Bend Magazine - May/June 2020

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#CENTR ALOREGONSTRONG

METOLIUS retreat

HELPING HANDS

JBARJ SHELTERS HOMELESS TEENS

BRIGHT SPOTS

SPRING WILDFLOWERS OF THE HIGH DESERT

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APRIL2020 2019 DISPLAY THRU JUNE

ACTOR ERIC CLOSE AND HIS WIFE KERI ON THEIR RANCH IN TUMALO



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THANK YOU FOR SHOWING US WHAT STRONG LOOKS LIKE. From health care workers on the front lines to teachers and students finding new ways to learn together online. From grocery clerks keeping the shelves stocked to bus drivers getting us safely where we need to go. And to everyone who is slowing the spread and saving lives by staying home. We are all essential. And we are stronger and safer when we all do our part. Learn more at saif.com.


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TAKE ME HIGHER Rock climbing might seem like the ultimate intimidating sport. In this intro to rock climbing story, we break down entry into climbing, easy as 1-2-3. WRITTEN BY LUCAS ALBERG

FRESH TRACKS

Skip the lift lines (and traffic) and head to Mount Bailey this winter for an epic backcountry skiing experience.

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TABLE of CONTENTS Features

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AT HOME WITH ERIC CLOSE

#CENTR ALOREGONSTRONG

METOLIUS retreat

Movie and television actor Eric Close moved his family to Central Oregon full-time in 2017. See behind the scenes of their Tumalo home and property, affectionately known as Getaway Ranch. WRITTEN BY LEE LEWIS HUSK

BUSINESS ON A ROLL

Brick and mortar business isn’t for everyone, and trucks aren’t just for food. These creative Bend entrepreneurs took their retail and service ideas to the streets, in trailers and trucks transformed into mobile businesses. WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW

HELPING HANDS

JBARJ SHELTERS HOMELESS TEENS

BRIGHT SPOTS

SPRING WILDFLOWERS OF THE HIGH DESERT

ACTOR ERIC CLOSE AND HIS WIFE KERI ON THEIR RANCH IN TUMALO

ON THE COVER

100

Actor Eric Close and his wife Keri walk their horses in Tumalo. PHOTO BY STEVE TAGUE

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PHOTO RYAN CLE ARY

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May\ June 2020


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TABLE of CONTENTS May \ June 2020

33

Departments

41

EXPLORE

The classy and classic getaway House on Metolius in Camp Sherman

WILDFLOWER HIKES Fresh air, an open trail and fields of native flowers. What else does spring need?

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COMMUNITY

Historic guard stations of the Deschutes National Forest | Seth Brown rises to the Oakland A’s | Cascade Youth and Family Center helps homeless teens

59

HOME

An actor finds the good life at Getaway Ranch

71 VENTURES

OSU-Cascades launches new outdoor products degree program | A Bend entrepreneur pours her heart into nuts

104

#CENTRALOREGONSTRONG

The photo essay Through Our Eyes features images submitted by the community of life during #stayhome

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BEND BUZZ COCC enters the housing business | High school named | Road improvements CO NEWS Sunriver-Bend bike route | Prineville magnet school CRAFT BREWING Brewery anniversaries

ART BEAT Custom guitar maker Bruce Boswell BOOKS Dave Edlund crafts an artful thriller CULTURE New series “Adventure Calls” spotlights Central Oregon

Front Deck

14

Back Deck

Also in this issue 16

Contributors

20

Publisher’s Letter

22

Connect with Us

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WORDS and PICTURES

LUCAS ALBERG Lucas Alberg is a native Kansan who ventured west after college in pursuit of outdoor adventure in the mountains. Finding his happy place, he soon combined his creative pursuits with his new home. Lucas currently works for a Bend-based outdoor company and published his first book, Trail Running Bend, through Wilderness Press in 2016. Since moving to Oregon in 2001, Lucas hasn’t stopped smiling. In this issue, he wrote about rock climbing for newbies (pg. 88), a category in which he counts himself.

DAMIAN FAGAN Damian Fagan lives in Bend with his wife, Raven, and is a freelance writer and naturalist guide. He has published numerous natural history articles, as well as two wildflower field guides. Keep an eye out for his books, Canyon Country Wildflowers and Wildflowers of Oregon, published by Falcon Press Publishing. For this issue, Damian wrote about three great hikes in Central Oregon that deliver plenty of wildflower viewing opportunities during the late spring and summer (pg. 33).

LEE LEWIS HUSK Someone recently called Lee Lewis Husk a unicorn—anyone raised in Bend is a rarity in this fast-growing city. As a teen, she skied at Mount Bachelor, drove her car through the Greenwood underpass when it filled with rainwater and snuck out to swim at Juniper at night with her friends. She left for thirty years but returned to raise kids and be near family. She still skis at Bachelor, and no longer has to sneak into Juniper. Being a freelance writer allows her to connect with her community and cover everything from science and medicine to travel, art and architecture. In this issue, she writes about actor-director Eric Close (pg. 59). MIGHTY CREATURE CO Mighty Creature Co is the creative collaboration between local photographers Ryan Cleary and Adam McKibben. Sharing a passion for Bend life and story-driven imagery, the two joined forces in 2016 and have been creating imagery for local, national and global brands ever since. They’ve been contributing photographers to Bend Magazine for more than three years. In this issue, Ryan and Adam captured Bend entrepreneurs who have taken it to the streets in mobile businesses (pg. 78). TOBY NOLAN Toby Nolan is a freelance photographer based in Bend. Born in Dublin, Ireland, Nolan has spent the past fifteen years working primarily in the adventure tourism industry, from fly-fishing guide to sea kayak guide, boat captain to lodge manager. Toby has lived and worked in Ireland, South Africa, Malawi, Kenya, Canada, New Zealand, Alaska and Oregon. From the early years in the dark room to today, photography has been a constant throughout Nolan’s life. He shoots commercially for a wide variety of clients plus many of his favorite magazines and publications. In this issue, he captured Boswell Guitars (pg. 97). STEVE TAGUE Steve studied at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California and worked for many years in New York City, shooting out of helicopters, inside museums and through martini glasses. He’s part artist, part MacGyver—always game for engineering the perfect light and problem solving to get the shot. If he weren’t a photographer he’d probably be professional wrestler. Luckily, he’s a photographer. In this issue, Tague captured actor Eric Close and his Tumalo ranch (pg. 59).

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WE BELIEVE IN COMMUNITY

Fifty years ago, it was our families, our friends, and our neighbors who inspired us to start a business that made a difference in our community. During hard — and good — times, it’s always been the people who matter most. Our community has always pulled together. With that kind of spirit and resiliency, we’re certain better days are ahead. We believe in the future of Central Oregon. We believe in community. | brooksresources.com DEVELOPING HEALTHY, LIVABLE COMMUNITIES IN CENTRAL OREGON SINCE 1969


Publishers HEATHER HUSTON JOHNSON ROSS JOHNSON Editorial Editor in Chief KIM COOPER FINDLING Managing Editor TERESA RISTOW Design Creative Director TIFFANY PAULIN Art Director KELLY ALEXANDER Associate Creative Director and Photo Editor ALEX JORDAN Production Assistant JEREMIAH CRISP Account Executives SUSAN CROW, ELISE FRANKLIN, SAGE GRIPEKOVEN, RONNIE HARRELSON Digital Digital Manager HEATHER RENEE SPITTLER Web Development ZACK JENKS - LITEHOUSE TECH Audience Development Circulation Manager AMARA SPITTLER Newsstand Consultant ALAN CENTOFANTE Local Distribution HEATHER LIGHTFOOT Contributing Writers JON ABERNATHY, LUCAS ALBERG, K.M. COLLINS, BRONTE DOD, DAMIAN FAGAN, SARA FREEDMAN, LEE LEWIS HUSK, JON PAUL JONES, LES JOSLIN Contributing Photographers RYAN CLEARY, ADAM MCKIBBEN, TOBY NOLAN, STEVE TAGUE

PUBLISHED BY OREGON MEDIA Chief Executive Officer HEATHER HUSTON JOHNSON President ROSS JOHNSON Vice President EVE DREHER Office Manager HEATHER RENEE SPITTLER Corporate Communications CLAUDIA JOHNSON Facilities BRIAN LEAHY OREGON MEDIA, LLC 974 NW RIVERSIDE BLVD. BEND, OREGON 97703 OREGON-MEDIA.COM Follow Bend Magazine FACEBOOK.COM/BENDMAGAZINE INSTAGRAM: @BENDMAGAZINE TWITTER: @BENDMAG BENDMAGAZINE.COM Subscriptions BENDMAGAZINE.COM/SUBSCRIBE All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronically or mechanically, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written permission of Oregon Media. Articles and photographs appearing in Bend Magazine may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. Bend Magazine and Oregon Media are not responsible for the return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily those of Bend Magazine, Oregon Media or its employees, staff or management. Proudly printed in Oregon.


