Page 1

M AR C H 2018

Sprint Canberra Multi-level Sprint New EO for OA RRP $8.50 inc GST


2018

Round 1

2

3

4

5

Event

Date

Location

1. Sprint

10 March

Melbourne, VIC

2. Sprint – WRE

10 March

Melbourne, VIC

3. Sprint

11 March

Melbourne, VIC

4. Sprint Relay

11 March

Melbourne, VIC

5. Sprint

30 March - 2 April

2018 Easter Carnival, Hobart, TAS

6. Middle Distance

2018 Easter Carnival, Hobart, TAS

7. Long Distance

2018 Easter Carnival, Hobart, TAS

8. Intermediate

2018 Easter Carnival, Hobart, TAS

9. Middle Distance

19 May

Daylesford, VIC

10. Long Distance

20 May

Daylesford, VIC

11. Middle Distance

8 September

Stanthorpe, QLD

12. Ultra Long Distance

9 September

Stanthorpe, QLD

13. Middle Distance

29 September

Renmark, SA

14. Relay

30 September

Renmark, SA

15. Sprint

1 October

Renmark, SA

16. Long Distance

6 October

Adelaide, SA

17. Middle Distance

7 October

Adelaide, SA

WRE = World Ranking Event

All race details can be found at www.orienteering.asn.au


ORIENTEERING AUSTRALIA

The President’s Page Blair Trewin

I

welcome everyone to a new Orienteering year ahead. There’s a lot to look forward to this year, starting with Easter in Tasmania – which, as is often the way when Easter is early, has crept up on us a bit. After that, major national events include the Australian MTBO Championships on the Sunshine Coast in May, and then the Australian Championships week in South Australia at the end of September. For many readers of this magazine, going to some (or all) of these events will be almost second nature. For those of you who have arrived more recently on the scene and haven’t yet had the chance to experience what a major national carnival is like, it’s well worth having ago – despite the “championship” label, there are courses for orienteers of any level of experience, and it is an opportunity to enjoy events on a larger scale than anything you’ve experienced locally. There’s plenty happening outside the major national carnivals, too – one I’m particularly looking forward to in the coming weeks is the NSW Championships weekend near Armidale, on what sounds like it will be some of the best granite terrain to be found anywhere. The summer has been a fairly quiet time for bush orienteering, although with plenty of successful summer programs. One highlight of this summer has been the staging of two major training camps. One, in December, was focused particularly on juniors (taking our cue from New Zealand, who have run a similar camp for a long time at about the same time of year), and attracted more than 60 juniors from all States. We have some exciting talent around amongst the younger juniors and it was great to see them have the chance to learn from a quality group of coaches, and from each other. The second was focused more on Sprint, and also incorporated the Sprint Canberra weekend, which in addition to providing high-quality competition also raised substantial funds for our national team programs. I would like to thank all of those involved in making these camps happen – especially Brodie

Nankervis (our newly appointed national Junior Coach) and David Poland for the Junior camp, and Jim Russell for the Sprint camp – and hope that we can build further on this to strengthen the talent we have coming through. Having a specific Sprint program will become especially important as we move, from 2020 onwards, to having an urbanspecific World Championships every second year. It is also likely that we will have more opportunities to compete in our region in urban-format events, one forthcoming example being the World Cup rounds to be held in China in October 2019; much of Asia is far more amenable to urban events than to forest ones. The Orienteering Australia annual conference took place in early December. This provided the opportunity to share information across the sport as to what is working well, including reviewing how well the participation projects that have been run over the last few years (many supported by Australian Sports Commission funding) have worked. A common thread is that projects which provide opportunities for people to take part in Orienteering close to where they live have done well, as have projects in new regional centres where there are locally-based people to drive them (Coffs Harbour and Albany being two good examples). We will be devoting a fair bit of time this year to updating and revising our strategic plan and goals for the sport, working with all of the State Associations, as well as with the ASC (linking in with the forthcoming release of a new National Sports Plan). It’s already clear that a major focus of the National Sports Plan will be to get more people physically active, and we will be doing a lot of thinking as to how we can contribute to that, whether it’s through our formally organised programs or providing opportunities (such as permanent courses) for people to do things more informally. Finding a suitable business model for the latter will also be important. Enough of the administrative discussion: time to go out and find some controls …..…

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 3


Winning PartnershiP

The Australian Sports Commission proudly supports Orienteering Australia The Australian Sports Commission is the Australian Government agency that develops, supports and invests in sport at all levels in Australia. Orienteering Australia has worked closely with the Australian Sports Commission to develop orienteering from community participation to high-level performance.

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION 4 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

Orienteering Australia is one of many national sporting organisations that has formed a winning partnership with the Australian Sports Commission to develop its sport in Australia.

www.ausport.gov.au


w w w. o r i e n t e e r i n g . a s n . a u Orienteering Australia PO Box 3379, North Strathfield, NSW 2137 admin@orienteering.asn.au President Blair Trewin president@orienteering.asn.au Director High Performance vacant Director Finance Bruce Bowen finance@orienteering.asn.au Director Technical Jenny Casanova technical@orienteering.asn.au Director Media & Communications Craig Feuerherdt it@orienteering.asn.au Director International (IOF Council) Mike Dowling international@orienteering.asn.au Director Bill Jones directorbill@orienteering.asn.au Executive Officer Paul Prudhoe eo@orienteering.asn.au National MTBO Coordinator Kay Haarsma mtbo@orienteering.asn.au OA Head Coach Jim Russell headcoach@orienteering.asn.au High Performance Administrator Ian Prosser hpadmin@orienteering.asn.au Manager Coach Development Barbara Hill coachdevelopment@orienteering.asn.au National Sporting Schools Coordinator Jim Mackay sportingschools@orienteering.asn.au Coach & Controller Accreditation Jim Mackay accreditation@orienteering.asn.au Badge Applications John Oliver 68 Amaroo Street, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650

0418 287 694 0413 849 309 02 6288 8501 0427 605 167 0438 050 074

0418 287 694 08 8337 0522 0411 125 178 0439 668 151 0418 270 476 0407 467 345 0407 467 345

STATE ASSOCIATIONS Orienteering Queensland: PO Box 114 Spring Hill QLD 4004. Secretary: David Firman secretary@oq.asn.au Orienteering NSW: PO Box 3379 North Strathfield NSW 2137. Admin Officer: John Murray, Ph. (02) 8736 1252 admin@onsw.asn.au Orienteering ACT: PO Box 402 Jamison Centre ACT 2614. Secretary: Phil Walker, Ph. (02) 6162 3422 office@act.orienteering.asn.au Orienteering Victoria: PO Box 1010 Templestowe VIC 3106. Secretary: Carl Dalheim, voa@netspace.net.au Orienteering SA: State Association House 105 King William St Kent Town SA 5067. Sec: Erica Diment (08) 8379 2914 secretary@sa.orienteering.asn.au Orienteering Western Australia: PO Box 234 Subiaco WA 6094. Secretary: Carol Brownlie: oawa.secretary@gmail.com Orienteering Tasmania: PO Box 339 Sandy Bay TAS 7005. Secretary: Peter Cusick secretary@tasorienteering.asn.au Top End Orienteers (Northern Territory): PO Box 39152 Winnellie NT 0821. Secretary: Susanne Casanova topendorienteersNT@gmail.com

NEXT ISSUE DEADLINE

April 13. Time-sensitive: April 20

ISSN 0818-6510 Issue 1/18 (no. 189) MARCH 2018

The national magazine of Orienteering Australia Inc. ABN 77 406 995 497 Published four times a year: First day of March, June, September, December. Print Post Approved PP 236080/00011, (100023602 for NSW). Editor: Michael Hubbert, P.O. Box 165, Warrandyte, Victoria 3113 mikehubbert@ozemail.com.au Phone (03) 9844 4878 Magazine Design & Assembly: Peter Cusworth, Ph. 0409 797 023 pcusworth53@gmail.com Magazine Treasurer: Bruce Bowen Printer: Ferntree Print, 1154 Burwood Hwy Upper Ferntree Gully. Contribution deadline: April 13; Time-sensitive – April 20. Deadline dates for contributions are the latest we can accept copy. Publication is normally planned for the 1st of March, June, September & December. Copies are dispatched in bulk to State associations in the week prior to that date. Regular Contributors: Competition – Blair Trewin; MTBO – Kay Haarsma; Official News – Paul Prudhoe. Contributions welcome, either directly or via State editorial contacts. Prior consultation is suggested before preparing major contributions. Guidelines available from the editor or from state contacts. State Editorial Contacts QLD: Liz Bourne – batmaps.liz@gmail.com NSW: Ian Jessup – marketing@onsw.asn.au ACT: John Scown – scown@light.net.au SA: Erica Diment – diment@adam.com.au – tel (ah) 8379 2914 VIC, WA and TAS – vacant Subscriptions: State Association members via State Associations. Contact relevant Association Secretary for details. Other subscribers: Write to The Australian Orienteer, PO‑Box 165, Warrandyte, Vic. 3113. Within Australia: $40 pa. Overseas: Asia/Pacific (inc. NZ) $A49, Rest of World $A58 pa. Delivery is airmail, there is no seamail option. Please send payment in Australian dollars by bank draft or international postal order, or pay direct by Visa or Mastercard. Quote full card number and expiry date. Subscription renewals (direct subscriptions only). The number in the top right-hand corner of the address label indicates the final issue in your current subscription. Opinions expressed in The Australian Orienteer are not necessarily those of Orienteering Australia.

CONTENTS T H E P R E S I D E N T ’ S P A G E.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 W O R L D O R I E N T E E R I N G DAY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ORIENTEERING AUSTRALIA NEWS................ 8 “ C ATA LY S T ” W R A P.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 0 2018 AUS CHAMPIONSHIPS PREVIEW......... 12 S P R I N T T R A I N I N G.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 4 JEFF.................................................. 15 S P R I N T I N T O S P R I N G.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 6 N U T R I T I O N .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 0 2 0 1 7 V I C S P R I N T .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 SPRINT CANBERRA................................ 24 SMARTPHONE COURSE............................ 31 MTBO................................................. 32 A N T I - D O P I N G .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5 I N J U R I E S.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 O - S P Y.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 8 P O R T S E A P E O P L E.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 0 S P O T T H E D I F F E R E N C E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5 TOP EVENTS......................................... 47

Cover photo: Ariadna Iskhakova at 2017 AUS Sprint. Photo: Tom de Jongh. MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 5


PROMOTION

Wednesday 23 May 2018

Be part of something Bigger! World Orienteering Day is just two months away and it’s time to get involved. Last year we set a new record of 288,007 participants in 79 countries. IOF President, Leho Haldna, has called on orienteers around the world to take up the challenge to bring our sport to even more people by setting an even bigger participation record this year: “World Orienteering Day has proven itself to be a highly successful event for global Orienteering and in 2018 we hope to once again set a new record in participation and reach the

vision of 500,000 participants around the world. Don’t let this opportunity to promote Orienteering as a sport for all pass you by. As we all know Orienteering is the best sport in the world and it certainly deserves much more attention than it usually gets. World Orienteering Day has shown in many parts of the world that being «part of something bigger» gives us opportunities to open discussions with the media, schools, official organisations, and partners and sponsors. The media is always looking for stories that are outside the usual. By using the global scope of World Orienteering Day in communications with the media and prospective participants you can tie in your local event to the bigger picture. The media likes to report about things like world records and this is a great opportunity to build a local story on a global concept. The fact that World Orienteering Day is a global event can also help in discussions with schools and other officials. Schools, parks, municipalities, etc, often look for different themed activities and this can be a great way to introduce Orienteering with the credibility of other activities around the globe. World Orienteering Day has become attractive amongst our sponsors and partners. Many companies simply want to be recognized as being part of an activity that adds value to society, so-called Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) sponsoring. World Orienteering Day, with its strong focus on physical activity for youths, and in fact all ages, is very attractive. We think this is equally attractive locally. World Orienteering Day also offers a great opportunity to try something new. There are in fact no restrictions in what kind of activities you can organise and register, other than that they should be an Orienteering activity. Indoor, outdoor, sprints, labyrinths, youth, elite, masters, whatever; all events count equally. Why not try new ways to attract new participants, and known ones to reach the already convinced orienteers. Do you have ideas you have always wanted to try? Now is the time to try them.

6 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018


The most important thing about World Orienteering Day is to have a plan to promote your event to the target participants. The IOF provides a set of tools for you to use, you just need to make them fit locally. Welcome to World Orienteering Day, May 23rd, 2018 ! And remember that this year any activity held between May 23rd and May 29th can be registered as a World Orienteering Day event.”

