prone to kicking might offer up a surprise!

TOPLINE

better (fore and aft), especially if the material is thin. That way the llama is not distracted by anything shifting or flapping on a windy day. Ensure the straps are made of something that will not catch the wool (old men’s ties are nice!) they are long enough and that wool is not being pulled or skin being pinched where they tie. Repeat that check in the staging area and during the parade route if the llama gets jumpy.

It is best not to allow the public to offer any treats to the llamas at any time as the last thing we want is a spitting war!

If you have moved on to a more challenging costume then be sure to practice with the llama at home ahead of time. Pack saddles make a fantastic base but if that is not feasible, pool noodles come in handy when placed horizontally on either side to keep all weight directly off the animal’s spine. Also, keep in mind anything that dangles off the costume may get tangled in the llama’s wool and things dangling in front of their knees will often cause them to kick.

At home prep This could (and probably should) be stripped out, enhanced and used as an entirely separate companion article.

Likewise, if you intend for them to wear a hat, be certain to practice with that as well. Velcro attachments to the halter help keep things in place but be certain any holes cut for ears do not allow the base of their ears to touch – cut extra wide so if anything shifts they won’t shake it off.

Basically if the llama is comfortable, the llama walker and the crowd will enjoy the parade. Start with basics – perhaps a lightweight decorated felt “blanket”. For seasonal parades you can go to Michaels or most other craft shops and buy large decorated felt bags that can be sewn together at the top and arranged to hang down on each side of the animal. You can place something inside to weight them a bit at the bottom or puff them out. Some folks have sewn throw rugs together.

If you use safety pins, place them so they will not poke the llama if accidentally opend. We tape the ends to prevent this.

If the llama has experience with packs, there is nothing the matter with decorating those as you can carry all sorts of snacks and drinks to make the waiting around go faster! If not using a pack saddle, make sure each costume has at least one strap to secure it – two are

When you put things on the halter keep in mind what ramifications there might be if the llama shook its head or put its head down. Not only do you want to be certain anything on the side of the halter will not whack the llama in the eyes but you also don’t want it dragged thru the poop pile when they lean down to check things out! Bag all components of a single costume together and label with the llama’s name. That way you can just hand off a bag to someone and they can get them ready. Bring a “costume emergency kit” with pins, tape, cable ties, scissors, etc. Contents will depend upon the costumes and their construction. Just assume something will come undone! The handlers should consider layering as it can be freezing while you are standing around early in the morning but warms up considerably once the sun comes out. For really big (i.e. long) parades, we try to have at least one animal with decorated packs so we can throw all our stuff in there. Bring a container of poop to establish a poop pile. Parade management If you have a large number of inexperienced volunteers, while waiting in the staging area for the parade to start, go over llama safety and parade guidelines with the entire group. Remind the walkers to watch behind them, and for those following to safeguard the ones in front. People have been known to pop out of the crowd grabbing at the wool for souvenirs. The llama would bounce around and the walker would have to calm the situation. Review the parade rules which usually restrict stopping and talking to the crowd during the parade.

ORVLA November 2013

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13

ORVLA November 2013


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TOPLINE

This slows down the parade, causes gaps in the entries, and most importantly it increases the liability for the parade organizers. Encourage the group to stay together, but still maintain a reasonable distance between animals to keep llama noses out of other llama butts etc. If you have a group of llamas which contains intact males, it is a courtesy to keep the females at the back of the group. Most larger parades will police the crowds but it is always wiser to keep the animals as close to the middle of the road as possible. Less experienced animals should be bracketed by those who are calmer and more experienced. Of course familiar herd mates are preferred if possible. Remember that animals on the right side of the street are more exposed as their handler is typically on the left and cannot act as a buffer. Therefore calmer, more experienced animals should be placed on the right if possible. There are always llamas who want to lead the group and others more comfortable following. Sometimes during the parade the line up will rearrange itself. Unless there is some overriding reason, it is best to just let each animal find their place or you will be fighting them all the way down the street. The herd leaders should be where all the llamas from that farm can see and get signals from the leader. If there is a large group, it is a great help to have an unencumbered person following the group, as they can see any problems developing or if any of the handlers are struggling for any reason. Often we will switch off llamas to pair them up with a better match – they need to have fun too!

About Dr. Pam Walker ORVLA Christmas meeting speaker Dr. Walker is a 1992 graduate of Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After two years in private practice as a Dairy practitioner, she went to the University of Illinois to complete a Food Animal Medicine and Surgery residency, where she also received her Masters of Science degree. During this time, she finished her boards in the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, specializing in Large Animals. She has taught senior veterinary students at University of Illinois, Washington State University, Michigan State University, and The Ohio State University. She has been invited to speak to owner/breeders and veterinarians about camelids across the country. She worked for 10 years as the full time veterinarian for a large Ohio Alpaca farm - Alpaca Jack’s Suri Farm - where she was responsible for the medical, surgical, reproductive and daily health care of the alpacas. To continue with her love of teaching, students and veterinarians come to her clinic from across the United States for additional training. For the last year she has expanded her practice to include medical and reproductive care of camelids from across the country. Currently she has her own private practice – Camelid Care Veterinary Services and is based out of Grove City, Ohio. She can be contacted at 419 – 306 – 9522 or for non – emergencies at pamwalker@hotmail.com.

A volunteer for poop patrol is essential. If a long parade, a decorated child’s wagon can carry a bucket so there is a ready repository. The biggest challenge is if one stops to “go” it is inevitable that a large majority of the rest will too so you may need to consider adding another volunteer for large groups. Note: Often offering that you have a designated ‘scooper” will get you a position closer to the front of the parade! Not all parades make a full circle back to the beginning. Some parades walk straight away from the starting area, leaving you to find a way back through the public to the trailer. Llamas typically have about a 4 hour window of patience, then the humming and dancing begins. The sooner they can get settled back in the trailer the better, so plan your route! It is important to remind all the llama walkers in the group to stay together to help the llamas maintain herd comfort. It is considerate to stay with the group so that everyone is accounted for at the end of the parade. The longer the route back to the trailer the more public situations will arise as people tend to flock to them and gather around them. Tired, cranky and sometimes nervous animals are not the very best. All of this together sounds daunting, but it is meant to cover a wide array of situations and a lot of it is second nature once you have participated in various events. The primary objective is to think ahead so you are sure to have a good time and show the public how much fun these animals can be! ORVLA November 2013

