Page 1

Top Line

McFarland’s Llama Farm MCFL Ringer

Quarterly Newsletter of the Ohio River Valley Llama Association

Riley-Ying Yang x Chelita

For e Sal May 2014

Volume 28, Number 2

Fun at the Llama Show Show & Breeding Stock Available Don & Sue McFarland 8000 Old Delaware Rd. Mt. Vernon, Ohio 43050 (740) 397-7820 (614) 206-4404 (Don)

Pat Linkhorn ORVLA TopLine Editor 56032 Claysville Road Cumberland, OH 43732

Mike, Cindy, David, Elizabeth & Ada Ruckman

www.McFarlandsLlamaFarm.com

8092 Old Delaware Rd. Mt. Vernon, Ohio 43050 (740) 393 2309

Place Stamp Here


SPILLING THE BEANS ABOUT ME Let us know something about you. Send your responses to Topline editor at orvla01@windstream.net WHERE DID YOU GROW UP? FAMILY MEMBERS-

EDUCATION AND MEMORIES-

PETS AS A CHILD-

OCCUPATIONFAMILY LIFE AS AN ADULT-

WHEN DID YOU GET INTERESTED IN LLAMAS?

INTERESTING EXPERIENCES WITH YOUR LLAMAS- (FUNNY,GOOD,EMBARASSING)

OTHER ANIMALS THAT YOU OWN AND LOVE?

Janice Schilling shared with us this month. Will you be the next?


TOPLINE

TOPLINE A quarterly publication of the Ohio River Valley Llama Association ORVLA website: www.orvla.com Editor: Pat Linkhorn 740-9638-5041 orvla01@windstream.net

The opinions and articles in TOPLINE are views expressed of their authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of ORVLA or the newsletter editor. This newsletter and ORVLA will not be responsible for the opinion or validity of statements expressed by authors or advertisers, nor do we assume any responsibility for typographical errors in submitted articles.

Contents - February 2013 Articles

From Social to Sales 5 Buddy and His Pals 7 OSU Open House 8 ORVLA Fall Hike 10 Recollections of my first GALA Conference 12 Lest We Forget 13 2014 Ohio State Fair Llama Show 16 Notes from Chereen 17 Gala Conference Press Release 17 Spilling the Beans 19 Gastrointestinal Parasites in Camelids 19 Caring and Comfort for the Down Llama 27 Membershipn Application 30 Fiber as Business 31 How to Kill an Organization 32 It’s Survey Time! (Again!) 33

Members and friends of ORVLA are invited and encouraged to send articles, advertisements, editorials, letters or suggestions. The purpose of this newsletter is to provide information only and should not be considered as a substitute for professional advice. Neither ORVLA or the SHOWS EVENTS MEETINGS TOPLINE editor will be held responsible for any losses resulting from a reader’s failure to heed Calendar of Events this caution.

35

DEPARTMENTS

ORVLA belongs to a newsletter network. We may reprint articles from these newsletter, unless specifically noted by the author of the article. In turn, they may reprint articles that are submitted to our editor. If you write an article that you do not wish to have to have used elsewhere, please indicate that to the editor when you submit your work.

ORVLA Board & Committees 2 Editor’s Message 3 Board Minutes 4 Sunshine Report 28 ORVLA Ads 36 ORVLA Recommended Veterinarians 37 Treasurer’s Report 38 38 Newsletter deadlines for articles and advertising Advertising Information are January 15 (February issue), April 15 (May ADVERTISERS issue), July 15 (August issue), and October 15 Hillcrest Llama Farm (Johnson) 11 (November issue). McFarland’s Llama Farm Back Cover The next newsletter deadline is July 15, 2014 Spittin’ Creek llamas & Alpacas (Shellabarger) Inside Front Cover Plus 28 Business Card Ads

1

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

ORVLA Officers

Committees ELECTION

PRESIDENT Bill Safreed (2014) 740-536-9385

Dustin Newton, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair 740-638-5041 orvla01@windstream.net

loghousellamas@hughes.net

VICE PRESIDENT Dustin Newton (2015)

FIBER

Doug Targett, board liaison Judy Ross & Gail Targett,Chairs 740-867-4267, 937-689-8273 goodnewsllamas@zoominternet.net tgafarm@gotsky.com

419-884-2615

pinewoodllamas@hotmail.com

SECRETARY Cindy Wilson (2016) 740-674-4513

HISTORIAN

Cindy Wilson, board liaison Jean Haumschild, Chair 740-824-3120 frv@verizon.net

silveyhollowfarm@hotmail.com

TREASURER Kris Miller (2015) 614-879-3276

MEMBERSHIP

Fred Tarr, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair 740-638-5041 orvla01@windstream.net

millersfarmatdcsbcglobal.net

BOARD MEMBERS

ORVLA Web Page

Fred Tarr (2014) 740-944-1647

Kris Miller, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair 740-638-5041 orvla01@windstream.net

tarrhillllamas@windstream.net

Tom Ross (2015) 740-867-4267

My mother-in-law, who is 89, visits him every day. She can still drive, but none of us felt we should allow her to drive there alone. When I wasn’t taking her to the hospital, I was taking one of my daughters to one of the many follow-up appointments for various things. It seems they all were in the month of May this year! Despite all the electronic gizmos and gadgets I have, none of my mobile ones have the capacity to allow me to work on our website or Topline when I’m away from home. So, once again, my apologies!

(llama check-in and shorn fleece judging Thurs., Aug. 7)

Enjoy the sunshine!

SUNSHINE

RaDarLlamas@yahoo.com

Cindy Wilson, board liaison Linda Pohle, Chair 740-943-3876 linda@thepohles.com

Doug Targett (2016) 937-689-8273 tgafarm@gotsky.com

WV Grand Llama and Fleece Show

August 9 and 10, 2014 Camelid Community’s Fiber as Business Conference September 28, 2014 9:00 A.M. 24th Annual Coshocton County Llama Show Coshocton County Fairgrounds – Hunter Arena

Bev & Krystle Frye 3390 Millersburg Rd. Martinsburg, OH 43037 740-668-4845

Dustin Newton, Tom Ross, board liaisons Deb Arendas, Chair llamadeb@aol.com

2

August 8 and 9, 2014

Triple H Farm

YOUTH

Visit us online! www.topline.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Ohio-River-Valley-LlamaAssociation ORVLA May 2013

July 18 and 19, 2014 26th Annual Ohio State Fair Llama Show

Cindy Wilson, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair orvla01@windstream.net

Darlene Sutton (2014) 330-868-6848

SAVE THE DATES

My father-in-law, who is 93 years old, recently had openheart surgery. Everything went well. He is in re-hab now and we hope to have him home within the next two weeks. The hospital where he had the surgery is only about 25 miles from us, but it is in the opposite direction of the town where I usually do all of my business - like getting Topline published!

Bob Johnson/Doug Targett, board liaisons PUBLICATION/TopLine

bjohnson4544@gmail.com

I want to apologize for the extreme delay of this issue of Topline.

Darlene Sutton/Bill Safreed, board liaisons PUBLIC RELATIONS/MARKETING

Bob Johnson (2016) 740-674-4544

Hello Everyone,

We have a great article in this issue on parasites by Dr. Pamela Walker. It’s 8 pages, but it’s well worth the read. If you look on page 28, she has dosages and uses for many of the medicines. I plan to laminate that page and keep it in my “vet” box.

PROGRAM

goodnewsllamas@zoominternet.net

TOPLINE

Message from the Editor

3

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

ORVLA Officers

Committees ELECTION

PRESIDENT Bill Safreed (2014) 740-536-9385

Dustin Newton, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair 740-638-5041 orvla01@windstream.net

loghousellamas@hughes.net

VICE PRESIDENT Dustin Newton (2015)

FIBER

Doug Targett, board liaison Judy Ross & Gail Targett,Chairs 740-867-4267, 937-689-8273 goodnewsllamas@zoominternet.net tgafarm@gotsky.com

419-884-2615

pinewoodllamas@hotmail.com

SECRETARY Cindy Wilson (2016) 740-674-4513

HISTORIAN

Cindy Wilson, board liaison Jean Haumschild, Chair 740-824-3120 frv@verizon.net

silveyhollowfarm@hotmail.com

TREASURER Kris Miller (2015) 614-879-3276

MEMBERSHIP

Fred Tarr, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair 740-638-5041 orvla01@windstream.net

millersfarmatdcsbcglobal.net

BOARD MEMBERS

ORVLA Web Page

Fred Tarr (2014) 740-944-1647

Kris Miller, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair 740-638-5041 orvla01@windstream.net

tarrhillllamas@windstream.net

Tom Ross (2015) 740-867-4267

My mother-in-law, who is 89, visits him every day. She can still drive, but none of us felt we should allow her to drive there alone. When I wasn’t taking her to the hospital, I was taking one of my daughters to one of the many follow-up appointments for various things. It seems they all were in the month of May this year! Despite all the electronic gizmos and gadgets I have, none of my mobile ones have the capacity to allow me to work on our website or Topline when I’m away from home. So, once again, my apologies!

(llama check-in and shorn fleece judging Thurs., Aug. 7)

Enjoy the sunshine!

SUNSHINE

RaDarLlamas@yahoo.com

Cindy Wilson, board liaison Linda Pohle, Chair 740-943-3876 linda@thepohles.com

Doug Targett (2016) 937-689-8273 tgafarm@gotsky.com

WV Grand Llama and Fleece Show

August 9 and 10, 2014 Camelid Community’s Fiber as Business Conference September 28, 2014 9:00 A.M. 24th Annual Coshocton County Llama Show Coshocton County Fairgrounds – Hunter Arena

Bev & Krystle Frye 3390 Millersburg Rd. Martinsburg, OH 43037 740-668-4845

Dustin Newton, Tom Ross, board liaisons Deb Arendas, Chair llamadeb@aol.com

2

August 8 and 9, 2014

Triple H Farm

YOUTH

Visit us online! www.topline.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Ohio-River-Valley-LlamaAssociation ORVLA May 2013

July 18 and 19, 2014 26th Annual Ohio State Fair Llama Show

Cindy Wilson, board liaison Pat Linkhorn, Chair orvla01@windstream.net

Darlene Sutton (2014) 330-868-6848

SAVE THE DATES

My father-in-law, who is 93 years old, recently had openheart surgery. Everything went well. He is in re-hab now and we hope to have him home within the next two weeks. The hospital where he had the surgery is only about 25 miles from us, but it is in the opposite direction of the town where I usually do all of my business - like getting Topline published!

Bob Johnson/Doug Targett, board liaisons PUBLICATION/TopLine

bjohnson4544@gmail.com

I want to apologize for the extreme delay of this issue of Topline.

Darlene Sutton/Bill Safreed, board liaisons PUBLIC RELATIONS/MARKETING

Bob Johnson (2016) 740-674-4544

Hello Everyone,

We have a great article in this issue on parasites by Dr. Pamela Walker. It’s 8 pages, but it’s well worth the read. If you look on page 28, she has dosages and uses for many of the medicines. I plan to laminate that page and keep it in my “vet” box.

PROGRAM

goodnewsllamas@zoominternet.net

TOPLINE

Message from the Editor

3

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Grafton, MA. They are requesting financial support to attend a weeklong training on working with camelids. Bob Johnson made a motion to deny the request. Fred Tarr seconded the motion. All in favor. Motion carried.

Board Minutes April 19, 2014 Theo’s Restaurant Cambridge, Ohio

Board members present: Bill Safreed, Kris Miller, Fred Tarr, Darlene Sutton, Bob Johnson and Cindy Wilson. Board members not present: Tom Ross, Justin Newton and Doug Targett. Other members present: Marie Safreed, Barbara Johnson and grandson Brice, Renee Tarr, Pat Linkhorn and Ray Sutton.

We discussed the Christmas meeting. Kris Miller suggested we honor more of our founding members at the meeting. Kris has a list and will attempt to contact them requesting their presence at the Christmas meeting.

Board president, Bill Safreed, called the meeting to order. The Treasurer’s Report had previously been sent to board members by e-mail. Bob Johnson made a motion to approve the Treasurer’s Report. Fred Tarr seconded the Motion. All in favor. Motion carried. Bill Safreed asked if anyone had heard any additional comments or complaints from the membership about the by-laws revisions since the article explaining the changes appeard in the last issue of Topline. No member comments were made to the Board so no further action will be taken. After a discussion of membership numbers, Pat Linkhorn suggested she send an online version of Topline to other llama organizations and allow them to send a link to their members for a couple of issues and let them know if they would like to continue receiving Topline, they would need to join ORVLA. The Board directed her to proceed. Several members who advertise have not renewed their membership. Pat will send out reminders to members who have not renewed their memberships. Fred Tarr reported Libby Rush and Char Neel are willing to organize the Hike/Picnic again. It will be held October 11, 2014 at the Jefferson County fairgrounds. There are hiking trails there and we will have access to the entire fairgrounds including the barns, restrooms and shelter houses. Camping will be available for those who would like to come the night before. Arrivial around 10:30 a.m., Hike at 11:00, with lunch to follow. Dustin Newton and his family represented ORVLA at the OSU Open House. They had llamas on display and handed out brochures and information. Bill Safreed told us the part of Equine Affair we were asked to participate in was cancelled for this year. There are some issues that would need to be worked out, including cost, if ORVLA was to be involved in the future. Arrangements for the Summer Solstice Show, to be held May 17, 2014, were discussed. Everything seems to be in place. The food vendor will be the same one used at the Daffodil show. We will have a traditional silent auction rather than a Chineese auction and there will be a 50/50 drawing. An e-mail was sent to ORVLA, along with other llama organizations, by two Vet students from Tufts continued on next page ORVLA May 2013

4

The next Board meeting will be held during the Ohio State Fair. Darlene Sutton moved to adjourn the meeting. Bob Johnson seconded the motion.. All in favor. Meeting adjourned. Respectfully submitted, Cindy Wilson, secretary

From SOCIAL to SALES: Selling Your Story By RJ Stangherlin

If you depend on your annual open barn, website, and community service projects to advertise your llamas, alpacas, or camelidrelated goods and services, you are still doing business in the 20th century. While these options can raise educational awareness, in a flat economy they do little to inspire sales. If, however, you are using social media channels to drive business, you position yourself to build educational awareness and opportunities for sales with 21st century free tools. Like it or not, today’s consumers work and play daily in social media. They buy, sell, interact, and have fun in e-commerce, so if you are still resisting the plunge into the most popular social channels, you need to rethink your marketing strategies for sustainability. I understand that many do not choose to sell their animals online even though there is a growing presence for doing just that. But what social media can do for your business is, proverbially speaking, put it out there by selling your story. And no one does that better, in my opinion, than Tabbethia Haubold. PLAA member and owner-operator of Long Island Livestock Company, Tabbethia does it all: open barn, extensive community service, youth programs, breeding, showing, craft shows (think Vogue Knitting Live), a shearing service and a branded natural products line. Where does she sell her story? Facebook. How does she do it? By being an authentic voice reaching out to her community with daily “Shear and Share” status updates. Tabbethia says Facebook has become her blog and she loves the interaction on those longs days of endless shearing and traveling. “Their energy and love are given back to me…and when I need help, they reach out to me and sustain me.” Tabbethia admits that being on Facebook daily is sometimes challenging but she keeps her presence vibrant because she believes communicating with her friends is important. And she notes she would never have found Teri Conroy and sold her a llama (Tank) if she hadn’t been on Facebook. continued on next page 5

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Grafton, MA. They are requesting financial support to attend a weeklong training on working with camelids. Bob Johnson made a motion to deny the request. Fred Tarr seconded the motion. All in favor. Motion carried.

Board Minutes April 19, 2014 Theo’s Restaurant Cambridge, Ohio

Board members present: Bill Safreed, Kris Miller, Fred Tarr, Darlene Sutton, Bob Johnson and Cindy Wilson. Board members not present: Tom Ross, Justin Newton and Doug Targett. Other members present: Marie Safreed, Barbara Johnson and grandson Brice, Renee Tarr, Pat Linkhorn and Ray Sutton.

We discussed the Christmas meeting. Kris Miller suggested we honor more of our founding members at the meeting. Kris has a list and will attempt to contact them requesting their presence at the Christmas meeting.