Be part of something bigger ! You can register your WOD events at worldorienteeringday. com The main day for WOD 2018 will be Wednesday May 23rd but you have the possibility to organise an event until May 29th. That means a WOD event can be at school, at your club, at your work or at a normal Orienteering event or training activity. Each can be a WOD event.

IOF’s vision regarding WOD: Göran Andersson - Project Coordinator, WOD The International Orienteering Federation’s goals regarding the organisation of this annual event are as follows: • Increasing the visibility and accessibility of Orienteering to young people; • Increasing the number of participants both in the schools’ activities, as well and in the clubs’ activities in all countries of National Federations; • To get more new countries to take part in Orienteering; •H  elping teachers to implement Orienteering in a fun and educational way.

Visionary course of action Each club of all national Orienteering Federations gets in touch with at least one school. As teachers might need help to implement Orienteering so the lessons are a fun and exciting experience. The IOF is working on providing teaching materials in different languages. The Regional Development and Youth Commission of the IOF coordinates and links interested Orienteering people from its national federations together in a school orienteering network in order to exchange materials and experiences. After the event, the students get to keep their maps to take home and show to their friends and family. For example:

Use the school “Evacuation Plan” for Orienteering! With the help of photos or just letters at the checkpoints you can carry out activities whenever you want. At “Internationella Engelska Skolan, Kista” (close to Stockholm) a “Treasure Hunt” has been held. It’s a walking orienteering through the school. The students had to find a letter at each checkpoint and in the end they had to put the letters together to discover a new clue. Depending on the level of the school you can increase the difficulties step by step.

You don’t need to draw a new map, just make a copy of the “Evacuation Plan” at your school. All hotels, big factories, shopping centres, etc, have an Evacuation Plan, just use it for Orienteering. It’s a perfect opportunity to educate youngsters in a fun way to get them involved in Orienteering!

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 7


ORIENTEERING AUSTRALIA

Orienteering Australia has a new Executive Officer Former ONSW President, Paul Prudhoe, is the new EO following the retirement of John Harding. The Orienteering Australia office has moved from Canberra to Sydney’s Olympic Park complex and Paul is already hard at work. “The Australian Orienteer” recently caught up with Paul: AO: Congratulations on your appointment. Had you been considering taking up this role for some time? PP: Yes, as you might imagine, with my current role as ONSW’s Executive Officer and previously as ONSW President, I’ve had a lot of contact with John Harding over the years. Some time ago John made me aware of his intention to retire and enquired if I would be interested in the position. But it wasn’t until the middle of last year, when the role was advertised, that I gave the possibility any serious thought. AO: Briefly describe your background in Orienteering. PP: I started orienteering way back in 1971 when I was still at Prescot Grammar School in the NW of England (near Liverpool). As I recall, my first event was in the Lake District, and my third event was the British Junior Championships in Scotland. Since then I moved progressively south and along the way have been a member of six or seven UK clubs, was involved in the organisation of the 1983 British Championships, and for a short time was President of Southdowns Orienteers. Since migrating to Australia in 1987 I’ve been a member of only three clubs and am now with Central Coast Orienteers. I’ve been a Level 3 controller for many years and an IOF Event Adviser for almost as long. I was involved with JWOC in 2007 as Marketing Director, and with WMOC in 8 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

AO: Funding is a perennial issue. Do you have ideas on how OA can increase funding and where best to spend it?

Paul Prudhoe

2009 as a controller, and was ONSW President for six years until 2014. More recently I was the National Controller for the very successful Oceania Championships in Tasmania in 2015. Along the way I’ve also controlled and organised many events in NSW. AO: What are the highlights of John Harding’s tenure? PP: Stability and a good relationship with the Australian Sports Commission, leading to recognition and funding for Orienteering nationally. AO: Broadly, as EO what are your goals for Orienteering Australia? PP: To maintain OA’s relationship with the ASC and to assist the States in growing membership and participation. We need to continue to raise the profile of Orienteering, while at the same time encouraging the States to join together in a more unified approach. AO: ONSW has had some good success with growth and innovation in recent years. Can some of those initiatives be brought to the national level? PP: mmm ...... possibly. In theory yes, but I assume that by national level you actually mean in other States, in which case, given the differences between the States in organisational and membership terms, and perhaps more importantly in financial terms, it would be easier for some States than others to consider and implement alternative ideas. One aspect that States might need to consider is that of more paid staff, as ONSW has over the last four years. These days with an ever-increasing pressure on OA and the States to increase membership and participation levels and the amount of effort needed to achieve targets, a volunteer workforce is no longer sufficient.

PP: You’re right, funding is a perennial issue, especially at the national (OA) level. However, I believe that if you were to look at the aggregate funds within Orienteering at a club and State level in this country, it is not an insignificant amount. The problem is that it is fragmented and difficult to combine the $$ forces to amplify initiatives. This is where a unified behaviour could solve some or all of the funding problems. There are many areas where the funds could be targeted, requiring ongoing discussion and agreement between all stake holders. AO: Publicity and general public awareness is another issue – any ideas on that front? PP: Publicity (and awareness of Orienteering) has always been an issue, which needs continued effort on OA’s and the States’ part. The size of the country and nature of the spread of population, plus the dominance of the ball game sports means that we must continue to chip away at the problem and promote when and where we can. While the use of traditional methods of the printed press and TV/radio still have a place, given the size of Orienteering I believe that digital publicity methods and social media will provide a better return. AO: How can we best manage our volunteers? PP: With great care and consideration. There are many members who are happy to be volunteers and who don’t want any financial compensation for their efforts, however more are needed, and old hands need to encourage and help new orienteers to volunteer. I would like to see the benefits of volunteering and the skills that can be learned more widely promoted. AO: Bush, Sprint, Park & Street, Ski, MTBO – do you have a personal preference? PP: Bush - I’m very much a traditionalist. While the other formats have their place and I get to as many as I can, orienteering in the bush teaches many skills, both for the competitor and for those involved in the organisation. I think some of those skills can’t really be learned elsewhere. AO: Paul, thank you for your time and best of luck in your new position.


2018 National High Performance Junior Development Squad (JDS) & Development Squads The 2018 National Squads were announced by Orienteering Australia in January. Congratulations to all those named and particularly to those new to the Squads. High Performance Squad Coach: Jim Russell National Development Squad Coach: Natasha Rowe Key Australian Junior Development Squad Coach: Brodie Nankervis Targeted Talented Athlete Coordinator: Krystal Neumann These are voluntary positions. It’s great to see several of our senior elite orienteers volunteering for these positions and all members of the high performance personnel have had personal experience as elite orienteers and a long association with high performance Orienteering in Australia.

High Performance Squad (HPS)

Afnan

Dante

M

SA

Allen

Rachel

F

Tas

Burrill

Simeon

M

Qld

Currie

Duncan

M

NSW

De Jong

Ellie

F

Qld

Dickinson

Joseph

M

Tas

Dowling

Zoe

F

Tas

George

Alistair

M

NSW

George

Rebecca

F

NSW

Jaffe

Patrick

M

Vic

Key

Aston

M

Vic

Maynard

Jo Anna

F

WA

Melhuish

Tara

F

ACT

Miller

Patrick

M

ACT

Miller

Tristan

M

ACT

Anderson

Bridget

F

SA

Norman

Meredith

F

SA

Barnett

Andrew

M

ACT

Oakhill

Winnie

F

Qld

Crane

Matthew

M

ACT

Pigerre

Caroline

F

Qld

Dent

Martin

M

ACT

Poland

Noah

M

ACT

Keely

Bryan

M

WA

Steer

Asha

F

Vic

Key

Natasha

F

Vic

Krajca

Tomas

M

ACT

Lawford

Belinda

F

ACT

McNulty

Henry

M

WA

Nankervis

Brodie

M

Tas

Neumann

Krystal

F

Qld

Prendergast

Aislinn

F

Vic

Rattray

Kerrin

M

SA

Round

Vanessa

F

SA

Steer

Lanita

F

Vic

Uppill

Simon

M

SA Tara Melhuish-ACT. Martin Dent-ACT.

Targeted Talent Athletes Squad (TTAS) National Development Squad (NDS)

Andrew Barnett-ACT.

Allen

Josh

M

Tas

Bennett

Robert

M

NSW

Cooper

Mikaela

F

Tas

Blatchford

Nicola

F

NSW

Cuthbert

Ella

F

ACT

Brownridge

Clare

F

Vic

Fidge

Jaiden

M

Qld

Dawson

Aidan

M

NSW

Fleming

Jed

M

Tas

Dawson

Michele

F

NSW

George

Abigail

F

SA

Day

Jarrah

M

Tas

George

Joanna

F

SA

Dowling

Anna

F

Tas

Gray

Mikaela

F

Qld

Doyle

Matt

M

Vic

Gray

Ryan

M

Qld

Keely

Leon

M

Vic

Haines

Angus

M

SA

Lawford

Ian

M

ACT

Kerr

Andrew

M

ACT

Neve

Jasmine

F

Vic

McCarthy

Brody

M

Vic

Schepisi

Matt

M

Vic

Melhuish

Zoe

F

ACT

Sheldon

Anna

F

Qld

Phillips

Arabella

F

Tas

Sprod

Olivia

F

SA

Reinbott

Grant

M

Qld

Wilson

Toby

M

NSW

Young

Caitlin

F

ACT

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 9


PROMOTION

ABC TV “Catalyst” wrap Ian Jessup, ONSW

M

any of you will have tuned in to ABC TV on January 30th to see Orienteering as part of the Catalyst program devoted to maths in everyday life. Some of you will no doubt be wondering how the results were determined. Well ..... some background first. We briefed the producer on how a typical summer series or score event works, and were expecting that same format on the day (get as many as you can, time penalty for being late). Lily Serna, the presenter, was involved in prior discussions with Chris Brown who devised the “Nearest Neighbour” and “Optimal Route” solutions. But it appears she was not briefed on the time penalty aspect. I did not think it would matter anyway, as 90 minutes would be more than enough to cover the 6km of fairly straightforward navigation around Centennial Park (in Sydney). And the three teams all went at about the same pace - a brisk walk with the occasional jog - so fitness was not a factor. However, film shoots drag on forever. With all the takes, retakes, stops and waiting for the cameraman and sound guy to catch up and position themselves for each shot (only about 5% ended up going to air), the 90 minutes was soon up. As such, the results were simply how many controls each pair reached - regardless of how much time was required to get back to home base.

CATALYST-Chris Brown & Lily Serna.

If time penalties had applied I reckon all three teams may have tied!  

While Team Yellow (Lisa Grant) won with 18/20 controls, they were furthest from home and would have incurred a higher time penalty.

In a real-world analogy, imagine you are a courier - you go to the office, pick up your errand list, do as many as you can in your allocated work hours, then go home without needing to drop back into the office. That’s how the scoring panned out on the day, too.

Team Orange (Clare Jessup) got 15/20 and Team Pink (myself) 14/20. For the ‘human intuition’ method, I chose a route that went to the furthest part of the map to begin with and left the handful of closest controls to last, thinking we had ample time to get them at the end. As such we were closest to home base when time ran out.

Nevertheless, it was a great vehicle to promote Orienteering (did you notice the SPORTident units - and NO compasses?) and a lot of fun to be part of.

So, the final results didn’t quite truly portray a proper score event. And that’s not just sour grapes from your last-placed correspondent!

If you live in a regional town, why not invite the local TV people out to an event?

CATALYST-filming. 10 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018


MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 11


2018 AUS CHAMPIONSHIPS PREVIEW

Australian Championships in South Australia Robin Uppill

Weila - terrain showing complex erosion in otherwise fast open to semi-open terrain

S

outh Australia is presenting a full event program as the on a school campus in Adelaide for the Sprint event, followed Australian Championships carnival in late September to by two areas of mixed pine plantation and native forest for the early October 2018. The program comprises the three individual Individual and Relay events. Existing maps of these areas are Australian Championship events (all are NOL and WRE events), available on the event web site. the Australian Relays (NOL event), the SA Middle Distance The associated public events will provide the option for Championships (final 2018 NOL event) and the three events of participants to enter three individual events or, if entering all the Australian Schools Championships and associated public three, a three day event. “Classes” available will be detailed in events. Orienteers will be able to compete in 8 events over the the event entry information. On the two forest days, the longest 9 days from weekend to weekend, and will experience a wide course available will be the longest of the Schools courses. Other variety of orienteering terrain. courses will be the remaining Schools championship courses plus The program begins with three events in the Riverland additional shorter hard and moderate courses, and easy and very of South Australia, in reasonable driving distance for those easy courses. orienteers who wish to drive from the eastern States. The areas The carnival concludes with the AUS Long Distance are approximately three hours’ drive from Adelaide. Two areas Championships and the SA Middle Distance Championships. with unique terrain are located in the eroded areas adjacent to The Long Distance event is in an area of varied terrain, mainly the River Murray. One area Crooked Straight has been used for spur-gully topography, but with mixed vegetation. Present are Orienteering in the past, however the area has been completed remapped along with the nearby Weila Bunyip Reach map using high quality LIDAR data specifically acquired for the map production. These areas are to be used for the AUS Middle Distance Championships and the AUS Relay Championships respectively. The AUS Sprint Championships will be held on the Renmark Schools campuses on Monday 1st Oct (this day is a public holiday in SA and some other States). Many accommodation options are available in the Riverland towns, and the school teams are to be accommodated in Renmark. The events then shift to the Adelaide region, for the three days of the AUS Schools Orienteering Crooked Straight – dry sandy watercourse and erosion gullies, semi-open woodland Championships. These will be held 12 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018


pine plantations from mature to younger pines, native forest often tending to be slower run, and some open areas. Rocky detail is common in the latter and some parts of the pine plantations. The native forest areas contain scattered gold mining terrain. Route choice decisions will be the key for the longer courses at this event. The final event which also concludes the 2018 NOL calendar, is the SA Middle Distance Championship at Keynes Gap. The area has been completely remapped based on LIDAR data. The terrain is mostly open farmland with large and extensive rock detail. Accommodation options for the events near Adelaide include a range of accommodation types in Adelaide itself, as well as many caravan parks and B&Bs in the Adelaide Hills or the Barossa Valley. Travel time from either area would be similar.