14

FENDER’S FISH HATCHERY & LLAMA FARM 50527 T.R. 220 BALTIC, OH (740) 622-0681 fendersfishhatchery.com 15

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE

This slows down the parade, causes gaps in the entries, and most importantly it increases the liability for the parade organizers. Encourage the group to stay together, but still maintain a reasonable distance between animals to keep llama noses out of other llama butts etc. If you have a group of llamas which contains intact males, it is a courtesy to keep the females at the back of the group. Most larger parades will police the crowds but it is always wiser to keep the animals as close to the middle of the road as possible. Less experienced animals should be bracketed by those who are calmer and more experienced. Of course familiar herd mates are preferred if possible. Remember that animals on the right side of the street are more exposed as their handler is typically on the left and cannot act as a buffer. Therefore calmer, more experienced animals should be placed on the right if possible. There are always llamas who want to lead the group and others more comfortable following. Sometimes during the parade the line up will rearrange itself. Unless there is some overriding reason, it is best to just let each animal find their place or you will be fighting them all the way down the street. The herd leaders should be where all the llamas from that farm can see and get signals from the leader. If there is a large group, it is a great help to have an unencumbered person following the group, as they can see any problems developing or if any of the handlers are struggling for any reason. Often we will switch off llamas to pair them up with a better match – they need to have fun too!

About Dr. Pam Walker ORVLA Christmas meeting speaker Dr. Walker is a 1992 graduate of Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After two years in private practice as a Dairy practitioner, she went to the University of Illinois to complete a Food Animal Medicine and Surgery residency, where she also received her Masters of Science degree. During this time, she finished her boards in the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, specializing in Large Animals. She has taught senior veterinary students at University of Illinois, Washington State University, Michigan State University, and The Ohio State University. She has been invited to speak to owner/breeders and veterinarians about camelids across the country. She worked for 10 years as the full time veterinarian for a large Ohio Alpaca farm - Alpaca Jack’s Suri Farm - where she was responsible for the medical, surgical, reproductive and daily health care of the alpacas. To continue with her love of teaching, students and veterinarians come to her clinic from across the United States for additional training. For the last year she has expanded her practice to include medical and reproductive care of camelids from across the country. Currently she has her own private practice – Camelid Care Veterinary Services and is based out of Grove City, Ohio. She can be contacted at 419 – 306 – 9522 or for non – emergencies at pamwalker@hotmail.com.

A volunteer for poop patrol is essential. If a long parade, a decorated child’s wagon can carry a bucket so there is a ready repository. The biggest challenge is if one stops to “go” it is inevitable that a large majority of the rest will too so you may need to consider adding another volunteer for large groups. Note: Often offering that you have a designated ‘scooper” will get you a position closer to the front of the parade! Not all parades make a full circle back to the beginning. Some parades walk straight away from the starting area, leaving you to find a way back through the public to the trailer. Llamas typically have about a 4 hour window of patience, then the humming and dancing begins. The sooner they can get settled back in the trailer the better, so plan your route! It is important to remind all the llama walkers in the group to stay together to help the llamas maintain herd comfort. It is considerate to stay with the group so that everyone is accounted for at the end of the parade. The longer the route back to the trailer the more public situations will arise as people tend to flock to them and gather around them. Tired, cranky and sometimes nervous animals are not the very best. All of this together sounds daunting, but it is meant to cover a wide array of situations and a lot of it is second nature once you have participated in various events. The primary objective is to think ahead so you are sure to have a good time and show the public how much fun these animals can be! ORVLA November 2013

14

FENDER’S FISH HATCHERY & LLAMA FARM 50527 T.R. 220 BALTIC, OH (740) 622-0681 fendersfishhatchery.com 15

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

Spilling the Beans submitted by Pat Linkhorn

Gary and I met in 1973 and married in 1975. I grew up in Smithfield, Ohio and Gary grew up in New Concord. I grew up raising horses and Gary grew up on a farm. We both were avid 4-H members. We have a small place outside of New Concord. It was big enough to have a few horses for many years. I showed horses and Gary had a drag racing car. Then we had children. We adopted Kim in the fall of 1986 and Krystal was born the summer of 1987. As many of you know, both girls have issues. Kim is Autistic and Krystal is blind due to prematurity. (She was a one pound, two ounce baby.) Since I’d been a horse person most of my life, we also got a pony for the girls. Kim never actually rode much but she did lead the pony around a lot. Gary and I talked about getting her a pet that was supposed to be led around but we couldn’t decide on what to get for her. Then we paid a visit to Hillcrest Petting Zoo, which was owned by Bob and Barb Johnson. Kim honed in on a big white llama. It didn’t have a name so Bob told Kim she could name him. Kim named him Bob. Bob the llama came to live with us on Christmas of 1995. Kim showed him in 4-H and did really well with him. Of course, there weren’t too many llamas in Guernsey County at that time either. We decided we would invest in a better llama for her.

TOPLINE

(continuedon page 18) We don’t win a lot at the shows. It’s sort of a hit and miss thing. Evidently we haven’t learned much over the years since the ones we think are so good end up coming in last but we keep going. Someday it will all come together. The fun is in the llamas themselves and all the great people we know.

We have ventured into another area of the industry. We are now processing our fiber and making all sorts of things. The Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired has been instrumental in helping Krystal begin her own business. It’s called Krystal’s Fiber Kreations and she can card the fiber, spin it into thread, make felted items and all sorts of things. We’ve only begun to explore all the possibilities. We also have three useless cats (Gary informed me that we have a mouse in the kitchen this morning) and a Doberman Pinscher whose greatest accomplishments are catching bugs and chasing skunks.

I worked with Dennis Fender’s daughter-in-law so we made a trip to Fender’s Fish Hatchery and Llama Farm to buy one llama. Unlike most people who have bought a llama from Dennis, we left that day and had purchased only one llama. We had a few months to wait until she would be weaned. However, we later received a phone call from Dennis who asked why we weren’t getting a llama for our other daughter. “Well, she’s blind,” we said. “So?” said Dennis. “She needs a llama too, so I’m going to give her a llama.” “We don’t take charity,” we said.