Board president, Bill Safreed, called the meeting to order. The Treasurer’s Report had previously been sent to board members by e-mail. Bob Johnson made a motion to approve the Treasurer’s Report. Fred Tarr seconded the Motion. All in favor. Motion carried. Bill Safreed asked if anyone had heard any additional comments or complaints from the membership about the by-laws revisions since the article explaining the changes appeard in the last issue of Topline. No member comments were made to the Board so no further action will be taken. After a discussion of membership numbers, Pat Linkhorn suggested she send an online version of Topline to other llama organizations and allow them to send a link to their members for a couple of issues and let them know if they would like to continue receiving Topline, they would need to join ORVLA. The Board directed her to proceed. Several members who advertise have not renewed their membership. Pat will send out reminders to members who have not renewed their memberships. Fred Tarr reported Libby Rush and Char Neel are willing to organize the Hike/Picnic again. It will be held October 11, 2014 at the Jefferson County fairgrounds. There are hiking trails there and we will have access to the entire fairgrounds including the barns, restrooms and shelter houses. Camping will be available for those who would like to come the night before. Arrivial around 10:30 a.m., Hike at 11:00, with lunch to follow. Dustin Newton and his family represented ORVLA at the OSU Open House. They had llamas on display and handed out brochures and information. Bill Safreed told us the part of Equine Affair we were asked to participate in was cancelled for this year. There are some issues that would need to be worked out, including cost, if ORVLA was to be involved in the future. Arrangements for the Summer Solstice Show, to be held May 17, 2014, were discussed. Everything seems to be in place. The food vendor will be the same one used at the Daffodil show. We will have a traditional silent auction rather than a Chineese auction and there will be a 50/50 drawing. An e-mail was sent to ORVLA, along with other llama organizations, by two Vet students from Tufts continued on next page ORVLA May 2013

4

The next Board meeting will be held during the Ohio State Fair. Darlene Sutton moved to adjourn the meeting. Bob Johnson seconded the motion.. All in favor. Meeting adjourned. Respectfully submitted, Cindy Wilson, secretary

From SOCIAL to SALES: Selling Your Story By RJ Stangherlin

If you depend on your annual open barn, website, and community service projects to advertise your llamas, alpacas, or camelidrelated goods and services, you are still doing business in the 20th century. While these options can raise educational awareness, in a flat economy they do little to inspire sales. If, however, you are using social media channels to drive business, you position yourself to build educational awareness and opportunities for sales with 21st century free tools. Like it or not, today’s consumers work and play daily in social media. They buy, sell, interact, and have fun in e-commerce, so if you are still resisting the plunge into the most popular social channels, you need to rethink your marketing strategies for sustainability. I understand that many do not choose to sell their animals online even though there is a growing presence for doing just that. But what social media can do for your business is, proverbially speaking, put it out there by selling your story. And no one does that better, in my opinion, than Tabbethia Haubold. PLAA member and owner-operator of Long Island Livestock Company, Tabbethia does it all: open barn, extensive community service, youth programs, breeding, showing, craft shows (think Vogue Knitting Live), a shearing service and a branded natural products line. Where does she sell her story? Facebook. How does she do it? By being an authentic voice reaching out to her community with daily “Shear and Share” status updates. Tabbethia says Facebook has become her blog and she loves the interaction on those longs days of endless shearing and traveling. “Their energy and love are given back to me…and when I need help, they reach out to me and sustain me.” Tabbethia admits that being on Facebook daily is sometimes challenging but she keeps her presence vibrant because she believes communicating with her friends is important. And she notes she would never have found Teri Conroy and sold her a llama (Tank) if she hadn’t been on Facebook. continued on next page 5

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

Bev Vienckowski, owner-operator with husband Ed of Second Wind Farm NE, LLC, and editor-in-chief of PLAAs newsletter, The Lama Letter, uses her Facebook farm page to advertise her llama beans, organic eggs, and seasonal produce. But forget buying llama beans from Bev for a while; she is completely out of stock, all because she markets on Facebook. Are you smiling yet? IF you are thinking of making just one media channel your go-to account, Facebook wins simply because it is the largest global media franchise with the greatest and best-integrated assets. Let’s face it: the world is on Facebook, so your marketing potential is unlimited. If you have an allergy to Facebook, consider creating a Pinterest account. If you love images, Pinterest is a great way to aggregate your assets and activities by “pinning” an online photo that links to a url. If you have a website and you want to give it a facelift, pin your images to your Pinterest account as I did with PLAA’s website. The second most popular media asset and winner of the most popular newcomer award last year, Pinterest is truly ubiquitous. If I could take photographs like Bob Wolfe, owner of Spruce Lane Llamas, I’d be all over Pinterest. It’s a great visual way to advertise your goods and services, and less threatening than Facebook, for the fainterhearted not yet ready for prime time media. My third and final choice for you to consider as an assetsmanaging opportunity is the 21st century encyclopedia, YouTube. We have become a truly visual society and nothing works more magic than a compelling video. If you are good at creating videos or filming short snippets like Bev Vienckowski, you can export from your smart phone directly to YouTube (or Facebook and other media channels); check out Bev’s llama Carbon wishing us a Happy Easter. A painless and easy way to keep your business out there, YouTube has almost achieved search engine status because of its volume of entries. There are other social media channels worth exploring, but these three are tried and true for creating effective possibilities, depending on how you sell your story. If you have suggestions for tech tips you would like to see in this space, questions wanting answers, or tutorials, please feel free to contact me. RJ Stangherlin, rj22@ptd.net

Buddy and His Pals

TOPLINE

PLAA member Loretta Radeschi of Bedford, PA has written the first in a series of children’s books based on her farm animals. Buddy and His Pals: True Stories of Horses, Llamas and Cats recaptures the real-life antics among her animals in a story for preschoolers to eight year-olds. The book is full is of gentle lessons about friendship and caring that develop among three horses, two llamas and two cats. Among those lessons are that friends don’t have to look like us; friends teach us patience and not to be afraid; friends are found in unexpected places and help us in unexpected ways. “Whether the llamas put their heads against Buddy’s cheek when he returns from a trail ride, rest their head on his withers, protect their other equine friends from a new horse or play with the cats on walks through the woods, each activity is a delight to watch. The first time the llama vet visited, Buddy ran between him and the two llamas. The vet said Buddy was protecting them from a stranger. After watching the animals welcome newcomers, run and chase one another in the pasture and play in the woods and high grass, I knew there was a story to be told. The book was fun to write. I had great characters and a ready-made story line.” Reading specialist Amy Dipasquale says Buddy and His Pals is “...A delightful story which encourages children and adults to talk about compassion and the true meaning of friendship.” Alyson Dehmcke, a former preschool teacher/ director comments that “...had Buddy and His Pals been written twenty-five years ago, it would have been one of the classroom favorites. On its surface, Buddy and His Pals is a lovely story about the friendships that develop between Buddy and his evergrowing family. On more subtle levels, there are many underlying lessons, including the importance of acknowledging and respecting the differences among us. Share this book with the young people in your life. I know they will enjoy it as much as I have.” Signed and personalized copies of Buddy and His Pals can be ordered through www.Lradeschi.com. The book is also available at amazon.com

To see examples click on the blue interactive web links below: Tabbethia Haubold: Long Island Livestock Company - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Long-IslandLivestock-Company/127414340612870 Teri Conroy: Wunsapana Farm - https://www.facebook.com/WunsapanaFarm - and Wunsapana Farm Artisan Lockspun Yarn - https://www.facebook.com/WunsapanaFarmArtisanLockspunYarn Bev Vienckowski: Second Wind Farm NE, LLC on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Second-Wind-Farm-NE-LLC/458956954177331 You Tube video: Wishing Carbon a Happy Easter - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RqDCy2Qc40 &feature=youtu.be Bob Wolfe: Spruce Lane Llamas - http://www.sprucelane.com/ References: 1. From Social to Sales: How to Make Money Off Your Tweets and Status Updates.” NFIB myBusiness: March/April 2014, pp. 31-35.

ORVLA May 2013

6

7

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

Bev Vienckowski, owner-operator with husband Ed of Second Wind Farm NE, LLC, and editor-in-chief of PLAAs newsletter, The Lama Letter, uses her Facebook farm page to advertise her llama beans, organic eggs, and seasonal produce. But forget buying llama beans from Bev for a while; she is completely out of stock, all because she markets on Facebook. Are you smiling yet? IF you are thinking of making just one media channel your go-to account, Facebook wins simply because it is the largest global media franchise with the greatest and best-integrated assets. Let’s face it: the world is on Facebook, so your marketing potential is unlimited. If you have an allergy to Facebook, consider creating a Pinterest account. If you love images, Pinterest is a great way to aggregate your assets and activities by “pinning” an online photo that links to a url. If you have a website and you want to give it a facelift, pin your images to your Pinterest account as I did with PLAA’s website. The second most popular media asset and winner of the most popular newcomer award last year, Pinterest is truly ubiquitous. If I could take photographs like Bob Wolfe, owner of Spruce Lane Llamas, I’d be all over Pinterest. It’s a great visual way to advertise your goods and services, and less threatening than Facebook, for the fainterhearted not yet ready for prime time media. My third and final choice for you to consider as an assetsmanaging opportunity is the 21st century encyclopedia, YouTube. We have become a truly visual society and nothing works more magic than a compelling video. If you are good at creating videos or filming short snippets like Bev Vienckowski, you can export from your smart phone directly to YouTube (or Facebook and other media channels); check out Bev’s llama Carbon wishing us a Happy Easter. A painless and easy way to keep your business out there, YouTube has almost achieved search engine status because of its volume of entries. There are other social media channels worth exploring, but these three are tried and true for creating effective possibilities, depending on how you sell your story. If you have suggestions for tech tips you would like to see in this space, questions wanting answers, or tutorials, please feel free to contact me. RJ Stangherlin, rj22@ptd.net

Buddy and His Pals

TOPLINE

PLAA member Loretta Radeschi of Bedford, PA has written the first in a series of children’s books based on her farm animals. Buddy and His Pals: True Stories of Horses, Llamas and Cats recaptures the real-life antics among her animals in a story for preschoolers to eight year-olds. The book is full is of gentle lessons about friendship and caring that develop among three horses, two llamas and two cats. Among those lessons are that friends don’t have to look like us; friends teach us patience and not to be afraid; friends are found in unexpected places and help us in unexpected ways. “Whether the llamas put their heads against Buddy’s cheek when he returns from a trail ride, rest their head on his withers, protect their other equine friends from a new horse or play with the cats on walks through the woods, each activity is a delight to watch. The first time the llama vet visited, Buddy ran between him and the two llamas. The vet said Buddy was protecting them from a stranger. After watching the animals welcome newcomers, run and chase one another in the pasture and play in the woods and high grass, I knew there was a story to be told. The book was fun to write. I had great characters and a ready-made story line.” Reading specialist Amy Dipasquale says Buddy and His Pals is “...A delightful story which encourages children and adults to talk about compassion and the true meaning of friendship.” Alyson Dehmcke, a former preschool teacher/ director comments that “...had Buddy and His Pals been written twenty-five years ago, it would have been one of the classroom favorites. On its surface, Buddy and His Pals is a lovely story about the friendships that develop between Buddy and his evergrowing family. On more subtle levels, there are many underlying lessons, including the importance of acknowledging and respecting the differences among us. Share this book with the young people in your life. I know they will enjoy it as much as I have.” Signed and personalized copies of Buddy and His Pals can be ordered through www.Lradeschi.com. The book is also available at amazon.com

To see examples click on the blue interactive web links below: Tabbethia Haubold: Long Island Livestock Company - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Long-IslandLivestock-Company/127414340612870 Teri Conroy: Wunsapana Farm - https://www.facebook.com/WunsapanaFarm - and Wunsapana Farm Artisan Lockspun Yarn - https://www.facebook.com/WunsapanaFarmArtisanLockspunYarn Bev Vienckowski: Second Wind Farm NE, LLC on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Second-Wind-Farm-NE-LLC/458956954177331 You Tube video: Wishing Carbon a Happy Easter - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RqDCy2Qc40 &feature=youtu.be Bob Wolfe: Spruce Lane Llamas - http://www.sprucelane.com/ References: 1. From Social to Sales: How to Make Money Off Your Tweets and Status Updates.” NFIB myBusiness: March/April 2014, pp. 31-35.

ORVLA May 2013

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ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE

Ohio State University Open House by Dustin Newton

The Ohio State Veterinary Open House invited ORVLA back on April 5, 2014 (represented by Pinewood Llama Farm) to be part of their event this year. We arrived at the OSU medical building where we were warmly welcomed by the students & faculty on bringing the llamas back again this year. The students and the parents that came to visit the veterinary school loved see the llamas. They touched them to feel their fiber to see how soft they are and a lot of them liked to take their pictures with them too. There were lots of questions on the difference between llamas & alpacas and on how to take care of them, if they are easy to raise, and on the different kinds of fiber that there are. Linda Newton did some spinning demonstration on how the fiber is taken from the animal and made in to yarn. She also talked about processing the fiber & the different ways of using the fiber. We had a display set up of different types of fiber for people to touch and we were able to hand out lots of brochures and information about ORVLA & Llamas. It was a wonderful day at the OSU Vet days this year and we’d like to thank Ohio State and ORVLA for giving us this chance share these wonderful animals!

Krystal’s Fiber Kreations All things fiber! (Coming Soon) www.fiberkreations.org Krystal Linkhorn, Owner ORVLA May 2013

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Ohio State University Open House by Dustin Newton

The Ohio State Veterinary Open House invited ORVLA back on April 5, 2014 (represented by Pinewood Llama Farm) to be part of their event this year. We arrived at the OSU medical building where we were warmly welcomed by the students & faculty on bringing the llamas back again this year. The students and the parents that came to visit the veterinary school loved see the llamas. They touched them to feel their fiber to see how soft they are and a lot of them liked to take their pictures with them too. There were lots of questions on the difference between llamas & alpacas and on how to take care of them, if they are easy to raise, and on the different kinds of fiber that there are. Linda Newton did some spinning demonstration on how the fiber is taken from the animal and made in to yarn. She also talked about processing the fiber & the different ways of using the fiber. We had a display set up of different types of fiber for people to touch and we were able to hand out lots of brochures and information about ORVLA & Llamas. It was a wonderful day at the OSU Vet days this year and we’d like to thank Ohio State and ORVLA for giving us this chance share these wonderful animals!

Krystal’s Fiber Kreations All things fiber! (Coming Soon) www.fiberkreations.org Krystal Linkhorn, Owner ORVLA May 2013

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ORVLA FALL HIKE When: October 11, 2014 Where: Jefferson County Fairgrounds Time: Check in and register at 10:30. Hike at 11:00 Over-night camping is available. Facilities will be open for showers. Camelid Companion Certification Door Prizes All food will be provided Great time to visit with all your llama friends

ORVLA May 2013

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ORVLA FALL HIKE When: October 11, 2014 Where: Jefferson County Fairgrounds Time: Check in and register at 10:30. Hike at 11:00 Over-night camping is available. Facilities will be open for showers. Camelid Companion Certification Door Prizes All food will be provided Great time to visit with all your llama friends

ORVLA May 2013

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Recollections of my first GALA Conference

That night I joined two or three other bodies, sound asleep, in one of the camp cabins at Hidden Valley. Little did I know it but snoring right across from me was another legend, John Mallon.

The year was 1994. A few years earlier, in a mid-life crisis moment, my wife and I decided to purchase a farm in Maine. At the time, we didn’t quite know what we were going to do with this farm but by 1994 it had become clear that llamas were going to be part of it. So, in September 1994, I decided, with some hesitation, to take early retirement. The offer was too good to turn down but did I really want to move from the middle of Chicago to a small rural town in Maine to become a llama farmer?

Next day, as attendees began to arrive, I started to appreciate the closeness and camaraderie of the llama community. I met the herd of Northern Vermonters. What a treat. And then Jane and Shari and their crazy athletic competitions. Lars Garrison, felt hat and all. Someone from Georgia even. Swimming in that shimmering lake followed by a dip in the hot tub. And, oh the food. I have been to almost twenty GALA conferences but never was the food better than in the mess hall of Hidden Valley. The fun and the singing continued into the evening and next day with perhaps the highlight being “Vermonters Just Like to Felt Hats” a musical performance by the Herd of Northern Vermonters. Or maybe it was David Pugh’s karaoke that topped the charts.

by Terry Beal

The very day that I signed those early retirement papers (which included a one week right of rescission) I flew to Maine to attend my first GALA conference at Hidden Valley Camp in Freedom, Maine. I did so at the urging of Sheryl Tishman, a well-known East Coast llama breeder who just happened to own the farm right next to mine and who just happened to be one of the conference organizers. With doubts circling in my head about whether or not I had made the right decision to retire, I arrived in Maine. The next day was preparation day for the conference placed and I placed myself under Sheryl’s command since I really had no idea what a llama conference was all about. She asked to me help her load up truck and trailer and then instructed me to follow her up to the conference site in Freedom. Along the way she said it would be necessary to stop at the silk-screening shop in Liberty, Maine to pick the conference T-shirts. So, off we went. It was one of those incredibly beautiful Maine fall days and as I followed Sheryl’s rig up Route 220, listening to Mozart on the radio, I came to the realization that my retirement decision was indeed the right decision. Stopping in Liberty, I jumped out of my car, ran up to Sheryl, gave her a hug and told her that I wasn’t going to fret any more about my retirement decision. After arriving at the camp Sheryl dispatched me to drive a few miles north to pick up some lunch for the committee members who were doing their conference prep things. Today, I do not think of Hidden Valley as being that much out of the way but, understand, I had just spent thirty years living in the city of Chicago. Central Maine might as well have been the moon. City boy meets country. Every time I pass that luncheon place up in Knox, Maine I remember my 1994 mission to pick up chow for the conference folks. That evening, Sheryl sent me on a mission I will never forget. After pestering her for more tasks, she said “I know what you can do, go down to Portland and pick up David Pugh”. I said I would go but that she would have to draw me a map of how to get there since I was still extremely unfamiliar with back country Maine. No GPS back in those days. I arrived at Portland airport and I drew up a small sign saying “GALA” which I held up to the window at the arrival gate hoping that it would be seen. Sure enough, a couple behind the window waved and I was about to meet a legend. By this time it was very late in the evening and there was a two hour drive ahead of us. It took a while to cut across the language barrier (“Yall wid me”). My passengers had been plane bound all day long and I could sense that they wanted nothing more than to slip into bed but first, I had to get myself lost. The three of us finally made it to Hidden Valley well past midnight. continued on next page ORVLA May 2013

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On Sunday, as everyone was getting ready to leave, I just happened to be watching Lars Garrison. I saw him give commands to three llamas asking them to jump up into the back of his covered pickup truck which they did without hesitation. And each one then turned and cushed. I couldn’t believe it. Back in Chicago, a few weeks later, I realized that I had made my irreversible retirement decision in Liberty on the way to Freedom.