SCHOOLS INVITATIONAL CAMP – SOUTH AUSTRALIA In conjunction with the 2018 Australian Championships Carnival, there will be a Camp for juniors (and their families) who are not selected for the official State Schools Teams. You don’t have to be good at Orienteering to attend, just keen. Make new friends, learn new skills and have fun together! This Camp will be held over six nights (1/10 to 6/10/2018), in Adelaide only (not in Renmark). It follows the successful Camp organised by Toni Brown at Bathurst (see reports in December 2017 edition of The Australian Orienteer), which saw over 40 orienteers from NZ and four States take part. The Camp is targeted for those in Years 5-12, but siblings and parents are welcome to join in. In fact, since this Camp is not part of the official Carnival program, parental attendance, supervision and help will be required.  Kids will do the normal Carnival events, but have shared meals, and participate in training sessions and social activities at night (remember Night-O at Hogwarts ?). Accommodation is at the Adelaide Shores Caravan Park, 1km from where the official Schools Teams are staying. http://adelaideshores.com.au/play/sport/groupaccommodation/

Gumeracha Goldfields map – showing some of the varied terrain

LIDAR hillshade - Weila – one of the processed products from the LIDAR data showing complex erosion.

Confirmations are not required until after the State Team selections are finalised, but for more information, or to express possible interest, please contact Aylwin Lim on 0438 322 761 or ayllim@netscape.net.

Keynes Gap aerial view – rocky ridges in the open farmland

Program Date

Event

Area

Sat Sep 29

AUS Middle Distance Championships

Crooked Straight, near Renmark

Sun Sep 30

AUS Relay Championships

Weila – Bunyip Reach, near Renmark

Mon Oct 1

AUS Sprint Championships

Renmark Schools

Tue Oct 2

AUS Schools Sprint Championships, Public Event – Day 1

Adelaide School Campus

Wed Oct 3

AUS Schools Individual Championships, Public Event – Day 2

Wirra Wirra, Mount Lofty Ranges

Thu Oct 4

AUS Schools Relay Championships, Public Event – Day 3

Mount Crawford North, Mount Lofty Ranges

Sat Oct 6

AUS Long Distance Championships

Gumeracha Gold Fields, Mount Lofty Ranges

Sun Oct 7

SA Middle Distance Championships

Keynes Gap, Eastern Mount Lofty Ranges

All event details are being posted on our website: sa.orienteering.asn.au

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 13


TRAINING

Sprint Training Ian Jessup – Marketing & Communications Officer, Orienteering NSW

O

ur Finnish scholar Konsta Vanhanen devised these fiendish but simple Sprint O training exercises. Using a 1:1100 ultra Sprint map and less than a dozen controls, an intricate Sprint course appears beyond our capabilities. But, by adding in some imaginary buildings or some imaginary walls, you can create some very testing courses.

cup

You have to be mindful of the artificial barriers on the map, relate them to the actual ground, avoid crossing them ….... and negotiate the garden beds as well.

For your elites, get them to try this at speed. For beginners, work on quickly identifying safe routes around the barriers at walking pace. For your average club members - a bit of both. The activity also introduces far more changes of direction than would otherwise be the case. And for the leg #2 to #3 on the map with imaginary walls - failure to plan ahead will mean taking the wrong line from the start and wasting a lot of time. At international level, an error of just a few seconds can mean the difference between a medal and missing the podium (top 6). And with SI Air saving precious seconds physically punching a control, flow and good route choice is even more paramount. This training activity was really good brain work, and an example of how to generate long complex courses from a small area. And it’s easy to add the building shapes in OCAD or Purple Pen.  Thanks Konsta.

14 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018


MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 15


MULTI-LEVEL SPRINT

Sprint into Spring goes up a level Photos: Ian Davies; Michael Hubbert

T

he Latrobe University sprint map has always been a complex one requiring careful map reading and navigation. And that complexity went up a big notch when Victoria’s 2017 Coach-inResidence, Mikkel Kaae-Nielsen, mapped a second level for the Sprint into Spring series. Some participants said the way the levels were shown on the map played with their minds. “When the next control was up a level, at first glance it seemed to be a long leg, but actually the control was nearby. And my first reaction was to head off to the left but then I realised it was just over there to the right.” Others were confused by the levels and climbed too high to the wrong level – particularly on stairs “K”. Here we show the “Mo Farah” course which was the longest at 3.6km. Natasha Key ‘creamed’ the women’s field and took a very creditable 11th place in the combined results. Top placings were: Mo Farah – 3.60km, 63 starters Name

Club

Time

Time behind

1

Peter Hodkinson

MFV

15:08

2

Brodie Nankervis

MFV

15:36

+0:28

4:20

3

Aston Key

MFV

15:59

+0:51

4:26

4

Bruce Arthur

MFV

16:54

+1:46

4:41

5

Todd Neve

MFV

17:13

+2:05

4:46

6

Joseph Dickinson

OV

17:17

+2:09

4:48

7

Kerrin Rattray

MFV

17:23

+2:15

4:49

8

Jed Fleming

OV

18:17

+3:09

5:04

9

James Robertson

BGV

18:29

+3:21

5:08

10

Ian Lawford

EUV

18:31

+3:23

5:08

11

Natasha Key

MFV

18:33

+3:25

5:09

Natasha Key. 16 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

Km time 4:12

2017 Sprint into Spring jersey winners.


MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 17


MULTI-LEVEL SPRINT

18 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018


The shortest course was the “Usain Bolt” at 1.8km. Ashley White ran away with the event but the girls showed their strength with 2nd, 3rd, & 4th placings. Here we show the course and top placings: Usain Bolt – 1.80km, 16 starters Name

Club

Time

1

Ashley White

YVV

14:27

Time behind

Km time

2

Maya Bennette

YVV

17:08

+2:41

9:31

3

Luca Bogdanovits

DRV

19:46

+5:19

10:58

4

Milla Key

MFV

20:45

+6:18

11:31

5

Thomas Caristo

YVV

21:30

+7:03

11:56

6

Annabelle Davey

OV

22:25

+7:58

12:27

7

Arika Bogdanovits

DRV

24:24

+9:57

13:33

8

Dale Taverna

OV

24:38

+10:11

13:41

9

Hannah Adams

BKV

26:11

+11:44

14:32

10

Eamon Heley

OV

27:03

+12:36

15:01

11

Juddson Petzer

OV

27:37

+13:10

15:20

12

Evan Gavens

BKV

31:02

+16:35

17:14

13

Mia Gavens

BKV

31:27

+17:00

17:28

14

Paula Davey

MFV

31:54

+17:27

17:43

15

Newbury Navigators

OV

38:09

+23:42

21:11

16

Olive Michailidis

OV

46:41

+32:14

25:56

8:01

Ashley White won M10A at the 2017 AUS Sprint Championships.

Alexandra Enlund.

Sophie Arthur.

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 19


NUTRITION

Eat your vegetables: Nutrients in leafy greens may help prevent dementia

Nutrients found in green leafy vegetables just might make your mind 11 years younger, according to a new study

D

ementia, a decline in memory and cognitive function, is one of the most feared aspects of ageing. But those who reported eating their vegetables seem to be more successful in staving it off. Researchers at Rush University and Tufts University in the US studied 1,000 people and found that those who reported eating one to two daily servings of green leafy vegetables, such as kale, lettuce or spinach, had slower rates of cognitive decline. The new research was published last year in the journal Neurology. Study participants completed food frequency questionnaires, which asked how often they ate certain foods in the past year. The researchers then estimated the levels of nutrients consumed by each participant based on their responses. The people in the study also underwent yearly testing of their memory and cognitive function. The group of participants who ate the most servings of leafy greens per day (an average of only 1.3 servings daily) had slower cognitive decline than those who ate fewer leafy greens, researchers found. Statistically, the effect was similar to being 11 years younger. The findings suggest this benefit is likely to come from important nutrients found in these vegetables, such as folate, lutein and nitrate, which were also associated with slower cognitive decline, Dr. Martha Clare Morris, lead author of the study, said. This may be because the nutrients protect against inflammation, stress and damaging changes in the brain, as has been reported in prior studies, according to the researchers. The design of the study could only show an association, not that eating these vegetables actually causes the lower rates of dementia. Additionally, much of the data is based on the reports of study participants, a possible source of bias or inaccuracy because few people can say for sure how many kale salads they ate in the past year. Still, the findings are promising, according to one expert not involved in the research. “A healthy diet is good for your body,” said Dr. Gayatri Devi, a neurologist specializing in 20 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

memory disorders at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Devi said she thinks the protective effects of leafy greens stem more from an overall healthy diet. “It keeps your arteries clean, reduces the risk for heart disease, reduces the risk for diabetes, and all that is good for your brain,” she said. Morris and her team attempted to control for other factors that can contribute for brain health including heart conditions, physical activity, mentally stimulating activities “like reading books and doing crosswords” and other factors. But the contribution from these other factors is “always a concern in observational studies and can never be fully ruled out,” she noted. Both Devi and Morris recommend against taking supplements of the studied nutrients and advocate for incorporating leafy greens instead. “It’s just so much easier and safer to get them from nature,” Devi said. So should you eat a bowl of lettuce every day to prevent dementia? Maybe. These findings suggest that greens might help keep your mind sharper. Plus, eating an extra cup of spinach every day probably isn’t going to hurt you. “There aren’t any drawbacks,” Morris said.


Victorian Institute of Sport

Hydration Tip

A

s we near the warmer months, it’s important our hydration is tip top. Here are some practical tips which can be easily incorporated into your training lifestyle. Remember to check the colour of your urine in the morning to see how well you’re hydrating! 1. Buy a new drink bottle! 2. Treat yourself to some fancy flavours of tea!