Kim & Dynamite

Bob the llama

“Well, I’m giving that little girl a llama!” Dennis informed us. And that was the end of THAT discussion! So the spring of 1998 we journeyed back up to Fenders’ and came home with two llamas. We still have the llama Dennis gave to Krystal. He’s a big black/brown llama named Bodie and Krystal is still showing him. That was a match made in heaven. Bodie seems to know that Krystal is blind. She shows him in gelding classes and in obstacle and public relations. She will stop and feel for the jump in obstacle classes and he will wait until she steps over before he will jump. The times that I have taken him in obstacle classes, he drags me over the jump! I guess he figures I can see and should just be faster. We now have fourteen llamas and I have to say that the people we have met over the years are the greatest people in the world. Many of our best times have been at llama shows. We do it as a family most of the time. Gary still drag races so he doesn’t go to all the llama shows with us, but he’s at most of them. ORVLA November 2013

16

Some of the girls

Krystal & Bodie 17

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

Spilling the Beans submitted by Pat Linkhorn

Gary and I met in 1973 and married in 1975. I grew up in Smithfield, Ohio and Gary grew up in New Concord. I grew up raising horses and Gary grew up on a farm. We both were avid 4-H members. We have a small place outside of New Concord. It was big enough to have a few horses for many years. I showed horses and Gary had a drag racing car. Then we had children. We adopted Kim in the fall of 1986 and Krystal was born the summer of 1987. As many of you know, both girls have issues. Kim is Autistic and Krystal is blind due to prematurity. (She was a one pound, two ounce baby.) Since I’d been a horse person most of my life, we also got a pony for the girls. Kim never actually rode much but she did lead the pony around a lot. Gary and I talked about getting her a pet that was supposed to be led around but we couldn’t decide on what to get for her. Then we paid a visit to Hillcrest Petting Zoo, which was owned by Bob and Barb Johnson. Kim honed in on a big white llama. It didn’t have a name so Bob told Kim she could name him. Kim named him Bob. Bob the llama came to live with us on Christmas of 1995. Kim showed him in 4-H and did really well with him. Of course, there weren’t too many llamas in Guernsey County at that time either. We decided we would invest in a better llama for her.

TOPLINE

(continuedon page 18) We don’t win a lot at the shows. It’s sort of a hit and miss thing. Evidently we haven’t learned much over the years since the ones we think are so good end up coming in last but we keep going. Someday it will all come together. The fun is in the llamas themselves and all the great people we know.

We have ventured into another area of the industry. We are now processing our fiber and making all sorts of things. The Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired has been instrumental in helping Krystal begin her own business. It’s called Krystal’s Fiber Kreations and she can card the fiber, spin it into thread, make felted items and all sorts of things. We’ve only begun to explore all the possibilities. We also have three useless cats (Gary informed me that we have a mouse in the kitchen this morning) and a Doberman Pinscher whose greatest accomplishments are catching bugs and chasing skunks.

I worked with Dennis Fender’s daughter-in-law so we made a trip to Fender’s Fish Hatchery and Llama Farm to buy one llama. Unlike most people who have bought a llama from Dennis, we left that day and had purchased only one llama. We had a few months to wait until she would be weaned. However, we later received a phone call from Dennis who asked why we weren’t getting a llama for our other daughter. “Well, she’s blind,” we said. “So?” said Dennis. “She needs a llama too, so I’m going to give her a llama.” “We don’t take charity,” we said.

Kim & Dynamite

Bob the llama

“Well, I’m giving that little girl a llama!” Dennis informed us. And that was the end of THAT discussion! So the spring of 1998 we journeyed back up to Fenders’ and came home with two llamas. We still have the llama Dennis gave to Krystal. He’s a big black/brown llama named Bodie and Krystal is still showing him. That was a match made in heaven. Bodie seems to know that Krystal is blind. She shows him in gelding classes and in obstacle and public relations. She will stop and feel for the jump in obstacle classes and he will wait until she steps over before he will jump. The times that I have taken him in obstacle classes, he drags me over the jump! I guess he figures I can see and should just be faster. We now have fourteen llamas and I have to say that the people we have met over the years are the greatest people in the world. Many of our best times have been at llama shows. We do it as a family most of the time. Gary still drag races so he doesn’t go to all the llama shows with us, but he’s at most of them. ORVLA November 2013

16

Some of the girls

Krystal & Bodie 17

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

Catching and Handling Llamas and Alpacas

prepared by the National Lama Intervention & Rescue Coordination Council (IRC Council)

Animal control and animal welfare authorities are sometimes called upon to remove llamas and alpacas from situations where their welfare is compromised or to capture loose animals when their presence is a hazard to traffic safety. Learning a bit about camelid behavior will help make catching and handling them easier and less traumatic for all concerned.* Local Help Many llama and alpaca owners are willing to help catch, halter and transport llamas and alpacas in need of rescue, re-homing or capture. They are used to the behaviors and motivations of such animals, which differ from other livestock in a number of ways, and can be of great help to animal control and welfare authorities. Most states have one or more llama and alpaca organizations that maintain a membership list with contact information. Ideally, local animal control authorities should have one or two names from their area llama and alpaca community they could contact to request help or advice for specific situations involving camelids. It would be good to have this information ahead of time and establish a working relationship before help is actually needed. If you do not have contact information for local camelid owners, you can contact one of the regional coordinators for the National Lama Intervention & Rescue Coordination Council (IRC Council) who will be able to provide advice, camelid contacts and even halters and leads if needed. They include: Northwest, Charlene Schmidt (509-722-5466, charlene@prosperitypal.com); West, Jan Sherrill (805238-2628, pacamom@lightspeed.net); Rocky Mountain Area, Olin Allen (970-493-2886, olinallen@ earthlink.net); Midwest, Sheila Fugina (715-246-5837, bsfugina@frontier.com); Southeast, Susan Ravan (sdravan@gmail.com); South Central, Sandra Reynolds (580-745-9202, lonestarranchoktx@ gmail.com); and Northeast, Marc Page (978-724-3273, home; 508-246-0424, weekdays 8 to 4; sputtermill@hughes.net). Catching Though they are among the earliest domesticated animals and generally very comfortable around humans, llamas and alpacas are very intelligent and intuitive; if they feel threatened or afraid, their first response is flight. Avoid pushing or panicking them into the flight mode. Slow, calm, confident movements are key to keeping them interested and engaged rather than suspicious and wary. Many of the llamas and alpacas involved in rescue situations may not be used to being handled or haltered, but there are ways to move them, contain them and transport them without always needing to halter each one. Above all, remain calm and be flexible. Make the site work for you. Preview the site ahead of time if possible to determine your catching and loading options. If you ORVLA November 2013

