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SPR I NG 2021

REBUILDING CONSUMER CONFIDENCE Safety, Quality, and Great Service Help Move the Industry Forward

Pent-Up Demand will Drive a Strong Recovery

OLCC: Expanding and Investing in Oregon’s Future Safety & Service: A Balancing Act

SYNDICATE WINE BAR, BEAVERTON

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NORTHWEST NORTHWEST NORTHWEST NORTHWEST FOOD SHOW DATES! FOOD SHOW FOOD FOOD SHOW SHOW DATES! DATES! DATES!

AUGUST 1-2, 2021 AUGUST 1-2, 2021 AUGUST AUGUST 1-2, 1-2, 2021 2021 THE 2021 NORTHWEST FOOD SHOW HAS LOTS OF NEW ATTENDEE-ATTRACTING, BUSINESS-BUILDING THE 2021FOOD NORTHWEST FOOD SHOW LOTS OF FEATURES DESIGNED TO GENERATE THE 2021 THE NORTHWEST 2021 NORTHWEST FOOD SHOWSHOW HAS LOTS HAS LOTS OF HAS OFNEW NEW ATTENDEE-ATTRACTING, BUSINESS-BUILDING CUSTOMERS FOR YOU! NEW ATTENDEE-ATTRACTING, NEW ATTENDEE-ATTRACTING, BUSINESS-BUILDING BUSINESS-BUILDING FEATURES DESIGNED TO GENERATE FEATURES FEATURES DESIGNED DESIGNED TO GENERATE TO GENERATE NEW NEW NEW THIS IS A SELLING SHOW. CUSTOMERS FOR YOU! CUSTOMERS CUSTOMERS FOR YOU! FOR YOU! SHOWCASE YOUR FULL PRODUCT LINE TO TARGETED BUYERS. THIS IS A SELLING SHOW. THIS IS ATHIS SELLING IS A SELLING SHOW. SHOW. NETWORK AT INDUSTRY NIGHT OUT. SHOWCASE YOUR FULL PRODUCT LINE TO TARGETED BUYERS. SHOWCASE SHOWCASE YOUR FULL YOUR PRODUCT FULL PRODUCT LINE TO TARGETED LINE TO TARGETED BUYERS.BUYERS. CELEBRITY AND LOCAL CHEF DEMONSTRATIONS. NETWORK AT INDUSTRY NIGHT OUT. NETWORK NETWORK AT INDUSTRY AT INDUSTRY NIGHT OUT. NIGHT OUT. ONE-ON-ONE CONSULTATIONS WITH ASK THE EXPERTS. CELEBRITY AND LOCAL CHEF DEMONSTRATIONS. CELEBRITY CELEBRITY AND LOCAL ANDCHEF LOCAL DEMONSTRATIONS. CHEF DEMONSTRATIONS. PITCH THE DISTRIBUTOR - SHARK TANK STYLE. ONE-ON-ONE CONSULTATIONS WITH ASK THE EXPERTS. ONE-ON-ONE ONE-ON-ONE CONSULTATIONS CONSULTATIONS WITH ASK WITH THEASK EXPERTS. THE EXPERTS. EMERGING PRODUCTS - NEW TO FOODSERVICE. PITCH THE DISTRIBUTOR - SHARK TANK STYLE. PITCH THE PITCH DISTRIBUTOR THE DISTRIBUTOR - SHARK-TANK SHARK STYLE. TANK STYLE. TASTING PAVILION - SPIRITS,WINE, BEER AND CIDERS. EMERGING PRODUCTS - NEW TO FOODSERVICE. EMERGING EMERGING PRODUCTS PRODUCTS - NEW TO- NEW FOODSERVICE. TO FOODSERVICE. TASTING PAVILION - SPIRITS,WINE, BEER AND CIDERS. TASTINGTASTING PAVILION PAVILION - SPIRITS,WINE, - SPIRITS,WINE, BEER AND BEER CIDERS. AND CIDERS.

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Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

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Ask your agent for an ORLA Group quote.

Your s s i M Don’t ance For Ch

• 1 2 1in

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The ORLA Group now getting an additional SAIF WORKERS’ COMP PREMIUMS FOR 2021 ORLA members who meet the group eligibility requirements can receive

an additional 21% discount with SAIF in the ORLA group plan, upon workers’ comp renewal date.

THIS IS THE LARGEST DISCOUNT AVAILABLE FOR OREGON’S HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS! ORLA MEMBERS: Contact your agent and ask for an ORLA Group quote, or contact SAIF directly at 888.598.5880.

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EXISTING SAIF CUSTOMERS: Ask your agent or contact SAIF directly at 888.598.5880 for an ORLA Group quote.

OregonRLA.org/SAIF

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


ABOUT

Restaurant & Lodging is published four times a year by Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association (ORLA), 8565 SW Salish Lane, Suite 120, Wilsonville, Oregon, 97070, 503.682.4422, 800.462.0619. To learn more about ORLA log on to OregonRLA.org.

PUBLISHER JASON BRANDT / PRESIDENT & CEO

JBrandt@OregonRLA.org LORI LITTLE / EDITOR

LLittle@OregonRLA.org HEIDI JANKE / DESIGN

HJanke@OregonRLA.org

MEMBERSHIP

To become a member of the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association, please contact Jennifer Starr at JStarr@OregonRLA.org or 503.682.4422.

ADVERTISING

Please support the advertisers herein; they have made this publication possible. For information on advertising opportunities, please contact ORLA: Marla McColly Director of Business Development at 503.428.8694 or MMcColly@OregonRLA.org

SUBSCRIPTIONS

To update your digital and print subscriptions to this publication and all ORLA communications visit OregonRLA.org.

2020-21 ORLA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Masudur Khan, Chair, Seaside Lodging LLC John Barofsky, Vice Chair, Beppe & Gianni’s Trattoria Shannon McMenamin, Secretary, McMenamins Harish Patel, Treasurer, Hampton Inn Dani Rosendahl, Immediate Past Chair, The Pit Stop Sports Bar & BBQ Grill Richard Boyles, Mereté Hotel Management Joe Buck, Babica Hen Cafe, Gubanc’s, Lola’s Cafe Don Crowe, Bandon Dunes Golf Resort Mike Daley, Pollin Hotels ​Emma Dye, Crisp Treva Gambs, Gamberetti's Italian Restaurant Jim Hall, Independent Restaurant Concepts (IRC) Steven Johnson, Vip's Industries ​Eli Katkin, Brickroom​ Matt Lowe, Jordan Ramis Attorneys at Law Bobbie McDonald, Sysco Portland Patrick Nofield, Escape Lodging Company Tom O’Shea, Sunriver Resort Buggsi Patel, BHG Hotels Komal (Tina) Patel - Ex Officio Board Member, ALKO Hotels Katie Poppe, Blue Star Donuts ​Rick Takach, Vesta Hospitality Randy Xavier, US Foods

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Syndicate Wine Bar,

Beaverton with takeout from neighborhood restaurant

Ickabod's Bar & Grill

SPRING 2021 Rebuilding Consumer Confidence COVER STORY 27 Rebuilding Consumer Confidence Safety, Quality, and Great Service Help Move the Industry Forward

SOLUTIONS 34 Empowered to Take Action A Team-Focused Approach to Rebuilding Customer Confidence

SPECIAL SECTION 8 Year In Review Together We Have Achieved Much During the Past 12 Months While Facing Historic Challenges ADVOCACY 11 Advocacy Update Active Member Engagement Helps Drive Advocacy Work

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Community Support The Cornerstone of the New Consumer Confidence

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It’s Your Business Workplace Safety and the Customer Experience

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Vaccines in the Workplace Taking Steps to Educate, Inform, and Encourage Vaccination Among Employees

AGENCIES 17 Pent-Up Demand Will Drive a Strong Economic Recovery The Stage is Set for Strong Economic Growth This Year and Next 19

Expanding and Investing in Oregon’s Future The Cupboards Aren’t Bare! They’re Overflowing!

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“We’ve Been Robbed!” Steps Lottery Retailers Can Take to Prevent and Handle a Robbery

OREGON HOSPITALITY FOUNDATION 23 Safety & Service: A Balancing Act A New Training Tool Can Help

IN EVERY ISSUE 7 From the CEO The Bright Light at the End of the Tunnel 43

Lodging Performance Report Hotel Benchmark Data

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News Briefs Industry Happenings

46

What Your Peers Are Saying Meet Some Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association Members

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Cost-Saving Programs Member-Exclusive Benefits

49 New Members Welcome! 50

Looking Ahead ORLA Three-Month Calendar

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Strengthen advocacy for Oregon’s hospitality industry by supporting ORLAPAC through our online auction.

JOIN US JUNE 16-24, 2021 If you find yourself in a position to help the industry by supporting ORLAPAC consider donating or buying an auction package.

DONATE AN AUCTION ITEM PURCHASE AN AUCTION ITEM Contact Jennifer Starr today at Visit OregonRLA.org/events on June 16-24 to 503.682.4422 or JStarr@OregonRLA.org view and bid on packages

DONATE TO ORLAPAC Make a direct contribution to the PAC at Oregonrla.org/orlapac

It would mean a great deal to have a donation from you or your business in support of our upcoming Bids for a Better Industry - ORLAPAC Online Auction. Restaurant gift cards, overnight stay packages, golf

outings, and other creative donation offerings will go a long way in making this online auction a successful fundraiser for ORLA’s Political Action Committee and the election of pro-industry candidates.

OregonRLA.org/Events 6

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


FROM THE CEO The Bright Light at the End of the Tunnel

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keleton crews, pinching pennies, and refreshing webpages in hopes of securing relief funds. The life of the hospitality business owner and the lives of your teams will be forever changed by the reality we continue to face. I’ve had the privilege of working in a business association leadership role for close to 10 years now – four years leading the Salem Area Chamber of Commerce and close to six years with ORLA as your President & CEO. It is hard to describe in words how different this past year has been compared to all the others. As you can most likely attest to, more than half the battle in leadership roles is staying tenacious, fighting for wins within your control, and standing on integrity and honesty with every step. A year like the one we have all experienced has the potential to break people in leadership positions. The ridiculousness of two-week at a time business operation for restaurants or local governments shutting down lodging operations due to panic and fear showcases just how important it is for individuals to stand up and seriously consider roles in elected office. If you look ahead, one of many byproducts of a year full of industry inequity will be more individuals awakening to the idea that they have something to offer their community on top of running a business. Many of you have the skills and talents to inspire those in your community and if you find yourself mulling opportunities to run for office, we would love to hear from you. As we reflect on a year that includes a once in a century crisis along with the crises of fire and ice layered on top, there is one noun that comes to mind to describe Oregon’s hospitality industry - breadth. Webster defines the word as ‘the distance from side to side.’ Our state association, even after everything we’ve endured, still includes well over 2,000 member locations with most of those operators running one to two-unit businesses and embracing a scrappy leadership mentality to get their business through the muck of 2020 and 2021. Within our membership is the stark truth that many have not been able to make the numbers work for their business overall

or for specific locations. Others have found success by ramping up foodservice in the safety of hotel rooms or by making considerable shifts to user-friendly to-go and delivery models. The breadth of our industry exists because our world continues to move towards a growing demand for customization. The bones of that diversification in Oregon will prove to be one of our biggest assets. This past year, ORLA has had to dig deep and find a new gear. The professional team which includes 15 staff have been incredibly committed to chalking up one win after another with a focus on what we can accomplish next. With so many ongoing restrictions in place targeting our industry we feel it’s an important exercise to showcase what we have done together over the past year. The pace of work and outcomes driven are not meant to diminish all that we have lost. Rather, this exercise is our attempt to put in words the level of activity taken on by your association when we have been called upon for a level of leadership needed to keep industry infrastructure in place so we are all prepared for the pentup demand to come. ORLA’s ‘Year in Review’ can be found in this edition of our magazine on page 8. If you’re like us at ORLA grappling with the realities within and out of your control, we hope you take a moment to recap all you have accomplished this past year. Use it to fuel your work and provide the energy boost needed to make it through our final stretch in 2021 and toward much better times. Thank you for standing alongside us and fighting hard for the importance of Oregon’s hospitality industry. Let’s continue telling our story knowing there are some great chapters ahead for our hardworking employees and the future of your business.  JASON BRANDT, PRESIDENT & CEO, ORLA

Jason Brandt serves as the President & CEO of the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association. He can be reached via email at JBrandt@oregonrla.org.