Lest We Forget

A Short History of the Greater Appalachian Llama and Alpaca Association www.galaonline.org by Hilary Ware (Including excerpts from an article by Polly Schofield, September 1989)

In 1984 a group of people calling themselves the “East Coast Llama Lovers”, led by Marty McGee, gathered at the lovely Hidden Valley Camp in Freedom, Maine. Jay Stager hosted that event and one the following year. At the 1985 Maine event the group resolved to 1) organize a third annual conference, and 2) meet during the winter in an effort to formalize the group into an “association” and 3) become and International Llama Association affiliate. At the winter meeting, held in New England, the name “Greater Appalachian Llama Association” was adopted, four committees were formed and chairpersons were elected. Activities - Nancy Calhoun and Viv Fulton; Education - John Lanich and Ann Aydelotte; Membership - Laura Sawyer and Tom Marino; Communications - Marty McGee and Alysa Griggs. This early association published two newsletters (Dale Graham), and held a successful medical seminar at Tufts University, organized by Ceacy Henderson Griffin. In 1986, the “3rd Annual East Coast Llama Conference” was held by GALA in conjunction with The East Coast Llama Lovers in Warwick, RI, chaired by Laura Sawyer. It drew 75 attendees. Affiliation with the ILA became a reality, and a committee was appointed to develop by-laws. An interim Board of Directors was formed. The 1987 GALA conference, chaired by Dale Graham and Tom Reichert, held in Syria, VA, drew 150 registrants. The draft by-laws were approved by the membership and the first officers and directors were elected. Also elected were representatives from the four geographical areas officially covered continued on next page

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Recollections of my first GALA Conference

That night I joined two or three other bodies, sound asleep, in one of the camp cabins at Hidden Valley. Little did I know it but snoring right across from me was another legend, John Mallon.

The year was 1994. A few years earlier, in a mid-life crisis moment, my wife and I decided to purchase a farm in Maine. At the time, we didn’t quite know what we were going to do with this farm but by 1994 it had become clear that llamas were going to be part of it. So, in September 1994, I decided, with some hesitation, to take early retirement. The offer was too good to turn down but did I really want to move from the middle of Chicago to a small rural town in Maine to become a llama farmer?

Next day, as attendees began to arrive, I started to appreciate the closeness and camaraderie of the llama community. I met the herd of Northern Vermonters. What a treat. And then Jane and Shari and their crazy athletic competitions. Lars Garrison, felt hat and all. Someone from Georgia even. Swimming in that shimmering lake followed by a dip in the hot tub. And, oh the food. I have been to almost twenty GALA conferences but never was the food better than in the mess hall of Hidden Valley. The fun and the singing continued into the evening and next day with perhaps the highlight being “Vermonters Just Like to Felt Hats” a musical performance by the Herd of Northern Vermonters. Or maybe it was David Pugh’s karaoke that topped the charts.

by Terry Beal

The very day that I signed those early retirement papers (which included a one week right of rescission) I flew to Maine to attend my first GALA conference at Hidden Valley Camp in Freedom, Maine. I did so at the urging of Sheryl Tishman, a well-known East Coast llama breeder who just happened to own the farm right next to mine and who just happened to be one of the conference organizers. With doubts circling in my head about whether or not I had made the right decision to retire, I arrived in Maine. The next day was preparation day for the conference placed and I placed myself under Sheryl’s command since I really had no idea what a llama conference was all about. She asked to me help her load up truck and trailer and then instructed me to follow her up to the conference site in Freedom. Along the way she said it would be necessary to stop at the silk-screening shop in Liberty, Maine to pick the conference T-shirts. So, off we went. It was one of those incredibly beautiful Maine fall days and as I followed Sheryl’s rig up Route 220, listening to Mozart on the radio, I came to the realization that my retirement decision was indeed the right decision. Stopping in Liberty, I jumped out of my car, ran up to Sheryl, gave her a hug and told her that I wasn’t going to fret any more about my retirement decision. After arriving at the camp Sheryl dispatched me to drive a few miles north to pick up some lunch for the committee members who were doing their conference prep things. Today, I do not think of Hidden Valley as being that much out of the way but, understand, I had just spent thirty years living in the city of Chicago. Central Maine might as well have been the moon. City boy meets country. Every time I pass that luncheon place up in Knox, Maine I remember my 1994 mission to pick up chow for the conference folks. That evening, Sheryl sent me on a mission I will never forget. After pestering her for more tasks, she said “I know what you can do, go down to Portland and pick up David Pugh”. I said I would go but that she would have to draw me a map of how to get there since I was still extremely unfamiliar with back country Maine. No GPS back in those days. I arrived at Portland airport and I drew up a small sign saying “GALA” which I held up to the window at the arrival gate hoping that it would be seen. Sure enough, a couple behind the window waved and I was about to meet a legend. By this time it was very late in the evening and there was a two hour drive ahead of us. It took a while to cut across the language barrier (“Yall wid me”). My passengers had been plane bound all day long and I could sense that they wanted nothing more than to slip into bed but first, I had to get myself lost. The three of us finally made it to Hidden Valley well past midnight. continued on next page ORVLA May 2013

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On Sunday, as everyone was getting ready to leave, I just happened to be watching Lars Garrison. I saw him give commands to three llamas asking them to jump up into the back of his covered pickup truck which they did without hesitation. And each one then turned and cushed. I couldn’t believe it. Back in Chicago, a few weeks later, I realized that I had made my irreversible retirement decision in Liberty on the way to Freedom.

Lest We Forget

A Short History of the Greater Appalachian Llama and Alpaca Association www.galaonline.org by Hilary Ware (Including excerpts from an article by Polly Schofield, September 1989)

In 1984 a group of people calling themselves the “East Coast Llama Lovers”, led by Marty McGee, gathered at the lovely Hidden Valley Camp in Freedom, Maine. Jay Stager hosted that event and one the following year. At the 1985 Maine event the group resolved to 1) organize a third annual conference, and 2) meet during the winter in an effort to formalize the group into an “association” and 3) become and International Llama Association affiliate. At the winter meeting, held in New England, the name “Greater Appalachian Llama Association” was adopted, four committees were formed and chairpersons were elected. Activities - Nancy Calhoun and Viv Fulton; Education - John Lanich and Ann Aydelotte; Membership - Laura Sawyer and Tom Marino; Communications - Marty McGee and Alysa Griggs. This early association published two newsletters (Dale Graham), and held a successful medical seminar at Tufts University, organized by Ceacy Henderson Griffin. In 1986, the “3rd Annual East Coast Llama Conference” was held by GALA in conjunction with The East Coast Llama Lovers in Warwick, RI, chaired by Laura Sawyer. It drew 75 attendees. Affiliation with the ILA became a reality, and a committee was appointed to develop by-laws. An interim Board of Directors was formed. The 1987 GALA conference, chaired by Dale Graham and Tom Reichert, held in Syria, VA, drew 150 registrants. The draft by-laws were approved by the membership and the first officers and directors were elected. Also elected were representatives from the four geographical areas officially covered continued on next page

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(anyone could join, of course) under the GALA service area, from Maine to Georgia.

dedication, courage, wisdom and harmony.”

The 1988 conference, “Catskill”, chaired by Nancy Calhoun and hosted by GALA members Bud and Lenore Whitcomb at their Winter Clove Inn [Round Top, NY] was overwhelming. There were 350 attendees. The first Auction for Research was held at this meeting and over $6000 was raised for Meningeal Worm Research at Cornell University.

GALA has grown, steadied, and grown again as owning llamas and alpacas remains a rewarding lifestyle.

Also in 1988 the GALA Lending Library was founded to help members enhance their knowledge of lama health, welfare, use and enjoyment. Original materials and all updated additions have been donated by GALA members and are shipped free by Librarian Cynthia Rossi (return postage paid by borrower) to current members. Cynthia has also developed a Free Packet of Llama Care Information available to any GALA member who is willing to share the material with humane societies, humane agents, livestock auctions, new owners, owners who may not know how to care for their llamas, etc. As an adjunct to the Library service, in 2013, Anita Collins became the GALA archivist for historical materials to be preserved and accessed as necessary. In 1989, GALA organized the first annual Spring GALA – an event in which GALA members across the region came together in small groups to have fun and games and share information about llamas (and eat marvelous pot-luck lunches). The GALA ’89 Conference was chaired by Janie Deemer and Susan White. A Neonatal Clinic by Dr. LaRue Johnson was held in conjunction with the conference. Membership exceeded 300, representing over 500 individuals. The GALA Newsletter grew too, with input from many members. In 1988 it was published quarterly, with two special issues relating to preand post-conference news. 1989 saw a bi-monthly publication. Polly adds: “As GALA grows, I charge you to remember the primary reason for the organization: To educate members and the public as to the breeding, raising and caring of llamas and related camelids. We are responsible to our animals, to provide the best and most appropriate care to them. May we do it with

In 1996, ‘Alpaca’ was officially added to our name as we became the Greater Appalachian Llama and Alpaca Association, celebrating the species’ similarities. GALA has supported ongoing camelid medical research for 27 years, reached out to those new to camelids, kept our resources – and membership – current on management practices and events through a comprehensive quarterly newsletter, and enjoy a vibrant web presence at: www.galaonline.org . We proudly count camelid industry luminaries Drs. Murray Fowler, LaRue Johnson, David G. Pugh, Karen Baum, C. Norman Evans, David Anderson, Bill Franklin and legends John Mallon, Mary McGee Bennett and Kay Patterson among our ~270 farms/households, past and present. Since 1987, GALA has held an educational conference every year (see below) except 1992, the year the ILA held its national conference in Burlington, VT. This makes GALA one of – if not the – longest running lama conferences in the country. Maine will have hosted GALA members, as of the 2014 conference, 5 times over 3 decades: every ten years (plus 2 other times) since the first gathering of East Coast Llama Lovers (GALA’s predecessor) in Freedom! Be part of the tradition. Join the fun in Portland, ME, October 23-26 for the 2014 GALA Conference featuring John Mallon, trainer extraordinaire, Dr. David Pugh, DVM extraordinaire, Linda Cortright of Wild Fibers, and many others. Learn about sustainable farming peacefully alongside carnivores, animal communication, brand new ways to work your fiber, llamas as golf caddies -in action, not to mention the latest in care, health and use. Local foods featured (ayuh, lobster, too) at an exceptional venue during fall colors in Maine. Plan your vacation and come along. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1987: First [Official] GALA Conference, Syria, Virginia: Chairs: Dale Graham & Tom Reichert, Grave Mountain Lodge 1988: Roundtop, NY “Catskill”: Chair: Nancy Calhoun, Winter Clove Inn 1989: Wheeling, WV: Chairs: Janie Deemer & Susan White, Oglebay Park 1990: Killington, VT: Chair: Caroline Boeckman-Dunne, Killington Resort 1991: Hagerstown, MD “Black Eyed Susan Conference” Chair: Polly Schofield 1992: No GALA Conference - ILA held their national conference in Burlington, VT. Nancy Calhoun, Chair 6. 1993: Lancaster, PA “The Small Llama Producer” Chair: John Zerphey; Lancaster Host 7. 1994: Freedom, ME “GALA Goes to Camp” Chairs: Sheryl Tishman, Hilary Ware & Jay Stager; Hidden Valley Camp 8. 1995: Ocean City, MD “Beach Party” Chair: Barb Berg; The Carousel 9. 1996: Farmington, CT “A Harvest in New England” Chairs: Pat & Kate Bars, Sandy & Marc Page; Farmington Marriott 10. 1997: Rome, NY “Lama Trek ‘97” Chair: Gail Yohe; The Beeches Conference Center 11. 1998: Wilkes Barre, PA- “Meet Me in the Woods” Chairs: Karen O’Neill and Dick Snyder; The Woodlands 12. 1999: Lancaster, PA (with LAMAS) “Moving Toward the New Millennium” Chairs: Karen O’Neill and Bo Morris 13. 2000: Warren, VT “Warm and Woolly in the Yurt” Chairs: Susan Houston & The Herd of Northern Vermonters, Sugarbush Inn 14. 2001: West Springfield, MA, “Lamas En Mass- An Owner’s Manual” Chair: Sandy Page; Best Western 15. 2002: Bushkill, PA “Hands on Lamas” Chairs: Dan Goodyear, Lars Garrison, Hilary Ware; Pocmont Resort 16. 2003: Bushkill, PA “Hands on Lamas” Chairs: Dan Goodyear, Hilary Ware and John Conboy; Pocmont Resort ORVLA May 2013

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(anyone could join, of course) under the GALA service area, from Maine to Georgia.

dedication, courage, wisdom and harmony.”

The 1988 conference, “Catskill”, chaired by Nancy Calhoun and hosted by GALA members Bud and Lenore Whitcomb at their Winter Clove Inn [Round Top, NY] was overwhelming. There were 350 attendees. The first Auction for Research was held at this meeting and over $6000 was raised for Meningeal Worm Research at Cornell University.

GALA has grown, steadied, and grown again as owning llamas and alpacas remains a rewarding lifestyle.

Also in 1988 the GALA Lending Library was founded to help members enhance their knowledge of lama health, welfare, use and enjoyment. Original materials and all updated additions have been donated by GALA members and are shipped free by Librarian Cynthia Rossi (return postage paid by borrower) to current members. Cynthia has also developed a Free Packet of Llama Care Information available to any GALA member who is willing to share the material with humane societies, humane agents, livestock auctions, new owners, owners who may not know how to care for their llamas, etc. As an adjunct to the Library service, in 2013, Anita Collins became the GALA archivist for historical materials to be preserved and accessed as necessary. In 1989, GALA organized the first annual Spring GALA – an event in which GALA members across the region came together in small groups to have fun and games and share information about llamas (and eat marvelous pot-luck lunches). The GALA ’89 Conference was chaired by Janie Deemer and Susan White. A Neonatal Clinic by Dr. LaRue Johnson was held in conjunction with the conference. Membership exceeded 300, representing over 500 individuals. The GALA Newsletter grew too, with input from many members. In 1988 it was published quarterly, with two special issues relating to preand post-conference news. 1989 saw a bi-monthly publication. Polly adds: “As GALA grows, I charge you to remember the primary reason for the organization: To educate members and the public as to the breeding, raising and caring of llamas and related camelids. We are responsible to our animals, to provide the best and most appropriate care to them. May we do it with

In 1996, ‘Alpaca’ was officially added to our name as we became the Greater Appalachian Llama and Alpaca Association, celebrating the species’ similarities. GALA has supported ongoing camelid medical research for 27 years, reached out to those new to camelids, kept our resources – and membership – current on management practices and events through a comprehensive quarterly newsletter, and enjoy a vibrant web presence at: www.galaonline.org . We proudly count camelid industry luminaries Drs. Murray Fowler, LaRue Johnson, David G. Pugh, Karen Baum, C. Norman Evans, David Anderson, Bill Franklin and legends John Mallon, Mary McGee Bennett and Kay Patterson among our ~270 farms/households, past and present. Since 1987, GALA has held an educational conference every year (see below) except 1992, the year the ILA held its national conference in Burlington, VT. This makes GALA one of – if not the – longest running lama conferences in the country. Maine will have hosted GALA members, as of the 2014 conference, 5 times over 3 decades: every ten years (plus 2 other times) since the first gathering of East Coast Llama Lovers (GALA’s predecessor) in Freedom! Be part of the tradition. Join the fun in Portland, ME, October 23-26 for the 2014 GALA Conference featuring John Mallon, trainer extraordinaire, Dr. David Pugh, DVM extraordinaire, Linda Cortright of Wild Fibers, and many others. Learn about sustainable farming peacefully alongside carnivores, animal communication, brand new ways to work your fiber, llamas as golf caddies -in action, not to mention the latest in care, health and use. Local foods featured (ayuh, lobster, too) at an exceptional venue during fall colors in Maine. Plan your vacation and come along. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1987: First [Official] GALA Conference, Syria, Virginia: Chairs: Dale Graham & Tom Reichert, Grave Mountain Lodge 1988: Roundtop, NY “Catskill”: Chair: Nancy Calhoun, Winter Clove Inn 1989: Wheeling, WV: Chairs: Janie Deemer & Susan White, Oglebay Park 1990: Killington, VT: Chair: Caroline Boeckman-Dunne, Killington Resort 1991: Hagerstown, MD “Black Eyed Susan Conference” Chair: Polly Schofield 1992: No GALA Conference - ILA held their national conference in Burlington, VT. Nancy Calhoun, Chair 6. 1993: Lancaster, PA “The Small Llama Producer” Chair: John Zerphey; Lancaster Host 7. 1994: Freedom, ME “GALA Goes to Camp” Chairs: Sheryl Tishman, Hilary Ware & Jay Stager; Hidden Valley Camp 8. 1995: Ocean City, MD “Beach Party” Chair: Barb Berg; The Carousel 9. 1996: Farmington, CT “A Harvest in New England” Chairs: Pat & Kate Bars, Sandy & Marc Page; Farmington Marriott 10. 1997: Rome, NY “Lama Trek ‘97” Chair: Gail Yohe; The Beeches Conference Center 11. 1998: Wilkes Barre, PA- “Meet Me in the Woods” Chairs: Karen O’Neill and Dick Snyder; The Woodlands 12. 1999: Lancaster, PA (with LAMAS) “Moving Toward the New Millennium” Chairs: Karen O’Neill and Bo Morris 13. 2000: Warren, VT “Warm and Woolly in the Yurt” Chairs: Susan Houston & The Herd of Northern Vermonters, Sugarbush Inn 14. 2001: West Springfield, MA, “Lamas En Mass- An Owner’s Manual” Chair: Sandy Page; Best Western 15. 2002: Bushkill, PA “Hands on Lamas” Chairs: Dan Goodyear, Lars Garrison, Hilary Ware; Pocmont Resort 16. 2003: Bushkill, PA “Hands on Lamas” Chairs: Dan Goodyear, Hilary Ware and John Conboy; Pocmont Resort ORVLA May 2013

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2014 OHIO STATE FAIR LLAMA AND FIBER SHOW – JULY 18-19 By Deb Arendas

Well the show is just a few months away and we hope you will be able to join us in Columbus for the 26th state fair llama show. It’s a great time together with our llama family and friends and wouldn’t be complete without you there. We will be having dinner in the arena – pizza and salad – at 5pm, and our exhibitors meeting will follow. Cost will be $6.00 per person 10 years and older and $4.00 per person for 5-9 year olds (under 5 is free). Please email or text me(llamadeb@aol.com or 330774-2513) before July 10th with your reservations – money will be collected at check in time along with your ILR fees. We will also once again have our silent auction. Please bring an item or 2 with you to donate to the auction – it can be new or gently used and does not have to be llama related. Anything and everything is welcome and appreciated. Proceeds from the auction go towards funding next years show and exhibitor awards. My hope is to raise enough to have a free dinner for everyone next year and with your help we can do it! If you have youth that will be doing youth judging please encourage them to read the ILR-SD Guidelines on the ILR website. Some of the questions on the test will have to do with general guidelines that youth should know. Please don’t let this discourage them from participating. We have had outstanding participation in the past and don’t want to see that diminish. Also please encourage your youth to bring their llama 4-H project book to fair to be judged. It does not have to be completed as it is judged accordingly with your county fair. It is judged on neatness, knowledge and activities with your animal. Any youth from any state can enter if they are showing an animal at this show. No scrapbooks or posters – project books only. Fiber folks – we have changed the requirements this year for your llama products. They can now contain 10-15% of another fiber – it just needs to be stated on your item when entered. We will also be offering grand and reserve champions for shorn and walking fleece classes for points only – there are no banners or awards being offered. So pack up your fans and your smiles and we will see you in July!! Please don’t hesitate to call with any questions or concerns 330-774-2513 (Debbie Arendas).