18

Catching and Handling Llamas and Alpacas -continued-

TOPLINE

are not able to assess the site before you need to move the animals, do so as soon as you arrive. Determine where and how secure the boundaries are (fences, buildings, etc.) and where you want the animals to end up for loading. See if there are materials on site that may be used to help contain animals—cattle panels, portable panels or gates—items that you can move where you need them. If you’ve had a chance to see the site ahead of time, you have the opportunity to bring needed materials and equipment. Funnel the animals. Even llamas and alpacas in a large open field can be moved in the direction you need them to go by funneling them into increasingly smaller areas. You can use a variety of visual barriers to help you herd the animals—a human chain (slow and calm), lightweight poles extended horizontally, a rope held between two people. Camelids don’t like being separated from their herdmates so it is important to keep them together. They also cue off one another so be alert to potential jumping or breaking away. This behavior can also work in your favor if the lead animal or two are headed where you want the group to go. If you are dealing with a single animal in a large space, another llama or two can be used as “bait”. This is when it’s especially helpful to know a local llama or alpaca owner. Do not use the following strategies. Do not use dogs to herd llamas and alpacas. Camelids usually view a strange dog as a predator and will flee rather than be herded. Do not try to herd llamas and alpacas on horseback. They often feel like they are being chased and will be pushed into the flight mode and become almost impossible to catch. Do not try to rope or lasso a llama or alpaca. You may cause serious injury or snap a neck. Do not chase llamas and alpacas or get so close they feel forced to flee or jump rather than be herded. Contain the animals. By herding the llamas or alpacas into increasingly smaller spaces, you can contain them in a safe space either for haltering or for herding into a trailer without haltering them. There may already be corrals or catch pens at the site into which you can herd the animals. If not, you can create temporary catch pens with portable panels and the sides of buildings or trailers. When you are catching camelids in a smaller space, one person needs to be in charge and directing the others where to go and what to do so you are not at cross purposes. Encircle the animals in a nonthreatening manner as you continue to make the circle smaller until the animals are able to be caught. Watch for aggressive behavior. Some llamas and alpacas have not learned to respect a human’s space. Though not common, if you come upon a llama that rushes the fence toward people, screams or has a history of biting or jumping on people, contact one of the regional IRC Council coordinators for help. It is usually intact males who have been over handled when young that exhibit this abnormal behavior, and they require special handling by a knowledgeable camelid person. Handling Load the animals. 19

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

Catching and Handling Llamas and Alpacas

prepared by the National Lama Intervention & Rescue Coordination Council (IRC Council)

Animal control and animal welfare authorities are sometimes called upon to remove llamas and alpacas from situations where their welfare is compromised or to capture loose animals when their presence is a hazard to traffic safety. Learning a bit about camelid behavior will help make catching and handling them easier and less traumatic for all concerned.* Local Help Many llama and alpaca owners are willing to help catch, halter and transport llamas and alpacas in need of rescue, re-homing or capture. They are used to the behaviors and motivations of such animals, which differ from other livestock in a number of ways, and can be of great help to animal control and welfare authorities. Most states have one or more llama and alpaca organizations that maintain a membership list with contact information. Ideally, local animal control authorities should have one or two names from their area llama and alpaca community they could contact to request help or advice for specific situations involving camelids. It would be good to have this information ahead of time and establish a working relationship before help is actually needed. If you do not have contact information for local camelid owners, you can contact one of the regional coordinators for the National Lama Intervention & Rescue Coordination Council (IRC Council) who will be able to provide advice, camelid contacts and even halters and leads if needed. They include: Northwest, Charlene Schmidt (509-722-5466, charlene@prosperitypal.com); West, Jan Sherrill (805238-2628, pacamom@lightspeed.net); Rocky Mountain Area, Olin Allen (970-493-2886, olinallen@ earthlink.net); Midwest, Sheila Fugina (715-246-5837, bsfugina@frontier.com); Southeast, Susan Ravan (sdravan@gmail.com); South Central, Sandra Reynolds (580-745-9202, lonestarranchoktx@ gmail.com); and Northeast, Marc Page (978-724-3273, home; 508-246-0424, weekdays 8 to 4; sputtermill@hughes.net). Catching Though they are among the earliest domesticated animals and generally very comfortable around humans, llamas and alpacas are very intelligent and intuitive; if they feel threatened or afraid, their first response is flight. Avoid pushing or panicking them into the flight mode. Slow, calm, confident movements are key to keeping them interested and engaged rather than suspicious and wary. Many of the llamas and alpacas involved in rescue situations may not be used to being handled or haltered, but there are ways to move them, contain them and transport them without always needing to halter each one. Above all, remain calm and be flexible. Make the site work for you. Preview the site ahead of time if possible to determine your catching and loading options. If you ORVLA November 2013

18

Catching and Handling Llamas and Alpacas -continued-

TOPLINE

are not able to assess the site before you need to move the animals, do so as soon as you arrive. Determine where and how secure the boundaries are (fences, buildings, etc.) and where you want the animals to end up for loading. See if there are materials on site that may be used to help contain animals—cattle panels, portable panels or gates—items that you can move where you need them. If you’ve had a chance to see the site ahead of time, you have the opportunity to bring needed materials and equipment. Funnel the animals. Even llamas and alpacas in a large open field can be moved in the direction you need them to go by funneling them into increasingly smaller areas. You can use a variety of visual barriers to help you herd the animals—a human chain (slow and calm), lightweight poles extended horizontally, a rope held between two people. Camelids don’t like being separated from their herdmates so it is important to keep them together. They also cue off one another so be alert to potential jumping or breaking away. This behavior can also work in your favor if the lead animal or two are headed where you want the group to go. If you are dealing with a single animal in a large space, another llama or two can be used as “bait”. This is when it’s especially helpful to know a local llama or alpaca owner. Do not use the following strategies. Do not use dogs to herd llamas and alpacas. Camelids usually view a strange dog as a predator and will flee rather than be herded. Do not try to herd llamas and alpacas on horseback. They often feel like they are being chased and will be pushed into the flight mode and become almost impossible to catch. Do not try to rope or lasso a llama or alpaca. You may cause serious injury or snap a neck. Do not chase llamas and alpacas or get so close they feel forced to flee or jump rather than be herded. Contain the animals. By herding the llamas or alpacas into increasingly smaller spaces, you can contain them in a safe space either for haltering or for herding into a trailer without haltering them. There may already be corrals or catch pens at the site into which you can herd the animals. If not, you can create temporary catch pens with portable panels and the sides of buildings or trailers. When you are catching camelids in a smaller space, one person needs to be in charge and directing the others where to go and what to do so you are not at cross purposes. Encircle the animals in a nonthreatening manner as you continue to make the circle smaller until the animals are able to be caught. Watch for aggressive behavior. Some llamas and alpacas have not learned to respect a human’s space. Though not common, if you come upon a llama that rushes the fence toward people, screams or has a history of biting or jumping on people, contact one of the regional IRC Council coordinators for help. It is usually intact males who have been over handled when young that exhibit this abnormal behavior, and they require special handling by a knowledgeable camelid person. Handling Load the animals. 19

ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE

Catching and Handling Llamas and Alpacas -continued-

If the animals are used to being haltered, or knowledgeable camelid owner help is available, you may be able to halter the llamas and alpacas and then load them into a trailer. If they are not used to being haltered, or no halters are available, you can use the same funneling technique already mentioned to direct them into a trailer. An open trailer can be used as the fourth side of a catch pen. By shifting panels and making the catch pen smaller, the animals can be moved closer and closer to the open trailer and will often jump in on their own. If they don’t jump in, alpacas and small llamas can be physically lifted and put into the trailer. With larger llamas, if their front legs are lifted into the trailer, they often will jump in the rest of the way, especially if you keep a panel directly behind them and don’t give them room to back up. Llamas sometimes lock their legs and lean back, sliding their front feet under the trailer, so use care not to injure their front legs. Llamas and alpacas often can be transported in vans (even mini vans), especially if you are dealing with only a few animals. Remove the back seats of the van and cover any holes or metal hardware on the floor with old carpet. Transport the animals safely. Never tie llamas or alpacas when transporting them. Camelids usually lie down when being transported, and they can suffer severe injury or death if tied. Properly fitted halters should fit snugly behind the head, and the noseband should ride high on the nose just under the eyes. If the noseband slides down onto the soft cartilage of the nose it can cut off breathing. The noseband fit should also allow for chewing. Do not leave halters on llamas and alpacas when they are released to their living environment. Get as much information as possible. If the llamas or alpacas are being moved and re-homed, try to get health records and any registration information or papers. These records will be very helpful in dealing with the animals’ future needs and placement. *Definition The word “lama” is used when referring to the South American “camelid” family that includes both “llamas” and “alpacas” (as well as the wild guanacos and vicunas). “Llama” is used when referring to the specific species, the llama. When we use the word “lama” in the U.S., we are usually referring to the two domesticated species, the llama and the alpaca. We also often use the word “camelid” to refer to llamas and alpacas together. .

ORVLA November 2013

20

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE

Catching and Handling Llamas and Alpacas -continued-

If the animals are used to being haltered, or knowledgeable camelid owner help is available, you may be able to halter the llamas and alpacas and then load them into a trailer. If they are not used to being haltered, or no halters are available, you can use the same funneling technique already mentioned to direct them into a trailer. An open trailer can be used as the fourth side of a catch pen. By shifting panels and making the catch pen smaller, the animals can be moved closer and closer to the open trailer and will often jump in on their own. If they don’t jump in, alpacas and small llamas can be physically lifted and put into the trailer. With larger llamas, if their front legs are lifted into the trailer, they often will jump in the rest of the way, especially if you keep a panel directly behind them and don’t give them room to back up. Llamas sometimes lock their legs and lean back, sliding their front feet under the trailer, so use care not to injure their front legs. Llamas and alpacas often can be transported in vans (even mini vans), especially if you are dealing with only a few animals. Remove the back seats of the van and cover any holes or metal hardware on the floor with old carpet. Transport the animals safely. Never tie llamas or alpacas when transporting them. Camelids usually lie down when being transported, and they can suffer severe injury or death if tied. Properly fitted halters should fit snugly behind the head, and the noseband should ride high on the nose just under the eyes. If the noseband slides down onto the soft cartilage of the nose it can cut off breathing. The noseband fit should also allow for chewing. Do not leave halters on llamas and alpacas when they are released to their living environment. Get as much information as possible. If the llamas or alpacas are being moved and re-homed, try to get health records and any registration information or papers. These records will be very helpful in dealing with the animals’ future needs and placement. *Definition The word “lama” is used when referring to the South American “camelid” family that includes both “llamas” and “alpacas” (as well as the wild guanacos and vicunas). “Llama” is used when referring to the specific species, the llama. When we use the word “lama” in the U.S., we are usually referring to the two domesticated species, the llama and the alpaca. We also often use the word “camelid” to refer to llamas and alpacas together. .

ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE Sunshine Report Sent Cyndy Schmohe a card following back surgery.

ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE Sunshine Report Sent Cyndy Schmohe a card following back surgery.

ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE Ohio River Valley Llama Association Membership Application 2013 Dues: $25 per calendar year Quarterly Newsletter - Membership Directory Quarterly Meetings - Great Way to Advertise

_____ New Member ____ Membership Renewal

Primary Name:_________________________ Additional Name: _____________________________ Farm Name:________________________________ Youth Name: ___________________________ Address:_____________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________ State: ______ Zip + four: ______________ County: ____________________________________________ Home Phone: _______________________________ Work Phone: ___________________________ Cell Phone: _________________________________ Fax: __________________________________ E-mail:____________________________________________________________________________ Website Address: ___________________________________________________________________ ____Linked on ORVLA website (to be linked, member must agree to link back to ORVLA’s website.) ____I agree to place a link to ORVLA on my website. Census: (optional) Number of Llamas: Females____ Males_____ Geldings_____ Number of Alpacas: Females____ Males_____ Geldings_____ Membership Fee @ $25.00 ____________ Business Card Ad in Topline for one year (include card) @ $20.00 ____________ Business Card Ad in Directory (include card) @ $5.00 ____________

TOPLINE ORVLA Fall Hike 2013 The ORVLA fall hike was Saturday, October 12 at Knox County Horse Park in Mt. Vernon, and if you missed it, you missed a lot of fun! The weather could not have been any better. We had a cool morning for the hike, bonfire, and roasting hot dogs and marshmallows. Everyone brought a covered dish so there was plenty of food to eat. “Hiking and Packing with our Llamas” was presented by Anne and Jim Hallowell from Peace of the Shenango Farm in Pennsylvania, and I know we all came away with a lot of good information. Renee Tarr and Pat Linkhorn did Camelid Companion certifications for anyone who wanted it done. Char and Libby did an excellent job again putting on this hike. Everyone had so much fun, and a few were mad at themselves for not getting their hike paper filled out correctly. There were letters posted all along the hike and people had to figure out a phrase from the letters. The answer was “Where the fun begins.” Ha! Had a lot of trivia questions, llama questions and fun give-a-way prizes. I am sure everyone is looking forward to next years hike!