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YEAR IN REVIEW Together We Have Achieved Much During the Past 12 Months While Facing Historic Challenges

Fighting for Your Rights and Your Business • Represented the interests of our industry through service on the Governor’s Economic Advisory Council and associated subcommittees. • Filed suit in federal court against the State of Oregon for ongoing inequitable treatment of hospitality businesses. Although unsuccessful, we secured outdoor dining across Oregon in early December for restaurants during the effort. • Partnered with our national affiliates to secure two rounds of Payroll Protection Program dollars with round two including 3.5 times monthly payroll exclusively for hospitality businesses.

for employees to pick up shifts without sacrificing unemployment insurance benefits when working part-time. • Launched a campaign to support HB 3177 and help bring equity to the business sector during the state of emergency related to Covid-19. • Advocating for an extension of previously secured moratoriums for commercial rent and mortgages into 2021. • Led efforts to get Oregon’s Video Lottery Terminals (VLTs) turned back on in the ‘extreme risk’ category. • Fighting for permanent repeal of Oregon’s flawed ‘scheduling law’ regulation.

• Secured statewide caps on third party delivery fees paid by restaurants at one of the lowest rates in the nation.

• Partnered with organizations in the beer industry to request tax relief for struggling craft brewers.

• Successfully advocated for changes to Oregon’s ‘extreme risk’ category to get indoor pools, hot tubs, and spas open.

• Successfully pushed curfew restrictions back from 10pm to 11pm or Midnight depending on risk category. Work continues to remove the arbitrary curfew regulation entirely.

• Launched a full-scale campaign with media resulting in scores of tv, print and radio interviews amplifying the stories of lodging establishments and restaurants. • Led the statewide effort to secure over $55 million in grants for small businesses with an emphasis on Oregon hospitality. • Secured a 2-week buffer for restaurants when opening back up indoor operations after adhering to restrictions in the ‘extreme risk’ category.

• Eliminated the possibility of penalties for underestimated payments or for not making quarterly payments for the Corporate Activities Tax. • Negotiated with Oregon Tourism Information for deferred payment plans for highway signage. • Campaigned to protect the 70/30 split for local lodging tax spending.

change in the Employee Retention Tax Credit (ERTC) so restaurants can now receive up to $19,000 per eligible employee in ERTC across 2020 and 2021. • Partnered with the National Restaurant Association to help pass the Restaurant Revitalization Fund, a $28.6 billion relief fund part of Biden’s American Rescue Plan that will provide grants across the country to restaurants. • Partnered with the National Restaurant Association in successfully pursuing a change in the Employee Retention Tax Credit (ERTC) so restaurants can now receive up to $19,000 per eligible employee in ERTC across 2020 and 2021. Calling Out Inequitable Treatment of Your Small Business • Successfully removed requirements to have restaurant operators track the movements of their customers. • Coordinated partnerships between lodging operators and local governments to prevent any efforts to commandeer private property for public health emergency shelter needs. • Promoted the importance of increased flexibility for tents and canopies to make outdoor seating capacity for restaurants more practical. • Challenging arbitrary guidelines based on total people indoors without consideration given to square footage available for dining and event space.

• Partnered with OLCC to create flexible license payment plans, flexible outdoor alcohol service areas, and secure support for To-Go Cocktails.

• Partnered with the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation to help establish the Restaurant Employee Relief Fund (RERF) to provide grants to more than 43,000 restaurant workers.

Launching More Group Deals to Help Protect Your Limited Margins • Announced historic 21% discount on SAIF workers comp premiums for the ORLA Group – the best deal in the entire state for restaurants and hotels.

• Supported and testified in favor of SB 1701, which passed, allowing flexibility

• Partnered with the National Restaurant Association in successfully pursuing a

• Keeping music licensing headaches at bay with multiyear discounts from 10-20%.

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Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


• Maintaining insurance and industry equipment and service agreements with partners including United Healthcare, Liberty Mutual, Dell Technologies, Clover, GNSA and Office Depot. • Launching flat rate pricing for credit card processing – Flat rate 2.3% + .05 or cost plus option. • Established a Legal Defense Fund for operators interested in pushing back against industry regulations. • Partnered with The Oregonian | Oregon Live to offer new members their choice of complimentary sponsored content or a montage video package highlighting their restaurant or hotel. Promoting the Industry to Defend Your Business • Expanded the purpose of the Oregon Hospitality Foundation (OHF) enabling ORLA’s 501 c(3) charitable arm to provide hospitality relief funds to operators feeding frontline workers and those with food insecurity. Funding has provided over 11,500 meals to date. • Launched ORLA Commitment to Safety Checklists and decals for members to show guests their commitment to ‘best in class’ operational standards. • Created Oregon2Go.com to amplify takeout and delivery options from foodservice operations across the state. • Partnered with the National Restaurant Association for the Great American Takeout campaign promoting takeout business. • Supported OHF’s Takeout & A Movie Series, raising money for the Hospitality Help Fund and promoting takeout business. • Partnered with Regence for “Takeout Tuesday” to showcase examples of what

friends to the restaurant industry can do to make a true difference for both the industry and the people we serve. • Hosted ‘Elected Leader Listening Sessions’ to get your voice heard by lawmakers. • Developed consumer-facing lodging and restaurant policy templates for service animal challenges. • Participated in and promoted cleanups in downtown Portland and the Coast in partnership with SOLVE Oregon and the Portland Business Alliance. • Helped coordinate solution-driven communications, connecting resources between the industry and the emergency/ utility partners: –Wildfires: food for firefighters, shelter for displaced communities –Power outages: food and lodging for PGE workers –Food insecurity: food deliveries to those in need by Regence Advancing Educational Opportunities to Improve Your Business • Launched the Oregon Hospitality Foundation’s COVID-times guest service video course “Providing Service While Supporting Safety” for restaurants and lodging establishments in both English and Spanish. • Created guidance and FAQs relating to COVID-19 and food safety for takeout and selling bulk or raw goods. • Developed partnership with Oregon’s Small Business Development Center (SBDC) Network to launch a no-cost, one-on-one advisor network, Oregon Restaurant Covid Assistance (ORCA) program. • Launched dozens of industry webinars on key topics, answering questions and highlighting best practices.

• Launched the Oregon Tourism Leadership Academy program, cultivating leaders to make positive and lasting contributions to the state’s tourism economy. • Developed the ORLA Live virtual conference specifically for Oregon Hospitality. Elevating the Industry and Your Business by Doubling Down on Communication • Mobilized industry members through text alerts and email campaigns to take action on issues important to the viability of our industry. • Aggregated information and intelligence to help you navigate our new reality with comprehensive resources online at OregonRLA.org. • Hosted over 20 Virtual Town Halls across the state to share the latest industry and political intelligence. • Escalating the momentum of press releases and announcements to keep the press, public and lawmakers abreast of the realities the hospitality industry continues to face. • Maintained continuity of printing and mailing the ORLA magazine focused on providing industry resources and highlighting best practices during the pandemic. • Informed the industry of local, state and federal activity through email alerts and announcements and the member-only Insider e-newsletter. • Created a digital forum to keep industry members abreast of ORLA activity via the CEO Blog and video series. Stay informed and engaged with your association at OregonRLA.org.  OREGON RESTAURANT & LODGING ASSOCIATION

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Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


ADVOCACY UPDATE Active Member Engagement Helps Drive Advocacy Work

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RLA's government affairs team has been busy on the front lines promoting and protecting the foodservice and lodging industries of Oregon during the 2021 Legislative Session. At the same time, ORLA’s volunteer leadership groups and government affairs committee continue to be actively engaged in state and local issues, calling on lawmakers to address issues facing our industry. During a Difficult 2020, ORLA’s Advocacy Efforts Result in Wins It would be hard to classify anything in 2020 as a “win,” and yet, despite a global pandemic, the shutdown of our restaurants and restrictions on our lodging properties, and unbelievable natural disasters, Oregon’s hospitality industry did manage to succeed in securing some important victories. A more complete review of these accomplishments is included in our “Year in Review” segment of the magazine, so here is just a few of the highlights. Federal Level - The $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act was signed into law by President Biden containing $28.6 billion in direct aid to restaurants. The Restaurant Revitalization Fund reflects a year-long effort to help restaurants in need. The RESTAURANTS Act, providing $120B in additional relief to restaurants, is still being discussed for future passage. State Level - ORLA led the statewide effort to secure over $55M in grants for small businesses with an emphasis on Oregon hospitality. Those grants helped hundreds of businesses stay open and keep people employed. We also worked early on to remove contact tracing requirements from state mandates after restaurants were shut down by Executive Order. Additionally, when the first shutdown occurred with less than 24 hours’ notice, ORLA lobbied the Governor’s office to allow for more time before future shutdown might occur. Future closures allowed for at least 72 hours. Finally, the constant uncertainty of being able to open for indoor dining or not based on County Risk Levels was beyond frustrating for many operators. ORLA’s advocacy for more consistency led to the Governor declaring that counties moving from “High Risk” to “Extreme Risk” would have an additional two weeks to bring their metrics in line before having to move. ORLA Government Affairs Committee Following a successful December meeting to review the 2021 Legislative Agenda for ORLA, the Government Affairs (GA)

Committee met again the first week of February to review the first set of bills dropped for the legislative session. Co-Chairs Nick Pearson (Jupiter and Jupiter Next hotels) and TJ Birkel (Darden Restaurants) led the committee through a discussion of the bills up for deliberation this year. ORLA is currently tracking over 120 bills with almost 4,000 bills total being introduced in this session. A full list of the bills we are supporting, opposing, monitoring or following can be found on our website at OregonRLA.org under the Advocacy tab. Because of the virtual nature of this session, it has become easier for members from across the state to sign up to testify on bills and ORLA still needs participation from our members to help ensure we can pass or kill the bills we need to take action on this session. To keep you updated, we’re trying something new this year. ORLA’s GA Committee is meeting weekly on Friday mornings for a 30-minute video call to review bills we are tracking that had a hearing the previous week and the outcome, if any, of those hearings as well as give a preview of the upcoming week’s hearings. We are also identifying those hearings where we need testimony–both written and oral–from members to help us in our advocacy efforts. If you are interested in being a member of the GA Committee, please email Greg Astley, Director of Government Affairs at Astley@oregonrla.org. Portland Kitchen Cabinet After an incredibly difficult and challenging year for Oregon’s hospitality industry, and at the time of this writing, signs are pointing to more counties re-opening for indoor dining, vaccinations being offered to hospitality workers among others deemed “essential,” and optimism among many about customers returning to our restaurants. ORLA’s Portland Kitchen Cabinet (PKC), a partnership with the National Restaurant Association, has been quite active in the last 12 months. We’ve been working with elected officials on important issues and keeping the lines of communication open between operators and those who make the decisions on issues ranging from licensing fees to public safety to financial relief. Tom Perrick, ORLA’s new Government Affairs Coordinator and PKC liaison, will be helping our members reach out to newly installed elected officials to continue the conversations and help them understand the perspective of our industry. Look for outreach from Tom to join us at these meetings to share your story and your perspective. OregonRLA.ORG 11


Tom will also be working with our PKC Steering Committee on several events this year including our philanthropic efforts to give back to the community. If you’re interested in being involved in these efforts as part of the PKC, please reach out to Tom at TPerrick@OregonRLA.org. Your voice is needed at the table and remember, you don’t have to be a member of ORLA or the National Restaurant Association to participate. Portland Lodging Alliance The Portland Lodging Alliance actively engaged elected officials in 2020 but also took a more “hands-on” approach to some of the issues facing the city, particularly in the downtown core. In partnership with SOLVE, members took part in several clean-up events in downtown, removing thousands of pounds of garbage and helping to make city streets safer and cleaner. Helping visitors feel better about their experience is just one step lodging operators have taken to bring back guests and their families. Members participated in meetings with Senator Jeff Merkley, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and several other elected officials and their staff to communicate not only the concerns they have and are hearing from visitors, but also to offer solutions and assistance to help resolve the issues facing the city. National Restaurant Association’s Public Affairs Conference Registration for the National Restaurant Association’s (NRA) 2021 Public Affairs Conference is open and ORLA encourages restaurants to consider engaging in this unique event. The conference will be completely virtual this year and we are hoping for record participation from Oregon’s restaurant community. The following are some key details for your information. Registration: Go to Conference.RestaurantsAct.com. The cost for members will be $50 and $75 for non-members. Given this significantly reduced price, there will not be any comp codes offered as in the past. NRA will begin programming late morning on the east coast to accommodate those of us on the west coast and the conference will 12

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

conclude with a virtual social event. We expect the same caliber of programming and speakers typically seen at this conference. Virtual Hill Meetings: In addition to the conference itself, ORLA plans to schedule virtual Hill Meetings on April 21st and 22nd. Our goal is to schedule meetings with all seven of our Congressional Members: • • • • • • •

Senator Jeff Merkley Senator Ron Wyden Congressman Cliff Bentz Congressman Earl Blumenauer Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici Congressman Peter DeFazio Congressman Kurt Schrader If you are interested in attending these virtual meetings, please contact me at Astley@OregonRLA.org and once we have a schedule, we will send you the information to log in and attend. Welcome to ORLA’s New Government Affairs Coordinator ORLA is pleased to introduce Tom Perrick, ORLA's new Government Affairs Coordinator and Portland Kitchen Cabinet Liaison. Tom comes to us with extensive experience in State and Local Government Affairs, Association Management, Client Development and Community and Civic Engagement and we are extremely happy to have him on the team here at ORLA.