New Research says Cheese is a Health Food

I

n a new analysis, researchers from China and the Netherlands analyzed 15 studies encompassing more than 200,000 people about the health effects of cheese. Thirteen of the studies analyzed went on for over 10 years. The findings? Overall, people who consumed high levels of cheese were 10 percent less likely to have a stroke and 14 percent less likely to develop coronary heart disease than participants who consumed no cheese. More isn’t necessarily better, though. In the study, too much cheese was found to be as negative as too little, with the best level around 40 grams a day (about the size of a matchbook). Researchers didn’t specify whether one type of cheese was better than the rest. However, there may be more to the story. There are many factors, such as the rest of a person’s diet, that need to be taken into consideration before making the claim that eating cheese every day is the key to minimizing heart disease. Cheese is a high-fat food that can be very popular in ketogenic diets, and these diets have been shown to actually decrease bad oxidated cholesterol and increase good HDL cholesterol and lower inflammation levels, all markers of higher

Almonds may help reduce heart disease

A

ccording to new research “eating nearly one-third a cup of almonds a day - either alone or combined with almost onequarter cup of dark chocolate and 2 1/3 tablespoons of cocoa a day - may reduce a risk factor for coronary heart disease.” So, what are almonds? A seed of the fruit of the almond tree, sweet almonds (Prunus amygdalu var. dulcis) are eaten; bitter almonds are not eaten but are used to produce almond oil. Almonds are sold in-shell or shelled. Shells: creamy yellow, naturally pitted; avoid if split, mouldy or stained. Shelled almonds: white inside, creamy texture; avoid if shrivelled or limp; smells and tastes lightly sweet. Sold whole, sliced, slivered,

3. A  dd a little extra salt to your meals or choose a salty snack such as popcorn, pretzels, flavoured rice cakes or add some salty capers to your next meal! 4. O  pt for a milk and yoghurt based breakfast or large smoothie post training. 5. Increase your veggie intake, sugar snap peas, celery, capsicum, zucchini and radish! 6. T  alk to your Sports Dietitian about supporting long, sweaty training sessions with electrolytes or undergo a sweat test analysis.

heart disease risk. The key is to really examine the context of the diet outside of cheese intake since eating extremely high levels of cheese was also correlated with increased heart disease risk. People may be eating more processed foods in addition to cheese, which can negate the benefits of these healthy fats. The take-away? Cheese is only one part of a diet, and while it may not be as harmful as previously thought, it’s also not a panacea - at least on its own. It’s also important to mention that not everyone tolerates dairy, even the grass-fed organic kind. We are all truly different, so listen to your own body. (extract from SupermarketGuru)

blanched, unroasted (raw), roasted, salted or unsalted in bags, cans or bulk. Can be dry roasted without oil or cooked in a deep fried process with oil; read the package ingredients carefully to see if sugars or other ingredients or preservatives have been added. Eat as a snack, add to salads, yoghurt or cottage cheese, grains or baked goods; mix with other nuts and dried fruits for “trail mix”. Pulse in food processor to make almond butter; use like peanut butter. How to store almonds - natural oils can develop rancidity. Store shelled almonds in a tightly sealed container in a dark, cool, dry place. Refrigerate up to three months; freeze up to one year. Whole almonds have a longer life than pieces or slivers; those in the shell last the longest. Health benefits: High in vitamin E, manganese, magnesium, copper, vitamin B2, and phosphorus. Almonds contain monounsaturated fat and plant protein (greater than an egg.) Contains many phytonutrients including flavonoids; there are 20 antioxidant flavonoids in the edible skins. Plant sterols may reduce cholesterol, as well as reducing inflammation. NOTE: almonds contain oxalates which may be unsuitable for those with existing or untreated kidney or gallbladder problems and can trigger allergies in some people. Shopping: look for almonds in multiple location in stores – usually found in produce, snacks and baking sections – compare brands and prices by weight for the best deal. MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 21


2017 VIC SPRINT

Sprint returns to Monash University

I

t’s been 10 years since the last VIC Sprint Championship at Monash University in Melbourne. In that time there have been many changes – new buildings, sports fields, roads and pathways. DROC’s Peter Dalwood had to map the whole campus anew for the 2017 VIC Sprints last November – he also set the courses, encouraging competitors to wind there way around and through the complex built environment, uncrossable olive green sectors and yet more building works. And, to add to the challenges facing us, some perfectly accessible paths and alleyways were artificially blocked off for the day to raise our level of concentration even higher. Here we show the map and two courses – M21 (3.9km) with Bruce Arthur’s route, and M70 (2.4km) with Michael Hubbert’s route.

M21 – Bruce Arthur.

1:4000

22 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

Course 1


1:4000

Course 5

M70 - Michael Hubbert. M70 placegetters. MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 23


SPRINT CANBERRA

Sprint Canberra

Race 1 at the Australian Institute of Sport Campus started us off in a fairly simple area but navigation was made more difficult by a large number of uncrossable fences and locked gates (one of which wasn’t shown on the map). Sophie Arthur flashed to the front on the Short course commencing a winning streak which saw her take 1st place in all five events and winning the series ahead of Julia Prudhoe and Milla Key.

Orienteering in the Fast Lane Jim Russell and his team brought us Sprint Canberra, held over the Australia Day weekend, with five fast and furious events in four days to test both navigation speed and endurance in hot and very humid weather.

Race 2 at the University of Canberra immediately started to play with our minds by taking us through an array of uncrossable olive green areas not immediately obvious on the ground and then many stairways and some multi-level structures for good measure. The Open course was a close run thing amongst the men with Brodie Nankervis just holding on to finish ahead of Martin Dent and coach-in-residence Race 2 - Uni of Canberra – Open Course - Men Name

EVT

13:56 14:00 +0:04

3 Peter Hodkinson

UK

14:07 +0:11

4 Will Gardner

UK

14:15 +0:19

5 Patrick Jaffe

MFV

14:24 +0:28

6 Aston Key

MFV

14:48 +0:52

7 Aidan Dawson

GON

14:59 +1:03

8 Simon Uppill

OHS

15:00 +1:04

9 Joseph Dickinson

EVT

15:20 +1:24

10 Bruce Arthur

MFV

15:36 +1:40

2 Martin Dent

Shannon Jones.

Brodie Nankervis.

Race 2 - Uni of Canberra – Open Course - Women Name

Zoe Melhuish ACT. 24 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

Time

RRA

1

Brodie Nankervis

Club

Club

Time

=1 Shannon Jones

AOA

17:20

=1 Natasha Key

MFV

17:20

3 Krystal Neumann

ENQ

17:24 +0:04

4 Tamsin Moran

UK

18:21 +1:01

5 Kathie Dent

RRA

19:23 +2:03

6 Caroline Pigerre

UGQ

19:27 +2:07

7 Allison Jones

RRA

19:27 +2:07

8 Ella Cuthbert

BSA

19:33 +2:13

9 Zoe Melhuish

POA

19:51 +2:31

10 Bridget Anderson

OHS

19:52 +2:32


Peter Hodkinson. The women were even closer with Natasha Key and Shannon Jones dead-heating for 1st and Krystal Neumann just 4sec back.

some very narrow passageways which may have been difficult to pick at 1:4000, and almost impossible for two people passing at any scale.

The Medium course was not nearly as close with Alex Davey a clear winner and Alison Inglis easily best of the women.

Race 5 at ANU South completed the series in an incredibly complex campus of old and newer buildings interspersed with many uncrossable areas of olive green requiring intense concentration and careful route choice over the whole course – no opportunities to relax and just run.

Race 3 at Bruce Ridge, nearby the AIS Campus, was billed as a “bush sprint” but turned out to be more of a Short-O with little need to deviate from straight line navigation or to make significant route choice decisions. The many mountain bike trails were pretty rough to run on so speed through the bush was the most telling factor in the results. Race 4 at Orana Steiner School presented us with a change of scale to 1:2000 and a map-flip on a relatively small area. The bigger scale was needed, too, for the built area contained

On the Medium course Jose Zapata came from the woodwork to win by nearly half a minute over Torren Arthur and Jon Glanville, while amongst the women Carolyn Jackson and Debbie Davey saved their best performances for the last event with Carolyn finishing comfortably ahead of Debbie and Natalie Smith.

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 25


SPRINT CANBERRA Race 1 – AIS Campus - Short Course Name

Club

Time

Sophie Arthur

MFV

10:28

2 Julia Prudhoe

CCN

13:56 +3:28

3 Milla Key

MFV

13:57 +3:29

4 Aoife Rothery

BFN

14:02 +3:34

5 Ingrid Shelton Agar

AOA

16:08 +5:40

6 Mira Walter

RRA

16:52 +6:24

7 John Suominen

WEA 18:38

+8:10

8 Michelle Cochrane

NCM 18:56

+8:28

9 Ella Hogg

POA

19:26 +8:58

10 Pauli Piiroinen

BSA

20:19 +9:51

1

Sophie Arthur-VIC.

Milla Key-VIC. 26 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018


Race 5 – ANU South – Medium Course – Women Name 1

7

10

Carolyn Jackson

Club

Time

BKV

22:38

2 Debbie Davey

WRN 23:01

+0:23

3 Natalie Smith

POA

23:09 +0:31

4 Cathy Hogg

POA

23:35 +0:57

5 Susanne Harrysson

BSA

23:48 +1:10

6 Phoebe Dent

CCN

25:03 +2:25

7 Tania Kennedy

GON

25:11 +2:33

8 Ana Herceg

POA

25:32 +2:54

9 Carolyn Matthews

NCN

25:58 +3:20

10 Alison Inglis

BSA

26:11 +3:33

8 3

4

9 5

ORIENTEERING

6

ACT

11 12

2 1 15 14

13 16

Red Roo Maps ANU orienteering map produced for Orienteering ACT by Bob Allison, 2014-16 First impression by David Shepherd, 2003. Copyright Orienteering ACT, January 2018

ANU Medium

3.0 km

1 124 2 104 3 126 4 105 5 103

17

6 102 7 111 8 127 9 108

18

10 80 11 128 12 113

Carolyn Jackson-VIC. Race 5 – ANU South – Medium Course – Men Name

0

100

200

Only to be used if Sportident unit fails

R1

R2

R3

14 121 15 119

Club

Time

16 117 17 123

CCN

20:57

2 Torren Arthur

MFV

21:26 +0:29

3 Jon Glanville

POA

21:41 +0:44

4 Alex Kennedy

GON

21:42 +0:45

5 Martin Wehner

WEA 21:51

6 John Shelton Agar

AOA

22:29 +1:32

7 Chris Andersen

BSA

23:06 +2:09

8 Paul Prudhoe

CCN

23:10 +2:13

9 Malcolm 300m Roberts

NCN

23:36 +2:39

10 Ari Piiroinen

BSA

23:50 +2:53

1

Jose Zapata

19

13 129

+0:54

SPRINT CANBERRA

18 122 19 200 60 m

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 27


SPRINT CANBERRA

Race 2 - Uni of Canberra – Med Course - Women Name

Club

Time

Alison Inglis

BSA

19:28

2 Susanne Harrysson

BSA

20:37 +1:09

3 Carolyn Matthews

NCN

21:02 +1:34

4 Tania Kennedy

GON

21:23 +1:55

5 Debbie Davey

WRN

22:33 +3:05

6 Ana Herceg

POA

22:46 +3:18

7 Carolyn Jackson

BK V

22:47 +3:19

=8 Carol Harding

BSA

23:14 +3:46

=8 Belinda Allison

RRA

23:14 +3:46

10 Margaret Peel

NCN

23:29 +4:01

1

Torren Arthur-VIC.

28 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

Race 2 - Uni of Canberra – Medium Course - Men 1

Name

Club

Alex Davey

WRN 18:19

Time

2 Finn Marsland

MCM

18:57 +0:38

3 Malcolm Roberts

NCN

18:59 +0:40

4 Alex Kennedy

GON

19:08 +0:49

5 Chris Andersen

BSA

19:17 +0:58

6 Torren Arthur

MFV

19:24 +1:05

7 Jon Glanville

POA

19:32 +1:13

8 Ari Piiroinen

BSA

19:50 +1:31

9 Martin Wehner

WEA 19:53

10 Paul Prudhoe

CCN

+1:34

20:05 +1:46


2018 JAFA

The Return of JAFA –

Queen’s Birthday Weekend 2018 Auckland, New Zealand

J

AFA* is back; New Zealand’s North West Orienteering Club is once again organising a 3-day Orienteering carnival over their Queen’s Birthday weekend. The dates are Saturday 2 June to Monday 4 June, 2018.

cup

All in all, JAFA 2018 promises to be a weekend of memorable orienteering, Trans-Tasman rivalry, friendship and fun. We’d love to see you there. For more information please go to qb2018.aoa.org.nz or to the Facebook Event page (on the North West Orienteering Club Facebook page) - ‘Jafa’ Queen’s Birthday Orienteering 2018. *Jafa is a slang term for a resident of Auckland, New Zealand. While there are various interpretations of the acronym, on this occasion our definition is Just Another Friendly Aucklandregion event.

The weekend’s events will start on Saturday with a Double Middle Distance with an afternoon chasing start at Lake Rototoa – last used for the 2017 Oceania Long Distance.

The UK’s Orienteering Magazine Following her win in the Oceania W21E Long Distance we asked renowned Australian Orienteer and member of the Bushrangers, Jo Allison, for her comments about the terrain. Jo says “with a mix of sand dune terrain types, Rototoa offers a very special New Zealand orienteering experience. There are opportunities to put compass skills to the test in lower visibility pine forest dunes and experience orienteering through areas of unique native forest. Then there is the enjoyment of navigating through sand dunes in beautiful open pine forest which is gloriously soft underfoot - a true orienteering paradise!” Those who were at JAFA 2015 will remember the afternoon chasing start at that event described as fast and furious, chasing starts add something extra to an event. With a chasing start on a special map such as Rototoa, Day 1 promises to be a day to remember. Days 2 & 3 will be Multi-day length events in Woodhill Forest on the same map used for the World Masters Long Distance Final 2017. Woodhill Forest is mostly radiata pine planted on undulating sand dune terrain, with good runnability. There are also small pockets of native New Zealand bush with reduced visibility and runnability. There is a network of widely spaced forestry roads and some motorbike tracks, but otherwise there are few paths. Orienteering here is technical and demanding. The weekend will double as a Pinestars/Bushrangers test match, definitely at senior level and hopefully also at U23 level.