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FROM the PUBLISHER

Stronger Together

PHOTO PE TE ALP ORT

It’s the bad days that make the good days good. This is a popular phrase used in our family and one that we’ve mentioned frequently since mid-March when our stay home routine began. As we face this public health crisis together, our thoughts are with all the families impacted by the COVID-19 virus. Whether it is an impact of health, business or school closures, job loss, furloughs, or the impacts of social distancing, the effects on our community are unprecedented. But out of the bad we’ve already seen plenty of good and we couldn’t be more grateful to call Central Oregon home. Our community has banded together. We are providing support for one another and we are doing whatever we can to help those most affected. We care about each other here, and it shows. We look forward to the day that our staff can all be together again and when we can visit our amazing advertising partners to thank them for their continued support. We are interdependent, we are in this together—and we are humbled. Never more than now. And so, we carry on. And we hope that within these pages you find some hope, inspiration and a chance to dream about the better days ahead. Bend Magazine invited you, our community, to submit your photos reflecting life in Central Oregon now. See page 104 for the photo essay, “Through Our Eyes,” which features many of your photos. For each image published, the contributor will receive a $25 gift card to the local store or restaurant of their choice. We thank each and every one of you for your participation and allowing us to capture this time through your eyes. Home matters more than ever right now. In our Home feature, we were invited to spend some time with actor Eric Close and his wife, Keri, who made their ranch in Tumalo their fulltime home in 2017. Learn about Eric’s impressive career and what drew them to make the leap to Central Oregon after years in Los Angeles. Spring is truly here, and the wildflowers are out to prove it. Learn to identify some of these natural beauties yourself, and find a few great trails to add to your list to visit when it is safe and we’ve been given the all clear. We believe in the power of community and wish your family safety and health as we get through this together. From our family to yours, stay safe and strong, Ross, Heather, Hannah & Fletcher

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Front Deck

new & next

BEND BUZZ + NEWS + BREWING

TA K I N G S H A P E

69 Newport Comes to Life TURN THE CORNER FROM NEWPORT AVENUE onto Brooks Street this spring, and catch the transformation of the long-vacant corner lot next door to Bend Brewing Co. The space has been empty since about 2006, and is finally being developed into 69 Newport, two structures that will each house a restaurant on the bottom floor and office spaces upstairs. Bend resident Sean Cavanaugh is developing the property along with his father and a business partner, and is excited to see the project come together after acquiring the land in 2016 and working through changes with zoning and other constraints. The trio is all originally from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, and Cavanaugh said this is his first project since relocating to Bend. “It’s a project we intend to hold long-term,” Cavanaugh said. “We’ve been very patient to develop the end result.” The development’s east building, on Brooks Street, will be

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occupied on the ground floor by Blissful Spoon, a company that has been selling gluten-free baked goods and granola at farmers markets and stores in the area for the last two years. The new spot will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner, offering baked goods as well as tapas and small plates of Mediterranean food, according to Miki Bekkari, who will run the restaurant with her husband, Kamal. In the project’s west building will be Sen, a new Thai noodle shop with the same owners as Wild Rose. The restaurant will be open for lunch and dinner, offering Thai hot pot, noodles and street food, according to owner Rosie Westlund. One upstairs unit of the project has also been leased as a company office and Cavanaugh said he is still seeking a tenant for the second. Both restaurant owners said they’re aiming for fall openings, so residents can expect two new dining options downtown in the coming months.

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Front Deck bend development

COCC Breaks Ground on New Housing Project Central Oregon Community College has broken ground on Outcrop, a new housing development in northwest Bend, and the first phase of the school’s larger Campus Village project. The first sixteen homes in the neighborhood, located at the intersection of NW Mount Washington Drive and NW Shevlin Park Road, will occupy about five acres of the college’s forty-nine acre property. Many of the residences, built by Curtis Homes, will have accessory dwelling units. In addition to profits from the homes when they are sold, the college plans to retain ownership of the land and lease it to new homeowners. The college is working with William Smith Properties Inc., the Bend development group behind Old Mill District and Les Schwab Amphitheater, and may identify opportunities for retail, offices and more homes on the college’s property in the future.

education

New Bend High School has a Name Bend’s newest high school, under construction at the corner of Knott Road and 15th Street on the south side of Bend, officially has a name. The board for Bend-La Pine Schools selected Caldera as the name for the district’s newest high school, set to open in fall 2021. The community was invited to suggest potential names for the school last fall through an online survey. In February, the New High School Naming Committee announced three finalists: Caldera, Woodlands and Vista, recommending Caldera as the final choice. “Naming this new school is an important step as we continue to build the school’s identity and culture,” said Chris Boyd, principal for the new school. “Our school will become a hub for the southeast Bend community and will be a welcoming place for each student.” Caldera is a reference to the Newberry National Volcanic Monument and the geologic past and present of Central Oregon. The new campus will have a two-story building with sixty classrooms, including career and tech education classrooms, a 600-seat auditorium, football stadium and other sports fields.

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transportation

Bond Delayed, but Bend Roads Still Getting Facelift A $190 million transportation bond scheduled to go to voters in May was pulled off the ballot by Bend’s City Council in March, due to economic uncertainty because of the COVID-19 pandemic. But, proponents hope to place the bond on a future ballot, potentially as early as November. The funds would have been used for projects to ease traffic around Bend, make roads and crossings safer for pedestrians and bicyclists and improve travel between east and west Bend. While the bond is off for now, residents can still expect some road work this summer, as $3.2 million will be spent to spruce up seventy-seven miles of Bend’s roads with sealing and resurfacing.

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Front Deck central oregon recreation

Bikers Could Enjoy New Route Between Sunriver and Bend Cyclists in Bend could one day hop on their bikes just south of the city and follow a path toward Sunriver, if a plan proposed by the Oregon Department of Transportation and U.S. Forest Service comes to fruition. A new 3.6-mile paved, multi-use trail would run from Knott Road near the southern end of Bend and parallel the west side of U.S. Highway 97 to the Lava Lands Visitor Center. There, bikers would connect to existing trails to continue on to Sunriver. The project was given planning, design and construction funds totaling $5.8 million from the Federal Lands Access Program, but will need to go through public comment periods and an environmental assessment will need to take place before construction would begin, with completion slated for 2023.

education

Prineville Magnet Elementary School to Focus on Arts, Technology, Outdoors A new elementary school opening this fall in Prineville will help the Crook County School District with overcrowding and offer students a hands-on learning experience, focusing on arts, technology, the outdoors and adventure curriculum. The new K-4 magnet school, named Steins Pillar Elementary, will allow students from Barnes Butte Elementary and Crooked River Elementary to spread out across three campuses, with the new school expected to enroll about 250 students. Steins Pillar Elementary, named after a 350-foot tall volcano remnant east of Prineville, will be located in the Pioneer South building on East First Street in Prineville. The school’s mascot will be the Eagles and its colors blue and green.

dining

Vine-N-Tap Restaurant and Wine Bar opens in Redmond The latest addition to the revitalized downtown Redmond is Vine-NTap, a new wine bar and scratch kitchen that was preparing for its grand opening this March just as rules began limiting dining establishments to takeout and delivery online. Owner David French postponed the March 19 opening of the dining room and instead pivoted, launching an online ordering system and using a smaller staff to get started with takeout, curbside pickup and delivery. The restaurant, located on Northwest Seventh Street, features sandwiches, gyros, salads and kids options, with plans to serve up wine and craft cocktails once fully open. See the full menu at vinentap.com.

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Front Deck brewing WRITTEN BY JON ABERNATHY

the beers of summer

Deschutes Brings Back Chainbreaker and Wows with Black Butte XXXII Fans of Deschutes Brewery’s Chainbreaker White IPA, rejoice—the Belgian-styled IPA is coming back this summer. Chainbreaker was retired in 2016, to the disappointment of many. The beer combines the wheat and spice of a Belgian witbier with the citrus-forward hops of an American IPA, a style pioneered by Deschutes and Boulevard Brewing back in 2012. This crisp and quenching ale is a perfect summer refresher after hitting the mountain bike trails—be sure not to miss it! And with Deschutes’ June anniversary, the brewery will be releasing Black Butte XXXII, its annual imperial barrel-aged homage to Black Butte Porter. This year the brewers took inspiration from the Spanish Coffee cocktail: the beer was aged in twelve-year-old Columbian rum barrels, infused with cold brew coffee and spiced with nutmeg. Bottles will be released in late June, so be sure to squirrel some away for when you need a cool-weather pick-me-up.