Tom will be focusing on engaging and growing our Portland Kitchen Cabinet program as well as working on other issues related to the Portland Metro area. He’ll be coordinating regular appointments with elected officials from the City of Portland, Multnomah County and Metro as well as state legislators from the Portland area and federal elected officials. In addition, Tom will be working with the Portland Kitchen Cabinet on at least one philanthropic effort this year. Tom can be reached at TPerrick@oregonrla.org.  GREG ASTLEY, OREGON RESTAURANT & LODGING ASSOCIATION


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HELPING THOSE WITH GAMBLING ISSUES Playing for Fun Working in Oregon’s hospitality industry, you’re certainly familiar with the sight of folks sitting at terminals playing Video Lottery games. For most players, it’s a fun way to pass some time, maybe while waiting for a table or enjoying a drink. Most players find the games enjoyable, as they are intended to be. But occasionally, you might see some players who seem agitated, or even angry or regretful. You may have wondered what, if anything, you might say to help these customers who continue to play even after the games have clearly stopped being fun.

One phone call can connect the player with a counselor specifically trained in gambling addiction issues. Players are offered effective treatment, often right from home. Best of all, it’s free.

OPGR Can Help No one expects you to become an expert in gambling addiction. You don’t need to take on diagnosing a customer’s issue or advising them on their options. Nor should you. But you can feel confident in offering players who seem to be struggling the information they need to connect to these services. OPGR. That’s what we’re here for.

When the Fun Stops There is some good news for these players. Here in Oregon, help is available for people who have issues with gambling. Oregon Problem Gambling Resource (OPGR) is available to anyone who has a gambling issue, either their own or a loved one’s. 14

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

CALL: 877-MY-LIMIT or TEXT: 503-713-6000 (695-4648)


VACCINES IN THE WORKPLACE Taking Steps To Educate, Inform, and Encourage Vaccination Among Employees

W

e’re all aware the road to recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic will be a long one. However, there is some good news as we start to see additional opportunities to bring back more jobs for Oregonians with continued increases in vaccination distribution over the course of the coming weeks and months. ORLA, along with our state and local partners, agencies and national affiliates want to ensure industry members have the necessary resources to properly educate and encourage their employees to get vaccinated.

Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) and a host of potential medical, personnel and personal Data Privacy violations.

ORLA has compiled a list of resources on the topic of Vaccinations in the Workplace, including helpful guidance from the American Hotel & Lodging Association, National Restaurant Association, BOLI and SAIF among others. Visit our website for a list of resources at http://bit.ly/orlaviw.

While mandatory vaccinations are allowed, a mandatory vaccination program is not advisable. The downside seems too great a risk for operators large and small.

In response to a number of inquiries on the topic of mandating vaccines in the workplace, we reviewed content from several sources with the vast majority urging caution. Here’s the rundown of information on the topic: A number of exceptions exist within mandatory programs, including medical conditions, religious grounds and potential union bargaining (if applicable). Mandatory vaccination programs are subject to state and/or federal oversight (BOLI, OSHA, NLRB, EEOC) and can trigger program review and legal pitfalls, such as violating the Americans with Disability Act (ADA), the Genetic

Even if successful in navigating the external patchwork of state and federal agencies, an operator that chooses to adopt a mandatory vaccination program must then overcome internal operational issues, such as what steps must be taken when an employee chooses not to be vaccinated, how to then protect the rest of the workforce, reconfiguration of office space, schedule changes and the like.

Employers are encouraged however to promote employee self-education for vaccination acceptance, support voluntary vaccinations, follow the guidelines of local, city and state health authorities, provide their workforce the flexibility for designated group vaccination schedules and work with local Chambers and trade associations. Read more about vaccines in the workplace and access guidance and resources at http://bit.ly/orlaviw. Please note, the information provided is for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice.  TOM PERRICK, OREGON RESTAURANT & LODGING ASSOCIATION

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Choose Local. Choose GNSA. CONTACT: Scott Herson-Hord SHord@GNSAdmin.com | 503.972.0999 GNSAdmin.com 16

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

OregonRLA.org/GNSA


PENT-UP DEMAND WILL DRIVE A STRONG RECOVERY The Stage is Set for Strong Economic Growth This Year and Next

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he cycle is different. The nature of the pandemic-induced recession led the economy into a severe shutdown essentially overnight last spring. Since then nearly every economic indicator has looked better than first feared. The stage is set for a very strong recovery this year and next as the pandemic wanes. This is largely due to the improvements seen in public health, the large federal fiscal policy response, and underlying resiliency in the economy. Most encouraging is that there has been surprisingly little economic scarring in the form of business closures and permanent layoffs to date.

online as they typically do going out to eat, on vacations, and getting their hair cut. Nationally, households have built up nearly $2 trillion in excess savings. Here in Oregon financial institutions have seen substantial increases in deposits. Much of this savings is currently sitting in bank accounts, ready to be spent when the time comes. That time is here.

Federal aid has kept most firms and households afloat over the past year. Despite being down 160,000 jobs (8%) to start the year, total personal income in Oregon today is higher than it was prior to the onset of the pandemic. Expanded unemployment insurance benefits and recovery rebates have helped keep the majority of the laid off workers from falling behind on bills and rent, even as job prospects have remained dim throughout the pandemic. The latest federal aid package will help tide over the hard-hit service sector employees another couple of months as the recovery gathers steam.

Specifically, large service-providing industries like health care, leisure and hospitality, and other services – namely barbershops and nail salons – will need to staff back up quickly as consumer spending rises. These sectors account for more than half of the current jobs hole today. Some subsectors like health care, social assistance, and food services have reduced their employment proportionately to the drop in consumer spending during the pandemic. Effectively, that means for every increase in spending in the months ahead, these firms will need to hire more workers to meet consumer demand.

Looking forward, as the economy continues to reopen and households become more confident in their ability to venture out safely, consumer spending will accelerate. Many forms of spending have been restricted by the pandemic, from indoor dining and nightlife to air travel and routine dentist appointments. Even so, consumers have spent where and how they have felt comfortable doing. In particular spending has shifted into physical goods, e-commerce, and home entertainment including streaming services. Furthermore, car sales and home sales have rebounded strongly since last spring.

Other subsectors like art, entertainment, and recreation, and accommodations have undertaken large levels of layoffs but also experienced even bigger drops in revenue. This likely means two things. First, these firms may not need to staff up as quickly as they can absorb a sizable increase in demand before needing to bring on additional labor. Second, these firms are very likely operating at losses in the past year. They relied on reserves, raised additional capital, or issued new debt to remain in business.

That said, even with the strong spending on goods, middle- and upper-income households have accumulated sizable savings in the past year. Despite consumers’ best effort, they are unable to spend as much ordering

As overall spending picks up, patterns will also start to move back toward old habits. This shift out of physical goods and back into laborintensive, in-person services will create strong employment growth later this year.

The key macroeconomic risk remains the permanent damage and business closures that accumulate before the pandemic is over. Here, too, the data is better than feared. The total number of businesses in Oregon is up two or three percent over the past year. In terms of closures, bars and

restaurants are the most impacted sector during the pandemic. The number of active OLCC liquor licenses for on-premise sales is down about five percent. Liquor license renewals have dropped proportionately across the different regions of the state. More encouraging is that start-up activity in Oregon and around the country continues to be quite strong. The number of total new business applications in the past six months has never been larger. As such, the economy is not suffering the double hit of more closures and fewer new businesses as was the experience in past severe recessions. All told, the stage is set such that economic growth this year and next will be the strongest we have seen in decades, possibly generations. Even so, it will likely take a year or two for all of the lost jobs to fully return. The current hole is that deep. However such a timeline means the current cycle, while severe, will be much shorter in duration than recent recessions. Much of the bullishness in terms of the outlook is due to the quick development and deployment of vaccines, plus the strong federal policy response. Oregonians are ready to resume the activities previously restricted by the pandemic and most have the income to support it.  JOSH LEHNER, ECONOMIST, OREGON OFFICE OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

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SAVE THE DATE August 24, 2021 | Topgolf, Hillsboro Whether you’re an aspiring golf pro or picking up a club for the first time, Topgolf is everyone’s game. No golf experience required. Industry allies will host small groups of operators in outdoor hitting bays, where they will enjoy hosted food and beverage and game play. Save the date and plan to come down for a good time.

PARTNERS

RAFFLE SPONSOR

BAY SPONSORS • Bargreen Ellingson • Energy Trust of Oregon; Exsisting Buildings • Hays Companies • HR Annie Consulting • POSitive Technologies • Togather Restaurant Consulting

OregonRLA.org/Events 18

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


EXPANDING AND INVESTING IN OREGON’S FUTURE The Cupboards Aren’t Bare! They’re Overflowing!

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hen you take a look around Oregon, it’s easy to see why the state’s population continues to grow; Oregon’s unique physical beauty and agricultural bounty provide the delectable products that find their way to our tables. Oregon’s hospitality industry is woven into that culinary tapestry and the gastronomical profile that attracts out-of-state visitors, many of whom later decide to return – to live in Oregon. These transplanted Oregonians are part of the population growth, which coupled with ever-evolving consumer trends have contributed to the steady increase of distilled spirits sales. Specifically, distilled spirits sales have grown 37 percent over the past five years, including an increase in the number of Oregon distilleries from 96 to 140. This has resulted in more products coming into Oregon’s distilled spirits supply chain with dwindling space to put them. That’s leading the OLCC’s effort to reinvest in our states’ distilled spirits distribution system to ensure it continues to meet the needs and requirements of the industry and the tastes of Oregon consumers. OLCC operations are currently housed in a building that was built when Dwight D. Eisenhower was President. The warehouse’s 60 year old design is no longer suitable for the volume of distilled spirits flowing through the warehouse to the 286 retailers around the state. The OLCC warehouse will reach its capacity in two years but because of the building’s age and physical condition it can’t be expanded. In fact, during the holiday sales season, the warehouse reaches 100 percent capacity which limits the number of items available to customers. In response, the Commission has been working with industry experts to consider the value of building a new warehouse. Moving to a new facility, while requiring a significant investment, would enable the Commission to continue to bring in new products to Oregonians as the distilled spirits market continues to evolve. Investing in a new warehouse would also enable the Commission to

consolidate operations into one facility rather than the two facilities it currently operates which would increase the efficiency of the distribution network. Earlier this year, the Governor supported the plan for the new warehouse by including it in her proposed budget and the 2021 legislature is considering the project. Over the course of the past five years, the OLCC has proactively responded to consumer demand and population growth by expanding the number of liquor store retailers throughout the state to better serve the hospitality industry and consumers. The OLCC estimates the 36 liquor stores opened during expansion have generated $79.8 million in new sales over the last 12 months ending December 2020 ($169.5 million since expansion began in 2016) and contributed more than $285 million in 2020 to schools, police, and alcohol and drug treatment services. Also, Oregon liquor stores provide guaranteed sales opportunity to Oregon-based distillers by giving them 25 percent of the total shelf space which allows local companies to compete with major out-of-state manufacturers. As customers return to restaurant dining and enjoying the amenities provided by the hospitality industry, licensees should be aware that sales data indicates individual consumers during the pandemic (their customers) have been “moving up the shelf ” to higher price point spirits. This shows that Oregonians are looking for a greater degree of quality in products. During the pandemic, Oregon’s hospitality industry has shown the innovation it’s known for by creating new spaces and ways to enjoy both great service and creative libations, whether through delivery of cocktails and food to-go or creating warm spaces for families to dine outside. As the pandemic begins to subside, bars and restaurants re-open, and customers re-emerge, the OLCC looks forward to the next phase of collaboration with Oregon’s hospitality industry, helping the industry reclaim its position as a vibrant part of Oregon’s economy.  OREGON LIQUOR CONTROL COMMISSION

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OREGON RESTAURANT COVID ASSISTANCE Restaurant industry experts stand ready to help you find effective solutions to sustain during the Covid-19 pandemic. Utilize no-cost, confidential, one-on-one guidance funded through the Cares Act.

Restaurant owners and managers are matched with industry experts who will provide free guidance on essential issues: • Marketing and Customer Relations • Financial Operations and Analysis • Menu Planning • Human Resources and Employee Management • Loyalty Programs • Online Sales and Takeout Service • Site Management and Lease/Landlord Negotiations • Front/Back of House Operations • Social Media • Point of Sale Systems • Coping with Covid

WEB: OregonSBDC.org/ORCA | EMAIL: ORCA@OregonSBDC.org | PHONE: 541.896.1714

Oregon Small Business Development Centers are funded in part through a cooperative agreement with

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the U.S. Small Business Administration, and by the Oregon Business Development Department.