Packed with maps, event reports, coaching tips and advice, MTBO, Mountain Marathons/Rogaining, Competitions and much much more. Subscribe online using all major credit cards at www.CompassSport.co.uk 52 pages, full colour, 6 times a year £44 World Subscription Var. 05

Britain’s

National

Orienteering

CompassSport Vol 37

Magazine

Issue 6 December 2016

£5.00

Var. 05

Britain’s

Vol 37

Issue 5 October 2016

CompassSport

£5.00

National

Orienteering

Vol 38

Magazine

Issue 1 Februa ry 2017

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RC#5 Fixtures OMM Report Competitions

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Advertise your event You can have a 6 x 9 cm event ad for just $50 In colour, if we have room, otherwise black & white Send artwork to The Editor: mikehubbert@ozemail.com.au

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 29


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AUSTRALIAN AgeNT foR

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Navigating 45 years A History of the Yarra Valley Orienteering Club By Peter Black

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This new book traces the history of orienteering in Victoria and the Yarra Valley club.

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Includes the beginnings of orienteering in Australia, the first southern hemisphere world championships, evolution of mapping, divergence into bike, street and sprint orienteering, influence of technology, and the pageant of club members, including legends of orienteering, that influenced these changes. Available at events (cash only) or from Ruth Goddard on 03 9457 1836 or ruthg@netspace.net.au

www.aussieogear.com

The Australian WOC JWOC and MTBO teams outfitted by Trimtex

30 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

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SMARTPHONE COURSE

ONSW opens smartphone permanent course ONSW is proud to announce the opening of our first permanent course available by smartphone - at Bicentennial Park in Sydney Olympic Park. And it's free! All courses start from Waterview Café. You can do them old-school with a hard copy of the map and instructions, or with the MapRun app developed by Queensland orienteer Peter Effeney. Participants have the choice of: • 2 score courses • 6 line courses • 2 courses that are wheelchair-friendly. The courses range from 1km to 5.3km and suit beginners all the way up to experienced orienteers looking for a navigational challenge outside regular competition. When you finish each course you can upload your times, splits and routes to the server then compare your results with friends. The Bicentennial Park permanent course is the culmination of 18 months work. ONSW thanks Sydney Olympic Park Authority, Sydney Olympic Park Bike Hire, Peter Effeney, Pacific Solutions and the Australian Sports Commission for their co-operation on this project. See the ONSW permanent course web page https://www.onsw.asn.au/ about/permanent-courses for information on all our courses. You can print a map from our website, pick up a copy at the bike hire shop, or go paperless and just use the app. We hope to launch two more Sydney courses by app later this year.

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 31


MOUNTAIN BIKE ORIENTEERING

INTERVIEW

Riley Martin Lives: Bunbury WA (170 km south of Perth) Birthdate: 4/12/2002 Attends: Bunbury Senior High School, yr 10; Favourite subjects - Chemistry & Physics Part-time job: Check out ‘dude’ at Coles Other hobbies: Playing my Xbox

Interview: Kay Haarsma Photo: Natasha Sparg

When did you start doing MTBO & why? We were into Cross Country MTB before we started any orienteering. When WA had Nationals in MTBO in 2016 we heard about it and decided to give it a try. What is the attraction of MTBO? I love the challenge of orienteering, the tactical thought process. Riding my bike on sweet single track is also one of my favourite things to do, so mixing the two is awesome. MTBO events done and best results? I have won State and National titles. The downside is that MTBO fields are really small. This year I am going to race the M20 age group in preparation for trying out for the Australian MTBO team in the future and to see how I go. I know it will be tougher racing in an older age group but hope that it will inspire me to try harder. (Kay Haarsma note: Riley has shown really good comparative kilometre rates & times on the same courses as more experienced riders in national level events – so that has to be his (and selectors) benchmarks until more junior boys get competitive in MTBO.) Bike? 2017 KTM Myroon 29 Master Carbon. It is a hardtail and I love how fast, light and responsive it is. I am lucky that Mum and Dad went halves with me as I could not afford such a sweet ride on my own. Any memorable experiences whilst competing? I bought a new map board at the Nationals last year and fell into the trap of not trying it out before a race. It came unscrewed early on – I lost the bolt and had to carry it in my mouth and hands for the rest of the race. Do you also do Foot Orienteering? I started Foot Orienteering first in early 2015 locally in Bunbury with SWOT – South West Orienteering Trekkers. They encouraged me to travel to the bush events in Perth that winter and to nominate for the Schools State Team. I had only been orienteering for three months when they chose the team and I missed out. It made me more determined to get in next year. I made the team in 2016 and in 2017. In WA we do not have the frequency of events and volumes of competitors, and I tend to stop Orienteering almost completely from October to March. During that time I ride MTB as often as I can with family and friends. (Kay Haarsma note: Riley placed 8th in the AUS Schools Championships & ran well in both Relays.) 32 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

Do you do MTB or road racing too? I have a road bike and ride it for training but don’t do any road racing. I don’t ride the short XC MTB series any more but rather like to do longer events that have 40-50km legs where I am racing against the clock. Like the Dwellingup 100, the Karri Cup, and the MTB leg in local adventure races with a team of kids. It is a struggle to fit it all in and these events are in the peak Foot O season. Also, sometimes Mum and Dad want to stay home for the weekend rather than driving my brother and I all around WA. What is a typical training week? Well, it depends on whether I am in a training phase or a rest phase. At the minute I am doing three running sessions a week and three riding sessions plus core exercises and flexibility training. I do intervals on the bike and the road plus long runs/rides for each too. Do you have a coach? I have only had a coach for seven months but its been beneficial. When I went to the Foot O Nationals in 2016 I found that I didn’t have the fitness I needed and my parents or I didn’t really know how I should train. My physio pointed us in the direction of Ben Green, a sports scientist, who is a middle and long distance running coach for Front Runner Sports. We didn’t make it easy on him as I wanted fitness for both Foot O & MTBO Nationals at the same time. He looked at the distances I needed to do and the frequency of competition as well as my age and body shape and gave me a program to suit. He taught me, too, about the importance of rest and recovery and strengthening my core. I belong to a local cycle club – 225 Racing, and when school goes back I will do an Ergo / wind trainer session with them too. I have also been lucky to have orienteers Ricky Thackray and Natasha Sparg here in WA who help me with my map reading and route choices. I aspire to beat Ricky when I go out on courses. Goals for MTBO? Short term I would like to do well at the Victorian Championships and Nationals in Qld. In the future I would love to compete at JWOC – MTBO (JWMTBOC). Your pre-race breakfast? Protein pancakes with apple and cinnamon. I love them warmed up with more fruit and Greek yoghurt.


The 2018 Australian MTBO Championships

The Sprint event will not disappoint. It is set in the school grounds and surrounds of a private school north of Brisbane. The map will be challenging and complex.

T

his year’s MTBO Championships are being held north of Brisbane over the weekend of 19th and 20th May. The carnival is being organised by the Sunshine Orienteers club.

The event centre is located in close proximity to all courses and is not too far from Brisbane city. If hanging out at the beach is your thing, the Sunshine Coast is not too far away.

We are planning for three great events but competitors should be really looking forward to the Middle Distance event where they will have the opportunity to ride around on 900 acres of lightly treed private land which is usually used for horse riding. There is a mixture of tracks, trails, dirt roads and also open riding across grasslands. The control placement will not necessarily be on tracks which will be a great test

The AusMTBOchamps website has all of the details including Bulletin 1. Entries are open now on Eventor.

of your navigation. This is all centred around a picturesque lake with flora and fauna to boot. The Long Distance event will be held in the pine forest at Beerburrum. The tracks range from open fire trails to small single trails. Glimpses of the Glasshouse Mountains are sure to distract even the hardest core athlete.

2 0 18 a us tr alian N or t h Br is ba n e

MT B O

c h a m pi o nsh i p s

South East QLD 19 - 2 0 M ay 2 0 18

• SPRINT: St Pauls School ground • MIDDLE: 900 acres private horse trails • LONG: Pine forest north of Brisbane • Accom: Watson Park Convention Centre • Warm up: Cyclegaine 13th May • Warm up MTBO: 18th May

www.sunshineorienteers.com.au/events www.ausmtbochamps.com MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 33


MOUNTAIN BIKE ORIENTEERING

BIKE SHORTS From Peter Cusworth

Two World Champs at Summer MTBO

H

eavy rain on the day of the first Melbourne Summer 75 MTBO event at Mt Evelyn in January meant the field was a bit smaller than usual, but there were two Junior World MTBO Champions in attendance. Local rider and 2015 Junior Sprint Champion Angus Robinson was joined by Adrian Jaeggi from Switzerland, who won the Sprint gold medal in 2016. Adrian is spending a few months in Melbourne and has been attending the local events and will still be here in time to give our local riders a good bit of competition at the Victorian Championships in March.

The Victorian MTBO Championships

B

eing held on 17-18 of March, the Victorian MTBO Championships is also the first round of the National MTBO Series and the selection trials for the Australian World Championships team. The three weekend events are all running out of the RACV Goldfields Resort in Creswick utilising two new maps and a classic remapped area. The Sprint map is entirely within the resort including the golf course, which will be closed for the duration of the event, cart tracks and the many MTB trails around the property.

Custom design Sports gear – O tops & pants, running tops, bike jerseys & nicks For clubs, teams, special events or individuals, feel a part of it in your custom made gear. We can design something for you, or use your own design. Free design service for quantities over 20. *O pants available in 2 stylish designs, long and 3/4 length.

Contact: Peter Cusworth pcusworth@bigpond.com Ph 0409 797 023 34 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

Swiss rider Adrian Jaeggi, the 2016 World Junior Sprint MTBO Champion, has been riding the Melbourne Summer MTBO events. Pipped by a few seconds by Aussie team rider, Glen Charlton, in the first race, Adrian comfortably won the second at Plenty South.

ACT MTBO up and rolling

F

ollowing her recent move to ACT, Marina Iskhakova has taken on the role of ACT MTBO Coordinator and has released details of a 5-event ACT MTBO Series, including an ACT Championships weekend, which will also be the 3rd round of the National MTBO Series. Together with husband Fedor, and the ACT team, these events will see plenty of opportunities to get out MTBOing in the ACT this year.

NZ Championships and Aus-NZ Challenge

A

pril sees the NZ MTBO Championships being run near Alexandra on the South Island from the 24th to the 27th. We are hoping to have a strong contingent of Aussies heading across the ditch as it is also an Australia New Zealand Challenge. The Kiwis beat us fairly comprehensively at last year’s Aus Champs at Wingello. www.mtbochamps.nz

MTBO appointments

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he Australian team officials for the Elite & JWOC World MTBO Championships in Austria in August will be: Kay Haarsma (SA) coach and Natasha Sparg (WA) manager.

Natasha Sparg, the Australian MTBO team manager for the 2018 World Championships.


ANTI – DOPING

IOF Anti-Doping (from IOF publication)

A

t the end of October 2017, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), released a statistical report for the year 2016. This annual report gives a general overview of AntiDoping activities within all sports, including Orienteering. The extensive report provides testing figures from all WADA accredited laboratories, showing both the IOF’s and other anti-doping organizations’ testing statistics. During 2016, a total of 130 samples were collected in tests issued by the IOF. 104 samples were taken in-competition and 26 out-of-competition. More than 96% of the samples were urine and the rest were blood samples. In-competition tests were spread over 10 different IOF Major Events in SkiO, FootO, MTBO, and TrailO. A total of 84 individual athletes were tested, representing 22 different nations.

cost of Anti-Doping testing stayed at approximately the same level as in 2016 (60 TEUR in 2017) and is slightly higher than the funding income received from Athletes License and Organisers’ contributions (59 TEUR). The increase in the cost per sample is due to the increase in out-of-competition testing and the inclusion of a higher number of blood tests to be able to establish Athletes Biological Passport monitoring. These are two important elements of the IOF Anti-Doping strategy which was revised in 2015. In 2016, the total number of samples taken within Orienteering was 402 (compared to 358 samples in 2015). 272 tests were issued by 17 different National Anti-Doping Organisations (292 tests by 20 NADOs in 2015). National AntiDoping Organisations took 142 in-competition samples and 130 out-of-competition samples. 14 samples were blood and the rest were urine samples. Samples Analyzed and Reported by Accredited Laboratories in ADAMS, 2016:

Comparing with 2015, the IOF almost doubled the number of Doping Controls in 2016, going from 66 samples in 2015 to 130 samples in 2016. As a result of the new financing and management method for Anti-Doping work, the total costs of testing however rose by less (ca 50%, from 42 TEUR in 2015 to 62 TEUR in 2016). For 2017, the full WADA report including other Anti-Doping organisations’ testing figures will not be published until late 2018. However, the IOF testing figures for the full year are known. During 2017, the total number of samples decreased somewhat to 107. Even so, the number of out-of-competition samples increased to 40, or 37% of all samples. The total

PERFECT WINTER O-TOUR

June 3rd - 17th, 2018 Your Perfect Winter O-Tour has been coordinated by 3 clubs for your holiday enjoyment. Tour northern NSW via events at Coffs Harbour, Rylestone/Kandos (QBIII) and Armidale. There are plenty of local attractions to explore between events and accommodation is a bargain!