Q&A

Steve Anderson of Kobold Brewing and The Vault Taphouse STEVE ANDERSON OPENED KOBOLD BREWING IN 2015 as a garage nanobrewery on

Bend’s westside. The former air traffic controller had been bitten by the homebrewing bug after moving to Bend, and decided to make a go at brewing professionally. Kobold has been successful; Anderson opened The Vault Taphouse in downtown Redmond in 2017, and in 2018 he purchased an industrial space in Redmond and built a ten-barrel brewery. In homebrewing, you typically brew five gallons of beer at a time. On a commercial scale, each barrel equals thirty-one gallons, which takes some adjustment when scaling up. Anderson found his biggest issues, however, were dealing with equipment working incorrectly, and matching sales forecasting to brew schedules. In 2019, Kobold partnered with Point Blank Distributing to expand the brewery’s reach and drive growth—Anderson expects 2020 sales to double from last year, and plans to get beer into cans and bottles as well. We reached out to Anderson to pose three questions to him for some behindthe-beer insight. The name “Kobold” and many of the beer names are clearly Dungeons and Dragons references, what’s the story behind that? When we went to name our brewery we wanted something with more imagery and story and we

found the Biersal Kobold in German folklore. The fact Kobolds were in Dungeons and Dragons made it even more appealing. Many of our names come from folklore and from D&D, which is nice because it’s tough finding beer names these days. What’s coming up for summer seasonal beers? We have been experimenting with hopped up lagers and have found a recipe that we are loving. We will put that in the Bend Brewfest and have it available to Point Blank for distribution and on tap at The Vault Taphouse. Silver Moon Brewing is planning to join Kobold for a collaborative fruited Hefeweizen that will be released in spring. They are great to work with and very beer savvy, so this will be a fun project. What are your favorite styles of beer to drink for summer? I’ve really been enjoying lagers/pilsners lately and find them easy to drink and super tasty. I am always a sucker for a brew with a great citrus hop aroma as well; could be a session IPA, IPA or...? Our Hopped Up Lager fits well.

anniversaries

Breweries Celebrate Birthdays—Virtually, Anyway May and June are popular months for brewery birthdays, with at least seven breweries observing milestones. Amid uncertainties swirling around the COVID-19 pandemic, however, this year’s celebrations may well be in spirit only. For instance, while Boneyard Beer originally planned to celebrate its tenth anniversary on May 2, it was weighing its options at press time.

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So let’s raise a toast and a nod to the others with anniversaries these two months: Immersion Brewing (four years), Craft Kitchen and Brewery (five years), Wild Ride Brewing (six years), Crux Fermentation Project (eight years), GoodLife Brewing (nine years), and Deschutes Brewery (a whopping thirty-two years!). Cheers!

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N AT U R A L H I S T O R Y

Take a Walk on the Wild(flower) Side Late spring is prime wildflower hiking time WRITTEN BY DAMIAN FAGAN

A

PHOTO LEON WERDINGER / AL A MY S TOCK PHOTO

bounty of spring and summer wildflowers blesses Oregon. Early in the season, wildflowers arise and unfurl their petals much to the delight of wildflower enthusiasts and pollinators, alike. Some of these plants are perennials, those that live more than two years, while others are annuals which race through their life cycle in one season, setting seed for future generations before they fade. Certain shrubs also contribute to the color of the season, with cloaks of flowers scented to attract pollinators such as bees and butterflies. Here are three spring hikes to observe and appreciate this bright and colorful petalous performance.

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EXPLORE


NATURE

WHYCHUS CANYON PRESERVE RIM TRAIL

South of Sisters

Named after a native Sahaptin word meaning “the place we cross the water,� Whychus Creek is a spectacular tributary of the Deschutes River. In 2010, the Deschutes Land Trust protected 930 acres of riparian (streamside) and high desert habitat and created the Whychus Canyon Preserve. Over seven miles of trails provide access to this scenic area and the Rim Trail offers excellent views of the Cascades and showy wildflowers in spring. Colorful blooms of arrowleaf balsamroot, Western columbine, sulfur buckwheat, two-lobe larkspur, desert paintbrush, Oregon sunshine, prickly phlox and Western blue flax paint the desert landscape with vibrant colors. Foothill death camas, named for its toxic bulbs, bears dense clusters of cream-colored flowers. Volunteers for the Deschutes Land Trust lead informative and fun spring wildflower walks along the Rim Trail. See deschuteslandtrust.org for trail status updates and current hike schedule.

Deschutes Land Trust's Whychus Canyon Preserve 34

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PHOTO LEFT COURTESY DESCHUTES LAND TRUST/JOAN AMERO

Rim Trail: roughly 2.1 miles long and fairly level.


NATURE

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arrowleaf balsamroot

Western columbine

sulfur buckwheat

two-lobe larkspur

desert paintbrush

Oregon sunshine

Western blue flax

foothill death camas

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prickly phlox


NATURE

FALL RIVER TRAIL

West of Sunriver

West of Sunriver along South Century Drive, the spring-fed Fall River arises and meanders twelve miles to its confluence with the Deschutes River. From the headwaters near the Fall River Guard Station, the river courses through mature pine forests and wet meadows where wildflowers such as triangular-leaf senecio, yellow monkey-flower, white bog orchid, scarlet gilia and blue-eyed grass hug the banks. In the drier uplands, a mix of wildflowers and shrubs such as western wallflower, Brown’s peony, Columbia puccoon, mountain trumpet, antelope bitterbrush, wax currant and green manzanita, named after its “little apples,” bloom along the trail. Visit fs.usda.gov for more information.

PHOTO TOP GEORGE OSTERTAG / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

Trail length: 5 miles out-and-back from the Fall River Guard Station, relatively level.

yellow monkey-flower

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scarlet gilia

antelope bitterbrush

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NATURE

GRAY BUTTE

Northeast of Smith Rock State Park Framing the skyline above Smith Rock State Park is Gray Butte. The origin of this ancient volcano’s name is shrouded in mystery—some say it’s for the grayish-colored rocky outcrops—but Lewis “Tam” McArthur, author of Oregon Geographic Names, uncovered another possibility, that the butte is named for Dr. Asa Gray (1810-1888), the “Father of American Botany.” Gray Butte is part of the Crooked River National Grasslands and offers trails for hikers, horse riders and mountain bikers to explore this high desert environment. The Cole Loop trailhead departs off Forest Road 57 across the road from the McCoin Orchard, a homesteader’s orchard planted in 1886, and contours around the west and south sides of Gray Butte before descending to the Skull Hollow Campground. Spring wildflowers abound along the trail and include Cusick’s elkweed with its light-blue four-petaled flowers, rough eyelashweed, yellow desert daisy, parsnip-flowered buckwheat, Douglas’ brodiaea and daggerpod—a member of the mustard family that bears slender daggerlike seed pods. Exceptional views of the Cascades compliment this hike. A vehicle shuttle from Skull Hollow Campground back to the trailhead is recommended. Visit fs.usda.gov for more information.

rough eyelashweed

Trail length: roughly 6.2 miles, one-way, with 1,550 feet of elevation change.

PHOTO LEFT CAVAN / AL AMY STOCK PHOTO

yellow desert daisy

Douglas’ brodiaea 38

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find your space.

Distancing on the trails done right. •

Stay six feet from others.

Offer a wide berth when passing and say “hello.”

Visit less popular trails and/or at less popular times.

82 parks and open spaces

Go solo or only with your household. No groups.

70+ miles of trail

Keep dogs on leash. It’s the law in Bend.

Wash your hands before and after a visit.

Follow local and national health guidance.

If you’re sick, stay home.

learn more at bendparksandrec.org.


W

WREN & WILD green beauty

WREN & WILD green beauty

50 b ra nd s of Eco Co nsci o u s C l ean Beau ty Fre e Shi p p i ng o r Cu rb sid e Pick u p w re na nd w i l d . co m | 541 - 4 8 0 - 3 2 5 2

Camp Sherman Store & Fly Shop campshermanstore.com Cold Springs Resort & RV Park coldspringsresort.com House on Metolius metolius.com Hoodoo’s Camp Sherman Motel & RV Park campshermanrv.com Hola! holabend.com Lake Creek Lodge lakecreeklodge.com Metolius River Lodges metoliusriverlodges.com Metolius River Resort metoliusriverresort.com The Suttle Lodge & Boathouse thesuttlelodge.com

Time to Unplug

Come to a place we think is a little slice of heaven. Camp Sherman, the hidden gem of Central Oregon, is waiting to greet you and your family. The majestic Metolius River flows under a tall canopy of Ponderous Pines, Larch, Fir and Cedar trees. Fly-fishing, camping, hiking, mountain biking and wildlife viewing are favorite pastimes. For more information on lodging and our area visit MetoliusRiver.com