Total Amount Enclosed ____________ ____I am enclosing a check (insert check #) _____________ Please make your check payable to ORVLA and mail with this form to: Libby Rush & Char Neel 19590 Harrisburg-Westerville Rd. Beloit, OH 44609-9507 ORVLA Youth Group Membership also available. Questions: rushar01@sbcglobal.net or 330-938-9935

ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE Ohio River Valley Llama Association Membership Application 2013 Dues: $25 per calendar year Quarterly Newsletter - Membership Directory Quarterly Meetings - Great Way to Advertise

_____ New Member ____ Membership Renewal

Primary Name:_________________________ Additional Name: _____________________________ Farm Name:________________________________ Youth Name: ___________________________ Address:_____________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________ State: ______ Zip + four: ______________ County: ____________________________________________ Home Phone: _______________________________ Work Phone: ___________________________ Cell Phone: _________________________________ Fax: __________________________________ E-mail:____________________________________________________________________________ Website Address: ___________________________________________________________________ ____Linked on ORVLA website (to be linked, member must agree to link back to ORVLA’s website.) ____I agree to place a link to ORVLA on my website. Census: (optional) Number of Llamas: Females____ Males_____ Geldings_____ Number of Alpacas: Females____ Males_____ Geldings_____ Membership Fee @ $25.00 ____________ Business Card Ad in Topline for one year (include card) @ $20.00 ____________ Business Card Ad in Directory (include card) @ $5.00 ____________

TOPLINE ORVLA Fall Hike 2013 The ORVLA fall hike was Saturday, October 12 at Knox County Horse Park in Mt. Vernon, and if you missed it, you missed a lot of fun! The weather could not have been any better. We had a cool morning for the hike, bonfire, and roasting hot dogs and marshmallows. Everyone brought a covered dish so there was plenty of food to eat. “Hiking and Packing with our Llamas” was presented by Anne and Jim Hallowell from Peace of the Shenango Farm in Pennsylvania, and I know we all came away with a lot of good information. Renee Tarr and Pat Linkhorn did Camelid Companion certifications for anyone who wanted it done. Char and Libby did an excellent job again putting on this hike. Everyone had so much fun, and a few were mad at themselves for not getting their hike paper filled out correctly. There were letters posted all along the hike and people had to figure out a phrase from the letters. The answer was “Where the fun begins.” Ha! Had a lot of trivia questions, llama questions and fun give-a-way prizes. I am sure everyone is looking forward to next years hike!

Total Amount Enclosed ____________ ____I am enclosing a check (insert check #) _____________ Please make your check payable to ORVLA and mail with this form to: Libby Rush & Char Neel 19590 Harrisburg-Westerville Rd. Beloit, OH 44609-9507 ORVLA Youth Group Membership also available. Questions: rushar01@sbcglobal.net or 330-938-9935

ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE Photo Highlights

TOPLINE

from the ORVLA Hike

ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE Photo Highlights

TOPLINE

from the ORVLA Hike

ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

Registration for ORVLA’S Holiday Meeting Saturday, December 7, 2013 Location: Miller’s Farm @Darby Creek, Russ &Kris Miller’s 9291 W. Broad St., Galloway, Ohio 43119

Time: 10:30 am Registration & Set-up for Silent Auction. Bidding will begin as soon as it’s all set-up. 11:00 am General Meeting. Please bring any questions with you that you’d like to discuss. Noon Lunch - Watch Facebook and our website for the menu!

1:00. pm Speaker, Dr. Pam Walker from Findlay, Ohio. She will be speaking on Parasites and Geriatrics. So bring your questions along!

3:00

Cost:

TOPLINE

Calendar of Events

NOVEMBER 7-10, 2013 - LAMAS ON PARADE! GALA’S 26TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE At the beautiful, historic CENTURY HOUSE in Latham (Albany), New York www.thecenturyhouse.com Rooms have already been filling quickly, book yours NOW! Reservations by phone only, call 518-785-9831 or Toll Free at 1-888-67HOUSE. THIS WILL BE A CONFERENCE TO REMEMBER! Speakers include: Kay Patterson, John Mallon, Tami Lash, Kristi Brown, DVM December 7, 2013 - ORVLA’S Holiday Meeting - 10:30 at Miller’s Farm @ Darby Creek 9291W. Broad St., Galloway, Ohio 43119. Deadline to register: November 30, 2013

Close of the Silent Auction.

Adults $18.00 Youth 6-16 $9.00 Children 5 & under free.

Please submit your calendar events to: Pat Linkhorn orvla01@windstream.net

Registration Deadline: November 30, 2013 Make checks payable to ORVLA & mail to:

Kris Miller 9291W. Broad St. Galloway, Ohio 43119

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Farm Name:__________________________ Phone and or email:_____________________ Attending:___________Member/Guest:____________ Number of Adults__________

@$18.00/ea._________

Number of Youth 6-16______

@$ 9.00/ea._________

Number of youth 5 & under___ Late Fee (Postmarked after 11/30/13)

@$ 5.00/ea._________ Total

ORVLA November 2013

$_________ 28

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

Registration for ORVLA’S Holiday Meeting Saturday, December 7, 2013 Location: Miller’s Farm @Darby Creek, Russ &Kris Miller’s 9291 W. Broad St., Galloway, Ohio 43119

Time: 10:30 am Registration & Set-up for Silent Auction. Bidding will begin as soon as it’s all set-up. 11:00 am General Meeting. Please bring any questions with you that you’d like to discuss. Noon Lunch - Watch Facebook and our website for the menu!

1:00. pm Speaker, Dr. Pam Walker from Findlay, Ohio. She will be speaking on Parasites and Geriatrics. So bring your questions along!