Plan your NSW road trip now! Inquiries: www.ccorienteering.org www.bboc.asn.au www.ntoc.asn.au

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 35


INJURIES

INJURIES … the helmet ‘whiskers’ are an optional extra! Greg Chatfield Ugly Gully - QLD

G

oing back 18 months or so, mid 2016, Geraldine and I were in Ireland and I picked up a bad dose of the flu. It was around that time, when I was feeling so miserable, that I had a fall at an event over there (looking at the map at the wrong time, you know, the old story). Since then, all this time, I experienced a fuzziness in the head and mild headaches and sinus problems but even a doctor there and my local GP, when we were home, suggested it was associated with the ongoing flu. This all persisted from then and throughout 2017 including trips to NZ for the World Masters and later to Ireland again along with the Scottish 6 Days.

When competing in the AUS Relay Championships in early October 2017 I had another fall causing rib injuries but which I didn’t feel was anything out of the ordinary (ditto map reading on the run). Shortly after my headaches worsened so another visit to the doctor was in order. I was referred for a CT scan which showed a large subdural clot (causing the left side of my brain to encroach well over to the right side compressing everything) and ended with me being taken from there to hospital by ambulance (now that was a surprise !) All seems well enough now, in Jan 2018, after the operation to drain the problem and follow up CT scans and specialist appraisals. I have though two dimples, 70mm apart, where the burr holes are which won’t repair because of my age but which should cause no problems subject to no knocks in that area. My senses seem back to normal but my wit is just as bad as usual, sorry. And just to lighten the mood slightly, taking into account the age many of us are reaching, and our new found fragility, the normal padded gaiters may not be enough. Maybe it’s time to consider wearing head protection ........... …......... but the helmet ‘whiskers’ are an optional extra !

36 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018


My fall from grace

In total I spent five weeks in hospital until Dr Rachel told me I was to be discharged and could look after myself at home. I asked if I should not stay a few more days as I was not feeling confident. “A hospital is not a hotel”, she informed me in her best bedside manner.

Ian Baker Bayside Kangaroos - VIC

My son Tim came to get me. We did a shop at the supermarket and loaded up the fridge. I do everything very slowly and carefully and things get easier as time goes by. At press date I still have split vision but it is improving slowly. I have a review at the end of March - if a full cure does not occur, then eye surgery may be necessary. I am going regularly to water aerobics and to the gym to ride the exercise bike. In hospital one always loses weight – I dropped about one kilo a week - so I started to keep a note of mine, down to 70kg (154 pounds), the same as when I was in the British Royal Navy aged 21/183 cm tall! Reduction from 75-76kg. Ian at the Tuckonie club’s 45th anniversary event in August 2017.

O

n Sunday 8 October 2017 I left my home in suburban Melbourne, cycled up the street and turned left onto the dedicated bike track. After about 300 metres I saw some gravel on the track so slowed down. That is the last thing I can remember. “The changes in brain function that can occur may include a brief period of loss of consciousness, as well as little or no memory for the event or events that occurred prior to the accident ……” Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Information Booklet. A couple out for a stroll found me unconscious on the ground and phoned for an ambulance. How long I was there - 15 minutes, 30 minutes? I’ve no idea. I remember being in quite some pain as I was rolled onto a stretcher with an orthopaedic collar round my neck and shoulders and then in a blur I was driven to the big Alfred Hospital in Melbourne. The passers-by took my bike to their nearby house for safe keeping. I cannot remember clearly the sequence of events with the Trauma section, Orthopaedic, Cardiac and Eye doctors. I had cracked two ribs in my left back, had a major fracture of the clavicle bone in my left shoulder, numerous cuts and bruises and, perhaps worst of all, I could not see properly: my vision was blurry and split – the two images from the right and left eye were separated, not converging. I was told this was the result of hitting my head on the ground - my helmet had been split; for several weeks I had to wear a patch on my left eye; there was no way I could drive or get about normally since I had no 3D vision. I remember opening my eyes one day to see a concerned group of medics by my hospital bed. “Pulse thirty three”, I heard. If it slows down a bit more I’ll be dead, I thought, but it does not hurt, I just feel very relaxed and dreamy. “50mls of (whatever)” ordered Professor (forget his name) and this was promptly injected to revive me.

And, I have made another change, alcohol. The last time a drop passed my lips was Saturday 7 October, the evening before the accident. Now, I am not a regular drinker of white wine at home on my own, though I do enjoy it if someone visits me or in a restaurant. From being a ‘boozer’ I have become a social drinker! Keep your fingers crossed for me! I aim to have a R & R holiday in Thailand to restore the spirits once I am recovered. And hopefully, back on the bike and on the Orienteering course.

Eyes wide shut! Ian enjoys a recovery massage at the hotel on a group bicycle tour of the Mekong delta area of Vietnam in 2015.

Ian Baker (Vic), now M80, is almost an original orienteer. He is founding editor of The Australian Orienteer.

Advertise your event You can have a 6 x 9 cm event ad for just $50 In colour, if we have room, otherwise black & white Send artwork to The Editor: mikehubbert@ozemail.com.au

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 37


O-SPY

Orienteering / Athletics cooperation

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rienteering Tasmania (OTAS) will foster a program of cooperation with Athletics Tasmania (AT) for the mutual benefit of both organisations. OTAS has placed three AT cross country events in their 2018 calendar and OTAS members will be encouraged to participate in them. In return, AT will place three Orienteering events in their calendar and be encouraging their members to participate.

O-SPY Orienteering in Oz will turn 50 soon.

The program commenced at an AT Twilight meeting on Feb 2, with a short Orienteering event of about 1.5km, starting and finishing inside the Athletics Centre. Controls were placed inside and outside the centre. All Athletics Tasmania members were encouraged to have a go and join regular orienteers for the mass start. Later in the meeting, athletes and orienteers were encouraged to compete in an invitational mile event.

T

here’s a little time to go yet but planning for a 50th birthday takes time, so better to start soon.

On August 23rd 1969 an Orienteering event was organised by Tom Andrews at Upper Beaconsfield, just east of Melbourne. There had been other navigation based events and activities held in earlier times in both Victoria and South Australia, and perhaps in other States as well. But this was the event that started Orienteering as we know it in Australia. So here’s the challenge for Orienteering Australia, Orienteering Victoria, and orienteers all around the country. You only turn 50 once so how will we celebrate this birthday?

You know when you’re hooked

W

hen you do this to your car you know you’re hooked and there’s no way back. Might as well just keep on going to events. (From an idea first seen in “CompassSport”, Oct 2017, page 33).

Hobart Athletics Centre.

Video Gaming may become an Olympic sport by 2024

C

ompetitive video gaming is gaining more legitimacy by being included in international sporting events. This year’s Asian Games in Jakarta will hold exhibition esports tournaments alongside swimming, soccer, and track & field. At the 2022 Asian Games in Hangzhou, China, video games will be a medal sport. Organizers of the 2024 Paris Olympics say they’re also open to the idea. Tournaments in China and South Korea routinely draw tens of thousands of spectators already. Esports won’t be part of Tokyo’s 2020 Olympic summer Games, but Japan’s Olympic Committee and the Tokyo city government have signed-off on holding huge tournaments in the run up to the Games. The Japan Times

38 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018


It’s time for Leaders

Deep Thought

A

I

Dangers and delights of a ’70s childhood

f C-3PO is “fluent in over six million forms of communication” why does he speak english with such a strange accent?

s Campbell Soup chief executive Denise Morrison has put it: “You can either lead change or be a victim of it. Now is the time for leaders.” 

Extract from an article in Melbourne’s Herald Sun –

W

atching mums knock back Cinzano, disappearing for hours on end on our pushies, toe-curling sunburn, and passive smoking. Those of us who grew up in the ‘70s are lucky to be alive.

C-3PIO. Source: Wikipedia.org

Australia officially moves 1.8 metres northeast

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ustralia’s coordinates have officially moved 1.8 metres northeast, with Minister for Resources and Northern Australia Matt Canavan launching Australia’s new coordinate reference frame, the Geocentric Datum of Australia 2020 (GDA2020). While Australians rely on positioning technology every day, they may not know that a datum is the underlying reference for Australia’s coordinates. They may also not realise that the accuracy of this datum is affected by the movement of Australia’s tectonic plate which travels around seven centimetres each year; this means Australia’s coordinates need to change to keep up. Australia is currently using a datum from 1994, now 23 years old and out of sync with the tectonic plate by 1.6 metres. Modernising the datum enables Australia to embrace a range of applications that depend on precise positioning, like autonomous and remotelyoperated systems.

Fine-tuning your Internal GPS from Liz Bourne I picked this news item up from Wild magazine.

French researchers demonstrate the ability to develop an ‘internal compass’.

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pparently, French researchers, funded by the European Research Council, and led by Kevin O’Regan, an ERCfunded researcher at the University of Paris Descartes, have been able to show that human beings can develop advanced spatial orientation to the extent that we are able to feel magnetic North without any supporting reference. Using several different experiments, the research preconditioned participants to know the direction of North. This involved wearing headphones that, when the participant faced North, the gentle sound of a waterfall would play. The experiments became increasingly complex, whereby a participant was blindfolded in a chair and could feel the direction of North, having been exposed to the preconditioning. Dogs can hear sounds way out of human range and dolphins and whales use echo location for direction. Several species have also been shown to be able to sense the Earth’s magnetic polarity - perhaps we can too and we just didn’t know it?

The updated coordinates are based on the projected position of the Australian continent in 2020. The map has moved.

And there are already several Apps and wearable products (that buzz when heading north) and others claiming to help you develop your own internal compass. Read more at the ERC=Science ² website.

Human compass Australia moves north-east MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 39


SHORT STORY

Portsea People Wilf Holloway (Germany)

Wilf is the author of “Murder at the 14th Control”, and several other books. This is an extract from Wilf’s new book “Memories and Meetings“ – available soon.

W

hen I was in Melbourne with my wife around 1980 we visited the Mornington Peninsula and the sand dunes near its western end in order to search for signs of Percy Cerutty and his athletes and perhaps run some of their training routes. Unfortunately there was nothing locatable and this was, of course, rather disappointing. However, by the time I visited Melbourne again in 2015 and drove up Arthur’s Seat with my girlfriend Heidrun and cousin Jackie there had been a few changes. Most relevant was the fact that the internet held promise of important information and it did prove possible to glean some from statements half-buried in athletics forums. Apparently Cerutty’s grave was in Sorrento Cemetery, just a few kilometres away from his beloved Portsea. Thus armed we set off for the Peninsula and after doing the usual touristy visits in extreme summer heat at 40 centigrade in the shade (of which there was very little) we finally got to seaside Sorrento and tried to locate the cemetery. The small town was packed with holidaymakers who had little idea of points of interest other than beach and bar. Car navigational systems proved no help either, but at the tiny tourist information office we were welcomed by the wife of a runner who indeed knew of Cerutty and gave us a map showing that the graveyard was only a couple of kilometres distant. We expected that the guru’s final resting place would be noted on some kind of map location there but it wasn’t, so the three of us searched the whole place with its many date-mixed gravestones for nearly an hour in the heat without luck. Rather frustrating, but back at the entrance there was a telephone number for the town council and upon ringing this we were amazed to hear a Mrs Joan Hoskins telling us she would be right over to show us the grave. True to word, she soon arrived and quickly led the way to the centre of the vast grounds, pushing a large lavender plant to the side and pointing to the ageing golden letters: Percy Wells Cerutty, etc. So that’s how we had missed it, the words were totally hidden behind the flowers sprouting in front. Not only that, but the helpful cemetery trust worker informed us that just down the road in Portsea itself was the very oval (the Aussie expression for a grassy sportsground) where Herb Elliot and co had trained nearly 60 years before. There was also a plaque there dedicated to Perce, so we hopped into the car again and sped over. True enough, and 40 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

the whole park had been renamed as “The Percy Cerutty Oval” as late fame for the famous man. Heidrun and Jackie then forced me to run a lap of the oval in commemoration of all those who had trained there and I must admit it was rather moving to think about those days long past as top world athletes spent their weekends here. My adolescent sporting dreams revolved around this area to a large extent (as explained elsewhere in this book) and thus I felt the need to get into the famous sand dunes as well. Four decades earlier this had been difficult but in the meantime there were metalled roads allowing one to reach the dunes on the south coast of the narrow peninsula. However, I unfortunately couldn’t try to run or walk to the tops of these because of prohibition notices warning about nature conservation. No problems for Cerutty and his athletes in the old days, as Youtube films of their exploits here show anybody interested in clicking onto it all. Mike Hubbert, editor of the The Australian Orienteer magazine, and Tom Andrews who was also one of the instigators of Orienteering in Australia and even has his place in the Oz National Sports Hall of Fame to prove this, were good runners who regularly spent their weekends at Portsea training in their youth. Mike tells how they arrived Friday evenings, slept early in