RETREAT

G E TAWAY

T

House on Metolius

lingering when we opened he drive down the A riverside hideaway, rich with history the front door. soft, red dirt road The family-owned toward the House WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW House on Metolius on Metolius property property is rich with is quiet and still, and history, used as a fishing your regular GPS might retreat from the early 1900s, and popular with visitors from Seattle, struggle to bring you there. But following the step-by-step directions Portland and San Francisco. One such visitor was John Zehntbauer, from the general manager, it was easy to find the Tamarack Cabin, a founder of Jantzen, the swimwear company known for its iconic a two-bedroom cottage overlooking the Metolius River and one of a diving girl logo. Zehntbauer purchased a portion of the property handful of lodging options on the property. in 1929 as a summer retreat for his family. Meanwhile, another A friend and I arrived within about ten minutes of each other on a corner of the property was developed into a lodge, called House on Friday afternoon, her after a two-hour drive from Eugene and myself Metolius, operated by Eleanor Bechen, a co-founder of downtown after a 45-minute drive north from Bend. We settled into our rooms Bend’s Pine Tavern. By the 1970s, Eleanor’s House on Metolius was inside a newly finished rental, the smell of fresh-cut lumber still

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RETREAT

merged with the rest of the property, and today it all remains with the Lundgren family, descendants of Zehntbauer. Kept in the family for decades, the Lundgrens opened up the estate to public gatherings and rentals in 2010, offering up their 10,000-square-foot, eight-bedroom, eight-bath “Main House” and four other cabins on the property as rentals, including “Eleanor’s Cabin,” the original House on Metolius structure. The cabins are spread out on a hillside overlooking the winding Metolius River, a big open meadow and groves of willow trees. From most areas of

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the 200-acre property, the focal point is a snow-capped Mount Jefferson perched above the crystal blue Metolius. “People will come out here for their peace and quiet all year-round,” said Rachel Gonzalez, general manager for House on Metolius. “It’s a very private experience and it feels like a world away.” In 2019, the family finished construction on two additional two-bedroom cabins, Tamarack and Manzanita, expanding the lodging portfolio to seven rentals across the estate. The newer cabins offer a modern but traditional feel, with stainless steel

counters and open shelving paired with wood-trimmed walls and black and white photos of people enjoying the property over the years. Two window seats are the perfect nooks to cozy up with Pendleton blankets for reading or sipping coffee and looking out at the river. Together with the main house, the cabins provide ample lodging for a company retreat, family reunion or wedding. They’re also available for nightly bookings via Airbnb or the House on Metolius website. “It’s a place where everybody can be together,” Gonzalez said.

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RETREAT

“It’s a very private experience and it feels like a world away.”

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Camp Sherman store

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After settling into our space, we headed out for a walk around the property, blazing our own trail across the meadow, toward the west. There are over 100 natural springs on the property, Gonzalez said, with many trickling into the Metolius River. We found the smallest cabin on the land, Power House, a studio apartment above a riverside hydro-electric plant, used to power the property from the 1930s until 1950, when Central Oregon Co-Op brought power to rural parts of the state. The studio, once occupied by the plant operator, was renovated as a guest cabin in the 1990s. Each cabin on the property has its own kitchen and dining area, and small outdoor grill, ready for guests to cook up whatever they desire. If cooking doesn’t sound relaxing, guests can venture to nearby Black Butte Ranch, Suttle Lodge or Lake Creek Lodge for dining, or pick up a deli sandwich or Mexican food a few miles down the road in Camp Sherman. The Camp Sherman Store is also full of fly-fishing gear, souvenir trinkets and a good selection of snacks and drinks. After packing up from our one-night getaway at House on Metolius, my friend and I stopped by Camp Sherman, which was buzzing with visitors on an unseasonably warm early spring day. We parked near the store and set out for a quick stroll along the river trail. It turned into a two-mile walk along the shady, flat, path, winding past campsites and family cabins and offering views of ducks, geese and fish flopping in and out of the babbling river—the perfect end to a peaceful weekend getaway on the Metolius River.

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PHOTO BOT TOM TRE VOR LYDEN

RETREAT


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COMMUNITY

N AT I O N A L F O R E S T

Summer Camp The Deschutes National Forest’s historic guard stations have stories to tell WRITTEN BY LES JOSLIN

The Elk Lake Guard Station is open seasonally as an information center.

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HELPING HERITAGE HANDS

Paulina Lake Guard Station

T

oday, the Deschutes National Forest’s natural landscape is known for awesome beauty and plenty of recreational opportunity. But once upon a time, the forest was home to a few select families. Seasonal forest guards spent their summers in guard stations, helping rangers protect the district’s resources, often in remote locations down unpaved roads and miles from ranger stations in Bend, Sisters and Crescent. Forest guards’ families often lived there with them. Some kids grew up at guard stations, and came away from those years with great stories to tell.

DICK AND DAVE ROBINS AT PAULINA LAKE GUARD STATION

In the summer of 1942, John P. Robins, his wife Helen and their young sons Dick and Dave arrived at the Paulina Lake Guard Station, just as the Civilian Conservation Corps, finished building it. District Ranger Henry Tonseth had hired Robins, a former Sisters High School principal then teaching algebra in California, as his summer forest

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guard in the Newberry Caldera. Robins had previous experience as a Deschutes National Forest guard and fire lookout. He’d be at Paulina Lake Guard Station for seventeen summers, and Dick and Dave would grow up there, tagging along with their parents and eventually helping their father with his work. Dave recalled helping pack supplies to Paulina Peak Lookout on burros when just a little guy. “My job with the burros was to apply an electric shock from a battery operated [livestock prod] whenever the burros stopped walking to get them going again,” he said. Once, when Robins and his sons were working at the start of the trail up Paulina Peak, the boys spotted a mother bear and cub. When the bear began moving toward them, the boys jumped in the truck and— taking normal precautions—locked the doors. This left their dad outside the truck. He yelled to the boys, they unlocked a door, he jumped in, and all were safe. Dick and Dave grew up and eventually left

Dave Robins

Paulina Lake Guard Station for college and careers. But they always returned for visits to Deschutes National Forest—specifically to a cabin their mom and dad had built on a Metolius River summer home tract. The refurbished Paulina Lake Guard Station now serves as a Newberry National Volcanic Monument summer visitor information station. Stop in on your next visit to this national monument within the Deschutes National Forest to see where Dick and Dave grew up.

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HERITAGE

FRANCES WYNKOOP AT ELK LAKE GUARD STATION

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EACH STATION TELLS A STORY

Other historic guard stations along Deschutes National Forest roads have similar stories and offer enjoyable visitor experiences. Built by the CCC in the mid-1930s at the headwaters of the river for which it is named, Fall River Guard Station has been restored and available as a recreation rental cabin for more than a decade. Historic Deschutes Bridge Guard Station, along the Cascade Lakes National Scenic Byway on the Deschutes River about three miles south of its Little Lava Lake headwaters, was recently restored and is scheduled to be available as a recreation rental soon. Behind this CCC-built cabin, an old log structure of the first Deschutes

TOP Forest Guard Frances Wynkoop and visitors at the Elk Lake Guard Station in the late 1940s. BELOW LEFT District Ranger Walt Schloer and Forest Supervisor Leslie Weldon open the restored Elk Lake Guard Station for business in 2001. BELOW RIGHT Today, the Fall River Guard Station southeast of Bend is in use as a vacation rental.

Bridge Guard Station compound remains. Further south, in the Crescent Ranger District, historic Crescent Lake Guard Station has been a recreation rental for several years. And, to the north in the Sisters Ranger District, the restored Suttle Lake Guard Station is a rental property of The Lodge at Suttle Lake.

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PHOTO COURTES Y LES J OSLIN

Dick and Dave were “old hands” at Paulina Lake Guard Station when, 30 miles to the northwest, 6-year-old Frances Wynkoop arrived at Elk Lake Guard Station in June, 1947 for the first of two summers there. Her dad, Clifford Wynkoop, a teacher in Sherwood, Oregon, was assigned as forest guard there. Fran recalls that her mother, Marjorie, who’d grown up in New York City, cried all the last 35-mile dirt road stretch from Bend to Elk Lake, wondering where her husband was taking her and their child. But when she looked out the cabin’s window the next morning, she exclaimed “I never want to leave!” On the northwest side of the lake, just north of Elk Lake Resort and surrounded by summer homes and campgrounds, the 1929 Elk Lake Guard Station was then the hub of a major recreation area. There, both Forest Guard Wynkoop and his wife greeted forest visitors, issued campfire permits and provided information and assistance. Young Fran pitched right in around the station—where she helped with chores and trained a chipmunk she named Whiskey— and in the field when her dad collected campground garbage in his own 1930 Model A Ford pickup. Fran had a lot in common with the Robins boys. Her parents also built a summer home on the Metolius River not far from the Robins’ summer home. Fran spent her teenage summers there and remembers fondly the accordion duets she and Black Butte fire lookout Paul Strebel played at the Camp Sherman dances. Last occupied by a Forest Service recreation technician in the mid-1990s, the historic Elk Lake Guard Station was restored by Forest Service personnel and Passport in Time program volunteers between 1998 and 2001. The historic station was reopened as a visitor information center and historic site in 2001, welcoming thousands of Cascade Lakes National Scenic Byway visitors every summer since.