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


“WE’VE BEEN ROBBED!” Steps Lottery Retailers Can Take to Prevent and Handle a Robbery

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n unfortunate reality of retail sales is dealing with some form of criminal activity. Although all criminal activity will impact your business, becoming the victim of a robbery is likely the most dangerous and unpredictable. Although robbery is less common than other crime, its nature will ultimately produce fear and anxiety for owners, employees and even customers which will be long lasting. It’s critical owners and staff take time to educate themselves in basic personal safety and ensure the business has invested time and money into proper crime prevention. First, what’s the difference between theft, burglary and robbery? Often used interchangeably, there are significant legal differences in these terms. Although there are legal nuances with each, generally, theft is appropriating property that belongs to another with the intention of depriving them of it. Burglary requires an individual enter or remain in a location unlawfully with the intent to commit another crime, often theft. Robbery is committing or attempting to commit theft while using or threatening to use physical force, a dangerous or deadly weapon or causing injury to another while committing the theft. The following tips will help reduce the likelihood your targeted and will protect your personal safety should it occur. PREVENTION It is important to invest in loss prevention methods. Standard loss prevention strategies can prevent you from ever being target. Install surveillance cameras and make them obvious. Ensure patrons can see your cameras. Record and maintain video for several weeks at a minimum. Using a cloud service to store video ensures its available if the criminals damage the system. Post signage - Post signs indicating the business has alarms, surveillance systems, holds little cash, participates in local crime prevention programs.

Facilities - Ensure your business is well lit both inside and out and has good sight lines for staff, limiting areas someone could hide. Utilize motion detection alarms to notify staff when customers enter the business or restricted areas. Develop a cash control program - Robbers want cash. Be discreet with your cash movements and make it known you have little on hand. Only pay claims during certain hours of the day. Have additional employees and security protocols in place during cashing hours. Avoid removing cash from lottery equipment during business hours but if you must, only exchange cash boxes. Don’t leave cash in video lottery equipment overnight. Utilize a drop safe to minimize available cash on hand. Customer contact - Always acknowledge customers entering your establishment. Always remain aware of your surroundings and trust your gut. If it seems suspicious, call police before it gets out of hand. Staffing - The more staff you have, the less likely robbers will feel able to control the environment. Consider having staff work in different areas making it difficult to target them together. Planning and training - Discuss with staff how to handle a robbery should it occur and review escape routes if needed. Practice activating panic alarms and making appropriate notifications. Discuss personal safety and prevention methods regularly. Opening and closing - If possible, have two employees present when opening or closing for the day. Visually check the entire business including all rooms to make sure nothing is out of the ordinary and no one remains in the store. The person in charge should be the only one with access to back doors which should always remain locked.

HANDLING A ROBBERY If you find yourself being robbed, each situation is different and requires calm levelheaded thinking to ensure everyone’s safety. Cooperate - Always cooperate with the robber unless your cooperation puts you at greater risk of injury. No property is more valuable than someone’s life. Remain calm - Keep the situation as calm as possible. Sudden movements could be interpreted as aggression and cause them to act. Alarms - If your business has a silent or duress alarm, you should only activate if you’re confident you can do so without detection. Don’t take any chances. Be observant - Watch for unique identifying characteristics you can later provide police. AFTER A ROBBERY Don’t pursue - Staff should not attempt to follow the robbers. Call 911 - Call the police immediately even if you previously activated an alarm. Lock the doors - Following the robbery lock all doors. This will provide a needed sense of security and prevent additional customers from entering until police arrive. Preserve evidence - While waiting for the police make notes of the robber’s description and encourage others to do the same. Don’t clean up or touch anything the robber has touched. Lottery Hotline - After the police have taken their report, notify the lottery hotline at 1-800-766-6789. The hotline will request a summary, the police case number, and details on lottery products stolen. Lottery Security, Oregon State Police, and your local law enforcement will coordinate the investigation.  OREGON LOTTERY OregonRLA.ORG 21


PR E SE N TI NG SPONSOR:

REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

MONDAY, JULY 26, 2021 Langdon Farms Golf Club, Aurora Participation in this tournament benefits Oregon hospitality and is vital to the strength of our political action committee and the growth of our industry. All proceeds from this event directly support ORLAPAC’s mission to advocate for favorable business legislation.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES:

Marla McColly, MMcColly@OregonRLA.org

CONTEST SPONSORS:

EVENT AND REGISTRATION:

HOLE SPONSORS TO DATE:

Jennifer Starr, JStarr@OregonRLA.org

BARGREEN ELLINGSON

HAYES COMPANIES

C O H O R ES

LAPORTE & ASSOCIATES, INC.

ELLIOTT, POWELL, BADEN & BAKER

SUMMIT CLEANING & RESTORATION

GARTH T. ROUSE & ASSOCIATES HR ANNIE CONSULTING

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EAGLE SPONSOR:

JORDAN RAMIS PC

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

TOGATHER RESTAURANT CONSULTING

OregonRLA.org/Events


SAFETY & SERVICE: A BALANCING ACT A New Training Tool Can Help

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Reprinted from February research by permission of Destination Analysts

picture is worth a thousand words. Excited and Cautious, Ready and Scary sums up the attitude of guests who may soon be walking through our doors for the first time in a year. Increasing numbers of home-bound travelers are tentatively scheduling vacations while many take-out diners seek to enjoy a meal somewhere inside other than home. Still, top of mind for most people who have stayed home since the pandemic’s first lock-down is safety. Tripadvisor's research on travelers’ booking criteria in 2020: 92% said “Cleanliness is the most important factor in selecting accommodations.” According to an OpenTable survey, a high percentage of consumers indicate that they make their dining choices based on the comfort level they have with a restaurant’s safety protocols. YOU may be confident about the procedures you have put into place, but how can you help make your potential customer feel comfortable enough to venture out for the first time? Research shows that how you communicate pre-arrival is exceptionally important to ease concern. Best Practice: Just as you have probably expressed on your own website, both Tripadvisor and Yelp have added space for businesses to describe their Covid safety practices. Balanced messaging is important, however. Having an enjoyable experience is, as it always has been, the motivation for travel and for dining out. While using the word ‘contactless’ can convey a good safety practice, might it also sound sterile to someone who is yearning to break out of forced isolation? Describing what guests can expect in terms of safety and enjoyment is consistent with hospitality that distinguishes a property. Read remarks from a few properties that are highly ranked, and you will

notice comments such as, “though the confirmation said that amenities could be limited, we appreciated they told us that the pool was available by reservation so social distance could be maintained and we could still use and enjoy it....” Or, perhaps, “because of Covid, while it wasn’t the same busy and high energy atmosphere we had previously enjoyed, our server went out of his way to be extra-friendly and the food was as delicious as always so we will continue to return.’’ Emphasizing that you seek to provide both a safe and enjoyable atmosphere is the balance that many customers seek not only to make, but to keep, their reservation. Ensuring that guests experience both will boost confidence and return intent. What If? Have we ever been as aware of the CDC or FDA as we all are these days? With this kind of emphasis, you can anticipate that many guests will be very observant about how closely your team follows recommended safety practices and even

compare yours to other locations they have visited. Being a germaphobe is not as nerdy as it used to be. A friend shared with me that, after observing how hastily a bus person wiped down the table when a diner left, she decided not to stay because it did not seem very thorough for Covid cleanliness concerns. Another friend told me that they chose a hotel based on the property’s Covid Safety Health Pledge. After noticing some cobwebs in their room, however, they felt nervous about how closely that pledge was followed, and they regretted their travel plans. She has not traveled since. I wondered if their reactions might have been different if they had conveyed their concerns to a service person who was able to respond and re-instill confidence? I realized that the situation was similar to any complaint about a misstep and that confidence may have been recoverable if handled correctly. At least there would have been a chance, anyway. The walk away is OregonRLA.ORG 23


Join the travel and tourism industry in registering now for the June 15 & 16 Governor’s Conference on Tourism for two days of education, inspiration and connections.

MOUNTAINS LEGACY

Find all educational opportunities at: industry.traveloregon.com

Where to go for training O R L AT R A I N I N G . C O M The Only Industry Training That Supports Oregon Hospitality!

CHECK OUT THE NEWEST ADDITION TO OUR TRAINING SUITE: Providing Service While Supporting Safety - Guest Service Tips During Covid-19 Challenges

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Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


probably a forever lost opportunity and the potential word of mouth even worse. Best Practice: While cleaning used to be something we did in the background away from guest sight, we now realize that allowing customers to see it in action can be a confidence builder. Seeing is believing. What plans do you have in place with your team members to address guest observations that may be similar to the concerns voiced by my friends? No matter how much we plan and practice, there are bound to be at least a few protocol missteps and/or encounters with highly sensitive guests. Are your associates as confident with words and actions they should take to address a guest’s safety concerns as they would be with typical pre-Covid complaints? Anticipating challenges and preparing credible responses can help repair a guest’s confidence and ensure that your safety goals are met. New Resource: The Oregon Hospitality Foundation, ORLA’s nonprofit 501c3, has just released a new and on-demand videobased training tool, Providing Service While Supporting Safety. The course addresses opportunities like those mentioned above.

Four challenging scenarios are portrayed, communication, credibility, compliance, and creating a positive experience. Participants first watch an example of an ineffective service response which results in a negative guest experience. This is followed with narrative coaching and a more effective service approach is portrayed ending with discussion questions. Both restaurant and hotel versions are available, each with helpful worksheets, and both are offered with a Spanish subtitle option. Since time is a premium, scenarios can be viewed individually in less than 15 minutes. Course access is via sliding scale donation, group codes and tracking are also available. See more at OregonGuestServiceSafety.org What’s next? A recent Destination Analysts report provides rational optimism about our industry’s recovery, with all momentum tied to the lessening of safety concerns. In the February 22, 2021 report, they note “Each week more Americans have been vaccinated as well as know others who have, more trips in the short term appear…. As COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to decline after their January peak, Americans’ optimism about the month ahead soared an additional five percentage points in the last

week, reaching another record high. Now 44.2 percent feel the pandemic situation in the United States will improve over the next four weeks….” While we all realize that turnaround will take time, earning and retaining consumer confidence in our industry’s safety practices, as well as creating positive experiences, will be essential to continuing momentum.  WENDY POPKIN, OREGON HOSPITALITY FOUNDATION

About

Wendy Popkin is the Executive Director of the Oregon Hospitality Foundation, a nonprofit 501c3 dedicated to providing educational, training, and philanthropic support to Oregon’s restaurant, lodging, and tourism industry. Wendy is a 35year career veteran who describes herself as “fanatically enthusiastic about helping others enjoy the same type of fabulous career opportunities I have enjoyed in the hospitality industry.” OregonHospitalityFoundation.org, WPopkin@OregonRLA.org

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Create a Culture of Food Safety.

ORLA'S SERVSAFE® MANAGER CERTIFICATION COURSE Give the best protection possible to your business, your brand and your customers. Help your team protect against foodborne illness outbreaks with ORLA's ServSafe training. This course blends the latest FDA Food Code, food safety research and years of food sanitation training experience. Your team will learn to implement essential food safety practices and create a culture of food safety. This certification meets the “Demonstration of Knowledge” and “Person in Charge” requirements of the Oregon Food Code and includes additional risk management training. Certification is valid statewide for five years and also satisfies the food handler requirement.

CLASSES AROUND THE STATE: Classes are typically held in Portland, Wilsonville, Woodburn, Eugene, Medford, Bend, and the recently added cities of Seaside and Lincoln City. Register Online at OregonRLA.org/ServSafe

ON-SITE PRIVATE CLASS: If you have 15 or more employees for the ServSafe course (and you have a classroom setting) we can provide the trainer at no additional cost! Call 971.224.1503 or 866.679.6733 for details.

OregonRLA.org/ServSafe 26

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


REBUILDING CONSUMER CONFIDENCE Safety, Quality, and Great Service Help Move the Industry Forward At a time when more consumers are beginning to venture out of their homes and into restaurants, bars and lodging properties, it's critically important to continue to maintain consumer confidence and build assurance of safe practices within the industry. Safety has become a differentiator on par with quality and service, so adopting a safetyfocused culture and communicating key information to potential patrons is key to getting back to “business as usual.” We asked four hospitality companies to share what they’ve been doing to establish best practices for safety and communicate that information to their guests. As of right now, industry professionals see no end in sight when it comes to enhanced cleaning and sanitizing. “We’ve asked ourselves, ‘What would our customers want us to do whether we think we need to do it or not?’” said David Anderson, co-owner of Syndicate Wine Bar in Beaverton. “We had to listen to the worst of their fears and the strongest opinions, then step back and say, ‘That may be a strong opinion, but what is the bell curve?’” Right now, it’s about keeping an ear to the ground, understanding what customers expect and being transparent about what you’re doing to adapt to those concerns. David Anderson, Syndicate Wine Bar, Beaverton OregonRLA.ORG 27


Beergarden, Eugene PHOTO: COURTESY OF DELENE & CO.