TOPLINE Notes from Cherreen about the Ohio State Fair Llama Show Well we finally made it. Talk about a miserable winter. I hope all of you and yours have came thru it healthy and happy. Time for spring, new happenings, and a Renewal of life itself. Also time to take a close look at your animals and decide what kind of haircut they will be receiving this year. The Ohio State Fiber Show is proud to have Tami Lash as our fiber Judge for the 2014 season. There are a few changes this year so please read all the information completely. Remember you do not need to be coming to the show or be showing to have your fleeces, and products entered and judged. I will gladly take them to the show, have them judged and return them to you. Just a note to remind you of the Composite Award. Are you really breeding the best of the best? Come, compete, and find out. I also need a few sponsors for this years show. Questions????? Cherreen 567-249-5294 Honnaleellamas@hotmail.com

GALA Conference Press Release The Greater Appalachian Llama and Alpaca Association (GALA) will be holding its 27th annual conference in Portland, Maine, at the Marriott Sable Oaks Hotel. GALA holds one of the nation’s most esteemed annual get-togethers with a strong emphasis on education for camelid owners. This year’s headliners include Bernie Rollin, PhD philosophy professor and noted animal ethicist; Dr. David Pugh, legendary camelid veterinarian; Darrell Anderson, pedigreed Livestock Specialist and llama judge; John Mallon, trainer extraordinaire; Dr. Daniel Bedenice, Tufts veterinarian, professor and researcher; and Linda Cortright, publisher of Wild Fibers magazine. Always featured at GALA conferences is a magnificent Fiber Room with workshops and activities for all. Plan a Maine vacation to include this conference.

LOOKING FORWARD TO A GREAT 2014 OHIO STATE FAIR LLAMA AND FIBER SHOW!!!!!

Conference registration will begin in August. In the meantime, you may view the headline speaker’s bios, a conference description in flyer form, and book a hotel reservation on line at: http://www.galaonline.org/conference2014.html.

NOTE: There is a mistake in the llama information that you download from The Ohio State Fair website. Classes 63, 65, 70 and 71 should say “Double and Single without crimp”. It only has single on their papers.

FENDER’S FISH HATCHERY & LLAMA FARM

ORVLA May 2013

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50527 T.R. 220 BALTIC, OH (740) 622-0681 fendersfishhatchery.com 17

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2014 OHIO STATE FAIR LLAMA AND FIBER SHOW – JULY 18-19 By Deb Arendas

Well the show is just a few months away and we hope you will be able to join us in Columbus for the 26th state fair llama show. It’s a great time together with our llama family and friends and wouldn’t be complete without you there. We will be having dinner in the arena – pizza and salad – at 5pm, and our exhibitors meeting will follow. Cost will be $6.00 per person 10 years and older and $4.00 per person for 5-9 year olds (under 5 is free). Please email or text me(llamadeb@aol.com or 330774-2513) before July 10th with your reservations – money will be collected at check in time along with your ILR fees. We will also once again have our silent auction. Please bring an item or 2 with you to donate to the auction – it can be new or gently used and does not have to be llama related. Anything and everything is welcome and appreciated. Proceeds from the auction go towards funding next years show and exhibitor awards. My hope is to raise enough to have a free dinner for everyone next year and with your help we can do it! If you have youth that will be doing youth judging please encourage them to read the ILR-SD Guidelines on the ILR website. Some of the questions on the test will have to do with general guidelines that youth should know. Please don’t let this discourage them from participating. We have had outstanding participation in the past and don’t want to see that diminish. Also please encourage your youth to bring their llama 4-H project book to fair to be judged. It does not have to be completed as it is judged accordingly with your county fair. It is judged on neatness, knowledge and activities with your animal. Any youth from any state can enter if they are showing an animal at this show. No scrapbooks or posters – project books only. Fiber folks – we have changed the requirements this year for your llama products. They can now contain 10-15% of another fiber – it just needs to be stated on your item when entered. We will also be offering grand and reserve champions for shorn and walking fleece classes for points only – there are no banners or awards being offered. So pack up your fans and your smiles and we will see you in July!! Please don’t hesitate to call with any questions or concerns 330-774-2513 (Debbie Arendas).

TOPLINE Notes from Cherreen about the Ohio State Fair Llama Show Well we finally made it. Talk about a miserable winter. I hope all of you and yours have came thru it healthy and happy. Time for spring, new happenings, and a Renewal of life itself. Also time to take a close look at your animals and decide what kind of haircut they will be receiving this year. The Ohio State Fiber Show is proud to have Tami Lash as our fiber Judge for the 2014 season. There are a few changes this year so please read all the information completely. Remember you do not need to be coming to the show or be showing to have your fleeces, and products entered and judged. I will gladly take them to the show, have them judged and return them to you. Just a note to remind you of the Composite Award. Are you really breeding the best of the best? Come, compete, and find out. I also need a few sponsors for this years show. Questions????? Cherreen 567-249-5294 Honnaleellamas@hotmail.com

GALA Conference Press Release The Greater Appalachian Llama and Alpaca Association (GALA) will be holding its 27th annual conference in Portland, Maine, at the Marriott Sable Oaks Hotel. GALA holds one of the nation’s most esteemed annual get-togethers with a strong emphasis on education for camelid owners. This year’s headliners include Bernie Rollin, PhD philosophy professor and noted animal ethicist; Dr. David Pugh, legendary camelid veterinarian; Darrell Anderson, pedigreed Livestock Specialist and llama judge; John Mallon, trainer extraordinaire; Dr. Daniel Bedenice, Tufts veterinarian, professor and researcher; and Linda Cortright, publisher of Wild Fibers magazine. Always featured at GALA conferences is a magnificent Fiber Room with workshops and activities for all. Plan a Maine vacation to include this conference.

LOOKING FORWARD TO A GREAT 2014 OHIO STATE FAIR LLAMA AND FIBER SHOW!!!!!

Conference registration will begin in August. In the meantime, you may view the headline speaker’s bios, a conference description in flyer form, and book a hotel reservation on line at: http://www.galaonline.org/conference2014.html.

NOTE: There is a mistake in the llama information that you download from The Ohio State Fair website. Classes 63, 65, 70 and 71 should say “Double and Single without crimp”. It only has single on their papers.

FENDER’S FISH HATCHERY & LLAMA FARM

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50527 T.R. 220 BALTIC, OH (740) 622-0681 fendersfishhatchery.com 17

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Spilling the Beans

submitted by Janice Schilling Indian Spring Llamas

I was born on a farm near Navarre Ohio. We had dairy cattle when I was young and beef cattle as I got older. I was always active in 4-H with the dairy and the beef along with other projects. I have 2 older brothers and neither of them are into anything agriculture. I guess I got the farm genes. My favorite pets as a child were my dogs and a goat that I had that always got into a lot of trouble. At one time he got on a friends brand new car that the brought to our house to show off. That was not a very good memory. I did enjoy the cattle that I took to the fair also. I graduated from Fairless High School and attended Kent State Canton for a year. I worked in retail until I married Ted in 1967. At that time we lived in the Beach City area. In 1971 we moved to the Baltic area and that is where I lived until 1997 when I moved to where I live at the present time. In 1977 Ted and I started our own business called Ted’s Trailer Repair. I was in charge of the book keeping and was busy raising our children. I have 2 boys and a daughter. Mindy is married and has a son, Jeff 16 and a daughter, Beth 13. Brent is in Atlanta and Chad lives in the Baltic area. We purchased our 1st llamas from Dennis Fender in 1992 and of course needed more. In 1997 this property was purchased and at one time I had around 60 llamas and have enjoyed many years showing llamas and being involved with ORVLA. At this time I am downsizing and own 20 llamas on my farm. I have had many memorable experiences at home and at shows. For close to 20 years I had an exhibit at the Tuscarawas County Fair with many llama friends helping with that project. I have been very involved with first the Holmes County Llama show and now the Daffodil Classic for many years. I like seeing others enjoying and being proud of their animals. My embarrassing moments at shows have been way too many and too numerous to mention. My best times have been just spending time with everyone and having a great time. I have met so many wonderful people in the llama community that I do not know where my life would be without all of you. My other favorite animal friend if my dog Tootsie. She is my guardian and best friend.

TOPLINE

Gastrointestinal Parasites in Camelids Management for the Herd Pamela G. Walker, DVM, MS, DipACVIM-LA Camelid Care Veterinary Services Grove City, OH 43123 pamwalker@hotmail.com

Internal parasites can be a problem in camelids without appropriate monitoring. There are many different parasites that need to be considered. Parasites that we consider to be the most important in older crias through adult camelids are Strongyles (which includes Nematodirus), Trichuris (Whipworms), Capillaria, Tapeworms, Coccidians and in some parts of the country Liver flukes and Lungworms. In younger crias, we are concerned about Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Coccidians. This article will concentrate on adult type parasites. There are many different Strongyle parasites and in a regular fecal floatation, the many different types can not be differentiated (with a few exceptions) and are referred to as Strongyle type of parasites. The major parasites found in the third compartment (C3 or true stomach) are Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia, and three that are like Ostertagia: Camelostrongylus, Teladorsagia and Marshallagia. Small intestinal worms are Cooperia, Nematodirus, Trichostrongylus, Lamanema and Tapeworms. These parasites rarely cause diarrhea, but rather weight loss, ill thrift and low protein. Whipworms, Capillaria, and Oesophagostomum are found in the cecum and large intestine. Whipworms and Capillaria are not commonly found in fecal analysis due in part to adult parasites shedding eggs intermittently and the eggs do not float very well unless saturated sugar solution is used. Both are clinically important and resistant to treatment. The larvae initially penetrate the small intestine where they mature, then the larvae migrate to the cecum and large intestine and become adults. The adults tunnel into the intestinal mucosa traumatizing vessels and in large enough numbers can cause enteritis and diarrhea. Camelids are susceptible to several species of liver flukes with Fasciola hepatica and F. magna being the most important in the U.S., particularly in the Pacific Northwest. A wet environment and intermediate hosts (snails and slugs) are needed in transmission. These parasites can cause an illthrift syndrome characterized by low protein and changes in blood work that indicates liver disease with specific increases in GGT and bilirubin concentration. Keeping in mind how often our camelids travel, any visiting animal showing signs of liver disease should be evaluated for possible liver flukes. Fluke eggs are not routinely found in a fecal sugar floatation, testing is best done by a serum ELISA test for Fasciola hepatica at Oregon or Colorado State University. Treatment is with Clorsulon which is in Ivomec Plus® or with Valbazen®. Whether or not Tapeworms can cause significant disease is controversial in some circles. They also are a parasite egg not frequently found in a routine fecal float. With increasing parasite load the eggs can be found more readily, especially when using saturated sugar solution and centrifugation method. What most owners notice are those pesky looking pieces of “rice” in the dung pile – or even continued on next page

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Spilling the Beans

submitted by Janice Schilling Indian Spring Llamas

I was born on a farm near Navarre Ohio. We had dairy cattle when I was young and beef cattle as I got older. I was always active in 4-H with the dairy and the beef along with other projects. I have 2 older brothers and neither of them are into anything agriculture. I guess I got the farm genes. My favorite pets as a child were my dogs and a goat that I had that always got into a lot of trouble. At one time he got on a friends brand new car that the brought to our house to show off. That was not a very good memory. I did enjoy the cattle that I took to the fair also. I graduated from Fairless High School and attended Kent State Canton for a year. I worked in retail until I married Ted in 1967. At that time we lived in the Beach City area. In 1971 we moved to the Baltic area and that is where I lived until 1997 when I moved to where I live at the present time. In 1977 Ted and I started our own business called Ted’s Trailer Repair. I was in charge of the book keeping and was busy raising our children. I have 2 boys and a daughter. Mindy is married and has a son, Jeff 16 and a daughter, Beth 13. Brent is in Atlanta and Chad lives in the Baltic area. We purchased our 1st llamas from Dennis Fender in 1992 and of course needed more. In 1997 this property was purchased and at one time I had around 60 llamas and have enjoyed many years showing llamas and being involved with ORVLA. At this time I am downsizing and own 20 llamas on my farm. I have had many memorable experiences at home and at shows. For close to 20 years I had an exhibit at the Tuscarawas County Fair with many llama friends helping with that project. I have been very involved with first the Holmes County Llama show and now the Daffodil Classic for many years. I like seeing others enjoying and being proud of their animals. My embarrassing moments at shows have been way too many and too numerous to mention. My best times have been just spending time with everyone and having a great time. I have met so many wonderful people in the llama community that I do not know where my life would be without all of you. My other favorite animal friend if my dog Tootsie. She is my guardian and best friend.

TOPLINE

Gastrointestinal Parasites in Camelids Management for the Herd Pamela G. Walker, DVM, MS, DipACVIM-LA Camelid Care Veterinary Services Grove City, OH 43123 pamwalker@hotmail.com

Internal parasites can be a problem in camelids without appropriate monitoring. There are many different parasites that need to be considered. Parasites that we consider to be the most important in older crias through adult camelids are Strongyles (which includes Nematodirus), Trichuris (Whipworms), Capillaria, Tapeworms, Coccidians and in some parts of the country Liver flukes and Lungworms. In younger crias, we are concerned about Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Coccidians. This article will concentrate on adult type parasites. There are many different Strongyle parasites and in a regular fecal floatation, the many different types can not be differentiated (with a few exceptions) and are referred to as Strongyle type of parasites. The major parasites found in the third compartment (C3 or true stomach) are Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia, and three that are like Ostertagia: Camelostrongylus, Teladorsagia and Marshallagia. Small intestinal worms are Cooperia, Nematodirus, Trichostrongylus, Lamanema and Tapeworms. These parasites rarely cause diarrhea, but rather weight loss, ill thrift and low protein. Whipworms, Capillaria, and Oesophagostomum are found in the cecum and large intestine. Whipworms and Capillaria are not commonly found in fecal analysis due in part to adult parasites shedding eggs intermittently and the eggs do not float very well unless saturated sugar solution is used. Both are clinically important and resistant to treatment. The larvae initially penetrate the small intestine where they mature, then the larvae migrate to the cecum and large intestine and become adults. The adults tunnel into the intestinal mucosa traumatizing vessels and in large enough numbers can cause enteritis and diarrhea. Camelids are susceptible to several species of liver flukes with Fasciola hepatica and F. magna being the most important in the U.S., particularly in the Pacific Northwest. A wet environment and intermediate hosts (snails and slugs) are needed in transmission. These parasites can cause an illthrift syndrome characterized by low protein and changes in blood work that indicates liver disease with specific increases in GGT and bilirubin concentration. Keeping in mind how often our camelids travel, any visiting animal showing signs of liver disease should be evaluated for possible liver flukes. Fluke eggs are not routinely found in a fecal sugar floatation, testing is best done by a serum ELISA test for Fasciola hepatica at Oregon or Colorado State University. Treatment is with Clorsulon which is in Ivomec Plus® or with Valbazen®. Whether or not Tapeworms can cause significant disease is controversial in some circles. They also are a parasite egg not frequently found in a routine fecal float. With increasing parasite load the eggs can be found more readily, especially when using saturated sugar solution and centrifugation method. What most owners notice are those pesky looking pieces of “rice” in the dung pile – or even continued on next page