Percy Cerutty’s grave.


bunk beds, lived frugally and trained extremely hard till Sunday evening, when it was back to Melbourne to studies or work. He remembers tough 15km runs along the rough paths, sandhills and beach, followed by strength training with weights. Cerutty was a stickler for health and nutrition so they ate lots of cereals with milk – until the bills for this liquid ‘luxury’ grew too high and his wife forced everybody to revert to lemon water with their raw oats ! Cerutty’s philosophy embraced not only physical training but mental stimulation, spartan philosophy and thought-provoking poetry. All this embedded in continual motivation, passing on the positive side of his varying experiences to everybody who would listen. He had been in such a bad bodily state at 43 years that he was only given a couple of years to live, but built himself up through iron will, healthy living and hard training after lowly beginnings. He ran his first marathon at 50 years old, clocking one minute outside three hours, before buying a small piece of land in Portsea and becoming an athletics coach. In order to advertise this fact he ran the 130 km to Melbourne and spent much of the rest of his life educating sportspeople on life and useful attitudes, believing that an athlete had to be tough both mentally and physically in order to win. His six books portrayed his sometimes eccentric views but there is no doubt that much of what he wrote was sensible and helped his ‘stable’ to top results. The biggest success was of course Herb Elliot, who exerted absolute authority over the mile and 1500 metres from 1957-61, taking world records and Olympic gold with apparent ease. Many world class athletes spent time learning from Cerutty, even Australian golden girl sprinter Betty Cuthbert (world records from 60 metres to 400 metres) was trained by him for general fitness. With his help she added the 400 metres Olympic title of 1964 to the three gold medals she had won eight years before. But others didn’t get on so well with this enigmatic, headstrong personality who became an internationally famous coach. World record man John Landy had arguments with Cerutty and left him, and Percy often crossed swords with rival coach Franz Stampfl, who he felt propagated far too much mind-killing interval training. There is certainly no doubt that Percy was enigmatic, apparently once even appearing in a TV show in shorts and without a shirt because he believed that viewers would only be able to recognise him if he appeared in his usual apparel. However, much of what he coached, notably his arguments for strength training, and especially for the upper body, have been successfully heeded ever since. At about 70 years old he gave up coaching and he died at 80, having made his mark on more than one generation of athletes.

MCG – National Sports Museum

I was a big fan of his at one time and read in his autobiography that when he retired he wanted to live on a south sea island and paint pictures. I once asked Tom Andrews what finally became of this plan. “Well,” said Tom, who knew his man pretty well, “I don’t know about the painting but he did indeed spend his retirement on an island in southern seas.” I asked where exactly - and thus walked right into Tom’s laughed answer: “Australia!” But in 2015 it was not only Portsea that provided fascinating encounters with dreams from my sporting past. On our first free day in Melbourne I had headed for the famous cricket stadium (MCG) housing the Australian National Sports Museum and Sport Australia Hall of Fame. Outside there were massive statues of some of the all-time sporting greats from Down Under, including Don Bradman, a cricketer who came from my father’s era and was therefore greatly admired by him.

MCG – Sir Donald Bradman.

Betty Cuthbert was there too, mouth wide open in her inimitable style and reminding me of her Tokyo clash with Britain’s Ann Packer, mentioned elsewhere in the sports memories of this book. Especially interesting about Cuthbert is the fact that she initially bought tickets for the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, hoping to visit on some of the big days – only to hit brilliant form herself, surprisingly make the Aussie team at the last moment and even rake in an incredible three golds! For Japan in 1964 she had awesome belief in herself after having to miss the Rome Olympics, and became the only runner in history to take individual gold altogether at all three sprint distances. Unfortunately struck down by illness she was confined to a wheelchair in later years but remained her radiant self as she was assisted to be one of the final torchbearers for Sydney in 2000. A whole area directly to the south east of Melbourne, and within walking distance of this modern, vibrating city, is devoted to sport, with the Rod Laver Tennis Stadium and about 20 outdoor courts emphasising the relevance for the annual MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 41


SHORT STORIES

MCG – Betty Cuthbert.

Australian Open. There are various other stadiums in the area there too and this was also the site of those Olympics of 1956 where my London clubmate Don Thompson collapsed in the heat during the 50km walk. On one grass oval of Olympic Park there used to be a well-used running track and it was here that Australian Ron Clarke, the best runner never to win a major gold medal, surprisingly broke two world records in the 1963 Emil Zatopek Commemorative Trophy race. The Collingwood Aussie Rules football team train there these days right beside the main road and one of sports most famous statues. It is a complex memorial portraying one of sports most memorable moments, even if it does not show a typical winning runner. One man is depicted getting up from the track after having fallen, and another helps him and asks if all is well. This simple situation seems unimportant until one knows the full story, which can even be viewed as a film six decades later on the internet.

Sportsmanship – John Landy helps Ron Clarke. 42 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

In the national mile championships final John Landy was favourite and had chances of breaking the world record but he gave these up with an unequalled act of sportsmanship in the first lap of the race. Ron Clarke, then a top junior runner, was tripped and fell, and although he had nothing to do with this accident, Landy turned back to see that all was well. Meanwhile, the rest of the field sped on, gaining about 40 metres over their illustrious opponent. And as even the event-hardened journalists in the grandstand watched with sheer admiration in their eyes, Landy chased the rest of the runners and caught them all, sweeping past in the final metres to take the title in a top time. We will never know for certain if it would otherwise have been a new world record but it was definitely a sports event of world eminence. Landy was of course the loser in that classic Vancouver mile race versus Roger Bannister in 1954 and it is interesting to note that he took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes in 1956, whilst young Ron Clarke lit the Olympic flame, so both were honoured in their home town. Thus it is especially fitting that their linking statue now adorns the edge of the sports ground there, even if it’s a bit away from mainstream activity and probably most training youngsters don’t even give it a glance or a thought. In the meantime a number of sports centres actually carry the names of famous runners, and this is also the case for Roger Bannister, who was brought up in Harrow and after whom the athletics track on the Uxbridge Road was named. I worked there as a groundsman in some summer holidays from being a student and also had my aforementioned long jump discussion there with David Bedford in his younger, less extravagant days. Olympic torchbearer is a task handled by both the famous and the not-so-famous. In the old days particular top sportsmen were asked to do the ‘job’ and it was a great honour to be the person actually lighting the flame in the stadium. The names of the last flame-carriers were often kept secret and there was great speculation concerning who it would finally be. One remembers the incredibly moving moment from 1996 in Atlanta as Mohammad Ali suddenly appeared, loved by the world and clearly ill, but fighting to keep control in order to uncertainly ignite that Olympic flame. Absolute last in the line in Sydney in 2000 was Cathy Freeman, who as an Aborigine had a really special place and later managed to assuage Aussie hopes with her satisfyingly emotional 400 metres win. But one of the final torchbearers that year was also a CEO in his sixties, the Portsea star Herb Elliot, whose book “The Golden Mile” was avidly read by me 40 years before and fetches over 100 dollars in the internet these days. He ran sub 4-minutes for the mile a total of 17 times and remained unbeaten in his international career, besides being a source of inspiration for me and about 10,000 better young runners. It is especially interesting to note that regarding distance running another major coach from this period also hailed from the opposite side of our globe, and his self-developed training system was so good that it is still utilised today. New Zealander Arthur Lydiard produced almost scientifically-structured training plans and along with Cerutty, Gerschler, Igloi and Van Aaken he in effect assisted me to produce my first university sports thesis. No wonder that I still marvel at these people and ‘ancient’ athletic days. But getting back to the torchbearers again I must mention that it was often possible to apply to be allowed to run a kilometre or so with that revered flame, and some friends of mine in both England and Germany had the good luck on various occasions to have their names drawn out of the sporting hat. All this


was in the old days before doping and money raised their ugly heads and reduced my personal interest in the Olympics. Okay, so these days there are still excitement and stars and fantastic races, but somehow a certain allure is missing when one doesn’t know how honest it all is, or whether the medals will be redistributed a few years later after further doping tests. A former friend and youth rival of mine, Roger Mills, finished 4th as a senior in the European Games 20km walk in Rome in 1974 but when the urine specimen of one of the medallists later proved positive the bronze medal was sent to England for him. It was presented in a TV sports show one evening with Roger, quite alone, mounting an impromptu rostrum to receive it. Upon being asked how he felt he replied, “Pretty daft”, which was not what the producers expected but which does seem to sum up the situation admirably. He deserved that medal, had earned it through many months of honest and hard training, but that belated presentation epitomizes the sad state of affairs in modern world sport. My second university thesis around 1970 dealt with the chances of the modern Olympics going the same fatal way as the ancient version but so far my negative predictions have proven false, so perhaps there must still be some innate spark of something positive in there somewhere. Many of the top sportsmen from the good old days made it big in business (like Elliot) or politics or other fields and I was intrigued to see that John Landy even became governor of the State of Victoria from 2001-06. In addition the man so closely associated with him back in 1956, Ron Clarke, was mayor of the Gold Coast from 2004-12. Long before this of course Clarke had made himself into a legend with 17 world distance running records – offset by the agonizing fact of never winning a cherished Olympic gold medal. This was perhaps ‘stolen’ from him by the IOC allocating the Games to Mexico City in 1968, when almost nobody from the lowlands stood a chance. But perhaps he would have been defeated anyway, because despite prodigious runs he could be outsprinted at the end if anybody could stay in contention till then. Which was hardly the case in so many of his races. Most memorable was the White City race in London in 1965 when I saw live on TV how a personal friend and editor of my very first book, European champion Bruce Tulloh, was amongst those top runners scorched off by Clarke’s incredible early pace. Runners gave up along the way, practically doubting the sanity of Clarke’s 4:06 first mile speed, only to soon stand at the trackside and join in the applause willing him onto that first-ever three miles under 13 minutes. In an incredible six weeks in 1965 he smashed twelve various world records and took a massive 36 seconds off the 10km time, and three years later I was at Crystal Palace with my father to see him even edge under his own world record for 2 miles. But really fascinating that day was seeing him remain at the relatively new arena for a further hour afterwards, signing autographs for all those kids dreaming of sometime running like him. As a young man doing interval training he had run three junior world records at 18, only to disappear from the scene for six years, possibly drained by those mind-sapping repetition spurts. Long steady runs later brought him more enjoyment and he restarted competitively, astounding everybody by running a world record six miles on his home track in Olympic Park in 1963. I seem to remember that that was the race where he stopped at the Finish, only to be exhorted by spectators to get running again, because about a lap further on the 10 km record was also within grasp despite the pause! Little did I know, that as Heidrun and I drove over to Parkdale on Christmas Eve 2015, we would suddenly be pleasantly confronted with all this. It was incredibly hot and after swimming at the nearby coast we still had a bit of time to wait before the invitation to relatives for the evening meal at their nearby home.