“Even as the vaccine rolls out and case counts potentially go down, we’re still going to have to have these practices of sanitizing tables and maintaining spacing for a while,” said Colby Phillips, co-owner and operator of PublicHouse in Springfield and Beergarden in Eugene. “Staff will likely have to wear masks for longer—until the greater part of population is vaccinated.” People will still want to see bottles of hand sanitizer set up for their use, HEPA filters and fans running inside, and open doors and windows on warm days. Some of the technology solutions that have facilitated social distancing are likely to become permanent fixtures in hospitality. PublicHouse and Beergarden instituted mandatory contactless ordering, which many customers have liked. The new Element Hotel in Bend, which is part of the Marriott hotel chain, allows members of its Bonvoy loyalty program to take advantage 28

of a virtual check-in process and download a mobile key. “That’s been very well received,” said General Manager Eric Rock. “It will be like Zoom and Microsoft Teams, which will forever live in our world.” If the expectation of elevated cleanliness sticks around for a long time, hospitality companies are certainly up to the challenge. “In the hotel industry, the safety of our employees and guests has always been our highest priority, so I’ve always believed that our industry is made for things like this because of our high expectations about cleanliness,” said Diana Steinman, director of operations, Oregon coast for VIP Hospitality Group whose properties include the Inn at Nye Beach in Newport and Inn at Wecoma in Lincoln City. For Steinman, the pandemic has meant a greater focus on staff training and sticking

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

to written policies. “We use hospitalgrade cleaners, so we use Ecolab to ensure that employees are trained on how to use the cleaners appropriately,” she said. “We follow the American Hospitality & Lodging Association’s training resources and guidelines that they’ve provided for the industry as well. They’ve come up with really extensive cleaning checklists for staff. Our managers are required to do continuous education and training. We have daily stand-up meetings with all of our staff. Any new resources we receive from industry leaders, we want to share those with our staff. Knowledge is power.” Another thing VIP Hospitality Group is doing to ensure a safe environment for guests is focusing on staff health. “We’ve been a lot more aware of the importance of hand washing, with managers regularly pointing out that everyone needs to wash their hands,” said Steinman. “It’s always been


Syndicate Wine Bar, Beaverton PHOTO: COURTESY OF DIEGO G DIAZ PHOTOGRAPHY AND SYNDICATE WINE BAR

the case that we don’t allow employees to work if they’re ill or have certain symptoms. Now, when every staff member comes on shift, we do a wellness check and take their temperature. We have a paid stay-at-home policy for staff that aren’t feeling well. If they’re sick, or if they come to work and we do a health assessment and find a problem, they’re confident that they can go home and still get paid. That allows the employee to be really honest about how they’re feeling, which is really important. “We can’t control what our employees do outside of work, but in our training, we encourage employees to avoid high-risk situations in their personal life,” she added. “We haven’t had any issues up to this point.” Keeping guests safe and still giving them that all-important sense of hospitality has required some creative solutions during the pandemic. When outdoor dining finally

became an option in the Portland suburbs, “we designed an outdoor space that could be set up and taken down in 15 minutes,” said Anderson. He and his wife / business partner, Angela, bought collapsible picnic tables, built their own stanchions when none were available at the local hardware store, and braided cords into ropes to further separate different seating areas. “We turned our street from a pandemic zone into a socially-distanced community,” Anderson said. They invited local musicians to play for guests—from a safe distance, of course. When the bar had to shut down its kitchen, it began allowing guests to bring takeout or food from home. Syndicate even came up with wine pairings for dishes being sold by neighboring restaurants to encourage patrons to visit them first. “Since we were told we couldn’t drive to the beach, we said, ‘Let’s bring the beach

to Beaverton,’” Anderson said. They created outdoor dining cabanas with Adirondack chairs, umbrellas, inflatable parrots and beach balls. “We said, ‘Let’s make the experience fun and help customers relax or laugh.’ In hospitality, that’s what it’s all about.” In the fall, when he knew the rain would be coming back, he found a large tent so that the bar didn’t have to shut down the outdoor gathering area. In the winter, the cabanas became wine igloos thanks to smaller tents that kept the warmth inside and the cold air at bay. “The idea was, again and again, what can we do to make our space a place that people come to in the middle of pandemic to relax and get away from the pandemic and get back to a sense of normalcy even during hard times,” said Anderson.

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Rise, complimentary breakfast at Element Bend, Bend PHOTO: COURTESY OF ELEMENT BEND

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Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


Natatorium at Element Bend, Bend PHOTO: COURTESY OF ELEMENT BEND

One of the Element Hotel’s creative adaptions was to allow people or families to sign up to use the pool and fitness center in shifts. “A family will sign up for a 1 p.m. time for the pool, for example, and they’ll use it for 45 minutes,” Rock said. “For the next 15 minutes, we go in and disinfect it to get it ready for the next group.” It has also used some more standard processes to give guests and staff a greater feeling of safety. Breakfast items are packaged rather than set out on a buffet. The hotel does one hot item a day, but it’s

prepared in the kitchen and passed directly to guests through a window that is almost completely covered with a plexiglass shield. Room service has been cut to once every four days, and guests have to be out of the room for at least an hour before a housekeeper will enter. Companies can have the best processes and procedures in the world, but if guests don’t know about them, they may not feel comfortable returning to their favorite restaurants and hotels. That’s why communication, not just policy changes, is critical to restoring consumer confidence.

“One of the things that we’ve tried to do is have lots of very friendly signage explaining the rules,” said Phillips with PublicHouse. Large banners hung throughout the restaurants make it easy for people to spot and review the policies. In addition, both of Phillips’ restaurants have a greeter who welcomes every guest. “Our staff proactively talks about our rules and how we’re handling things,” he said. “Sometimes we have to remind people what the rules are or teach them. I think that helps alleviate potential issues. Not all of them, but most of them.” OregonRLA.ORG 31


Inn at Nye Beach PHOTO: COURTESY OF VIP HOSPITALITY GROUP

VIP Hospitality Group has taken several steps to communicate its COVID safety protocols. “When they receive their confirmation letter, it lists out a lot of what our guests can expect during their stay: temperature checks for staff, contactless checkout, toiletries that are individually wrapped,” Steinman said. “We can provide them with a mask if they don’t have one. If a guest makes a reservation over the phone, we share this information with them verbally. This information is also on the website, and we provide links to county websites so people can see our local requirements and what restaurants are or aren’t open.” “Social media is a big communication tool for us,” said Anderson. “Some days we’ll post two, three, four times a day because we have so much content.” Updates can be more serious, such as when government agencies institute new mandates or the bar’s service hours change. They can also be fun, announcing live music or sharing a joke or lighthearted thought for the day. 32

“I’ve always had a dry sense of humor, but now that my son is 15 years old, it’s a dry sense of dad humor,” Anderson quipped. But, he added, in all seriousness, “If I can get you to laugh, maybe I can get you to forget the craziness of the world for a minute. When I go back through our social media posts from the past year, we’ve always had a positive message. We always kept it upbeat, and our customers really valued that.” Syndicate’s communications have also provided a strong and consistent position on safety protocols, which Anderson believes has been very important. “People are desperate for leadership,” he said. “They’re desperate for guidance right now. Things are constantly shifting. They’re getting inconsistent guidance from the government. We figured out what we could do and were consistent with our message. We did not want to pass uncertainty and fear onto our customers.” Steinman encourages all hospitality companies to keep up these good,

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

proactive communication measures, as well as extra safety protocols, for as long as it takes. “Guests need to see that all of these industries, from airlines to cruises to restaurants, are working together,” she said. “They need to know that every industry leader is working together to provide training to the employees that work in these different travel industries. That gives travelers confidence that employees are being trained properly and the organizations they work for are providing tools and resources to deliver an experience that’s great but also safe.” Anderson echoes these ideas. Even a year into the pandemic, it’s easy to not know the best way to handle workplace issues or bring customers back. “The anxiety is there for all of us but know that your neighbors are in the same situation as you,” he said. “Don’t be afraid to reach out for help. In the hospitality industry, we’re all in this together.”  SOPHIA BENNETT


Photo courtesy of McMenamins

New and Dem On- ourse C

Providing Service While Supporting Safety Guest Service Tips During Covid-19 Challenges

This online course is scenario-driven addressing common guest service challenges restaurant and hotel staff are experiencing during the pandemic. Choose from a restaurant or hotel version, available in English and Spanish.

Skills Participants Will Learn: • • • •

Guest-friendly communication of safety procedures and expectations Creating and reinforcing organizational credibility with safety practices Approaching a non-compliant guest with the goal of avoiding escalation Creating positive guest experiences despite potentially awkward safety protocols

Course is available for a donation. Funds will help support the Oregon Hospitality Foundation’s mission to provide timely resources such as this course, in addition to operational funding needed to support programs for the hospitality industry’s workforce and philanthropic needs.

SPONSORS AND PARTNERS

R E S TA U R A N T C O N S U LTA N T S

OregonGuestServiceSafety.org

OregonRLA.ORG 33


EMPOWERED TO TAKE ACTION A Team-Focused Approach to Rebuilding Customer Confidence

D

uring a time of heavy uncertainty and ever-changing health regulations within the hospitality industry, it has become all the more important to ensure your team feels confident and empowered to take the proper actions to provide the best service to your customers as possible. Beyond carrying out required COVID-19 protocols and regulations, it’s crucial that management is able to maintain and rejuvenate their employees so they’re offering hospitality to your guests, beyond just customer service. Focus on Safety Measures for the Team and Customers Keeping health and safety at the forefront of the customer experience is crucial, but what does this look like exactly for your team? This means ensuring your team has the necessary tools to make sure they feel as safe as possible. Whether it’s masks, face shields, personal hand sanitizers, make it known to your team that you are placing their safety just as high as the customers’ safety. When your team feels safe, the more time they will get to spend focusing on customer safety and satisfaction rather than being preoccupied with the fear of their own well-being. The additional aspect to this is ensuring that your team is knowledgeable about and comfortable with executing safety measures for customers. Are these tasks occurring consistently? Do they know to direct

34

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

customers to complimentary masks or how to properly sanitize tables? With whatever safety measures you’ve adopted, the calmer and more confident your team is with these, the more comfortable this will make your customers. Role Play Customer Scenarios If a customer isn’t wearing a mask in your establishment, will your team know how to handle this situation with grace and authority? This scenario has been one that’s become more popular and even more difficult to handle. A great way to help your team feel more confident with dealing with any tricky circumstances that may arise such as this one, is role play. Take some time with your entire team to practice how you’d like them to handle difficult or unsafe circumstances, so they never feel completely unprepared. Switch roles between team member and customer so that everyone gets to experience and understand both sides of the situation. If and when a situation arises such as those role-played, guests will take notice of how your team handled the challenge. They will certainly appreciate that you and your team were confident and had a plan in place to handle the situation with the utmost care and compassion. Teach Clear Communication of the Plan Owners and managers aren’t the only ones who respond to customer


The team at Hilton Garden Inn Wilsonville Portland has been empowered to go above and beyond what is required to keep employees and guests safe, resulting in both employee and guest confidence.

questions or concerns. If a guest were to call and ask about your COVID-19 safety protocols, would every team member be able to answer confidently and correctly? While your team may be stellar at actually carrying out any safety measures or policies, they need to also be able to communicate this safety plan to the customers. Customers feel more at ease when those who are providing the service are knowledgeable about their safety plan and are able to explain it in a clear, easy to understand way. This requires extra education and training to be sure your entire team is prepared to answer any and all questions your customers may have. Provide Stability In a world full of turmoil, uncertainty, and change, it’s vital that your team finds solace and stability within their work life as much as feasibly possible. While there are always going to be things out of our control, there are many things we can still work on to provide a more enjoyable experience for both customers and the team. People need structure in times of turmoil and some great ways to provide that to your team are consistent schedules and hours, pay, and type of work. The more stable your team members are within their roles, the stronger performance you’ll see out of them. This equates to more dependable, high-quality service for your customers!