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SERVING EVERYONE

1960s

THE DESCHUTES PUBLIC LIBRARY — 100 YEARS OF SERVING YOUR NEEDS

For the last 100 years, we’ve grown with our communities in Deschutes County. In the 1950s and ‘60s, libraries in Central Oregon expanded services to include special programs for children such as story times and after school activities. Today, the library provides all of the same great resources and services as well as many online options. You can download books, music, and movies from the comfort of home and enjoy the library with your entire family. We invite you to celebrate with us as we look back on 100 years of community — and to join us as we imagine the next 100 years together. Visit us at deschuteslibrary.org to learn more.

deschuteslibrary.org


PURSUITS

SPORTS

Field of Dreams High desert rookie Seth Brown makes history as a member of the Oakland A’s WRITTEN BY K.M. COLLINS

L

ong shot lefty and Sisters local Seth Brown got his call up to the majors late last August. Not long after, he made his first play for the Oakland A’s, dropping a base hit down the left field line and picking up his first career RBI (run batted in) as part of a 19-4 win against the Kansas City Royals. You could say that things were off to a great start. “Congratulations, Seth Brown!” hollered the announcer to the nation. “Triple-A’s or big leagues—it doesn’t matter, bat still works!’’ NBC Sports’ Ben Ross calls Brown’s 2019 batting stats a historic start— Brown was the first player in Oakland A’s history to collect ten hits in the first five games of his career. Brown, a first baseman and outfielder, hails from Klamath Falls and Medford. He graduated from Medford High School, went on to play college ball for Linn-Benton Community College in Albany, Oregon, and later for Lewis-Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho, where he earned a degree in law enforcement.

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In 2015, the Oakland A’s brought Brown into the minors fold late in the nineteenth round of the draft. Brown said he got the call up while having a normal day around the house with his family. “I remember Jim Coffman, the scout, said, hey, you’re going to be an Oakland A, we gotta get you a pair of white cleats!” Slow and steady, Brown worked his way up the minors ladder, starting at the AZL Athletics, and moving through seasons with the Vermont Lake Monster, Stockton Ports, Midland RockHounds, Toros Del Este (Dominican Winter League) and finally, the Las Vegas Aviators, from which he was ultimately called up to the big leagues. Alex Hall of the A’s Prospect Watch calls 2016 Brown’s breakout year, likely due to the thirty homers he hit, compared to single digits the year prior. Brown said the key was to quiet his mind. “Minors is a long road and you’re grinding and it’s not for everyone. Long days, bus travel, standing in lines at fast food restaurants late night

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PURSUITS

Seth and his wife Brittaney Brown

after games. It wears on the body and mind. Eventually I learned how to work as hard as I could every day but also have fun.” Finding that balance helped Brown finally achieve what he’d long dreamed of. “When I got the call to the big league,” he said, “I was hitting in the cages that day, it was pretty unexpected. It was my manager’s birthday and he had gotten the best present that day, he got to tell me I was going to the big leagues. I tried to hold it together. I called

my dad first. All I could say was, ‘I did it.’ It’s a moment that I will never forget—I had accomplished my dream.” Some have called Brown a late bloomer, as he didn’t make the minors until 23 and is a major’s rookie at 27. However, his 2019 stats speak for themselves. In 112 games, he boasted a .297 batting average with thirtyseven home runs and 104 RBIs. ‘Sleeper agent’ or ‘ace up the sleeve’ seem better suited metaphors.

Don’t be surprised to see Brown and his wife Brittaney, a Sisters schoolteacher and baseball coach, giving pointers to local kids, sandlot-style, this off-season. “For kids looking to set high goals, don’t ever let someone tell you you can’t do something,” Brown said. “Any goal can be yours if you’re willing to put in the work…and say thank you to everybody who supports and roots for you.”

Baseball & COVID-19

2020 Major League

In response to ongoing pandemic precautions, Major League Baseball has suspended all operations to include the remainder of Spring Training games and to delay the start of the 2020 regular season. The decision came in accordance with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the thirty clubs and

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the MLB Players Association. “The clubs remain committed to playing as many games as possible when the season begins. We will continue to monitor ongoing events and undertake the precautions and best practices recommended by public health experts, and urge all baseball fans to follow suit,” said the MLB in a news release.

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The Center STRONG

I had problems with my big toe for many years, but when the pain got so bad that I couldn’t sleep at night, I started researching my options. Fusing my toe just wasn’t going to work for me. My doctor helped me find a solution to gain my mobility back. Now, I’m back to hunting, hiking, and able to do all of the activities needed to run my 160 acre farm... Read the rest of Jim’s story at TheCenterOregon.com. Find your strength here.

Make an appointment today. 541.382.3344 TheCenterOregon.com


HELPING HANDS

HOMELESSNESS

Relief from the Streets Cascade Youth and Family Center helps homeless teens WRITTEN BY SARA FREEDMAN

H

ow does a teenager end up living on the street? It could be too dangerous for them to stay at home, so they run away. Their family might be homeless and can no longer take care of them. Their parents may have kicked them out because of their sexual orientation. Whatever the reason, Cascade Youth and Family Center meets homeless youth where they are—without judgement—and is the only nonprofit in Deschutes County that provides comprehensive services for runaway and homeless youth. CYFC opened in 1989 and is one of the many at-risk youth programs offered by J Bar J Youth Services. If there is a crisis at home, families and kids can first call the center’s 24-hour hotline. Staff members provide crisis intervention, and emergency shelter is available to help kids stay off the street if they are in danger of running away. CYFC then provides mediation to help resolve conflict, strengthen relationships and keep the family together.

If kids do end up on the street, the center’s street outreach team lets them know about the LOFT—a group home on Bend’s west side where teens are welcome to a hot shower, a warm meal and access to services. The LOFT offers drop-in hours weekly for homeless youth in Central Oregon—no questions asked. Teens can also move into the LOFT permanently for two years while they finish high school, are working or are looking for a job. It’s a stable home with a caring staff that helps kids get back on track. When residents are ready to move out, they continue to be supported by their case manager as they transition to independent living. Last year, CYFC provided emergency shelter for sixty-five homeless or runaway youth, 150 hours of family mediation, and the LOFT provided a home for forty-nine teens. Finally, 94 percent of the LOFT’s kids transitioned to a safe and stable living situation after the residency.

Eliza Wilson, CYFC Alum When you meet Eliza Wilson, you see an accomplished young professional not unlike many of her peers in Bend. What you don’t see is a childhood of chronic homelessness. The daughter of a disabled veteran, Wilson and her five siblings grew up in a travel trailer, moving around from the time she was five until she was a teenager. When Wilson started high school in Bend, relationships at home were starting to break under stress. She was living on the streets when her parents reached out to Cascade Youth and Family Center for help. Instead of going home, Wilson moved into the LOFT, a transitional home for teens. “The counselors met me where I was at,” she said. In addition to a stable living environment, the LOFT offers counseling, life skills training and resources. Wilson remembers a staff member showing her a big book of college brochures and asking her where she wanted to go to college. “It made an impact,” she said. “They believed in me and my future.” While living at the LOFT, Wilson earned a 4.0 grade point average her senior year of high school. In her twenties, Wilson returned to the LOFT as the office manager. The kids trusted her. She’d been there. Wilson moved on to become a case manager and over the years has become a passionate advocate for Central Oregon’s homeless population. She’s now a program manager at Grandma’s House, a nonprofit that provides housing for homeless mothers. Wilson knows what never giving up on someone means. She’s living proof.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Donate now. Go to cascadeyouthandfamilycenter.org for more information. Follow CYFC on Facebook and Instagram. You’ll see the most pressing needs posted there. Gift cards. The residents need everything from work boots to school supplies to winter coats. M AY \ J U N E 202 0

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Making a Life at Getaway Ranch Actor and director Eric Close finds home in Tumalo WRITTEN BY LEE LEWIS HUSK

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PHOTOS BY STEVE TAGUE

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pending time with Eric Close is like hanging out with a friend. You can swap hiking stories, share intel on restaurant openings, discuss your favorite movies from last year’s BendFilm Festival and talk about the pros and cons of keeping junipers as part of your landscape. He lives modestly on acreage just outside of Bend with his wife, Keri, two dogs and three horses. Close’s regular-guy attitude masks a career that has brought him fame and recognition. He’s worked with the likes of Clint Eastwood, Bradley Cooper and even the former Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle, who Close hired for one of her first acting jobs. His best friend of twenty-eight years, Dr. Robert Lum, a radiation oncologist in Ventura, California, said, “Eric’s a celebrity but he does not view himself as more than anybody else. He’s a regular person.” That perception is echoed among those who know him. When he’s out in Central Oregon, people may approach him and say things like, “You look familiar,” or “Sorry to bother you but aren’t you the guy on ‘Nashville?’” “It doesn’t bother me at all,” he said. “Everybody is really friendly and genuinely excited to meet an actor from one of their favorite shows. I try never to ignore anybody or miss an opportunity to engage with my fans.”