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on occasion some very long strands of white “string”. The Tapeworm (Moniezia) of ruminants is very long (2 meters or more) and are passed to camelids when they ingest contaminated forage mites. Infection tends to be in young camelids (weanling to yearlings) taking 6 weeks to develop to adult parasites within the animal with the adult worm living for approximately 3 months. Although rare, I have seen them cause clinical disease, even death from impaction in a few cases. There are six types of Eimeria species or Coccidia that can infect camelids. These are species specific parasites (only infecting camelids) with differing degree of pathogenicity. Eimeria lamae is considered to be the most pathogenic of the “regular” (small and medium) coccidia, with Eimeria alpacae being the least pathogenic. Eimeria macusaniensis (E. mac) is the largest, slowest maturing and most significant of the coccidian parasites. There is another large coccidia that we are learning about and is being seen on some farms, Eimeria ivitaensis. It can be seen with E. mac and does look similar with a more elongated shape. In naïve animals, especially crias, it can be the only cause of diarrhea (author experience). For simplicity I refer to E. alpacae as small coccidia, E. lamae as medium coccidia and Eimeria macusaniensis as large coccidia. It is rare for adults to have clinical disease to “regular” coccidia, but E. mac can cause clinical disease in adults, frequently characterized by an ill-thrift syndrome or diarrhea in some acute cases. E. mac was first reported in the United States in 1988. Like other coccidian type parasites, it is species specific infecting all camelids (alpacas, llamas, guanacos and vicunas). There are many differences from “regular” coccidia. E. mac takes longer than other coccidia for the infection to mature in the animal (32 to 36 days, time until you can find the oocyst in a fecal analysis). It also sheds for longer in the feces, greater than 45 days. The youngest it can be seen is about 45 days of age versus 21 days of age for “regular” coccidia. E. mac can be seen in all ages, with clinical disease seen more frequently in younger crias and breeding age females traveling to a new farm. If E. mac is present on a farm, herd immunity will develop in adults; leaving the younger animals the most susceptible to infection and disease. It will also expose naïve animals (never exposed to E. mac before) that are new to the farm to infection with E. mac. These naïve animals should be monitored closely as serious disease (even fatalities) can occur before any clinical signs are seen. To do this, a fecal analysis should be performed when the animal comes to the farm and repeated in 30 and 60 days. This should allow for any new infections with E. mac and/or other significant parasites to be managed. Further complications are that clinical signs can range from no signs to severe diarrhea. Any animal that shows signs of ill thrift, weight loss, and/or diarrhea should be evaluated by your veterinarian. The first step is to run a proper fecal analysis (centrifugation using saturated sugar solution) and to determine if the protein and albumin concentrations in the blood are decreased (Chemistry panel). If you are suspicious of E. mac infection and the fecal is negative, but the protein and albumin concentrations are low it is advisable to treat with Ponazuril anyway (see below). Oregon State University has recently developed a special test to detect a component of DNA of both E. mac and Eimeria lamae in feces. This test is to be used in situations where E. mac is suspected, but no oocysts found in feces (earliest stages of infection). Several factors with regard to E. mac however are encouraging, one is that immunity does appear to develop in both individuals and the herd and another is that like other coccidian parasites, healthy adults can have incidental findings of E. mac oocysts in their feces without ill effects (author experience)

Although no formal research has been done on the best way to treat E. mac we know that Sulfas and Amprolium (Corid®) are only effective in the earliest stages of the infection. These stages are generally already past when the oocysts are found in feces. Another drug, Marquis® (Ponazuril), used to treat an equine protozoal spinal parasite, has also been used to treat E. mac. Ponazuril absorption has been studied in calves and has good absorption, suggesting that it would be absorbed in camelids. The advantage of this drug is that it is effective in the later stages of the infection. Because Marquis® is made for horses, it is too concentrated to use on alpacas as manufactured. It is very water soluble and can easily be diluted. Measure out 40 grams of Marquis® paste, using a gram scale (which can also be used to measure feces), and then add distilled water till the total weight is 60 grams and mix well; this results in a concentration of 100 mg/mL. Of this dilution, give 9 mg/lb (which equals 9 mL per 100 lbs), orally for 3 days. Since the equine paste has carrier as well as drug it is best to dilute the whole tube at one time, allowing for more equal distribution of the active ingredient (each tube has enough for 3 dilutions). Baycox® (Toltrazuril), the parent drug to Ponazuril, not approved for use in the United States, has been used for several years by camelid owners for the treatment of E.mac. Information provided to the author by Bayer demonstrated good absorption in cattle with only one dose. Suggesting this drug, made for piglets, would also work to treat E.mac. Dose: 9 mg/lb (1.8 mL/10 lb), orally, once. It does appear as if treatment with these drugs will reduce shedding of the oocysts and the ability of the oocyst to be infective. The importance of treating animals with clinical disease (ill-thrift, low albumin) is to reduce survival of the multiplying stages of the parasite and resultant damage to the intestines. Proper monitoring of internal parasites in camelids can be challenging, especially in larger herds. Ideally a fecal exam should be done on each animal before any de-worming drugs are administered; this can be impractical in a large herd. It is tempting to do group fecals to “test” a group/pen. That is a very bad idea and waste of money/time. The information has no value as you have no idea whose feces it is. Every animal has a different immune system and can be exposed to the same parasites with different abilities to fight off the parasites. This takes into consideration that 20 – 30% of animals on a farm harbor 70 – 80% of the worms. In small herds (10 – 20 animals) all animals should be tested, in a large herd, 10% (or more) of the animals (at least 10 – 20 animals) should be tested. If there are several barns, then choose 3 to 5 from each barn with the total equaling 20 (or more if feasible). When deciding which animals to choose, pick from a variety of ages and target the ones with the lowest Body Condition Score (BCS). This should be done a minimum of two to three times a year. In addition, it is a good idea to perform a fecal exam on every female immediately after giving birth as her immune system is at its lowest. Another opportune time would be to test crias a few weeks after weaning. Using this information a tailored de-worming program can be designed for any size herd. For this information to be meaningful, the correct procedure should be used. There are many different techniques and variations reported. A recent article1 compared several techniques and floatation times. The conclusion was that the centrifugation-floatation technique, using concentrated sugar (specific gravity = 1.27) and a 60 minute floatation time was superior in detecting the parasites that have the potential for causing problems in camelids. A float time of 3 to 4 hours is also acceptable (not 24 hours). It is important to be consistent for best results (personal communication).

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on occasion some very long strands of white “string”. The Tapeworm (Moniezia) of ruminants is very long (2 meters or more) and are passed to camelids when they ingest contaminated forage mites. Infection tends to be in young camelids (weanling to yearlings) taking 6 weeks to develop to adult parasites within the animal with the adult worm living for approximately 3 months. Although rare, I have seen them cause clinical disease, even death from impaction in a few cases. There are six types of Eimeria species or Coccidia that can infect camelids. These are species specific parasites (only infecting camelids) with differing degree of pathogenicity. Eimeria lamae is considered to be the most pathogenic of the “regular” (small and medium) coccidia, with Eimeria alpacae being the least pathogenic. Eimeria macusaniensis (E. mac) is the largest, slowest maturing and most significant of the coccidian parasites. There is another large coccidia that we are learning about and is being seen on some farms, Eimeria ivitaensis. It can be seen with E. mac and does look similar with a more elongated shape. In naïve animals, especially crias, it can be the only cause of diarrhea (author experience). For simplicity I refer to E. alpacae as small coccidia, E. lamae as medium coccidia and Eimeria macusaniensis as large coccidia. It is rare for adults to have clinical disease to “regular” coccidia, but E. mac can cause clinical disease in adults, frequently characterized by an ill-thrift syndrome or diarrhea in some acute cases. E. mac was first reported in the United States in 1988. Like other coccidian type parasites, it is species specific infecting all camelids (alpacas, llamas, guanacos and vicunas). There are many differences from “regular” coccidia. E. mac takes longer than other coccidia for the infection to mature in the animal (32 to 36 days, time until you can find the oocyst in a fecal analysis). It also sheds for longer in the feces, greater than 45 days. The youngest it can be seen is about 45 days of age versus 21 days of age for “regular” coccidia. E. mac can be seen in all ages, with clinical disease seen more frequently in younger crias and breeding age females traveling to a new farm. If E. mac is present on a farm, herd immunity will develop in adults; leaving the younger animals the most susceptible to infection and disease. It will also expose naïve animals (never exposed to E. mac before) that are new to the farm to infection with E. mac. These naïve animals should be monitored closely as serious disease (even fatalities) can occur before any clinical signs are seen. To do this, a fecal analysis should be performed when the animal comes to the farm and repeated in 30 and 60 days. This should allow for any new infections with E. mac and/or other significant parasites to be managed. Further complications are that clinical signs can range from no signs to severe diarrhea. Any animal that shows signs of ill thrift, weight loss, and/or diarrhea should be evaluated by your veterinarian. The first step is to run a proper fecal analysis (centrifugation using saturated sugar solution) and to determine if the protein and albumin concentrations in the blood are decreased (Chemistry panel). If you are suspicious of E. mac infection and the fecal is negative, but the protein and albumin concentrations are low it is advisable to treat with Ponazuril anyway (see below). Oregon State University has recently developed a special test to detect a component of DNA of both E. mac and Eimeria lamae in feces. This test is to be used in situations where E. mac is suspected, but no oocysts found in feces (earliest stages of infection). Several factors with regard to E. mac however are encouraging, one is that immunity does appear to develop in both individuals and the herd and another is that like other coccidian parasites, healthy adults can have incidental findings of E. mac oocysts in their feces without ill effects (author experience)

Although no formal research has been done on the best way to treat E. mac we know that Sulfas and Amprolium (Corid®) are only effective in the earliest stages of the infection. These stages are generally already past when the oocysts are found in feces. Another drug, Marquis® (Ponazuril), used to treat an equine protozoal spinal parasite, has also been used to treat E. mac. Ponazuril absorption has been studied in calves and has good absorption, suggesting that it would be absorbed in camelids. The advantage of this drug is that it is effective in the later stages of the infection. Because Marquis® is made for horses, it is too concentrated to use on alpacas as manufactured. It is very water soluble and can easily be diluted. Measure out 40 grams of Marquis® paste, using a gram scale (which can also be used to measure feces), and then add distilled water till the total weight is 60 grams and mix well; this results in a concentration of 100 mg/mL. Of this dilution, give 9 mg/lb (which equals 9 mL per 100 lbs), orally for 3 days. Since the equine paste has carrier as well as drug it is best to dilute the whole tube at one time, allowing for more equal distribution of the active ingredient (each tube has enough for 3 dilutions). Baycox® (Toltrazuril), the parent drug to Ponazuril, not approved for use in the United States, has been used for several years by camelid owners for the treatment of E.mac. Information provided to the author by Bayer demonstrated good absorption in cattle with only one dose. Suggesting this drug, made for piglets, would also work to treat E.mac. Dose: 9 mg/lb (1.8 mL/10 lb), orally, once. It does appear as if treatment with these drugs will reduce shedding of the oocysts and the ability of the oocyst to be infective. The importance of treating animals with clinical disease (ill-thrift, low albumin) is to reduce survival of the multiplying stages of the parasite and resultant damage to the intestines. Proper monitoring of internal parasites in camelids can be challenging, especially in larger herds. Ideally a fecal exam should be done on each animal before any de-worming drugs are administered; this can be impractical in a large herd. It is tempting to do group fecals to “test” a group/pen. That is a very bad idea and waste of money/time. The information has no value as you have no idea whose feces it is. Every animal has a different immune system and can be exposed to the same parasites with different abilities to fight off the parasites. This takes into consideration that 20 – 30% of animals on a farm harbor 70 – 80% of the worms. In small herds (10 – 20 animals) all animals should be tested, in a large herd, 10% (or more) of the animals (at least 10 – 20 animals) should be tested. If there are several barns, then choose 3 to 5 from each barn with the total equaling 20 (or more if feasible). When deciding which animals to choose, pick from a variety of ages and target the ones with the lowest Body Condition Score (BCS). This should be done a minimum of two to three times a year. In addition, it is a good idea to perform a fecal exam on every female immediately after giving birth as her immune system is at its lowest. Another opportune time would be to test crias a few weeks after weaning. Using this information a tailored de-worming program can be designed for any size herd. For this information to be meaningful, the correct procedure should be used. There are many different techniques and variations reported. A recent article1 compared several techniques and floatation times. The conclusion was that the centrifugation-floatation technique, using concentrated sugar (specific gravity = 1.27) and a 60 minute floatation time was superior in detecting the parasites that have the potential for causing problems in camelids. A float time of 3 to 4 hours is also acceptable (not 24 hours). It is important to be consistent for best results (personal communication).

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In addition there are techniques to give a general idea of number of parasite eggs present or a specific number of eggs present per volume of feces. The latter is preferred and is called the egg per gram (EPG) technique. Some parasites are variable egg shedders; and in some circumstances very low numbers of EPG found in a fecal exam may represent a significant problem (see discussions below). Please request the EPG method when discussing the type of fecal exam needed with your veterinarian. When discussing the results of fecal analysis, it is important to know how the numbers were obtained and what they mean. After proper preparation of the sample, each parasite egg seen on the slide is counted. As indicated previously, almost all Strongyle type parasites look very similar and are counted as a group. Nematodirus (a type of Strongyle) is a very unique egg and can and should be counted separately, especially as in some cases very low numbers of this parasite can represent a problem. Other distinctive eggs that should be counted separately are Whipworms, Capillaria, Tapeworms, and most Coccidians (especially the medium and large). A frequently asked question is at what EPG should I de-worm my animal? There is not a simple answer to that question, even veterinarians cannot agree on the number! Several factors need to be taken into consideration. The first is which types of parasite eggs are found in the fecal analysis, the second is the BCS and the third is the color of the mucous membranes (mm color) of the animal. What is agreed upon is that if a fecal analysis reveals a significant EPG count, and the animal in question has a poor BCS and pale or white mucous membranes, the animal should be de-wormed. Conversely if a routine fecal analysis shows a “normal” amount of Strongyle type eggs in an animal that has a good BCS and is not pale, de-worming is not needed or even desired. The big question is what is “normal” and what is “significant”? Truly it is a question without a definitive answer and you should work with your veterinarian to determine what is important for your herd. General guidelines for individual farms can be made after a series of fecal analysis over a period of time. If most of the time the results on your farm are less than 200 EPG of Strongyle type eggs then the de-worming program (drugs) being used is still effective. If that number starts to climb, then you may have the start of a problem. The EPG number is lower when considering parasites such as Whipworms, Capillaria, Nematodirus and E. mac. It is very important to keep in mind treating the herd versus an individual animal. MANY factors need to be taken into consideration when deciding to treat, also which drug to use. Younger animals on the farm are going to be at greater risk so monitoring crias and weanling weights (several times/week) and checking BCS and mucous membrane color monthly are very important. Next are the show animals and 1 to 2 year olds, they have several new stressors as they start to interact with the herd on an adult level and are entering puberty. Show animals should be tested several times during each show season. Not because they will pick up parasites at shows but due to inherent stresses related to showing (full fleece, travel, new environments, etc.). If you are an active breeding farm, everyone worries about what the new animal may bring to the farm, but rarely consider what parasites this animal will be exposed to after they arrive. A herd will develop a certain amount of herd-immunity to the existing parasites on the farm, any new arrival will be exposed to “novel” parasites and can get a severe infection. These parasites do not have to be “bad” parasites, just “new to them” parasites of which they have no resistance. If you have a camelid with a poor BCS, diarrhea (may also have soft feces or even normal pellets), anemia (pale continued on page 24 ORVLA May 2013

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In addition there are techniques to give a general idea of number of parasite eggs present or a specific number of eggs present per volume of feces. The latter is preferred and is called the egg per gram (EPG) technique. Some parasites are variable egg shedders; and in some circumstances very low numbers of EPG found in a fecal exam may represent a significant problem (see discussions below). Please request the EPG method when discussing the type of fecal exam needed with your veterinarian. When discussing the results of fecal analysis, it is important to know how the numbers were obtained and what they mean. After proper preparation of the sample, each parasite egg seen on the slide is counted. As indicated previously, almost all Strongyle type parasites look very similar and are counted as a group. Nematodirus (a type of Strongyle) is a very unique egg and can and should be counted separately, especially as in some cases very low numbers of this parasite can represent a problem. Other distinctive eggs that should be counted separately are Whipworms, Capillaria, Tapeworms, and most Coccidians (especially the medium and large). A frequently asked question is at what EPG should I de-worm my animal? There is not a simple answer to that question, even veterinarians cannot agree on the number! Several factors need to be taken into consideration. The first is which types of parasite eggs are found in the fecal analysis, the second is the BCS and the third is the color of the mucous membranes (mm color) of the animal. What is agreed upon is that if a fecal analysis reveals a significant EPG count, and the animal in question has a poor BCS and pale or white mucous membranes, the animal should be de-wormed. Conversely if a routine fecal analysis shows a “normal” amount of Strongyle type eggs in an animal that has a good BCS and is not pale, de-worming is not needed or even desired. The big question is what is “normal” and what is “significant”? Truly it is a question without a definitive answer and you should work with your veterinarian to determine what is important for your herd. General guidelines for individual farms can be made after a series of fecal analysis over a period of time. If most of the time the results on your farm are less than 200 EPG of Strongyle type eggs then the de-worming program (drugs) being used is still effective. If that number starts to climb, then you may have the start of a problem. The EPG number is lower when considering parasites such as Whipworms, Capillaria, Nematodirus and E. mac. It is very important to keep in mind treating the herd versus an individual animal. MANY factors need to be taken into consideration when deciding to treat, also which drug to use. Younger animals on the farm are going to be at greater risk so monitoring crias and weanling weights (several times/week) and checking BCS and mucous membrane color monthly are very important. Next are the show animals and 1 to 2 year olds, they have several new stressors as they start to interact with the herd on an adult level and are entering puberty. Show animals should be tested several times during each show season. Not because they will pick up parasites at shows but due to inherent stresses related to showing (full fleece, travel, new environments, etc.). If you are an active breeding farm, everyone worries about what the new animal may bring to the farm, but rarely consider what parasites this animal will be exposed to after they arrive. A herd will develop a certain amount of herd-immunity to the existing parasites on the farm, any new arrival will be exposed to “novel” parasites and can get a severe infection. These parasites do not have to be “bad” parasites, just “new to them” parasites of which they have no resistance. If you have a camelid with a poor BCS, diarrhea (may also have soft feces or even normal pellets), anemia (pale continued on page 24 ORVLA May 2013