3:00

Cost:

TOPLINE

Calendar of Events

NOVEMBER 7-10, 2013 - LAMAS ON PARADE! GALA’S 26TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE At the beautiful, historic CENTURY HOUSE in Latham (Albany), New York www.thecenturyhouse.com Rooms have already been filling quickly, book yours NOW! Reservations by phone only, call 518-785-9831 or Toll Free at 1-888-67HOUSE. THIS WILL BE A CONFERENCE TO REMEMBER! Speakers include: Kay Patterson, John Mallon, Tami Lash, Kristi Brown, DVM December 7, 2013 - ORVLA’S Holiday Meeting - 10:30 at Miller’s Farm @ Darby Creek 9291W. Broad St., Galloway, Ohio 43119. Deadline to register: November 30, 2013

Close of the Silent Auction.

Adults $18.00 Youth 6-16 $9.00 Children 5 & under free.

Please submit your calendar events to: Pat Linkhorn orvla01@windstream.net

Registration Deadline: November 30, 2013 Make checks payable to ORVLA & mail to:

Kris Miller 9291W. Broad St. Galloway, Ohio 43119

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Farm Name:__________________________ Phone and or email:_____________________ Attending:___________Member/Guest:____________ Number of Adults__________

@$18.00/ea._________

Number of Youth 6-16______

@$ 9.00/ea._________

Number of youth 5 & under___ Late Fee (Postmarked after 11/30/13)

@$ 5.00/ea._________ Total

ORVLA November 2013

$_________ 28

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

The Working Llama

In this edition of The Working Llama Terry Crowfoot from Australia tells us what its like to drive llamas in her country.

LLAMA DRIVING IN UK

Driving a llama is rather a solitary affair here in UK. Indeed, I seem to be the only driver currently over here, despite (or maybe because of!) my attempts to inspire others. I understand there have been one or two in the past but that driving was never a serious consideration. I first became interested about six years ago, some five years after acquiring my first two llamas. I was completely green, having never driven anything other than a car or lawn-mower. But with the help of the two wonderful Llama Driving videos made by Jim Logan and Bobra Goldsmith respectively and a great deal of e-mailed help from Barb Brady in Washington State, I managed to break one of my girls to harness. The harness itself was one of Barb Brady's and the cart? Well, to be honest, I couldn't afford to import a smart Eagle cart from USA, so I bought a flat-packed pony cart from eBay. It seems to have served me well. Because I was so green, and nervous with it, I completed about a hundred hours of traffic-walking, long-reining, and road-walking behind the cart before finally hopping aboard. We don't have the lovely facilities that are provided in State Parks in USA for driving, so all my work is done on country roads. We meet a fair amount of motorised traffic, mostly vans and cars, but Mary-Ann, my driving girl, is totally comfortable with it. I guess the biggest danger is drivers taking their eyes off the road and trying to photograph us with mobile phones! I have been privileged to join the NW USA annual Drive-in, in Idaho, on two occasions and to be loaned driving llamas and carts, and to meet other drivers there, but these occasions are short-lived and driving alongside other turnouts is always very different from driving alone here at home. But it is a lovely way to enjoy the countryside here. And, because llamas don’t have the metal shoes sported by their equine friends it is also extremely quiet!

TOPLINE

ORVLA Recommended Vets Charlene Arendas, DVM Large Animal Veterinary Services Llamas - Alpacas - Sheep - Goat - Equine 330-559-2773, LlamaDr@aol.com (ORVLA member) Joy Bishop-Forshey, DVM The Joy of LLamas Wauseon, OH 419-337-0015, drlamaj@yahoo.com (ORVLA member) Country Road Veterinary Services Inc. Polly Modransky, DVM PO Box 69 East Springfield, OH 43925-0069 740-543-1419 Recommended by Vicky & Alan McMaster East Holmes Veterinary Clinic Eric M. Shaver, D.V.M. Amity Wise, D.V.M. Aaron Wise, D.V.M. Austin Hinds, D.V.M. Kristem Mierzwiak, D.V.M. 5503 County Road 120 Berlin, OH 44610 330-893-2057, ehvcvet@wifi7.com (ORVLA member)

Rocky Knoll Large Animal Veterinary Services Marylou Rings D.V.M. Dublin, OH 937-243-1224 Recommended by Kris Miller Spring Meadow Veterinary Clinic Marnie Lahmon, DVM Rachel Hesselschwardt, DVM 1746 St. Rt. 60 Ashland, OH 44805 419-289-2466, www.springmeadowvet.vetsuite.com Recommended by Lee Ann King Tri-County Veterinary Service, Inc. Timothy Woodward, DVM 16200 County Rd 25-A Anna, OH 937-693-2131 Recommended by Dawn Lusk Donald Waltman, DVM PO Box 3, 221 East Main St. Baltic, OH 43804-0003 Recommended by Jean Ames

Recommend your Vet! ORVLA members are being asked to help create a veterinarian database for its members. This database will be valuable in the event that you are in search of a good camelid vet or your current vet is unavailable and another vet is needed. The list will help you find a vet in your local area and receive help. Please check with your vet first to see if they would like to be included. Their information will be listed on the website, in the directory and Topline. Also, to keep our vet’s current in our camelid world, they will receive Topline with our thanks for all they do for us. Send your veterinarian’s name, address, phone and web information to Pat Linkhorn, 740-638-5041, orvla01@windstream.net ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

The Working Llama

In this edition of The Working Llama Terry Crowfoot from Australia tells us what its like to drive llamas in her country.

LLAMA DRIVING IN UK

Driving a llama is rather a solitary affair here in UK. Indeed, I seem to be the only driver currently over here, despite (or maybe because of!) my attempts to inspire others. I understand there have been one or two in the past but that driving was never a serious consideration. I first became interested about six years ago, some five years after acquiring my first two llamas. I was completely green, having never driven anything other than a car or lawn-mower. But with the help of the two wonderful Llama Driving videos made by Jim Logan and Bobra Goldsmith respectively and a great deal of e-mailed help from Barb Brady in Washington State, I managed to break one of my girls to harness. The harness itself was one of Barb Brady's and the cart? Well, to be honest, I couldn't afford to import a smart Eagle cart from USA, so I bought a flat-packed pony cart from eBay. It seems to have served me well. Because I was so green, and nervous with it, I completed about a hundred hours of traffic-walking, long-reining, and road-walking behind the cart before finally hopping aboard. We don't have the lovely facilities that are provided in State Parks in USA for driving, so all my work is done on country roads. We meet a fair amount of motorised traffic, mostly vans and cars, but Mary-Ann, my driving girl, is totally comfortable with it. I guess the biggest danger is drivers taking their eyes off the road and trying to photograph us with mobile phones! I have been privileged to join the NW USA annual Drive-in, in Idaho, on two occasions and to be loaned driving llamas and carts, and to meet other drivers there, but these occasions are short-lived and driving alongside other turnouts is always very different from driving alone here at home. But it is a lovely way to enjoy the countryside here. And, because llamas don’t have the metal shoes sported by their equine friends it is also extremely quiet!