Remember Rewards and Recognition While rewards and recognition have always been heavily encouraged for teams, it is ever-so-important to remember to do so now. Your employees always deserve to feel seen and valued for the hard work they are putting in, especially during such chaotic times. You may never know what is going on outside of someone’s work life, so make sure to recognize hard workers often. Whether big or small, rewards and recognition can go a long way. These can be things such as a hand-written note of appreciation, a gift card to their favorite restaurant, or even a shout-out to them in a team huddle. Whatever manners you decide to use to recognize your employees, make sure you’re being fair and equitable to everyone on the team. Thinking beyond the basics of what hospitality looks like now, businesses must work from the bottom-up with a team-focused approach to rebuilding customer confidence. When your team (your foundation) is strong, cohesive, and prepared to take on anything, they really can do just that. The more energy you place on creating great team dynamics and knowledgeability, the more happy and loyal customers you’ll gain.  ZOE STANLEY, HR ANNIE CONSULTING

OregonRLA.ORG 35


nal guidance, custom meal

Comprehensive Package with monitoring and support s Cost: $7/employee per month includes the entire family

Virtual Visits Virtual Visits s.html learn more rograms thatto include nutritional guidance, custom meal take control of Help your employees • Unlimited 24/7 access to virtual care with licensed providers • No copays or hidden charges • Select phone or video visits Help your employees • Providers order appropriate prescriptions from pharmacy of patient's choice

Virtual Visits Virtual Visits

take control of their health with unlimited 24/7 General Medical virtual visits from Teladoc. their health with unlimited 24/7 • Helps employees avoid inconvenient and costly trips to urgent care and emergency rooms virtual visits from Teladoc. • Expert guidance and review of conditions by a medical professional

e

Help your employees take control of

Mental Health

their health with unlimited 24/7 Comprehensive Package Help your take control • Select from a listing of licensed mental health providers and reschedule with theemployees same virtual visits from Teladoc. Comprehensive Package provider Virtual Visits Cost: $7/employee per month includes the entire family learn more rg/healthsolutions.html to

their health with unlimited 24/7 virtual visits from Teladoc.

• On average, first sessions with providers occur within 7 days - nationally, the average wait days and can take months

lp your employees take control of • Unlimited 24/7 access to virtual care with licensed providers Cost: $7/employee per monthmental includes the entire family eir health with unlimited 24/7 time for an in-person health session is at least 25

• No copays or hidden charges stual been visitsproduced from Teladoc.from sources believed to be reliable (as • Select phone orimproper video visits • Unlimited 24/7 access virtual care with doc Health, Inc., shall not be held liable forto any or licensed providers • hidden Providers order appropriate prescriptions from pharmacy of patient's choice • No copays or charges ved from other sources does not constitute an endorsement Neck and Back Care • Select phone or video visits General of Teladoc Health, the global leader inMedical virtual care. Teladoc

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• Providers order appropriate prescriptions from pharmacy of patient's choice • Access health coaches •certified Helps employees avoid inconvenient and costly trips to urgent care and emergency rooms General Medical • Expert guidance and review of with conditions by a medical professional • Exercise-based treatment plans monitoring and support

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• Helps employeeslast avoid inconvenient costly trips to urgent care and emergency rooms • Programs four to eightand weeks Mental and Health • Expert guidance review of conditions by a• medical professional Unlimited 24/7 access to virtual care with licensed providers

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, and HealthiestYou Although the dataprovider contained in personalized this document hasprograms been produced from sources believed to be reliable (as • Expert-developed that include nutritional guidance, customofmeal • Providers order appropriate prescriptions from patient's choice completeness, legality, reliability, or usefulness any information. Teladoc Health, occur Inc., shall not be held anythe improper or pharmacy On average, first sessions with providers within 7 days -liable nationally, average wait • Select from a• listing ofoflicensed mental health providers and reschedule with thefor same plans, shopping guides, and bility for anyone’s use ofprovider the information. Further, of datamore derived from otherissources not constitute an endorsement time for aninclusion in-person mental health session at leastdoes 25 days and can take months General Medical ss of information obtained from other sites. HealthiestYou is now part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. Teladoc • On average, first sessions with providers occur within 7 days - nationally, the average wait • Helps employees avoid inconvenient and costly trips to urgent care and emergency rooms ncluding but not limited Neck and Back Care

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nally, the average wait n take months

time for an in-person mental health session is at least 25 days and can take months

• Expert guidance and review of conditions by a medical professional

dance, custom meal

• Access certified health coaches Neck and Back Care • Exercise-based treatment plans withHealth monitoring and support Mental • Programs last four to eight weeks • Access certified health coaches

Go month to www.oregonrla.org/healthsolutions.html to learn more ployee per includes the entire family • Select from a listing of licensed mental health providers and reschedule with the same Go to • Exercise-based treatment plans with monitoring and support and sign up! Nutrition Counseling provider • Programs last four care to eight with weeks 24/7 access to virtual licensed providers • Expert-developed personalized programs that include nutritional guidance, custom meal OregonRLA.org/HealthSolutions • On average, first sessions with providers occur within 7 days nationally, the average wait plans, shopping guides, and more Counseling time for an in-person mental health session is at least 25 days and can take months s or hiddenNutrition charges • Expert-developed personalized programs that include nutritional guidance, custom meal to learn more and sign up! plans, shopping guides, and more one or video visits

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from sources believed to be reliable (as shall not be held liable for any improper or sources does not constitute an endorsement h, the global leader in virtual care. Teladoc

Neck and Back Care

Teladoc Health, Inc., encompasses consumer brands: Teladoc, Best Doctors, Advance Medical, and HealthiestYou Although the data contained in this document has been produced from sources believed to be reliable (as referenced herein), no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding accuracy, adequacy, completeness, legality, reliability, or usefulness of any information. Teladoc Health, Inc., shall not be held liable for any improper or incorrect use of the information described and/or contained herein and assumes no responsibility for anyone’s use of the information. Further, inclusion of data derived from other sources does not constitute an endorsement by Teladoc Health, Inc. It is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the content and usefulness of information obtained from other sites. HealthiestYou is now part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. Teladoc Health, Inc., on its own behalf and on behalf of its affiliates and/or wholly owned subsidiaries including but not limited

Goprescriptions to www.oregonrla.org/healthsolutions.html to learn more order appropriate from pharmacy patient's choice • Access certifiedof health coaches

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and sign up! • Exercise-based treatment plans with monitoring and support Go to www.oregonrla.org/healthsolutions.html to weeks learn more • Programs last four to eight and sign up! Nutrition Counseling

loyees avoid inconvenient and costly trips to urgent care and emergency rooms • Expert-developed personalized programs that include nutritional guidance, custom meal plans, shopping guides, and more dance and review of conditions by a medical professional Teladoc Health, Inc., encompasses consumer brands: Teladoc, Best Doctors, Advance Medical, and HealthiestYou Although the data contained in this document has been produced from sources believed to be reliable (as referenced herein), no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding accuracy, adequacy, completeness, legality, reliability, or usefulness of any information. Teladoc Health, Inc., shall not be held liable for any improper or incorrect use of the information described and/or contained herein and assumes no responsibility for anyone’s use of the information. Further, inclusion of data derived from other sources does not constitute an endorsement by Teladoc Health, Inc. It is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the content and usefulness of information obtained from other sites. HealthiestYou is now part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. Teladoc Health, Inc., on its own behalf and on behalf of its affiliates and/or wholly owned subsidiaries including but not limited

Teladoc Health, Inc., encompasses consumer brands: Teladoc, Best Doctors, Advance Medical, and HealthiestYou Although the data contained in this document has been produced from sources believed to be reliable (as referenced herein), no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding accuracy, adequacy, completeness, legality, reliability, or usefulness of any information. Teladoc Health, Inc., shall not be held liable for any improper or incorrect use of the information described and/or contained herein and assumes no responsibility for anyone’s use of the information. Further, inclusion of data derived from other sources does not constitute an endorsement by Teladoc Health, Inc. It is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the content and usefulness of information obtained from other sites. HealthiestYou is now part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. Teladoc Health, Inc., on its own behalf and on behalf of its affiliates and/or wholly owned subsidiaries including but not limited

OLCC APPROVED ALCOHOL SERVER TRAINING

Go to www.oregonrla.org/healthsolutions.html to learn more and sign up! m a listing of licensed mental health providers and reschedule with the same

e, first sessions with providers occur within 7 days - nationally, the average wait n in-person mental health session is at least 25 days and can take months

Teladoc Health, Inc., encompasses consumer brands: Teladoc, Best Doctors, Advance Medical, and HealthiestYou Although the data contained in this document has been produced from sources believed to be reliable (as referenced herein), no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding accuracy, adequacy, completeness, legality, reliability, or usefulness of any information. Teladoc Health, Inc., shall not be held liable for any improper or incorrect use of the information described and/or contained herein and assumes no responsibility for anyone’s use of the information. Further, inclusion of data derived from other sources does not constitute an endorsement by Teladoc Health, Inc. It is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the content and usefulness of information obtained from other sites. HealthiestYou is now part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. Teladoc Health, Inc., on its own behalf and on behalf of its affiliates and/or wholly owned subsidiaries including but not limited

Oregon's only winner of the Brandon Hall Award for Excellence for Alcohol Server Education rtified health coaches

k Care

based treatment plans with monitoring and support last four to eight weeks • Just $18 for the course and practice test

nseling • Available in English or Spanish veloped personalized programs that include nutritional guidance, custom meal • Take the training on your computer or mobile device pping guides, and more

• Resources to help guide you • Stop and start anytime

w.oregonrla.org/healthsolutions.html to learn more up!

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onsumer brands: Teladoc, Best Doctors, Advance Medical, and HealthiestYou Although the data contained in this document has been produced from sources believed to be reliable (as essed or implied is made regarding accuracy, adequacy, completeness, legality, reliability, or usefulness of any information. Teladoc Health, Inc., shall not be held liable for any improper or cribed and/or contained herein and assumes no responsibility for anyone’s use of the information. Further, inclusion of data derived from other sources does not constitute an endorsement nsibility of the user to evaluate the content and usefulness of information obtained from other sites. HealthiestYou is now part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. Teladoc n behalf of its affiliates and/or wholly owned subsidiaries including but not limited

36

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

of


COMMUNITY SUPPORT The Cornerstone of the New Consumer Confidence

Regional treasure Country Grains at Fir Point Farms, Aurora

O

ne year ago, in a sudden turn of events, every restaurant or bar owner, operator, manager, and employee was shaken to the core with the words “lock down.” These shockwaves went out through communities across Oregon, leaving everyone in our state wondering how their personal favorite spot would survive. This undeniably caused a massive decline in consumer purchases of food and beverage, with individually-owned restaurants representing one of the hardest hit sectors. Even after lockdowns were lifted and partial capacity was allowed, the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis1 reported that May 2020 spending had dropped 33 percent year over year, a trend that has continued as the pandemic ceases to subside.

However, something fascinating and extremely hopeful has emerged from the ashes of so much uncertainty and decline: the engagement of communities in sustaining the life of their local restaurants. Purchasing food and beverages from your local watering hole is now less about the pristine execution and style we are accustomed to. A shift in focus has taken center stage. The consumer can now be a part of something larger; this is their opportunity to impact the world and future in front of them. They have the power to vote with their dollar and keep the places they love alive during this crisis. Driven by a renewed sense of community, restaurants are now able to engage consumer confidence in a whole new light, for the immediate future and hopefully for years to come. OregonRLA.ORG 37


Stay Connected by Subscribing to ORLA eCommunications. Get the latest hospitality industry news, event details, and offers. ORLA provides different types of email subscriptions to make sure you get exactly the info you are looking for. Tailor your subscriptions at OregonRLA.org/subscribe. CHOOSE THE RIGHT EMAILS FOR YOU  Insider: Monthly news and information (members only)  Alert: Urgent call to action or industry alerts  Announcement: Industry announcements  Events: Industry and association activities  Industry Offers: Sponsored messages, deals and discounts

38

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


Country Grains at Fir Point Farms, Aurora

To nurture this goodwill and confidence we need to focus on four values that will always ring true with our patrons. 1. Be Consistent. Part of what has been so trying for our industry and consumers is the lack of consistency over the past year. Every time a customer voted to spend their dollars at our establishments, they said, “I believe in getting to eat here again someday.” That anticipation has been building now for a long time. Making sure we are doing everything we can to update and hone our plans, training, and organization to be as consistent as possible will ensure these expectations are met and exceeded. 2. Be Bold. Don’t be afraid to implement new systems and solutions. Restaurants have developed new strategies that are increasingly more profitable or efficient throughout this process. Even if it delivers a somewhat different experience for our customers, with strong communication we can build even more trust with our patrons by showing them we learn and grow toward a brighter future. Prior to the COVID pandemic, consumer confidence has primarily relied more clinically upon customers’ “feelings about current and future economic conditions.”2 All expectations in this arena have been bucked in 2020. In the past, downturns resulted in smaller dining budgets. In stark contrast, 2020 saw many households become more intentional and habitual about their dine out habits. Customers throughout the State of Oregon, as well as nationwide, are making personal commitments to patron (whether dine-in, take-out, or delivery) local restaurants and show their loyalty. Social media pages focusing on this topic popped up and overnight have gained thousands of followers to support local eateries. This flies in the face of standard buying habits in restaurant consumers, not only contradicting typical household budgeting, but doing so at a time when so much is insecure: staffing, training, adjusted hours, supply chain and new service models. Communities around the nation are sounding a rallying cry, not only touching many a restaurant owner and employee, but also bringing something new to the forefront for us as an industry: the customer’s confidence comes not simply from our deliverables, but equally from their active engagement in our success. So how do we maintain this new type of consumer confidence as we progress into the future? Ultimately customers want to see their old favorites come back, stronger and better than before. Consumers have been dreaming about that day when they get to enjoy their favorite burger, pint, or bowl of pasta at that special eatery that they helped save. We cannot disappoint them.