We decided to stop off at the local park opposite my cousin’s house because there were some shady trees there to sit under. A couple of athletes were working out despite the intense heat and there was a notice asking training visitors to donate a dollar for using the facilities. A far cry indeed from Alperton track times with Bill sitting there every evening to collect the few pence from everybody, whether complete greenhorns or world champions. As we sat down I noted that the track was very good and there was even an excellent modern safety cage for the throwing events, which you don’t find everywhere. Plus the reverse side of a large statue which looked like it could display an Olympic torchbearer. Despite the grilling heat I stood up and wandered around to the front of this strange statue reflecting the sunlight. The similarity to Ron Clarke was immediate and amazing, and quickly confirmed by the explanation plaque. But the real surprise came upon reading the details – this was the very Mentone track upon which Clarkey once ran his ten-mile world record ! He took this from England’s Mel Batty who had been a familiar figure at many of my cross-country races where I finished about 500th and he was 500 places closer to the front. Absolutely amazing was that later dinner conversation proved that none of my Australian relatives there knew anything about this! So probably I’m the only one in the family completely nuts on old athletics! Just one final story remains to be told here, fascinating because it casts further light upon another great runner of the fifties – Emil Zatopek. The Czech was well known not only for his sporting prowess, deep humanity and unfailing sportsmanship but also for his bearing up to the Soviets in the wake of the 1968 communist shutdowns. So he was beloved by runners everywhere, especially with his famous statement: “Birds fly, fish swim, humans run!” Sometime later, after Ron Clarke had long since proven he was the best but had never won that elusive gold he visited Prague and a number of athletics friends. When the Australian was leaving, Zatopek gave him a small package at the airport and said he should only unwrap it when he got home. Clarke did this, and found one of the Czech’s Olympic gold medals, re-engraved with Clarke’s name. Nothing could epitomise the exploits and characters of these two men better than that. It is no wonder that they were both almost worshipped by runners of my generation. The book will be available soon from Wilf at wilfholloway@web.de

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 43


SHORT STORIES

Parallel Punching! Wilf Holloway

M

ike Jordanson was having a brilliant run and as he approached the final control he thanked the gods who had granted him this brilliant result in the biggest race of his year. British Relay Championships and in top form he had run fast through the complex terrain, there could be no way that the nevertheless strong LOK team had got past him on that final leg. Intermediate times from leg two indicated he had probably started with a massive 6 minute lead and at Mike’s error-free tempo even British champion Gerald Bates would have made little gain over the 7 kilometres, 2-3 minutes cutdown at most. So Mike ran in to the final control stand, selected the slightly nearer electronic station as a girl from another course thrust her own chip into the adjacent station. The bleep confirmed Mike’s registration and he sprinted off down the run-in, habit forcing speed even in this simple situation. Clubmates Eric and Malcolm joined him halfway, jubilantly raising their fists as the trio covered the final metres over the line, the crowd of spectators cheering and the announcer congratulating Sheffield on their win. Mike punched the station for his final time and stopped as excited clubmates surrounded him. Despite exhilaration he would be tired for a few minutes at least, but one job remained to be done. He walked on the 50 metres to the computer read-out, knowing he had double-checked every single control and there could be no error on that score. With a smile for the woman at the table he pushed his SI stick in - but was amazed as the woman said, “One missing!” “That’s not possible,” exclaimed Mike, with surprise all over his face. Surprise that turned to horror as the woman said her readout was quite definite. “Which control?” asked the northerner with shock taking control of his body and thoughts. “The last one,” replied the official, not without a degree of disbelief.

“No!” shouted Mike, and in the fast reaction of a top orienteer trained to make instant decisions he turned and ran back down the path, brushing past other exhausted finishers. He knew he had heard the confirmation ‘peep’ as he punched at that final control – but now realised he had probably only heard the parallel station, his own hadn’t correctly registered. Nothing on his SI stick, would there be something on the station itself? For a few seconds he wondered what the rulebook would say about all this, but the various questions could be sorted out afterwards. Right now it was vital to get to that last control again before LOK arrived! “What’s up?” shouted Eric, but received no answer from his clubmate already storming back down the final 150 metres towards the final control. It was the toughest sprint of his life and he powered everything into it as the crowd wondered what was happening. And he very nearly made it. He was only 10 metres from the control stand when opponent Gerald Bates burst out of the forest after punching. Surprised to see Mike, but putting in an instant sprint up the final straight. Mike punched, turned and raced after him, but it was clearly a hopeless task, already so deep into oxygen debt. The rulebook would have to decide on the silver medals, the gold had unfortunately gone. (does this sound familiar ????)

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VICTORINOX AWARD This issue’s Victorinox Award goes to Peter Cusworth for MTBO maps, reports and other contributions to this magazine over a long period of time. Peter will receive a Victorinox Handyman which includes 24 tools and features – retail value $139. 44 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018


SPOT the DIFFERENCE

The Bush O season is upon us with Easter in Tasmania just around the corner, so it’s a good time to test your skills at reading a complex Bush O map. Many of you may have run on this map in years past. Do you recognise it? The scale is 1:7,500 and there are 25 differences in the two otherwise identical map sections. CAN YOU FIND ALL 25 ???

MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 45


LETTERS

Letters The Australian Orienteer welcomes letters. Preference

will be given to letters which are concise and which make positive points. The editor reserves the right to edit letters, particularly ones which are longer than 300 words.

Snake bite at Transit Flats

W

e enjoyed the article by Martin Bicevskis in the December 2017 edition of The Australian Orienteer, (pages 12 – 14), about David Marshall’s 2015 course design on Transit Flats. In the article, David is quoted as saying: “One problem I had particular concern about was overseas competitors encountering snakes, of which I saw many.” We saw none; however the accompanying photo (two days post-event) shows that Angela did indeed encounter one. During the event she thought she’d hit her shin on a stick. A post-event look had us wondering - we’d never seen such an odd stick injury - and then snake bite was confirmed by physician cousins in Melbourne a couple of days later. Fortunately it must have been just a glancing blow from one of the less venomous species, and no lasting harm was done. We loved Tasmania in general and will certainly come back, but if we orienteer there again, puncture-proof armour from the knees down would seem to be in order. Does Aussie O-Gear stock such an item?

Mine host did not appreciate this, especially when a few glasses went flying, and ordered the whole party to depart at once. To Louey he addressed solemn words, “Never dare to show your face in Myrniong again or you will be shot, no warnings!” Louey did not care to risk things and never made himself visible in Myrniong again. We all miss him. Ian Baker (Bayside Kangaroos, Victoria) Graham Davies-John Lewis-Eric Planinsek.

2018 NSW & ACT Ski-Orienteering Championship Perisher Valley, Nordic Shelter 12th August 2018, starting 9.30am

snake bite - close-up, Jan 2015.

Life’s Secrets Revealed

here is one aspect of the life of John Lewis, Louey the Fly, which had to remain a closed book during his lifetime. Readers will know he died last July at the age of 82 (The Australian Orienteer – September 2017, page 45). Louey and I were the partners in O-Gear, the orienteering gear shop which we started in 1976 in a trailer. We took it in turns to hook the trailer up to our cars and tow it to wherever the next event was being held.

He explained that a few years previously as a member of Richmond Harriers athletic club he had gone to Ballarat for an inter-club relay event. Richmond had won so on the way home the victorious athletes stopped at the hotel in Myrniong to refresh themselves with a few ales and some gigantic T-bone steaks. Never one to do things by halves, Louey, exhilarated by the club’s success, celebrated by doing a haka, the Kiwi war-dance, on the bar of the hotel.

I N V I TAT I O N

Robert Gilchrist & Angela Pearson

T

into the back and you have to drive the next bit”. Without explanation he lay flat on the floor in the back of the car, only to show his face again several kilometres later.

Organised by Red Roos, Big Foot and Perisher X Country. This event forms part of XC Ski week with the start in front of the beautiful, warm and special Nordic Shelter at Perisher. Everyone who loves or dreams of trying Skiing or Orienteering will be able to take an opportunity to combine both skills and to take part in our exciting Championship. It will be the 4th Championship, after Swedish Ski-O expert Patrik Gunnarsson brought the concept back to Perisher in 2014. It is the only Ski-O event in Australia and among only few in the Southern Hemisphere! Three Ski-O courses will be offered: Short (about 2.5km), Middle (about 5km), Long (about 7.5km)

A 2-hour Snogaine (teams of 2-3) will be offered with a mass start at 10am. Each CP marked on the map will be worth a specific number of points. Team with the highest score wins.

O-Gear graphic.

This particular Sunday the event was near Ballarat and we drove there together in Louey’s big shiny BMW 7 on the new highway which replaced the old slow road through every small town on the way from Melbourne. Coming back after the event, Louey was driving his car. Just before the hamlet of Myrniong the highway was closed and traffic diverted through the township. Louey saw the sign, pulled into the side of the road, saying “Ian, I’m getting 46 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER MARCH 2018

Family Treasure-Hunt (Adults with kids) – a series of clues has to be collected to help you finally to discover a Treasure! This is a 1-2 hour snow adventure (on skies or on snowshoes) that you and kids will really enjoy! Please register through Eventor starting April 2018. Non-orienteers are welcome to register at Eventor or to email their registration directly to the organiser. Entry fee is $20 (for adults), $15 (for under 21s) and kids under 7 are free. Hot chocolate, coffee and tea will be provided at the Finish! Course Planner: Fedor Iskhakov, Red Roos Event Director: Marina Iskhakova, Red Roos 0412 308 310


TOP EVENTS 2018

2019 March 10-12 March 17-18

March 30April 2 April 5-7

April 21-22

April 24-27

April 19-27

Melbourne Sprint Weekend, VIC www.parkstreeto.com.au/msw2018 VIC MTBO Championships – National MTBO Series #1 Creswick, www.vicmtbo.com

May 30June 2 July 28Aug 3 July 5-12

AUS Easter Carnival, Hobart, Tasmania www.eastertasmania2018.net.au Bay of Fires 3 Days, Tasmania www.eastertasmania2018.net.au NSW Long & Middle Distance Championships nr Armidale, NSW www.ntoc.asn.au/nswchamps2018/

July 6-12 July 27Aug 3

NZ MTBO Champs & AUS-NZ Challenge, Alexandra NZ. www.mtbochamps.nz AUS MTBO Championships Sunshine Coast, QLD www.ausmtbochamps.com

Aug 13-18

May 23

World Orienteering Day

Oct 26-27

June 2-4

JAFA WEEKEND, New Zealand Lake Rototoa & Woodhill Forest www.qb2018.aoa.org.nz

June 9-11

QBIII Orienteering, NSW Rylestone / Kandos www.ccorienteering.org

May 19-20

June 27July 1

WMMTBOC Nagykovacsi, Hungary

June 28July 1 July 6-13

European Youth Championships Veliko, Bulgaria eyoc2018.eu WMOC Copenhagen, Denmark

July 8-15

JWOC Kecskemét, Hungary www.jwoc2018.hu/ O-Ringen Höga Kusten, Sweden. www.oringen.se WOC 2018 Riga, Latvia woc2018.lv WMTBOC, JWMTBOC Zwettl Austria

July 21-27 Aug 4-11

Aug 4-12 Aug 12 Aug 17-22

Sept 14-16 Sept 29 -Oct 7 Oct 13-18 Dec 22-27

Dec 27-31

WOC Sarpsborg, Østfold, Norway woc2019.no/en Oceania & AUS Championships SE NSW & NE Victoria WMMTBOC Breitenbrunn, Germany AUS MTBO Championships Victoria www.ausmtbochamps.com

Sept 28 - Oct 6 Oct 2-6

2020 Easter

AUS 3 Days, NSW

July 7-11 June 28-Jul 5 August 7-15 August 17-23

Sprint WOC, Denmark (near Velje) JWOC, Turkey WMOC, Slovakia WMTBOC, Jeseník, Czech Republic AUS Championships, Tasmania

2018

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Ski Orienteering NSW & ACT Championships, Perisher, NSW North American O Championships Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada yukonorienteering.ca/naoc2018 London City Race Weekend slow.org.uk/events/cityrace2018/

PO Box 625 Daylesford VIC 3460

pretex

AUS Championships Renmark & Adelaide, South Australia Alice Springs Masters Games www.alicespringsmastersgames.com.au Asian Orienteering Championships Hong Kong www.oahk.org.hk/ Xmas 5 Days, NSW www.onsw.asn.au

AUS Easter Carnival Perth Hills & Narrogin, WA wa.orienteering.asn.au/easter2019 European Youth Championships Grodno, Belarus 2019 Scottish 6 Days Strathearn, Perthshire, Scotland WMOC 2019 Riga, Latvia wmoc2019.lv/ JWOC Silkeborg, Denmark www.jwoc2019.dk/ 2019 WMTBOC & JWMTBOC Viborg, Jutland, Denmark

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MARCH 2018 THE AUSTRALIAN ORIENTEER 47


You can run what else will you do?

Photos: Tourism Tasmania and Andrew Wilson; Poon Wai Nang; Kathryn Leahy; Paul Fleming; Rob Burnett

Start planning now! WIN one of five easter tasmania 2018 entry packages! To enter, look for our competition posts on the Easter Tasmania 2018 Facebook Page and in the comments section, tell us why – in 25 words or less – taking part in the adventure appeals to you. Entry Packages include a credit to the value of one adult entry to the Australian Three Days plus $200 towards accommodation and transport costs. Lucky draws will be held late October 2016, April 2017, September 2017, November 2017 and February 2018. FOR TERMS AND CONDITIONS VISIT OUR WEBSITE, GO TO PRACTICAL INFORMATION AND CLICK ON COMPETITION DETAILS

www.eastertasmania2018.net.au

make your travel plans easy with ract travel Use our preferred travel agency RACT to book your ferry, flights, car, accommodation and sight-seeing adventures. For details visit our website and go to Travel Advice.

The Australian Orienteer – March 2018  

A quarterly magazine from Orienteering Australia

The Australian Orienteer – March 2018  

A quarterly magazine from Orienteering Australia