“There were always tears when we’ d leave Bend. We loved it so much.”

AN ACTOR’S LIFE

The Close family’s migration to Central Oregon started with the ABC drama, “McKenna,” filmed in Bend in 1994. Close rode the train from Los Angeles to Chemult and rented a home in Tumalo to be on location with costars Chad Everett and Jennifer Love Hewitt. “The show was kind of like “Fantasy Island” set in the mountains,” he said. “We filmed all over Central Oregon featuring many of its stunning locations.” The show conveyed upbeat stories about a family of wilderness outfitters helping people overcome life’s difficulties through challenging adventures in the outdoors.

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Despite being cancelled after six months, “McKenna” proved pivotal to Close’s life, career and future connection to Bend. During filming, Close proposed to Keri in the scenic meadow at Todd Lake. He told his future bride that “if we ever have two nickels to rub together, I’d love to have a little cabin in Bend.” Next to San Diego where he was raised, he added, there was no place he loved more than Bend. After “McKenna,” Close returned to Los Angeles where his career took off, landing roles on TV series like “Sisters,” “Dark Skies,” “The Magnificent Seven,” “Now and Again,” and Steven Spielberg’s miniseries, “Taken,” for which he was nominated for two Saturn Awards for best actor. But it was the crime drama “Without a Trace,” in which he played FBI agent Martin Fitzgerald, that put Close in front of millions of viewers. The CBS program aired on prime time from 2002 to 2009 and was nominated for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama

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HOME

“It’s a wonderful place to be, very peaceful and calming.”

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Series award by the Screen Actors Guild. After the series ended, Close landed memorable guest appearances on longrunning TV shows, such as “Criminal Minds,” “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” and the hit legal drama, “Suits.” And then came ABC’s “Nashville,” a musical drama which ran for six seasons. Close starred as Mayor Teddy Conrad, husband to country music superstar Rayna Jaymes, played by Connie Britton. The series was filmed in Nashville, requiring Close to be there for three years while his wife remained in Los Angeles with their two daughters. He jokes that because he traveled frequently between the two cities, the Southwest Airline crews would greet him with, “It’s the mayor of Southwest!” Close has also acted in movies, most notably American Sniper released in 2014 in which he played DIA Agent Snead opposite Bradley Cooper.

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“We want people to kick back, relax and enjoy the view.” COMING HOME TO CENTRAL OREGON

In 2004, Eric and Keri began looking for property in Bend. Their friend, Troy Meeder, cofounder of Crystal Peaks Youth Ranch (for which Close serves on the board), connected them with a neighbor who was thinking of selling. “Troy put together a fishing trip on the Deschutes River, and while we were on the river, the neighbor and I struck up a conversation about the house. He told me what he wanted. I told him what I could pay,” Close recalled. Before the trip was over, they’d agreed on a price and sealed it with a handshake. Thirty days later, Eric and Keri were owners of a home on five acres in Tumalo. For the next twelve years, the Closes continued to reside in Southern California where Eric could be near Hollywood and work. But they returned to Bend and their property as often as possible. Preparing to become empty nesters, the couple began to wonder where they wanted to spend the next phase of their lives. Could they make Bend their permanent home and still allow Eric to maintain a successful career in entertainment? “There were always tears when we’d leave Bend. We loved it so much,” Keri recalled. Around 2010, Eric began to work everywhere but in Los Angeles. So, in 2017, the Closes decided to make the move. Their daughters were about to head to college. It seemed like a good time to be where they loved the healthy lifestyle, could spend more time outdoors and support the community.

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VACATION-TURNED-FAMILY HOME

In the early years of property ownership, the Closes made a few changes to what they fondly refer to as “Getaway Ranch.” “Friends and extended family have come here over the years to get some much-needed R&R from their busy lives,” said Keri. “But it needed a little TLC. Once we made it our permanent home, we updated it and made it our own.” For the past two-and-a-half years, the couple has been remodeling and expanding the original footprint. They added a detached three-bay garage, incorporated a front entry and completely renovated the kitchen and media room. Keri designed the kitchen around her love of cooking and entertaining, “with a little help from Pinterest,” she joked. They purposely retained the home’s rustic nature. “We want people to kick back, relax and enjoy the view,” Eric said. One of his favorite spots is the jacuzzi on the cedar deck with views of the Cascades spanning from Mount Bachelor to Mount Jefferson and their horses grazing in the paddock below. “It’s a wonderful place to be, very peaceful and calming,” he said. One thing they discovered about the property was the existence of a few buried trash heaps left by a family who lived in the area in the 19th century. “I bought a metal detector and would go treasure hunting with our kids,” Eric said. “We started finding things like skeleton keys and children’s toys. The girls called it the treasure museum.”

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THE NEXT EPISODE

Eric and Keri got engaged at Todd Lake in August 1994

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The couple is producing a film based on Crystal Peaks Youth Ranch cofounder Kim Meeder’s best-selling novel, Hope Rising: Stories from the Ranch. Keri wrote the script, and Eric will direct the movie in and around Bend. “One of my goals is to make movies and TV content right here in Oregon. It’s so beautiful and diverse,” he said. Both Closes look forward to the annual BendFilm Festival for which Eric has served as a juror in past years. In addition to serving on the board of Crystal Peaks, Eric’s career has allowed the couple to become more involved in local and global charities. While filming a public service announcement for CBS Cares in South Africa, the couple learned about the Africa Foundation which helps people in rural communities by providing health clinics, schools and clean water. Since getting involved with the foundation, Keri joined the board and the couple has raised enough funds to build two preschools and an Orphans and Vulnerable Children Center in South Africa. Part of the support comes from net profits on the sale of Keri’s handmade jewelry sold online (prescreative.com). For fun and exercise, the Closes take full advantage of Central Oregon’s trails, rivers, mountains and golf courses as often as possible. They like to take their horses for long rides in nearby federal lands or go camping at Big Lake. Eric pursues his passion for golf on numerous courses around the area and had the rare privilege, even among celebrities, of playing in the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am golf tournament. “My best friend Robert was my caddy for eight of the ten years I played,” he recalled. “In 2015, I finally made the cut to play in the final round on Sunday. Making the cut is the coveted prize for the amateurs and you get an umbrella that says, ‘I Made the Cut,’” he laughed. “It was awesome standing on the 18th green with friends Jim Nantz, Nick Faldo and Clint Eastwood.” So, if you see someone who looks familiar fly fishing on the Deschutes or Metolius Rivers, sipping a microbrew at The Bite in Tumalo or drinking coffee at Loony Bean of Bend, it might just be the celebrity among us. Feel free to say hello.

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VENTURES

E D U C AT I O N

Business Outsiders A new degree for Central Oregon’s future outdoor product innovators WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW

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VENTURES

Students attend outdoor sports expo Outdoor Retailer in Denver

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hen students in a new outdoor products class at Oregon State University-Cascades were asked last fall to brainstorm a new product to design, Daniel Rogers suggested heated flyrod grips. An outdoor enthusiast who enjoys flyfishing on Central Oregon rivers and lakes, Rogers, 20, explained that while you can’t wear gloves fishing because of the technical maneuvering required, chilly temps can still make your hands cold. The class liked Rogers’ idea, and began studying each phase of product development to learn what it would take to make the concept a reality. “We worked on sketches, a materials list, costs, suppliers and charted it out on Excel,” Rogers said. “Now I’m thinking start to finish about things.” The students weren’t actually manufacturing the flyrod grips, but instead

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were learning the steps involved in product development as part of the first introductory class for the university’s new outdoor products degree program. The degree, which students can officially declare beginning this fall, is a project four years in the making, launched with a $250,000 gift from Bend-based insulated water bottle company HydroFlask in 2016. More than thirty outdoor products companies from Central Oregon and elsewhere, including Black Diamond, Patagonia, SmartWool and others, offered input as the program was developed. HydroFlask’s donation helped the school hire outdoor products expert Geoff Raynak to lead the program. “When this position came up, it was just sort of perfect,” said Raynak, who spent twenty years in the industry, including engineering bicycles and more recently at Bend-based Ruffwear, which creates outdoor products for dogs.