3. Look Ahead. Taking stock of all we have learned about our businesses over the past year and preparing for a worst-case scenario in the future will instill needed confidence in both our guests and us as operators. Now is the time to plan and prepare what we have learned for future pivots, readying ourselves for whatever changes or issues we are confronted with. 4. Be Transparent. Tell your story! Continue to engage and reengage your client base with stories of victory, community, growth and the effort you and your teams are displaying to provide the best for your patrons. Emails, blurbs on your menu, website testimonials, and one-on-one conversations are great strategies to initiate the conversation. However you engage, do it loud and proud. After a year full of lockdowns, hardship and pivots, I hope as we move forward our local restaurants, communities, and customers will remember this time of connection as a small bright spot, leaving behind the long-lasting mark of confidence, even as this time fades into a distant memory.  NATALIE SHEILD, TOGATHER RESTAURANT CONSULTING

1 https://oregoneconomicanalysis.com/2020/07/01/bar-and-restaurant-demand-graph-of-theweek/ 2 Oxford Languages https://languages.oup.com/google-dictionary-en/

OregonRLA.ORG 39


IT’S YOUR BUSINESS: Workplace Safety and the Customer Experience

I

t has been a long haul since March 2020. The cycle of opening, closing, reopening, and closing again for businesses in Oregon has been like a never-ending roller coaster ride. The focus has shifted from thriving to surviving and reconnecting with customers. Customers have changed, too. To rebuild customer relationships and gain consumer confidence, businesses are forced to rethink their customer experience. Employees, managers, and owners play a vital role in this process. Customers want to feel safe when they resume travel and make dining out part of their routine. Providing a safe and healthy workplace where employees feel productive and cared for is the foundation for boosting consumer confidence. A positive customer experience depends on: • Adequate staffing • Knowledgeable, professional, welltrained employees • Feeling heard and understood • A clean, safe, secure environment

• A product or service that meets or exceeds their expectations • Quick, timely, and considerate problem solving • No excuses Here’s where workplace safety comes into the picture. Your business relies on people to operate. If an employee is injured on the job, it could impact each of the customer experience elements listed above. Customers build relationships with a company’s brand and their employees. The two are tightly woven, and customers quickly recognize high turnover in staffing. If employee safety is an afterthought, you lose valuable time reorganizing shift schedules, managing injury paperwork, conducting accident analysis, training, and reinforcing safety policies and procedures. Employees and management could invest this time to make sure customers are happy and well served.

Now Offering FREE HOUR-LONG CONSULATIONs . . . . . . to optimize your dining operation!

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custom fabrication • planning & design • professional installation • consulting • kitchen equipment & supplies 541-746-7480 • Sales@curtisresteq.com • curtisresteq.com 40

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

located in

Beaverton, Bend, Eugene, Medford & Boise


Employees are also dealing with a lot of stress during this time. Competing family priorities, inconsistent income, and job insecurity have taken a toll on today’s workforce. Beyond the general concerns around COVID-19, mental well-being in the workplace is just as important as injury and illness prevention. One way to erase the stigma around mental health in the workplace is to talk about it. “If employers take steps to foster an environment where mental health issues and resources are discussed openly and regularly, workers will feel more comfortable accessing help. The results will also be good for your business because of lower health care costs, improved productivity, less absenteeism, and less turnover,” said Liz Hill, adviser, SAIF Total Worker Health. Only one in three people who need mental health help get it, according to the American Psychiatric Association and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). Similarly, free employee assistance programs offered by employers

have only a 3-5 percent rate of use nationally. Reasons vary but include stigmatization, fear of losing their job, or simply lack of access to resources. Whatever the reason, mental health experts say the consequences are worse when people stay silent. There are a lot of ways to support a culture of well-being, but an easy place to start is bringing up mental health. Supervisors can support employees by sharing resources available through benefit programs and the community. “Maybe it's at your next team meeting, or on a walk with a co-worker, but the important thing is to make sure people feel like they can talk about it,” Hill says. For more ideas on creating a healthy workplace for mental well-being, visit saif.com/wellbeing.  SAIF CORPORATION

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OregonRLA.ORG 41


Together We Make Our Industry Stronger! GOVERNMENT ADVOCACY

GROUP PURCHASING POWER

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

INDUSTRY INTELLIGENCE

Protecting Our Businesses

Saving Money Together

Training Our Industry

Keeping Each Other Informed

Be heard at the local, state and federal levels of government, make informed decisions with shared industry intelligence and best practices, and save money on industry products and services with ORLA-exclusive deals. Membership is what makes this all possible. Joining is easy, visit OregonRLA.org to get started.

OREGON RE STAURANT & L O DG IN G A S S O C IAT IO N |

Serving Oregon Hospitality!

HAVE YOU HEARD ORLA'S PODCAST? Subscribe to Boiled Down wherever you get your podcasts so new episodes are delivered directly to your device! We condense valuable information and intelligence for Oregon hospitality. Check out our latest episode on the state of the industry and what we can expect next.

OregonRLA.org/BoiledDown 42

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


LODGING PERFORMANCE Hotel Benchmark Data The information contained in this report is provided by STR. For detailed lodging performance data for your area, contact STR at 615.824.8664 ext. 3504 or info@str.com. ORLA members can log in to access to monthly reports on OregonRLA.org in the Resource Library. MONTH - JANUARY 2021 VS JANUARY 2020

Occupancy (%)

Avg Rm Rate ($)

RevPAR ($)

Percent Change from January 2020

2021 2020 2021 2020 2021 2020 Occ ADR RevPAR Room Room Room Rev Avail Sold United States

39.6

Oregon

41.7 47.8 87.72 104.97 36.56 50.13 -12.7 -16.4 -27.1 -28.7 -2.2 -14.6

63.7

103.89

168.34

41.14

107.18

-37.8

-38.3

-61.6

-63.6

-5.1

-41.0

Eastern+

37.0 36.6 73.68 76.21 27.25 27.87 1.1 -3.3 -2.2 -1.8 0.4 1.5

Central+

40.8 41.5 98.55 100.84 40.22 41.86 -1.7 -2.3 -3.9 -2.1 1.9 0.2

Southern+

53.5 41.9 82.86 79.94 44.33 33.47 27.8 3.7 32.4 32.5 0.1 27.9

Willamette Valley+

47.4 51.0 82.52 97.55 39.10 49.71 -7.0 -15.4 -21.4 -20.2 1.4 -5.7

MT Hood/Gorge+

41.2 46.1 93.48 92.96 38.55 42.88 -10.6 0.6 -10.1 -6.3 4.2 -6.8

Portland Metro+

33.6 54.9 85.53 116.38 28.75 63.87 -38.8 -26.5 -55.0 -58.3 -7.3 -43.2

Coast+

46.8 41.0 95.63 95.79 44.80 39.28 14.2 -0.2 14.0 14.6 0.5 14.8

39.3 54.9 90.79 125.74 35.72 68.99 -28.3 -27.8 -48.2 -49.2 -2.0 -29.7

Pacific

YEAR TO DATE - JANUARY 2021 VS JANUARY 2020 Occupancy (%)

Avg Rm Rate ($)

RevPAR ($)

Percent Change from YTD 2020

PARTICIPATION Properties

Rooms

Room Room Room 2020 Occ ADR RevPAR Census Sample Census Sample Rev Avail Sold U.S. 39.3 54.9 90.79 125.74 35.72 68.99 -28.3 -27.8 -48.2 -49.2 -2.0 -29.7 58603 35354 5278044 3968679 Pacific 39.6 63.7 103.89 168.34 41.14 107.18 -37.8 -38.3 -61.6 -63.6 -5.1 -41.0 8840 4475 751375 561706 Oregon 41.7 47.8 87.72 104.97 36.56 50.13 -12.7 -16.4 -27.1 -28.7 -2.2 -14.6 1003 515 67945 48169 Eastern+ 37.0 36.6 73.68 76.21 27.25 27.87 1.1 -3.3 -2.2 -1.8 0.4 1.5 96 46 4951 2978 Central+ 40.8 41.5 98.55 100.84 40.22 41.86 -1.7 -2.3 -3.9 -2.1 1.9 0.2 86 50 5826 4178 Southern+ 53.5 41.9 82.86 79.94 44.33 33.47 27.8 3.7 32.4 32.5 0.1 27.9 156 68 8575 5353 Valley+ 47.4 51.0 82.52 97.55 39.10 49.71 -7.0 -15.4 -21.4 -20.2 1.4 -5.7 160 98 10948 8105 Hood/Grg+ 41.2 46.1 93.48 92.96 38.55 42.88 -10.6 0.6 -10.1 -6.3 4.2 -6.8 35 22 2305 1840 Metro+ 33.6 54.9 85.53 116.38 28.75 63.87 -38.8 -26.5 -55.0 -58.3 -7.3 -43.2 228 170 23749 21320 Coast+ 46.8 41.0 95.63 95.79 44.80 39.28 14.2 -0.2 14.0 14.6 0.5 14.8 235 64 11339 4777

2021

2020

2021

2020

2021

Hilton Garden Inn- Wilsonville, Oregon

Seattle | Portland | Sacramento | Pleasanton

Saltline Hotel - Seaside, Oregon

Hyatt House - Beaverton, Oregon

deacon.com

OregonRLA.ORG 43


JOIN YOUR PEERS! September 19-20 • Bend Thought Leaders. Networking. Workshops. Parties.

INSPIRATIONAL KEYNOTE PRESENTATIONS

Riverhouse on the Deschutes

ESSENTIAL BREAKOUT SESSIONS

OREGON HOSPITALITY PROFESSIONALS

INDUSTRY VENDOR SHOWCASE

Join us this fall as we bring the industry back together at Riverhouse on the Deschutes in Bend. Industry leaders, owners and operators gather for this multi-day event of illuminating keynotes, informative seminars, breakout sessions, networking and parties. REGISTRATION $275 If you are bringing three or more people, your third and additional attendees will receive a discounted rate of $245.

Major Sponsors:

Breakout Sponsors: Dell Technologies, Garth T. Rouse & Associates, Jordan Ramis PC, Summit Cleaning & Restoration, UnitedHealthcare Vendor Showcase to Date: Crystal Investment Property, Curtis Restaurant Equipment, Dell Technologies, Elliott, Powell, Baden & Baker, POSitive Technologies, Togather Restaurant Consulting

ORLAHospitalityConference.com 44

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021


NEWS BRIEFS Happenings From Around the Industry

Restaurant Industry Insights

The National Restaurant Association each year prepares a comprehensive overview of the restaurant industry providing a look at trends and what’s ahead. The report is considered the most authoritative source for restaurant industry sales projections and trends. The State of the Industry report is based on analysis of the latest economic data and extensive surveys of restaurant operators and consumers and includes insights on trends and economic forecast for operations, menu, sales and workforce. Visit Restaurant.org/research for more information.

New Training Tool for Today’s Service Challenges

The Oregon Hospitality Foundation, ORLA’s 501c3 nonprofit, released a new and affordable 24/7 internet-based training tool to help address the myriad of service challenges your team may be facing. “Providing Service While Supporting Safety” offers coaching by example via videos that address four common challenges: Communication, Credibility, Compliance, and Creating a Positive Experience. The entire curriculum can be viewed in less than 40 minutes or, each scenario can be viewed separately in 15 minutes or less. Best practices are illustrated via both video and narration, are specific to either lodging or foodservice situations, and are reinforced by downloadable worksheets that can help generate discussion for your situational needs. See more details on our English and Spanish flyers. Visit OregonGuestServiceSafety.org for more information.

Oregon Tourism Leadership Academy 

ORLA’s second year of the Oregon Tourism Leadership Academy (OTLA) is shaping up to include a full class of participants when it launches later this summer. We received more applications than spots available in the class, which is both a testament to the demand for more experiential learning in this sector and the value this experience provides as expressed by our first-year participants. To learn more about OTLA, and how you (or your team members) can apply for the 2022 group, visit OregonRLA.org/OTLA.