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or white mucous membranes) and/or low protein concentration in the blood, finding even 200 EPG of Strongyle type or 5 to 10 EPG (or less) of Whipworm, Capillaria, Nematodirus and/or E. mac will warrant treatment. Many thought processes will need to be changed in the face of information learned by parasitologist and veterinarians over the last few years. One of the more major concepts to be changed is that camelid owners are notorious for wanting to always have a negative fecal result in the animal being tested. Another is the desire to “rotate” drugs with each treatment. Always having a negative fecal is a dangerous concept as it encourages the development of resistant parasites and it lowers the individual animals’ immunity to parasite infection. Due to the parasites developing resistance to current drugs used to de-worm, the strategies used to treat our animals must change. For many years parasitologist and veterinarians recommended that all animals in a herd should be treated with a de-worming drug at the same time. This concept has proven unsustainable year after year. We are seeing that despite the supposed “cleaning” up of all the animals on a farm, the parasites have still developed resistance. The current approach is to selectively choose to treat only animals in need of treatment. This takes into consideration that 20 – 30% of animals harbor 70 – 80% of the worms.2 This will leave a population of parasites in the alpacas that have not been exposed to specific drugs and will help prevent selection of parasites for resistance (term used by parasitologist is refugia). So the eggs of these parasites passed out onto the pastures will be non-resistant eggs and will hopefully out number the resistant eggs. What does this mean for the camelid owner? Using the guidelines presented earlier evaluate (BCS, weight, mucous membrane color – keep records!!) the whole herd (preferably by the same person each time) and do fecal floatation of the animals you identify at risk. Using all the information obtained to decide which animals to treat. With large herds, initially treat at the time of evaluation the animals that are pale, have low BCS or any alpaca that seems to be underweight for age and size. As this evaluation process continues, any animal that has a negative change in BCS, weight and/or mucous membrane color should be treated (and tested). A list should be kept of those treated and if a positive weight gain/BCS in thin animals is not seen, an individual fecal in those animals should be done, or rechecked if already tested. Also to keep in mind is that thin animals with parasites may have other concurrent problems so additional testing may be necessary. Specifically, have your veterinarian perform a Complete Blood Count (CBC with a spun packed cell volume – PCV) to check for anemia and a Chemistry analysis to assess liver and kidney function. Further testing may be necessary in certain situations, namely Mycoplasma haemolamae (a.k.a. “Epe”).

pole worm). Producers have the impression that this is a “new” parasite. IT IS NOT! It has always been everywhere across the US. What is new in the Northern herds is the Haemonchus parasite has become resistant to the de-worming drugs that have been used for years. Haemonchus is known for causing severe anemia and protein loss without significant weight and body condition loss with moderate to severe infection (1000 - > 5000 EPG). In addition, the immature form (too young to produce eggs) also suck blood and contribute to blood loss. This is why it is SO important to check mucous membrane color whenever you evaluate your animals. Camelids do not show weakness from anemia until their blood level is very low (PCV < 5-8%) in most cases. This means they can die overnight and look “normal” the previous day. Overuse of de-worming drugs has been the cause of this problem so it is important to change our way of thinking and not de-worm everyone in the herd, just the ones showing problems. De-wormers with new mechanisms of action are several years away from being available in the US. There are 3 classes of anthelmintics in use today with small ruminants: 1) Benzimidazoles (Panacur, Valbazen), 2) Cholinergic agonists (Levamisole), and 3) Avermectins, Milbemycins (Cydectin). None of these drugs are labeled for use in camelids, so the specific doses and frequency of administration are unknown. Several of these drugs have very narrow ranges of safety. Panacur has a very wide margin of safety, whereas Valbazen and Levamisole have a very narrow safety margin. The choice of which product to use is the big question. The best choice is to use the oldest class of drugs that still results in a 90% reduction of parasite eggs found in a fecal floatation. The only way to test this is to have a fecal analysis done before any de-worming is done and to repeat (on the same animal) the fecal analysis in 10 to 14 days. If you have the room to change pastures after de-worming, wait for 4 to 5 days after the last dose of drug is given before changing pastures. It is also recommended that when using oral products to withhold food overnight. This slows the flow of gastrointestinal contents and allows an increase in the time the drug is in contact with the parasite. Another way to increase the efficacy of a drug that seems to be losing its potency is to repeat dosing 12 hours apart, this will also increases the duration of contact between drug and parasite (works best with Panacur/ SafeGuard. Do not do this with Valbazen!). The dosing information provided should be reviewed with your veterinarian when you are considering which de-worming product to use. These are the drugs most commonly used as de-wormers, other drugs may have been used in camelids, check with your veterinarian for safety. continued on next page

Limited use of de-worming drugs does not include the use of Ivermectin or Dectomax due to the presence of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis (Meningeal worm) in the Mid-West and Eastern United States (anywhere white tail deer are found). These drugs are still the mainstay we use to prevent infection with Meningeal worm. Due to the overuse of these drugs, many parasites (not the Meningeal worm) have developed irreversible resistance to these drugs. In the Southern United States, this problem has been severe for many years. This drug resistance is now being seen in parasites on camelid farms in the Northern US. Of current interest is Haemonchus (a.k.a. the Barber continued on next page ORVLA May 2013

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or white mucous membranes) and/or low protein concentration in the blood, finding even 200 EPG of Strongyle type or 5 to 10 EPG (or less) of Whipworm, Capillaria, Nematodirus and/or E. mac will warrant treatment. Many thought processes will need to be changed in the face of information learned by parasitologist and veterinarians over the last few years. One of the more major concepts to be changed is that camelid owners are notorious for wanting to always have a negative fecal result in the animal being tested. Another is the desire to “rotate” drugs with each treatment. Always having a negative fecal is a dangerous concept as it encourages the development of resistant parasites and it lowers the individual animals’ immunity to parasite infection. Due to the parasites developing resistance to current drugs used to de-worm, the strategies used to treat our animals must change. For many years parasitologist and veterinarians recommended that all animals in a herd should be treated with a de-worming drug at the same time. This concept has proven unsustainable year after year. We are seeing that despite the supposed “cleaning” up of all the animals on a farm, the parasites have still developed resistance. The current approach is to selectively choose to treat only animals in need of treatment. This takes into consideration that 20 – 30% of animals harbor 70 – 80% of the worms.2 This will leave a population of parasites in the alpacas that have not been exposed to specific drugs and will help prevent selection of parasites for resistance (term used by parasitologist is refugia). So the eggs of these parasites passed out onto the pastures will be non-resistant eggs and will hopefully out number the resistant eggs. What does this mean for the camelid owner? Using the guidelines presented earlier evaluate (BCS, weight, mucous membrane color – keep records!!) the whole herd (preferably by the same person each time) and do fecal floatation of the animals you identify at risk. Using all the information obtained to decide which animals to treat. With large herds, initially treat at the time of evaluation the animals that are pale, have low BCS or any alpaca that seems to be underweight for age and size. As this evaluation process continues, any animal that has a negative change in BCS, weight and/or mucous membrane color should be treated (and tested). A list should be kept of those treated and if a positive weight gain/BCS in thin animals is not seen, an individual fecal in those animals should be done, or rechecked if already tested. Also to keep in mind is that thin animals with parasites may have other concurrent problems so additional testing may be necessary. Specifically, have your veterinarian perform a Complete Blood Count (CBC with a spun packed cell volume – PCV) to check for anemia and a Chemistry analysis to assess liver and kidney function. Further testing may be necessary in certain situations, namely Mycoplasma haemolamae (a.k.a. “Epe”).

pole worm). Producers have the impression that this is a “new” parasite. IT IS NOT! It has always been everywhere across the US. What is new in the Northern herds is the Haemonchus parasite has become resistant to the de-worming drugs that have been used for years. Haemonchus is known for causing severe anemia and protein loss without significant weight and body condition loss with moderate to severe infection (1000 - > 5000 EPG). In addition, the immature form (too young to produce eggs) also suck blood and contribute to blood loss. This is why it is SO important to check mucous membrane color whenever you evaluate your animals. Camelids do not show weakness from anemia until their blood level is very low (PCV < 5-8%) in most cases. This means they can die overnight and look “normal” the previous day. Overuse of de-worming drugs has been the cause of this problem so it is important to change our way of thinking and not de-worm everyone in the herd, just the ones showing problems. De-wormers with new mechanisms of action are several years away from being available in the US. There are 3 classes of anthelmintics in use today with small ruminants: 1) Benzimidazoles (Panacur, Valbazen), 2) Cholinergic agonists (Levamisole), and 3) Avermectins, Milbemycins (Cydectin). None of these drugs are labeled for use in camelids, so the specific doses and frequency of administration are unknown. Several of these drugs have very narrow ranges of safety. Panacur has a very wide margin of safety, whereas Valbazen and Levamisole have a very narrow safety margin. The choice of which product to use is the big question. The best choice is to use the oldest class of drugs that still results in a 90% reduction of parasite eggs found in a fecal floatation. The only way to test this is to have a fecal analysis done before any de-worming is done and to repeat (on the same animal) the fecal analysis in 10 to 14 days. If you have the room to change pastures after de-worming, wait for 4 to 5 days after the last dose of drug is given before changing pastures. It is also recommended that when using oral products to withhold food overnight. This slows the flow of gastrointestinal contents and allows an increase in the time the drug is in contact with the parasite. Another way to increase the efficacy of a drug that seems to be losing its potency is to repeat dosing 12 hours apart, this will also increases the duration of contact between drug and parasite (works best with Panacur/ SafeGuard. Do not do this with Valbazen!). The dosing information provided should be reviewed with your veterinarian when you are considering which de-worming product to use. These are the drugs most commonly used as de-wormers, other drugs may have been used in camelids, check with your veterinarian for safety. continued on next page

Limited use of de-worming drugs does not include the use of Ivermectin or Dectomax due to the presence of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis (Meningeal worm) in the Mid-West and Eastern United States (anywhere white tail deer are found). These drugs are still the mainstay we use to prevent infection with Meningeal worm. Due to the overuse of these drugs, many parasites (not the Meningeal worm) have developed irreversible resistance to these drugs. In the Southern United States, this problem has been severe for many years. This drug resistance is now being seen in parasites on camelid farms in the Northern US. Of current interest is Haemonchus (a.k.a. the Barber continued on next page ORVLA May 2013

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TOPLINE

Anthelmintic

Dosage/Concentration

Route

Ivomec (Ivermectin)

1.5 mL/100 lbs

SQ

Dectomax (Dormectin)

2.0 mL/100 lbs

SQ

Panacur/SafeGuard (Fenbendazole)

9.0 mL/100 lbs (9 - 23mg/lb, 100 mg/mL) High dose: 23 mg/lb, 23 mL/100 lbs 4.0 mL/100 lbs (8.8 mg/lb, 225 mg/mL)

Oral

Synanthic 22.5% Suspension (Oxfendazole) Strongid Paste (Pyrantel – pamoate)

4.5 mL paste/100 lbs (8 mg/lb, 180 mg pyrantel base/mL)

Valbazen (Albendazole)

Can repeat once in 7 days with severe infection 5.0 mL/100 lbs (5.5 mg/lb, 114 mg/mL)

Levasole (Levamisole)

Oral

Oral Repeat in 10 days Oral

Resistance develops quickly with regular use!! 2 bolus/100 lbs (4 mg/lb, 184 mg bolus)

Oral Repeat in 10 days

Cydectin (Moxidectin) Sheep drench 1mg/mL

20 mL/110 lbs, Once (0.18 mg/lb, 1 mg/mL) Use double dose chart on container.

Oral

Quest gel (Moxidectin) Horse 2% paste (20mg/ mL)

3 mL/300 lbs Once

Oral

Comments/ Precautions Not effective on Whipworms, Tapeworms Not effective on Whipworms, Tapeworms Very safe in all ages and if pregnant. High dose, safe in all ages. Same class of drug as Panacur. Metabolized to Fenbendazole. Not to be used with Levasole. Moderate margin of safety. Do not use if pregnant or less than 50 lbs. Can cause liver failure in young crias or if given for multiple days. Oral route safer than SQ. ONLY to be used if no other drugs work! Not good on Whipworms or Lung worms Use in crias > 4 months. Moderate margin of safety. May cause coughing after administration.

Use as is in adult llamas. Too concentrated as is to use in alpacas. May cause coughing after use.

continued on next page ORVLA May 2013

26

It must be remembered that use of chemicals to control parasites is only one step in an attempt to limit parasite infection in our camelids. Other factors such as herd/barn density, feeding practices (always feed hay off the ground), climate, age of animal, overall health of the herd, type of soil and the actual parasites already present in the animal/environment must be taken into consideration. With so many variables, developing a proper de-worming program for your herd will not happen overnight. It will take some careful thought by you and your veterinarian and a willingness to make decisions that at first seem contrary to what “you have always done”.

1. Comparison of methods to detect gastrointestinal parasites in llamas and alpacas. Cebra C, Stang B. JAVMA 2008; 232 (5):733-741. 2. Anthelmintic Resistance of Gastrointestinal Parasites in Small Ruminants. Fleming S, Craig T, Kaplan R, et al. J Vet Intern Med 2006;20:435-444. 3. Dr. Pam Walker – personal observation You can contact Dr. Walker at: Camelid Care Veterinary Clinic Pamela G. Walker, DVM 3971 Hoover Road, Ste. 353 Grove City, OH 419-306-9522

Caring And Comfort For The Down Lama By Cynthia Rossi

Diapers, hair dryers, Banixx spray, electric hoists, and good neighbors can provide comfort to a llama or alpaca who cannot rise! Caring for what were once called “easy to care for” pets for over two decades has required using basic, inexpensive and sensible items to benefit both lama and are caregiver. First obtain proper veterinary guidance to assess the needs of a llama or alpaca that cannot rise on its own. Respected camelid experts agree that getting the animal to rise is essential to healing; the longer the animal is recumbent, the greater the chance that it will not rise again on its own. The time for accomplishing this varies with factors including the cause, the animal’s condition and age. Here are some products and actions that can be beneficial to all involved during the downtime. BEDDING Lowe’s Home Improvement Centers carry lightweight, but durable, closed foam rubber matting that is sold by the foot. Located in the flooring section, this gray matting is cut from huge rolls as requested by the customer. Because it is a closed cell foam, it does not absorb liquid and is lightweight, thus easy to carry outside to rise off. The cost is approximately $4.99 per linear foot and the width is three (3) feet. A six foot long section costs $30. If possible, buy two sections and use the extra while the first is drying. This foam matting has proven to be durable and affordable and is used as year round bedding over concrete resting areas for the llamas here. DIAPERS AND KEEPING DRY Lying in urine and fecal matter is detrimental and a major challenge to proper care and healing. Place clean hay on the rubber mat and change whenever needed. Then place a diaper and/or bed under pad beneath the hind end of the lama and change when soiled. Thrift stores often carry bags of donated adult diapers priced at $5 or less. Local discount and medical supply/home health supply houses also sell them at affordable prices. Prepare to make at least four changes per 24 hours. These simple steps minimize or prevent sores and ulcercontinued on page 36 ations while enhancing creature comfort. 27

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE

Anthelmintic

Dosage/Concentration

Route

Ivomec (Ivermectin)

1.5 mL/100 lbs

SQ

Dectomax (Dormectin)

2.0 mL/100 lbs

SQ

Panacur/SafeGuard (Fenbendazole)

9.0 mL/100 lbs (9 - 23mg/lb, 100 mg/mL) High dose: 23 mg/lb, 23 mL/100 lbs 4.0 mL/100 lbs (8.8 mg/lb, 225 mg/mL)

Oral

Synanthic 22.5% Suspension (Oxfendazole) Strongid Paste (Pyrantel – pamoate)

4.5 mL paste/100 lbs (8 mg/lb, 180 mg pyrantel base/mL)

Valbazen (Albendazole)

Can repeat once in 7 days with severe infection 5.0 mL/100 lbs (5.5 mg/lb, 114 mg/mL)

Levasole (Levamisole)

Oral

Oral Repeat in 10 days Oral

Resistance develops quickly with regular use!! 2 bolus/100 lbs (4 mg/lb, 184 mg bolus)

Oral Repeat in 10 days

Cydectin (Moxidectin) Sheep drench 1mg/mL

20 mL/110 lbs, Once (0.18 mg/lb, 1 mg/mL) Use double dose chart on container.

Oral

Quest gel (Moxidectin) Horse 2% paste (20mg/ mL)

3 mL/300 lbs Once

Oral

Comments/ Precautions Not effective on Whipworms, Tapeworms Not effective on Whipworms, Tapeworms Very safe in all ages and if pregnant. High dose, safe in all ages. Same class of drug as Panacur. Metabolized to Fenbendazole. Not to be used with Levasole. Moderate margin of safety. Do not use if pregnant or less than 50 lbs. Can cause liver failure in young crias or if given for multiple days. Oral route safer than SQ. ONLY to be used if no other drugs work! Not good on Whipworms or Lung worms Use in crias > 4 months. Moderate margin of safety. May cause coughing after administration.