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VENTURES

Raynak said the unique degree program was developed because there is a need among outdoor products businesses for employees with a broad understanding of the industry, including its history, the design and manufacturing of products, engineering and marketing, all factors that come into play for a business. “This program didn’t come out of thin air,” Raynak said. “It came out of the industry looking for wellrounded future employees. They want students who have an idea of the scope and history of the industry, an understanding of the entire process, a respect and understanding of what it means to be stewards of the land and the experiential sense.” For student Will Kramer, 21, switching from majoring in engineering to instead pursuing outdoor products has given him a sense of how he might turn his engineering skills into a career. “I can more clearly see my future,” said Kramer, who took Raynak’s fall outdoor products class, which focused on water products, and the winter term class, focused on winter products. In January, the class headed to Outdoor Retailer in Denver, Colorado, where students were able to meet up with outdoor clothing and equipment manufacturer DaKine, as well as browse the hundreds of other booths showcasing companies within the outdoor products industry, collecting business cards and leaving their heads spinning with ideas for the future. While the program is still in its infancy, it has the potential to grow quickly. Raynak said he’s responding to a three to five inquiries a week from prospective students. Part of the appeal for students is

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the fact that it’s located in Bend, a place where more than 100 outdoor brands call home, and where outdoor adventure is close by. “Employees or students can do cone runs at Mount Bachelor before work, or go run the river at lunch,” Raynak said. Raynak said he’s talking with many of those local outdoor product companies about ideas to integrate with the program, through things like internships and projects, as well as bringing in outdoor experts to speak to classes. The hope is that once students graduate, they consider working for some of the same companies or developing a new product here in Central Oregon. Raynak said, “A poster child of success would indeed be someone who graduates from the program and is an entrepreneur here in Central Oregon, in the outdoor industry.”

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INTERVIEW

FOOD TRENDS

Cracking the Nut A Bend entrepreneur hopes to change the world with nuts and seeds INTERVIEW BY KIM COOPER FINDLING

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hanna Koenig Camuso launched the whole food artisanal nut and seed company Gather Nuts in Bend in 2019. The Texas native and certified nutrition consultant came to Central Oregon with her husband six years ago from Colorado, seeking a milder climate that still offered the outdoor recreation they both loved. When she was in nutrition school, Koenig Camuso had started making “activated” nuts and seeds, which means soaking them to release nutrients and roasting at medium heat to preserve good fats, in her kitchen. Over time she got more creative, adding unique flavor profiles like maple cardamom and turmeric curry. Soon others were encouraging her to sell these delicious treats, and Gather Nuts was born.

Why nuts? I wanted to create a whole food artisanal nut and seed company to support healthy eating on the go. Our lives are increasingly busier and eating well can be a challenge. Recent studies show that people are snacking more than they are sitting down for meals. Nuts and seeds are the perfect snack—easily transportable, filling and nourishing— and they’re nutritional powerhouses. High in fiber, healthy fats and protein, they keep you fueled throughout the day, while their vitamins and minerals support the body.

If these barriers are not broken down through a soaking process, they can be difficult to digest and some of their nutrients remain locked away. I started to experiment with soaking and roasting at home. I’d open my spice drawer and imagine what would combine well—Turmeric Curry Cashews was my first flavor. I began sharing them with friends, who convinced me that I needed to sell them.

What led you to Bend and to this business? Growing up, nuts were a staple food in my family, but I never truly understood their value until I was in nutrition school. I learned about the soaking process and the need to protect healthy fats from high temperatures. Nuts and seeds have barriers that protect them from natural threats in nature.

Tell us about the philosophies behind Gather Nuts. Our mantra is People. Planet. Animals. We work in each of these areas to support healthy eating while minimizing our environmental footprint. Our goal is to not only provide snack options, but to encourage culinary creations with our products to add a quick and easy nutritional boost and added flavor.

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Some of our favorites: topping oatmeal or salad with our Maple Fennel Pumpkin Seeds, or sprinkling Chocolate Coffee Cashews over a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Every business decision revolves around how we can do the least amount of harm to the planet, from where we source our products to our packaging and efforts to reduce waste. Our nuts and seeds support plant-based eating, which has the potential to greatly reduce the effects of climate change. One of the leading causes of climate change is food: what we consume, the production of it, and its waste. Onefifth of greenhouse gas emissions are caused by meat production alone. Lastly, we offer an alternative to animalbased proteins that is more beneficial to your overall health. What’s it like to run a business such as this from Bend? Bend is a fantastic place to be an entrepreneur. You can really feel the hometown spirit here. People rally behind new brands and strong products.

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Retailers have been exceptionally open and embracing, especially because our products are a great fit for Central Oregon’s active lifestyle. I’ve found mentorship from the local organization Opportunity Knocks, which facilitates a monthly small group meeting of food companies like myself. There’s an increasing recognition that the food manufacturing industry is growing in Bend. People are making a concerted effort to ease some of the challenges food startups here face: high cost and low inventory of commercial kitchen space, lack of warehousing, distribution and co-packing. Share some of your most significant challenges with us. One of our biggest challenges is making an initial introduction of our nuts to the consumer. We often do tastings at

First Friday Artwalk, Newport Market, farmers markets and various retailers. After falling for our flavor combinations, people connect with our brand and the health benefits of our process. Where are your sales strongest? Currently our retail sales at places like Newport Market, West Coast Provisions and Palate Coffee are strongest, but over the holidays, our ecommerce sales soared. People loved sneaking our nuts and seeds into stockings and giving them as hostess gifts. How is Gather Nuts different from other purveyors? Gather Nuts uses exclusively organic ingredients. We work with two wholesalers that are multiple certified in being organic and fair trade. Most commercial nuts are sourced from the least expensive places possible, with growing practices that aren’t

sustainable. So, we begin with a higher quality nut. Then, how we process our nuts is different. Most companies roast their nuts at high temperatures which can damage the fats. This technique produces nuts as quickly as possible. We soak our nuts and seeds in saltwater for twentyfour hours and slow roast them at a low temperature, which takes longer but it’s the essence of why our products taste the way they do. What are your goals with Gather Nuts? We are an ambitious company with high growth expectations. We know the snack industry is growing rapidly, as is the consumer demand for plant-based products. We are positioning our company to grow alongside consumer demand.

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HOW BUSINESS IS GOING MOBILE IN CENTRAL OREGON WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW PHOTOS BY MIGHTY CREATURE CO

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hile many entrepreneurs dream of one day opening a brick and mortar storefront to showcase their business and reach customers, the risks and cost of doing so can be a barrier for many. Finding the right location can be a challenge, expensive, and a storefront is a commitment that typically comes with a long-term lease or mortgage. This leaves some local entrepreneurs thinking outside the box, beyond the typical storefront, instead hitting the streets in their trucks and trailers and setting up shop wherever makes sense. Their rents are low (sometimes free), they can make house calls for customers, and they’re nimble enough to adapt in the face of economic uncertainty. A mobile business may not work for every company, but these Central Oregon business owners are cruising along.

HEAD OVER HAIR STYLIST JYLIANA RENSTROM was looking for something with a little more independence than renting a chair in a barbershop, but with a little less overhead than operating her own Main Street salon. And flipping through photos online one day, she came across a converted Airstream trailer that sparked an idea. “I wanted to take a leap of faith, and so I did this,” said Renstrom, a Bend native. After a client connected her with someone selling an empty 1947 trailer made of World War II airplane parts, she set out to make her dream a reality. Renstrom opened Head Over Wheels in April 2017, and within eighteen months she was booked solid. After testing out a few locations, including at Spoken Moto and Podski’s, Head Over Wheels found its current home at The Camp, 305 NE Burnside Avenue in Bend. Inside the salon are two styling chairs and one washing station, as well as a seating area, shelves for products and ample sunshine from the trailers wide front windows. “Everything inside is really thought out,” Renstrom said. She said her costs for rent and to operate the shop add up to a little more than renting a station at a salon, but are much less than if Renstrom wanted to open a typical brick and mortar business herself. Going mobile means Renstrom gets to focus on being a stylist rather than being bogged down by the responsibilities of operating the business. Overall, it’s a decision Renstrom is happy with. “It’s cool how my community and my clients have come together in different ways and supported me in this journey,” Renstrom said. The best part of getting your hair done in a shiny “hairstream?” Checking out your reflection in the chrome after you step out the front door.

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VISIT THE TRAILER

Sneak a peak of Head Over Wheels at The Camp, 305 NE Burnside Ave. Find the latest info and book an appointment by visiting headoverwheelshairco.com.

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CENTRAL OREGON WHEN ARLAN MENDELL GOT HIS FIRST KNIFE and sharpener from his grandfather at age 12, he could never have imagined decades later he’d be running his own mobile knife sharpening business in Central Oregon. While he carried the knife and used it throughout his life, and taught his own sons to sharpen their knives, it was nothing more than a hobby until 2016, when the previous owners of Central Oregon Knife Sharpening were selling their business. Five years later, Arlan Mendell runs the mobile shop with his son, Peter, traveling to businesses throughout the week for sharpenings and setting up in front of grocery stores to pick up business from the public. Though he can sharpen too, Peter Mendell mostly handles administrative tasks and interacts with customers, while his dad does the majority of the knife work. “I’m the horsepower and he takes care of the finer details,” Arlan Mendell said. Shop dog Lily, a very fluffy Corgi, handles the summer sunbathing and occupying children who tag along to drop off or pick up knives. The Mendells get a lot of their work from restaurants, school districts 82

and other businesses using knives and scissors, like dog groomers and hair stylists. Being mobile means limiting the time their customers spend away from their equipment, and the mobile sharpening shop has all the tools a permanent location would. “Just because we’re mobile doesn’t mean we lack in quality,” Arlan Mendell said. The remainder of the company’s business comes from Central Oregon residents with regular kitchen knives. They can be dropped off and sharpened in as little as twenty to forty minutes, which works out to a shopping trip or a couple errands. The Mendells said there are pros and cons to being on the go, but they like the freedom to travel around, including making visits to Madras, Prineville, Sunriver and La Pine, in addition to Redmond and Bend. Because they’re constantly mobile, there’s no rent to pay, keeping overhead costs low. “It’s a double-edged sword,” Peter Mendell said with a laugh. “Having a brick and mortar store, people know where you are…but on the flipside, we have flexibility.”