TOPLINE

ORVLA Recommended Vets Charlene Arendas, DVM Large Animal Veterinary Services Llamas - Alpacas - Sheep - Goat - Equine 330-559-2773, LlamaDr@aol.com (ORVLA member) Joy Bishop-Forshey, DVM The Joy of LLamas Wauseon, OH 419-337-0015, drlamaj@yahoo.com (ORVLA member) Country Road Veterinary Services Inc. Polly Modransky, DVM PO Box 69 East Springfield, OH 43925-0069 740-543-1419 Recommended by Vicky & Alan McMaster East Holmes Veterinary Clinic Eric M. Shaver, D.V.M. Amity Wise, D.V.M. Aaron Wise, D.V.M. Austin Hinds, D.V.M. Kristem Mierzwiak, D.V.M. 5503 County Road 120 Berlin, OH 44610 330-893-2057, ehvcvet@wifi7.com (ORVLA member)

Rocky Knoll Large Animal Veterinary Services Marylou Rings D.V.M. Dublin, OH 937-243-1224 Recommended by Kris Miller Spring Meadow Veterinary Clinic Marnie Lahmon, DVM Rachel Hesselschwardt, DVM 1746 St. Rt. 60 Ashland, OH 44805 419-289-2466, www.springmeadowvet.vetsuite.com Recommended by Lee Ann King Tri-County Veterinary Service, Inc. Timothy Woodward, DVM 16200 County Rd 25-A Anna, OH 937-693-2131 Recommended by Dawn Lusk Donald Waltman, DVM PO Box 3, 221 East Main St. Baltic, OH 43804-0003 Recommended by Jean Ames

Recommend your Vet! ORVLA members are being asked to help create a veterinarian database for its members. This database will be valuable in the event that you are in search of a good camelid vet or your current vet is unavailable and another vet is needed. The list will help you find a vet in your local area and receive help. Please check with your vet first to see if they would like to be included. Their information will be listed on the website, in the directory and Topline. Also, to keep our vet’s current in our camelid world, they will receive Topline with our thanks for all they do for us. Send your veterinarian’s name, address, phone and web information to Pat Linkhorn, 740-638-5041, orvla01@windstream.net ORVLA November 2013

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ORVLA November 2013


TOPLINE

ORVLA – Treasury Report July 1, 2013 – September 30, 2013

Beginning Balance Income Membership Dues Topline Ads

$17,656.51 Beginning Balance 50.00 330.00

Total Income

$380.00

Expenses Topline Printing Topline Postage ILR - SD Fee Solstice Show Total Expenses

Income Expenses Ending Balance

$17,565.51 380.00 728.20 $17,217.31

306.00 167.20 255.00 728.20

Topline Advertising Information and Rates

Topline is a quarterly newsletter of the Ohio River Valley Llama Association and remains one of the most affordable ways to advertise your farm or business. Special rates are offered for members and for ads paid for one year in advance. Newsletter deadlines for your ads are January 15 (February issue), April 15 (May issue), July 15 (June issue), and October 15 (November issue). Payment is due ten (10) days after receipt of Topline. ADVERTISING RATE INFORMATION FOR MEMBERS One Issue Four Issues Full Page (7 1/2” x 9 3/4”) 45.00 180.00 Half Page (7 1/2” x 4 3/4”) 30.00 120.00 Qtr. Page (3 5/8” x 4 3/4”) 20.00 80.00 Inside & Back Covers (First come - first serve basis) 75.00 300.00 Business Cards 5.00 20.00 ADVERTISING RATE INFORMATION FOR NON-MEMBERS Full Page (7 1/2” x 9 3/4”) 55.00 220.00 Half Page (7 1/2” x 4 3/4”) 40.00 160.00 Qtr. Page (3 5/8” x 4 3/4”) 20.00 80.00 Inside & Back Covers (First come - first serve basis) 85.00 340.00 Business Cards 10.00 40.00 CLASSIFIED ADS: $5.00 per ad up to 25 words. Each additional word after 25 is .20 cents per word.

Discount (1 yr.) 150.00 100.00 60.00 280.00

200.00 140.00 60.00 320.00

INSERTS: $30.00 per page for members and $35.00 per page for non-members. 120 copies are needed per issue. Copies must be on regular weight paper - no card stock. Only five pages will be accepted per issue. Submit your print ready copy and payment for ads (payable to “ORVLA” only please) to: Pat Linkhorn 56032 Claysville Rd. Cumberland, OH 43732 or email orvla01@windstream.net ORVLA November 2013

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SPILLING THE BEANS ABOUT ME Let us know something about you. Send your responses to Topline editor at orvla01@windstream.net WHERE DID YOU GROW UP? FAMILY MEMBERS-

EDUCATION AND MEMORIES-

PETS AS A CHILD-

OCCUPATIONFAMILY LIFE AS AN ADULT-

WHEN DID YOU GET INTERESTED IN LLAMAS?

A legAcy born of love. Since 1995, Spittin’ Creek has been building a long line of high-quality, award winning pedigrees.

INTERESTING EXPERIENCES WITH YOUR LLAMAS- (FUNNY,GOOD,EMBARASSING)

Today, the tradition continues. Loved like family, our llamas are gentle, well trained and eager to please. Call us today to inquire about purchasing opportunities. - Greg & Debbie Shellabarger

OTHER ANIMALS THAT YOU OWN AND LOVE?

Pat Linkhorn shared with us this month. Will you be the next? Xenia, Ohio • P: 937-376-2980 • www.SpittinCreek.com


Top Line Quarterly Newsletter of the Ohio River Valley Llama Association

November 2013

Volume 26, Number 4

We came, we hiked, we conquered

McFarland’s Llama Farm…..3 generations committed to excellence! Pat Linkhorn ORVLA TopLine Editor 56032 Claysville Road Cumberland, OH 43732

Place Stamp Here


Tlonlinenov2013