Use as is in adult llamas. Too concentrated as is to use in alpacas. May cause coughing after use.

continued on next page ORVLA May 2013

26

It must be remembered that use of chemicals to control parasites is only one step in an attempt to limit parasite infection in our camelids. Other factors such as herd/barn density, feeding practices (always feed hay off the ground), climate, age of animal, overall health of the herd, type of soil and the actual parasites already present in the animal/environment must be taken into consideration. With so many variables, developing a proper de-worming program for your herd will not happen overnight. It will take some careful thought by you and your veterinarian and a willingness to make decisions that at first seem contrary to what “you have always done”.

1. Comparison of methods to detect gastrointestinal parasites in llamas and alpacas. Cebra C, Stang B. JAVMA 2008; 232 (5):733-741. 2. Anthelmintic Resistance of Gastrointestinal Parasites in Small Ruminants. Fleming S, Craig T, Kaplan R, et al. J Vet Intern Med 2006;20:435-444. 3. Dr. Pam Walker – personal observation You can contact Dr. Walker at: Camelid Care Veterinary Clinic Pamela G. Walker, DVM 3971 Hoover Road, Ste. 353 Grove City, OH 419-306-9522

Caring And Comfort For The Down Lama By Cynthia Rossi

Diapers, hair dryers, Banixx spray, electric hoists, and good neighbors can provide comfort to a llama or alpaca who cannot rise! Caring for what were once called “easy to care for” pets for over two decades has required using basic, inexpensive and sensible items to benefit both lama and are caregiver. First obtain proper veterinary guidance to assess the needs of a llama or alpaca that cannot rise on its own. Respected camelid experts agree that getting the animal to rise is essential to healing; the longer the animal is recumbent, the greater the chance that it will not rise again on its own. The time for accomplishing this varies with factors including the cause, the animal’s condition and age. Here are some products and actions that can be beneficial to all involved during the downtime. BEDDING Lowe’s Home Improvement Centers carry lightweight, but durable, closed foam rubber matting that is sold by the foot. Located in the flooring section, this gray matting is cut from huge rolls as requested by the customer. Because it is a closed cell foam, it does not absorb liquid and is lightweight, thus easy to carry outside to rise off. The cost is approximately $4.99 per linear foot and the width is three (3) feet. A six foot long section costs $30. If possible, buy two sections and use the extra while the first is drying. This foam matting has proven to be durable and affordable and is used as year round bedding over concrete resting areas for the llamas here. DIAPERS AND KEEPING DRY Lying in urine and fecal matter is detrimental and a major challenge to proper care and healing. Place clean hay on the rubber mat and change whenever needed. Then place a diaper and/or bed under pad beneath the hind end of the lama and change when soiled. Thrift stores often carry bags of donated adult diapers priced at $5 or less. Local discount and medical supply/home health supply houses also sell them at affordable prices. Prepare to make at least four changes per 24 hours. These simple steps minimize or prevent sores and ulcercontinued on page 36 ations while enhancing creature comfort. 27

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE Sunshine Report

Synpathry to Bill and Phyllis Wycoff on the passing of their son, Billy Morgan.

ORVLA May 2013

28

29

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE Sunshine Report

Synpathry to Bill and Phyllis Wycoff on the passing of their son, Billy Morgan.

ORVLA May 2013

28

29

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE Ohio River Valley Llama Association Membership Application 2014 Dues: $25 per calendar year Quarterly Newsletter - Membership Directory Quarterly Meetings - Great Way to Advertise

_____ New Member ____ Membership Renewal

Primary Name:_________________________ Additional Name: _____________________________ Farm Name:________________________________ Youth Name: ___________________________ Address:_____________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________ State: ______ Zip + four: ______________ County: ____________________________________________ Home Phone: _______________________________ Work Phone: ___________________________ Cell Phone: _________________________________ Fax: __________________________________ E-mail:____________________________________________________________________________ Website Address: ___________________________________________________________________ ____Linked on ORVLA website (to be linked, member must agree to link back to ORVLA’s website.) ____I agree to place a link to ORVLA on my website. Census: (optional) Number of Llamas: Females____ Males_____ Geldings_____ Number of Alpacas: Females____ Males_____ Geldings_____ Membership Fee @ $25.00 ____________ Business Card Ad in Topline for one year (include card) @ $20.00 ____________ Business Card Ad in Directory (include card) @ $5.00 ____________ Total Amount Enclosed ____________ ____I am enclosing a check (insert check #) _____________ Please make your check payable to ORVLA and mail with this form to: Pat Linkhorn 56032 Claysville Rd. Cumberland, OH 43732 ORVLA Youth Group Membership also available. Questions: orvla01@windstream.net or 740-638-5041 (home) 740-680-0193 (cell

ORVLA May 2013

30

Camelid Community PRESS RELEASE

TOPLINE

“Fiber as Business” Conference Offers Options to Camelid Owners As both alpaca and llama farms have begun to take more interest in the fiber side of raising their animals, many are confused about where to start. If you are wondering how to generate an income flow from all that gorgeous fiber walking around in your pasture, Camelid Community’s “Fiber as Business” conference August 9-10 can provide you with the tools you need to make some money with your fiber. Based on Camelid Community’s earlier survey, we know many llama and alpaca owners are eager to do just that. Held at the Shisler Center in Wooster, Ohio, the conference will answer questions such as: What can I do with my fiber? How can I do it? Now that I’ve got something, how do I make money with it? After I make money, how do I keep the IRS happy? In short, you will learn the whole process from what to do after you shear your animals all the way to how to put your fiber profits in the bank and not give it all to the IRS. We want to provide fleece producers throughout the camelid industry the information they need in order to benefit from the services currently available in the industry. We know one size doesn’t fit all and are confident the range of options presented during the weekend will help you find the possibilities that might work for you. We want you to be able to create your own fiber business plan no matter how large or small and no matter what type of alpacas or llamas you have. Representatives of five fiber organizations will make presentations that focus on descriptions of their groups and services, what they expect from people (how to prepare fleeces, etc.) and what people can expect from them (money, product, etc.), typical turnaround time and how people can participate with them and make money using their services. After individual sessions, representatives will participate in a Q&A panel discussion so conference-goers have a chance to get their questions answered. The five groups include Alpaca Fiber Cooperative of North America, The Alpaca Blanket Project, New England Alpaca Fiber Pool, Pacific Northwest Llama Fiber Cooperative and Natural Fiber Producers. Two or three fiber mills will also make presentations on their services, expectations and the products they can provide llama and alpaca owners. You can have the most wonderful product in the world, but there’s no income flow if you can’t sell it. Tara Swiger—yarn maker, author and teacher—has learned what it takes to be successful and will share her marketing tips with conference participants. Author of the book Market Yourself—A marketing system for smart and creative business owners, Tara will present a session on using online marketing and social media to sell yourself and your products and another session on making the most of local and regional events and opportunities. Tara Swiger guides crafty businesses in creating marketing plans, maps and to-do lists that they’ll actually stick with. She holds digital and in-person workshops for artists, makers and writers. Her first business sold her handmade yarn, often using fiber from local farms. She has also owned a handmade-yarn-only yarn shop, consulted on social marketing for tech start-ups and retailers and has been featured in international craft publications such as Crafty and Inside Crochet. 31

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE Ohio River Valley Llama Association Membership Application 2014 Dues: $25 per calendar year Quarterly Newsletter - Membership Directory Quarterly Meetings - Great Way to Advertise

_____ New Member ____ Membership Renewal

Primary Name:_________________________ Additional Name: _____________________________ Farm Name:________________________________ Youth Name: ___________________________ Address:_____________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________ State: ______ Zip + four: ______________ County: ____________________________________________ Home Phone: _______________________________ Work Phone: ___________________________ Cell Phone: _________________________________ Fax: __________________________________ E-mail:____________________________________________________________________________ Website Address: ___________________________________________________________________ ____Linked on ORVLA website (to be linked, member must agree to link back to ORVLA’s website.) ____I agree to place a link to ORVLA on my website. Census: (optional) Number of Llamas: Females____ Males_____ Geldings_____ Number of Alpacas: Females____ Males_____ Geldings_____ Membership Fee @ $25.00 ____________ Business Card Ad in Topline for one year (include card) @ $20.00 ____________ Business Card Ad in Directory (include card) @ $5.00 ____________ Total Amount Enclosed ____________ ____I am enclosing a check (insert check #) _____________ Please make your check payable to ORVLA and mail with this form to: Pat Linkhorn 56032 Claysville Rd. Cumberland, OH 43732 ORVLA Youth Group Membership also available. Questions: orvla01@windstream.net or 740-638-5041 (home) 740-680-0193 (cell

ORVLA May 2013

30

Camelid Community PRESS RELEASE

TOPLINE

“Fiber as Business” Conference Offers Options to Camelid Owners As both alpaca and llama farms have begun to take more interest in the fiber side of raising their animals, many are confused about where to start. If you are wondering how to generate an income flow from all that gorgeous fiber walking around in your pasture, Camelid Community’s “Fiber as Business” conference August 9-10 can provide you with the tools you need to make some money with your fiber. Based on Camelid Community’s earlier survey, we know many llama and alpaca owners are eager to do just that. Held at the Shisler Center in Wooster, Ohio, the conference will answer questions such as: What can I do with my fiber? How can I do it? Now that I’ve got something, how do I make money with it? After I make money, how do I keep the IRS happy? In short, you will learn the whole process from what to do after you shear your animals all the way to how to put your fiber profits in the bank and not give it all to the IRS. We want to provide fleece producers throughout the camelid industry the information they need in order to benefit from the services currently available in the industry. We know one size doesn’t fit all and are confident the range of options presented during the weekend will help you find the possibilities that might work for you. We want you to be able to create your own fiber business plan no matter how large or small and no matter what type of alpacas or llamas you have. Representatives of five fiber organizations will make presentations that focus on descriptions of their groups and services, what they expect from people (how to prepare fleeces, etc.) and what people can expect from them (money, product, etc.), typical turnaround time and how people can participate with them and make money using their services. After individual sessions, representatives will participate in a Q&A panel discussion so conference-goers have a chance to get their questions answered. The five groups include Alpaca Fiber Cooperative of North America, The Alpaca Blanket Project, New England Alpaca Fiber Pool, Pacific Northwest Llama Fiber Cooperative and Natural Fiber Producers. Two or three fiber mills will also make presentations on their services, expectations and the products they can provide llama and alpaca owners. You can have the most wonderful product in the world, but there’s no income flow if you can’t sell it. Tara Swiger—yarn maker, author and teacher—has learned what it takes to be successful and will share her marketing tips with conference participants. Author of the book Market Yourself—A marketing system for smart and creative business owners, Tara will present a session on using online marketing and social media to sell yourself and your products and another session on making the most of local and regional events and opportunities. Tara Swiger guides crafty businesses in creating marketing plans, maps and to-do lists that they’ll actually stick with. She holds digital and in-person workshops for artists, makers and writers. Her first business sold her handmade yarn, often using fiber from local farms. She has also owned a handmade-yarn-only yarn shop, consulted on social marketing for tech start-ups and retailers and has been featured in international craft publications such as Crafty and Inside Crochet. 31

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE Once you’ve made some money with your product, you’ll be glad you had some accounting and tax advice from nationally recognized speaker David Krebs, president of Krebs & Co. Seminars and chief visionary officer of the CPA Advisory Group. David consults and speaks to more than 7,000 small business owners and accountants annually. Among his clients are a number of alpaca and llama farms and fiber related businesses. We are also working on getting an excellent representative from another part of the larger U. S. fiber industry for our Saturday luncheon keynote speaker. More conference details will follow as they become finalized. Meanwhile, if you have any questions regarding the conference please contact Barb Baker (bebaker@earthlink.net) or Sheila Fugina (bsfugina@frontier.com). If you’d like to come early or stay later, you’ll find Wooster is located in the heart of Amish country in a lovely, laid back setting with great restaurants that serve local produce, meats and Ohio wine. Come and enjoy all the area has to offer—it’s a beautiful time of year in northeastern Ohio. Camelid Community wants to thank those who responded to the earlier fiber conference survey and let you know that we did, indeed, hear you. Though we know many who responded live in other parts of the country, the conference location was chosen in great part because so many alpaca and llama owners who responded live within reasonable driving distance of the conference center. Keeping costs as low as possible for attendees was also a consideration. Based on the response to this conference, we hope to hold a similar one in another part of the country.

It’s Survey Time!

TOPLINE

Please take the time to take the ORVLA Survey. You can either fill it out here and mail to: Pat Linkhorn Topline Editor 56032 Claysville Road Cumberland, OH 43732 OR You can visit the link below to take the survey on-line. https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ORVLASurvey

This survey is anonymous. No identifying information is collected when you take it on-line. 1. Would you be interested in attending some pot luck meetings at a park or other facility? Please circle your answer. Yes No 2. Do you know of any places where we could have our meetings?

How To Kill An Organization

reprinted from Lama Lingo, March 1997 • Don’t participate beyond paying your dues - let “them” handle things. Then complain that members have no voice. • Decline all office and committee appointments - you’re too busy. Then offer vociferous advice on how “they” should do things. • If appointed to a committee, don’t work - it’s a courtesy appointment. Then complain because the organization has stagnated. • If you do not attend regular meetings and committee meetings don’t introduce new ideas to those who do. Then you can play “Devil’s Advocate” to those ideas submitted by others. • Don’t join membership drives and encourage others to become members - that’s time consuming. Then complain that membership is not growing. • Don’t read newsletters and other information sent you - it’s not that important. Then complain that you’re not kept informed, • Don’t volunteer your talents, that’s ego fulfillment. Then complain that you’re never asked to participate and everything is run by the “click”. • And, if by chance, the organization grows in spite of your contributions. Grasp every opportunity to tell everyone how tough it was: how hard you worked through the years to bring the organization to its present level of success.

ORVLA May 2013

32

3. What suggestions do you have for future meetings?

4. Who would you like to have for future speakers?

5. Would your farm be willing to host a meeting? If so, please enter your farm name with your answer or e-mail ORVLA at orvla01@windstream.net if you wish to remain anonymous.

33

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE Once you’ve made some money with your product, you’ll be glad you had some accounting and tax advice from nationally recognized speaker David Krebs, president of Krebs & Co. Seminars and chief visionary officer of the CPA Advisory Group. David consults and speaks to more than 7,000 small business owners and accountants annually. Among his clients are a number of alpaca and llama farms and fiber related businesses. We are also working on getting an excellent representative from another part of the larger U. S. fiber industry for our Saturday luncheon keynote speaker. More conference details will follow as they become finalized. Meanwhile, if you have any questions regarding the conference please contact Barb Baker (bebaker@earthlink.net) or Sheila Fugina (bsfugina@frontier.com). If you’d like to come early or stay later, you’ll find Wooster is located in the heart of Amish country in a lovely, laid back setting with great restaurants that serve local produce, meats and Ohio wine. Come and enjoy all the area has to offer—it’s a beautiful time of year in northeastern Ohio. Camelid Community wants to thank those who responded to the earlier fiber conference survey and let you know that we did, indeed, hear you. Though we know many who responded live in other parts of the country, the conference location was chosen in great part because so many alpaca and llama owners who responded live within reasonable driving distance of the conference center. Keeping costs as low as possible for attendees was also a consideration. Based on the response to this conference, we hope to hold a similar one in another part of the country.

It’s Survey Time!

TOPLINE

Please take the time to take the ORVLA Survey. You can either fill it out here and mail to: Pat Linkhorn Topline Editor 56032 Claysville Road Cumberland, OH 43732 OR You can visit the link below to take the survey on-line. https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ORVLASurvey

This survey is anonymous. No identifying information is collected when you take it on-line. 1. Would you be interested in attending some pot luck meetings at a park or other facility? Please circle your answer. Yes No 2. Do you know of any places where we could have our meetings?

How To Kill An Organization

reprinted from Lama Lingo, March 1997 • Don’t participate beyond paying your dues - let “them” handle things. Then complain that members have no voice. • Decline all office and committee appointments - you’re too busy. Then offer vociferous advice on how “they” should do things. • If appointed to a committee, don’t work - it’s a courtesy appointment. Then complain because the organization has stagnated. • If you do not attend regular meetings and committee meetings don’t introduce new ideas to those who do. Then you can play “Devil’s Advocate” to those ideas submitted by others. • Don’t join membership drives and encourage others to become members - that’s time consuming. Then complain that membership is not growing. • Don’t read newsletters and other information sent you - it’s not that important. Then complain that you’re not kept informed, • Don’t volunteer your talents, that’s ego fulfillment. Then complain that you’re never asked to participate and everything is run by the “click”. • And, if by chance, the organization grows in spite of your contributions. Grasp every opportunity to tell everyone how tough it was: how hard you worked through the years to bring the organization to its present level of success.

ORVLA May 2013

32

3. What suggestions do you have for future meetings?

4. Who would you like to have for future speakers?

5. Would your farm be willing to host a meeting? If so, please enter your farm name with your answer or e-mail ORVLA at orvla01@windstream.net if you wish to remain anonymous.

33

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

6. Regarding the Summer Solstice Show that ORVLA has every year, would you like to see any changes made?

7. Do you have any suggestions for events you would be interested in attending?

8. Would you like to see the Fall Hike continued? Please circle your answer. Yes No 9. Who would you like to see ORVLA support and give donations to?

10. What could we do to increase membership?

11. Do you have any suggestions for the Board? We are in place to represent the membership, but we need you to let us know what you want.