Free Restaurant Guidance

ORLA partnered with Oregon’s Small Business Development Center (SBDC) Network to launch a new, nocost, one on one confidential advisor network. The Oregon Restaurant Covid Assistance (ORCA) program includes a network of seven professional restaurant consultants ready to assist industry operators with ongoing challenges posed by the pandemic. ORCA's advising services and webinars are provided via Zoom and email throughout Oregon. For more information or to sign up, email orca@oregonsbdc.org, call (541) 896-1714 or visit Oregonsbdc.org/orca. OregonRLA.ORG 45


WHAT YOUR PEERS ARE SAYING Meet Some Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association Members

M

embership in ORLA means being part of the only organization in the state devoted to protecting and promoting the interests of our industry. It’s all of us together that makes that possible.

Get inspired by these peer profiles where members share about changing perpectives and boosting consumer confidence. For a little springtime fun we also wanted to know who prefers a coastal getaway or mountain adventure, and what Disney character they would be if they could play one for a day.

Tell Your Peers a Little About You! If you are a member, and are willing to be profiled here, please email us at info@OregonRLA.org. Also, let us know if there is a question you would like to see your peers answer.

GET TO KNOW SOME OF YOUR PEERS BY READING THEIR RESPONSES TO THESE BUSINESS RELATED QUESTIONS:

How has your perspective as a consumer changed due to the pandemic? How is your company boosting confidence in safety protocols?

NATALIE SHEILD Sheild Bistro & Catering Kitchen/ Pig & Turnip, Springfield

Title: Owner, Executive Chef Open Since: 2014 Member Since: 2021 Coast or Mountain? Mountain adventure Disney character for a day: Moana How has your perspective as a consumer changed due to the pandemic? I think the pandemic has made me even more conscientious about purchasing local than before. Seeing those local dollars work is awesome!

46

JATIN PATEL Lodging Management Northwest, Portland

Title: Principal Joined the Company: 2001 Member Since: 1995 Coast or Mountain? Coast for Sunrise and Sunset, Mountain for daytime Disney character for a day: Mickey or Goofy How has your perspective as a consumer changed due to the pandemic? I don't mind using technology like apps to make reservations, order food or even make restaurant reservations. Before I always wanted to call and speak to a person however the pandemic has forced me to purchase goods and services using technology and I like it now. I feel it's more accurate and faster.

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

KARI FISHER Summit Cleaning & Restoration

Title: Regional Relationships Manager Joined the Company: 2016 Member Since: 2017 Coast or Mountain? Mountain adventure Disney character for a day: Ariel How is your company boosting confidence in safety protocols? Since the beginning of the pandemic, Summit has ensured that every employee is properly trained and prepared with the CDC recommended PPE & disinfectants to ensure they are always leaving the client facility a safer environment than when we arrived. Summit also added a full suite of sanitizing and disinfecting services to help keep our clients and their patrons safe as we all continue to navigate through this pandemic.


JASON RANDLES Crux Fermentation Project, Bend

Title: Marketing Manager Joined the Company: 2017 Member Since: 2020 Coast or Mountain? Mountain adventure Disney character for a day: Perry the Platypus How has your perspective as a consumer changed due to the pandemic? I have a new appreciation for the importance of a "third place" for people to connect with others and treat themselves.

YVETTE JOHNSON Procter & Gamble, Los Angeles

Title: Account Executive Food Service covering CA/OR/WA Joined the Company: 2017 Member Since: 2020 Coast or Mountain? Coastal Getaway Disney character for a day: Simba, Lion King How is your company boosting confidence in safety protocols? P&G is elevating in store marketing presence to help leverage the EPA approved brands they are using to clean and disinfect, which the consumers know and trust.

CARI SHAFER Oxford Suites, Pendleton and Hermiston

JOHN "JB" BARRY Porter Partners, Springfield

Patience: Seating in restaurants, availability of staffing, food deliveries, and much more. We all need to be more patient with one another!

Porter created contactless ordering for food halls, restaurants, breweries, hotels and stadiums before it was COVID necessary! Porter keeps tabs high and people safe.

SHANNON ADAIR 1188 Brewing Company, John Day

RICK BROOKS Quality Inn, Florence

Title: Owner/Operator Open Since: 2013 Member Since: 2015 Coast or Mountain? Mountain adventure Disney character for a day: 2014 Maleficent! How has your perspective as a consumer changed due to the pandemic?

Title: General Manager Joined the Company: 2016 Member Since: 2020 Coast or Mountain? Coastal Getaway Disney character for a day: Pluto How has your perspective as a consumer changed due to the pandemic?

My perspective hasn’t changed. I will still love a fantastic social gathering when they are allowed and can’t wait for that day! I’m all about experiences.

It has made me more aware of my surroundings. Slightly anxious when I go in public. Sympathetic to people who are on the front lines.

Title: General Manager Joined the Company: 2018 Member Since: 2018 Coast or Mountain? Mountain adventure Disney character for a day: Mickey OG How has your perspective as a consumer changed due to the pandemic?

Title: Chief Porter Open Since: 2019 Member Since: 2020 Coast or Mountain? Mountain adventure Disney character for a day: Aladdin How is your company boosting confidence in safety protocols?

OregonRLA.ORG 47


HOW CAN WE SERVE YOU?

MEMBER SOLUTIONS Save Time and Money with ORLA’s Endorsed Service Providers | OregonRLA.org/ESP

Membership in ORLA means being a part of the only organization in the state devoted to protecting and promoting the interests of the entire hospitality industry. Contact us for questions; let us know what issues are affecting your business and how we can help. We have your back!

MEMBERSHIP CONTACTS:

STEVEN SCARDINA Regional Representative 503.718.1495 SScardina@OregonRLA.org TERRY HOPKINS Regional Representative 541.441.2219 THopkins@OregonRLA.org GREG STANERUCK Regional Representative 503.858.0086 GStaneruck@OregonRLA.org MARLA McCOLLY Director of Business Development 503.428.8694 MMcColly@OregonRLA.org GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS CONTACTS:

JASON BRANDT President & CEO 503.302.5060 JBrandt@OregonRLA.org GREG ASTLEY Director of Government Affairs 503.851.1330 Astley@OregonRLA.org TOM PERRICK Government Affairs Coordinator 971.224.1512 TPerrick@OregonRLA.org GLENDA HAMSTREET Executive Coordinator Government Affairs 971.224.1509 GHamstreet@OregonRLA.org ORLA MAIN OFFICE: ​​503.682.4422 48

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

WORKERS’ COMP INSURANCE ORLA’s group program with SAIF affords members an additional 21% premium discount if they meet the eligibility requirements.

CREDIT CARD PROCESSING ORLA Members get a discounted flat swiped rate of 2.3% + .05 a transaction, plus additional fees waived and tools to run your business more efficiently.

PROPERTY & LIABILITY INSURANCE The only Group Dividend Property and Liability program in Oregon whose policyholders have potential for a dividend.

HEALTHCARE SOLUTIONS Standard healthcare coverage. ORLA Health Solutions also includes telemedicine, at-home testing, health savings accounts, free prescription discount cards and mental health resources.

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT AND IT SUPPORT ORLA Members receive up to 30-40% off the everyday price on select Dell products. Members can also receive round-the-clock access to IT help with ProSupport, only from Dell.

OFFICE PRODUCTS AND SERVICES Up to 80% off Manufacturers Suggested List Price. Create customized buying list to fit your needs.

PAYROLL, TIME & ATTENDANCE, SCHEDULING, AND HRMS Receive 45% off Payroll Module and 30% off any additional modules, including Time & Attendance, Scheduling, and Human Resource Management Systems (HRMS), for the lifetime of their membership. All modules come with local team-based support.

MUSIC LICENSING ORLA Members can save up to 20% off their music licensing fees.​​

MUSIC LICENSING ORLA Members can save 10% on first year annual fee. ORLA 401K / PROFIT SHARING Employers with a qualified plan are exempt from participating in OregonSaves. Learn more from plan administrator, Garth T. Rouse & Associates SEX TRAFFICKING RECOGNITION AND RESPONSE: 10% discount on in-person training and Guardian Seal Virtual Training program.

human sex trafficking is the buying or selling of another hum

HOSPITALITY an exchange ofHUB anything of value for the sex act. Sex trafficking is t Find additional member-to-member exclusive cost-saving offers United States and around the world. The most common place to bu and benefits aimed at improving your bottom line online at OregonRLA.org/hospitality-hub.

INDICATORS OF SEX TRA


NEW MEMBERS ORLA Would Like To Welcome The Following New Members From November 2020 - January 2021 • Backstop Bar & Grill, Canby

• The Dalles Area Chamber of Commerce, The Dalles

• NW Draft Technicians, Portland

• Bandon Vistas, Bandon

• The Dalles Country Club, The Dalles

• Over the Edge Taphouse, LLC, Terrebonne

• Beaverton Budget Inn, Beaverton

• The Dalles Inn, The Dalles

• P & R Stations LLC, Summerville

• Beergarden, Eugene

• Devil's Food Catering, Portland

• Padington's Pizza Inc., Salem

• Belknap Hot Springs Resort RV, McKenzie Bridge

• Econo Lodge, Bend

• Palms Motor Hotel, Portland

• Belknap Hot Springs Resort, McKenzie Bridge

• Econo Lodge, Prineville

• Papa John's Pizza, Medford

• Bellagio's Pizza International, Wilsonville

• Econo Lodge S.E. Portland, Milwaukie

• Papa Murphy's / Kaydee Corp, Medford

• Best Western Astoria Bayfront Hotel, Astoria

• El Caporal, Bend

• Papa Murphy's / Tiki Corp, Medford

• Best Western Newberg Inn, Newberg

• Element Bend

• Pie + Vine, Ashland

• Billy Mac's Seaside Bar & Grill, Seaside

• Hampton Inn & Suites, Astoria

• Pop's Branding Iron Restaurant & Lounge, Albany

• Bites Restaurant, Forest Grove

• Happy Camp Hideaway, Netarts

• Procter and Gamble Professional, Cincinnati, OH

• Blended Main Street Eatery LLC, Myrtle Creek

• Hays Companies, Lake Oswego

• Qdoba Mexican Eats, Portland

• Bohemian Bar & Bistro, Grants Pass

• Holiday Inn Express & Suites, Seaside

• Quality Inn Tigard, Tigard

• Bottica, Inc., Beaverton

• Howard Associates, Ferndale, WA

• SaltLine Hotel, Seaside

• Bread & Ink Cafe, Inc., Portland

• Jam on Hawthorne, Portland

• The Sea Note, Waldport

• Brooklyn Trattoria, Portland

• Kaffe 101 Inc, Coos Bay

• Shilo Inn, The Dalles

• Burger King, Medford

• KeyBank, Beaverton

• Super 8 Suites & Inn, Medford

• Burger Time LLC, Mt. Angel

• The Lodge at Hot Lake Springs, La Grande

• Taj Indian Cuisine, Ashland

• Casey's Restaurant, Klamath Falls

• Magnum Enterprises, LLC, Beaverton

• Taqueria Picaro, Ashland

• Charlie's Mountain View, Government Camp

• Max's Tavern, Eugene

• True Juice, Grants Pass

• Comfort Inn & Suites, Tualatin

• Motel 6 Bend, Bend

• Xanadu Restaurant Mgmt, Inc., West Linn

• Crux Fermentation Project, Bend

• Muchas Gracias, Portland

• Yakuza Lounge, Portland

• Dairy Queen, White City

• Noble Coffee Roasting, Ashland

OregonRLA.ORG 49


LOOKING AHEAD Visit OregonRLA.org for event details and registration.

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Earth Day

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AHLA Safety Summit

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Flag Day

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Governor's Conference on Tourism

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Bids for a Better Industry - ORLAPAC Online Auction 50

Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

5 6 7 8

Juneteenth

Bids for a Better Industry - ORLAPAC Online Auction

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Food Waste Stops with Me is a collaboration between FoodWasteStopsWithMe.org Care are continuing their efforts to prevent Metro, the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association,

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as well as city and county governments to help food service businesses reduce food waste. OregonRLA.ORG 51


Customized coverage as unique as your business. There’s no business quite like yours. That’s why, in partnership with Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association (ORLA), Liberty Mutual Insurance works hard to understand it and deliver coverage specific to your needs. We bring you 30+ years of partnership with the ORLA and an exclusive Property, Auto, and Liability Safety Group Dividend Program for qualifying ORLA members.* When you work with us, you’re working with the #1 preferred business insurer.**

To learn more, talk to your independent agent/broker or visit LibertyMutualGroup.com/Business.

* Dividend evaluation occurs annually; dividends are not guaranteed. ** Based on 2019 survey of business insurance buyers on preference of national carriers sold via independent agents. ©2020 Liberty Mutual Insurance. Insurance underwritten by Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., Boston, MA, or its affiliates or subsidiaries. 52 Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association | SPRING 2021

Profile for Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association

Restaurant & Lodging - Spring 2021  

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