12. Has ORVLA done anything that you disagree with in the past few years?.

13. What kind of information would you like to see in TopLine?

TOPLINE

Calendar of Events

July 18 and 19, 2014 26th Annual Ohio State Fair Llama Show Email or text llamadeb@aol.com or 330-774-2513 for info http://www.ohiostatefair.com/osf/downloadbooks/livestock/2014/llama_entry.pdf September 28, 2014 – 9:00 A.M. 24th Annual Coshocton County Llama Show Coshocton County Fairgrounds – Hunter Arena Download an entry form on our website August 8 and 9, 2014 (llama check-in and shorn fleece judging Thurs., Aug. 7) WV Grand Llama and Fleece Show ILR Sanctioned; double halter and single performance and fleece New this year: Alpaca shorn fleece free entry tickets and parking for exhibitors Superintendent: Terese Evenson: asgaardllamas@yahoo.com 606-473-0119 – home; 606-316-6362 - cell Clerk: Diana Lewis: cdlewis@zoominternet.net 740 886 7086 – home; 740-550-0730 – cell Visit us on Facebook: WV Grand Llama and Fleece Show http://statefairofwv.com/ August 9 and 10, 2014 Camelid Community’s Fiber as Business Conference Shisler Conference Center The conference will answer questions such as: What can I do with my fiber? How can I do it? Now that I’ve got something, how do I make money with it? After I make money, how do I keep the IRS happy? In short, you will learn the whole process from what to do after you shear your animals all the way to how to put your fiber profits in the bank and not give it all to the IRS. http://www.camelidcommunity.us/ September 28, 2014 – 9:00 A.M. 24th Annual Coshocton County Llama Show Coshocton County Fairgrounds – Hunter Arena Download an entry form from our website Please submit your calendar events to: Pat Linkhorn orvla01@windstream.net

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ORVLA May 2013

34

35

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

6. Regarding the Summer Solstice Show that ORVLA has every year, would you like to see any changes made?

7. Do you have any suggestions for events you would be interested in attending?

8. Would you like to see the Fall Hike continued? Please circle your answer. Yes No 9. Who would you like to see ORVLA support and give donations to?

10. What could we do to increase membership?

11. Do you have any suggestions for the Board? We are in place to represent the membership, but we need you to let us know what you want.

12. Has ORVLA done anything that you disagree with in the past few years?.

13. What kind of information would you like to see in TopLine?

TOPLINE

Calendar of Events

July 18 and 19, 2014 26th Annual Ohio State Fair Llama Show Email or text llamadeb@aol.com or 330-774-2513 for info http://www.ohiostatefair.com/osf/downloadbooks/livestock/2014/llama_entry.pdf September 28, 2014 – 9:00 A.M. 24th Annual Coshocton County Llama Show Coshocton County Fairgrounds – Hunter Arena Download an entry form on our website August 8 and 9, 2014 (llama check-in and shorn fleece judging Thurs., Aug. 7) WV Grand Llama and Fleece Show ILR Sanctioned; double halter and single performance and fleece New this year: Alpaca shorn fleece free entry tickets and parking for exhibitors Superintendent: Terese Evenson: asgaardllamas@yahoo.com 606-473-0119 – home; 606-316-6362 - cell Clerk: Diana Lewis: cdlewis@zoominternet.net 740 886 7086 – home; 740-550-0730 – cell Visit us on Facebook: WV Grand Llama and Fleece Show http://statefairofwv.com/ August 9 and 10, 2014 Camelid Community’s Fiber as Business Conference Shisler Conference Center The conference will answer questions such as: What can I do with my fiber? How can I do it? Now that I’ve got something, how do I make money with it? After I make money, how do I keep the IRS happy? In short, you will learn the whole process from what to do after you shear your animals all the way to how to put your fiber profits in the bank and not give it all to the IRS. http://www.camelidcommunity.us/ September 28, 2014 – 9:00 A.M. 24th Annual Coshocton County Llama Show Coshocton County Fairgrounds – Hunter Arena Download an entry form from our website Please submit your calendar events to: Pat Linkhorn orvla01@windstream.net

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ORVLA May 2013

34

35

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE

ORVLA Recommended Vets

ORVLA ADS TOO MUCH COLOR!

Want to trade one young brown female llama for one young white female llama. Gordon Yanke Spice of Life Llamas 937 206-4878 937 471-7308 NOT YOUR SALON BLOW OUT It is essential to dry the skin and fiber. The diaper/under pad will minimize the work involved. Old towels can be used to absorb urine from the skin and fiber. Then blow dry (also available at thrift stores for a couple of dollars) and fluff the fiber to minimize irritation and maximize comfort. Drying time is just minutes with a high speed dryer. This step is critical in cold weather. TREATING SORES If a sore or irritation occurs, Banixx Wound Care or Zymox can be sprayed on the affected area. Both are available though livestock catalogs and farm stores. They do not require a prescription, are non-irritating, and promote healing. Two other products available at drug stores provide good protection: Zinc oxide cream and Baudreaux’s Butt Paste, an Oprah favorite. EXERCISE It is important to exercise the lama’s legs. Place a blanket on the ground along the side the lama and roll the lama onto its side on the blanket. This is the easiest time to use the blow dryer. After drying, work each leg in a “range of motion” to prevent contracted muscles. As the lama improves, you will notice increased action and reaction. Gently massage each leg. Then roll the lama onto its other side and repeat these steps. Ideally you will do this 3 to 4 times each day. THE ELEVATOR RIDE I hire help to assist lifting down lamas, for many year using a sling and a cumbersome ratchet type device. Recently lama owner friend, Deb Arendas, recommended a remote-controlled electric hoist available through Harbor Freight Tools. The 440 capacity model was on sale for $99.99 and the 880 pound capacity model was on sale for $124.99. You can order through an 800 number an often free shipping is offered. Both sizes include bolts and hangers. I purchased the 880 pound version and a kind neighbor installed it onto a 1-1/2 inch solid steel bar that extends over the 5-1/2 foot wide wash stall in minutes. The sling was made by another neighbor years ago from a terry bath sheet that utilizes two Western style horse girths in the side seams. Chains are attached to the buckles at each end of the girths and then attached to the chains (cut to desired lengths at the local hardware store). There are some good sling ideas available on web sites. I am going to have a local canvas/awning company make one. Initial sling time may be a minute or two once daily, but frequency and time in the sling will increase as the lama gains strength. GOOD NEIGHBORS The lifting of a down lama is not a solitary pursuit. Fortunately, I have some wonderful neighbors and friends who has assisted over the years. Their generous efforts are supplemented with paid help who are here for 30 minute periods a couple of times daily when needed. THE ONE THING SO MUCH PRACTICE HAS NEVER LESSENED A down lama here causes as much heartache today as it did years ago. I have found ways to minimize lama discomfort, but have found none to lessen my pain when dealing with a down lama. Reprinted from The Lama Letter, May 2014, Vol XX, No. 2. ORVLA May 2013

36

Charlene Arendas, DVM Large Animal Veterinary Services Llamas - Alpacas - Sheep - Goat - Equine 330-559-2773, LlamaDr@aol.com (ORVLA member) Joy Bishop-Forshey, DVM The Joy of LLamas Wauseon, OH 419-337-0015, drlamaj@yahoo.com (ORVLA member) Country Road Veterinary Services Inc. Polly Modransky, DVM PO Box 69 East Springfield, OH 43925-0069 740-543-1419 Recommended by Vicky & Alan McMaster East Holmes Veterinary Clinic Eric M. Shaver, D.V.M. Amity Wise, D.V.M. Aaron Wise, D.V.M. Austin Hinds, D.V.M. Kristem Mierzwiak, D.V.M. 5503 County Road 120 Berlin, OH 44610 330-893-2057, ehvcvet@wifi7.com (ORVLA member)

Rocky Knoll Large Animal Veterinary Services Marylou Rings D.V.M. Dublin, OH 937-243-1224 Recommended by Kris Miller Spring Meadow Veterinary Clinic Marnie Lahmon, DVM Rachel Hesselschwardt, DVM 1746 St. Rt. 60 Ashland, OH 44805 419-289-2466, www.springmeadowvet.vetsuite.com Recommended by Lee Ann King Tri-County Veterinary Service, Inc. Timothy Woodward, DVM 16200 County Rd 25-A Anna, OH 937-693-2131 Recommended by Dawn Lusk Camelid Care Veterinary Clinic Pamela G. Walker, DVM 3971 Hoover Road, Ste. 353 Grove City, OH 419-306-9522 (ORVLA member)

Recommend your Vet! ORVLA members are being asked to help create a veterinarian database for its members. This database will be valuable in the event that you are in search of a good camelid vet or your current vet is unavailable and another vet is needed. The list will help you find a vet in your local area and receive help. Please check with your vet first to see if they would like to be included. Their information will be listed on the website, in the directory and Topline. Also, to keep our vet’s current in our camelid world, they will receive Topline with our thanks for all they do for us. Send your veterinarian’s name, address, phone and web information to Pat Linkhorn, 740-638-5041, orvla01@windstream.net 37

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

TOPLINE

ORVLA Recommended Vets

ORVLA ADS TOO MUCH COLOR!

Want to trade one young brown female llama for one young white female llama. Gordon Yanke Spice of Life Llamas 937 206-4878 937 471-7308 NOT YOUR SALON BLOW OUT It is essential to dry the skin and fiber. The diaper/under pad will minimize the work involved. Old towels can be used to absorb urine from the skin and fiber. Then blow dry (also available at thrift stores for a couple of dollars) and fluff the fiber to minimize irritation and maximize comfort. Drying time is just minutes with a high speed dryer. This step is critical in cold weather. TREATING SORES If a sore or irritation occurs, Banixx Wound Care or Zymox can be sprayed on the affected area. Both are available though livestock catalogs and farm stores. They do not require a prescription, are non-irritating, and promote healing. Two other products available at drug stores provide good protection: Zinc oxide cream and Baudreaux’s Butt Paste, an Oprah favorite. EXERCISE It is important to exercise the lama’s legs. Place a blanket on the ground along the side the lama and roll the lama onto its side on the blanket. This is the easiest time to use the blow dryer. After drying, work each leg in a “range of motion” to prevent contracted muscles. As the lama improves, you will notice increased action and reaction. Gently massage each leg. Then roll the lama onto its other side and repeat these steps. Ideally you will do this 3 to 4 times each day. THE ELEVATOR RIDE I hire help to assist lifting down lamas, for many year using a sling and a cumbersome ratchet type device. Recently lama owner friend, Deb Arendas, recommended a remote-controlled electric hoist available through Harbor Freight Tools. The 440 capacity model was on sale for $99.99 and the 880 pound capacity model was on sale for $124.99. You can order through an 800 number an often free shipping is offered. Both sizes include bolts and hangers. I purchased the 880 pound version and a kind neighbor installed it onto a 1-1/2 inch solid steel bar that extends over the 5-1/2 foot wide wash stall in minutes. The sling was made by another neighbor years ago from a terry bath sheet that utilizes two Western style horse girths in the side seams. Chains are attached to the buckles at each end of the girths and then attached to the chains (cut to desired lengths at the local hardware store). There are some good sling ideas available on web sites. I am going to have a local canvas/awning company make one. Initial sling time may be a minute or two once daily, but frequency and time in the sling will increase as the lama gains strength. GOOD NEIGHBORS The lifting of a down lama is not a solitary pursuit. Fortunately, I have some wonderful neighbors and friends who has assisted over the years. Their generous efforts are supplemented with paid help who are here for 30 minute periods a couple of times daily when needed. THE ONE THING SO MUCH PRACTICE HAS NEVER LESSENED A down lama here causes as much heartache today as it did years ago. I have found ways to minimize lama discomfort, but have found none to lessen my pain when dealing with a down lama. Reprinted from The Lama Letter, May 2014, Vol XX, No. 2. ORVLA May 2013

36

Charlene Arendas, DVM Large Animal Veterinary Services Llamas - Alpacas - Sheep - Goat - Equine 330-559-2773, LlamaDr@aol.com (ORVLA member) Joy Bishop-Forshey, DVM The Joy of LLamas Wauseon, OH 419-337-0015, drlamaj@yahoo.com (ORVLA member) Country Road Veterinary Services Inc. Polly Modransky, DVM PO Box 69 East Springfield, OH 43925-0069 740-543-1419 Recommended by Vicky & Alan McMaster East Holmes Veterinary Clinic Eric M. Shaver, D.V.M. Amity Wise, D.V.M. Aaron Wise, D.V.M. Austin Hinds, D.V.M. Kristem Mierzwiak, D.V.M. 5503 County Road 120 Berlin, OH 44610 330-893-2057, ehvcvet@wifi7.com (ORVLA member)

Rocky Knoll Large Animal Veterinary Services Marylou Rings D.V.M. Dublin, OH 937-243-1224 Recommended by Kris Miller Spring Meadow Veterinary Clinic Marnie Lahmon, DVM Rachel Hesselschwardt, DVM 1746 St. Rt. 60 Ashland, OH 44805 419-289-2466, www.springmeadowvet.vetsuite.com Recommended by Lee Ann King Tri-County Veterinary Service, Inc. Timothy Woodward, DVM 16200 County Rd 25-A Anna, OH 937-693-2131 Recommended by Dawn Lusk Camelid Care Veterinary Clinic Pamela G. Walker, DVM 3971 Hoover Road, Ste. 353 Grove City, OH 419-306-9522 (ORVLA member)

Recommend your Vet! ORVLA members are being asked to help create a veterinarian database for its members. This database will be valuable in the event that you are in search of a good camelid vet or your current vet is unavailable and another vet is needed. The list will help you find a vet in your local area and receive help. Please check with your vet first to see if they would like to be included. Their information will be listed on the website, in the directory and Topline. Also, to keep our vet’s current in our camelid world, they will receive Topline with our thanks for all they do for us. Send your veterinarian’s name, address, phone and web information to Pat Linkhorn, 740-638-5041, orvla01@windstream.net 37

ORVLA May 2013


TOPLINE

ORVLA – Treasury Report January 1, 2014 – March 31, 2014

ORVLA – Treasury Report January 1, 2014 – March 31, 2014 Beginning Balance Income Membership Dues Topline Ads Total Income Expenses Topline Printing Topline Postage OSU Vet Open House ILR-SD (Summer Solstice) Insurance Total Expenses

Beginning Balance

$17,324.76 Income Expenses

1,285.00 425.00 Ending Balance 1,710.00

$17324.76 1710.00 1095.90 $17938.86

294.80 191.10 10.00 100.00 500.00 1,095.90

Topline Advertising Information and Rates

Topline is a quarterly newsletter of the Ohio River Valley Llama Association and remains one of the most affordable ways to advertise your farm or business. Special rates are offered for members and for ads paid for one year in advance. Newsletter deadlines for your ads are January 15 (February issue), April 15 (May issue), July 15 (June issue), and October 15 (November issue). Payment is due ten (10) days after receipt of Topline. ADVERTISING RATE INFORMATION FOR MEMBERS One Issue Four Issues Full Page (7 1/2” x 9 3/4”) 45.00 180.00 Half Page (7 1/2” x 4 3/4”) 30.00 120.00 Qtr. Page (3 5/8” x 4 3/4”) 20.00 80.00 Inside & Back Covers (First come - first serve basis) 75.00 300.00 Business Cards 5.00 20.00 ADVERTISING RATE INFORMATION FOR NON-MEMBERS Full Page (7 1/2” x 9 3/4”) 55.00 220.00 Half Page (7 1/2” x 4 3/4”) 40.00 160.00 Qtr. Page (3 5/8” x 4 3/4”) 20.00 80.00 Inside & Back Covers (First come - first serve basis) 85.00 340.00 Business Cards 10.00 40.00 CLASSIFIED ADS: $5.00 per ad up to 25 words. Each additional word after 25 is .20 cents per word.

Discount (1 yr.) 150.00 100.00 60.00 280.00

200.00 140.00 60.00 320.00

INSERTS: $30.00 per page for members and $35.00 per page for non-members. 120 copies are needed per issue. Copies must be on regular weight paper - no card stock. Only five pages will be accepted per issue. Submit your print ready copy and payment for ads (payable to “ORVLA” only please) to: Pat Linkhorn 56032 Claysville Rd. Cumberland, OH 43732 or email orvla01@windstream.net ORVLA May 2013

38


SPILLING THE BEANS ABOUT ME Let us know something about you. Send your responses to Topline editor at orvla01@windstream.net WHERE DID YOU GROW UP? FAMILY MEMBERS-

EDUCATION AND MEMORIES-

PETS AS A CHILD-

OCCUPATIONFAMILY LIFE AS AN ADULT-

WHEN DID YOU GET INTERESTED IN LLAMAS?

INTERESTING EXPERIENCES WITH YOUR LLAMAS- (FUNNY,GOOD,EMBARASSING)

OTHER ANIMALS THAT YOU OWN AND LOVE?

Janice Schilling shared with us this month. Will you be the next?


Top Line

McFarlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Llama Farm MCFL Ringer

Quarterly Newsletter of the Ohio River Valley Llama Association

Riley-Ying Yang x Chelita

For e Sal May 2014

Volume 28, Number 2

Fun at the Llama Show Show & Breeding Stock Available Don & Sue McFarland 8000 Old Delaware Rd. Mt. Vernon, Ohio 43050 (740) 397-7820 (614) 206-4404 (Don)

Pat Linkhorn ORVLA TopLine Editor 56032 Claysville Road Cumberland, OH 43732

Mike, Cindy, David, Elizabeth & Ada Ruckman

www.McFarlandsLlamaFarm.com

8092 Old Delaware Rd. Mt. Vernon, Ohio 43050 (740) 393 2309

Place Stamp Here

Tlmayfinal  

The May 2014 issue of Topline, the Ohio River Valley Llama Association

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