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FIND THE TRUCK

Check cosharpening.com for updates about the truck’s location. Central Oregon Knife Sharpening’s regular stops: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays at Newport Market in Bend 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays at Whole Foods Market in Bend Occasional Saturdays at Taco Salsa in Bend Second Friday of each month at Ace Hardware in Sisters

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BEVERAGE BAR THE TUMBLEWEED ISN’T YOUR TYPICAL BAR, and not just because it’s on wheels. Owner Kindra Hayward set out to create a mobile saloon that is classy and sophisticated, while also maintaining its western charm. The result is a converted horse trailer, with four beer taps, an espresso machine and everything needed to serve up signature cocktails for a wedding or special event. “I knew I wanted the western flair, while staying classy and true to who I am,” said Hayward, who lives in Prineville with her husband and three children, ages 7, 4 and 1. The idea first came to Hayward about four years ago, but as a busy stay-at-home mom and with the family’s new house under construction, opening the mobile bar kept getting put off. With some help from friends with skills in carpentry and metal fabrication, the Tumbleweed was finally completed last summer. “I wanted to prove to myself that I could do this,” Hayward said. In August, Hayward worked her first wedding, dishing out specialty cocktails along with another server. She said the Tumbleweed’s niche is that it serves two to three specific cocktails for each event, not a full bar, meaning the bride and groom can choose some signature drinks for the night. This can include wine, beer, kombucha, coffee or cocktails. Hayward said the low overhead of starting a mobile business means it’s accessible to more people, as long as they’re willing to work hard. Growing primarily by word of mouth and some social media, Hayward said the business is slowly gaining popularity and she’s booked numerous weddings for the upcoming season. “I’m super grateful, and in disbelief that I had this vision and I’ve seen it through,” Hayward said. “I’m so blessed with all the support.”

BOOK THE BAR

Visit tumbleweedbeveragebar.com to schedule the Tumbleweed for a future event

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FANCY WHEN TAYLOR PRICHARD STARTED Fancy Pups Mobile Grooming in California three years ago, she transitioned from working at a grooming shop with a storefront location, and some of her furry customers came with her. “Because of the fact that I started my mobile business in kind of the same area, I was able to see an immediate difference in the dogs,” Prichard said. Dogs that were overwhelmed in a busy grooming office with other dogs, blow dryers, clippers and ringing phones were suddenly more at ease. A year later, her family moved to Redmond, and she worked to restart the mobile grooming shop here. For new customers, Prichard meets with dog and owner inside their home to fill out paperwork and discuss grooming needs before heading out to the trailer, which has warm running water heated by propane and a generator for power. Typical appointments last an hour, but could be more or less depending on the dog’s size and type of grooming. “The dogs will run out and meet me and jump right in the trailer,” she said. Prichard said the one-on-one attention the dogs receive is less stressful for dogs and faster overall. While Prichard loves the flexibility of being mobile, traveling mostly between Bend, Redmond and Prineville, one challenge is the weather. She starts later in the mornings in the winter to avoid icy roads and sometimes tells clients she will be late if its snowy. She’s also aware of the temperature to make sure her trailer’s pipes don’t freeze. Two years into running the business in Central Oregon, Prichard said that despite being one of many groomers in town, including other mobile groomers, she’s found a strong customer base. “This is a super dog friendly area, so it really took off here,” she said. “There are plenty of dogs to go around.”

SCHEDULE A GROOMING

Visit fancypupsmobilegrooming.com to schedule an appointment

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MOBILE BOUTIQUE AFTER A LIFE-ALTERING CONCUSSION from a car accident in 2019, Tara Parsons was looking to take her career in a new direction, away from computers and the hustle and bustle of her previous jobs. Parsons was a customer of Bend’s first mobile women’s fashion boutique, and thought maybe a small mobile business would work as her next career. When she stopped into Wildflower Mobile Boutique to chat with thenowner Mariah Young about her idea, fate stepped in. Young had decided two days prior she was going to sell the shop and Parsons, of course, was interested. Three weeks later it was a done deal. “She had done an amazing job with such a great vision,” Parsons said of Young. “The truck has such a good reputation in town.” Parsons has since taken the helm at Wildflower, and continues to stock boho-style women’s clothing, as well as locally made jewelry and beanies. “I try to have a huge variety,” she said. The typical home base for the boutique is at Spoken Moto, though Parsons will scoot over to downtown during First Friday, set up in front of the new Kevista Coffee on Century Drive and hit the road for occasional events and fundraisers. The truck can also be booked at no charge for a ladies night or other events, by request. “Being mobile is so great, I can just pick up and go,” Parsons said. “I can plug in with an extension cord and be ready.” With minimal costs to operate, Parsons said she feels the business is flexible and “recession proof.” Are there any downsides? Parsons said it took a little trial and error to get the converted Frito-Lay truck to stay level, a necessity to keep the doors closed and the shop warm in the winter. And, Parsons said, “She is a bit of beast to drive.”

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FIND THE BOUTIQUE

The Wildflower Mobile Boutique’s most recent home was parked at Spoken Moto, 310 SW Industrial Way, Bend Use the Track the Truck page at wildflowerfashiontruck.com to confirm its location Email wildflowerfashiontruck@gmail.com to arrange a visit from the truck for events

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PHOTO ADA M MCKIBBEN

ROCK CLIMBING 88

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What’s so great about rock climbing, and how do I do it? WRITTEN BY LUCAS ALBERG

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o you wanna rock climb? Easy. First, you identify a problem, send it, and boom—problem solved! Uh, what!? Ok, let’s back up… For the uninitiated, climbing can be a pretty intimidating sport. It’s filled with specific terminology and slang, specialized gear, multiple disciplines, and let’s be frank—in a town like Bend, Oregon, a mere stone’s throw from Smith Rock State Park—it’s also filled with a lot of bad ass climbers. Yup, intimidating indeed. However, once you make that leap (or Dyno: a leaping move in which the climber lunges to the next hold, momentarily leaving the rock), climbing can be a truly rewarding sport for both the body and the mind.

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Students with Smith Rock Climbing School

A ZEN Workout WITH FRIENDS

PHOTO THIS PAGE COURTES Y SMITH ROCK CLIMBING SCHOOL

Climbing is an incredible workout—both physical and mental. There’s strategy involved in determining the best route, figuring out the right handholds, manipulating your body and keeping your mind sharp while exerting energy up a rock wall. You develop strength in the core, legs and arms, dexterity, and muscles in places you never knew you had muscles (finger muscles, people!) It’s a sport that’s best done with friends, and in a town like Bend, a great way to make new ones. Chris Wright, longtime Bend resident and accomplished climber and certified guide, said the climbing community here is warm and welcoming. “Central Oregon is filled with a lot of highly talented climbers yet it’s a very supportive environment,” he said. “People just want to help people, and it’s never a contest. Whether it’s a 5.5 [beginner route] or a 5.14 [expert], people are supportive, inclusive and encouraging. It really bucks the trend of how climbing can be sometimes.”

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SOUNDS GREAT. NOW WHERE DO I BEGIN? You’ve got the motivation, the gusto and are determined to make a go of climbing. So where to begin? The indoors is a great spot to start. Learning at a climbing gym immediately eliminates the weather factor and provides a safe environment in which to learn. In Central Oregon, the Bend Rock Gym (BRG as the locals call it) offers programs and classes for both youth and adults, and you’re guaranteed to have a knowledgeable climber or friendly staff member nearby to answer any questions and help get you started. “Our goal is to support the Central Oregon climbing community, from beginners to elite,” said Rich Breuner, Director of Operations at the Bend Rock Gym. “We do everything in our power to ensure that people leave with the best possible experience and go away loving the sport as much as all of us that work here.” Depending on the individual, Breuner said there are many ways into climbing. Two of the most popular are bouldering (a style of climbing closer to the ground without the use of rope) and top roping using auto-belay systems (which allow you to climb vertical walls securely without a partner). “Bouldering lets you feel the more dynamic movements and has more athletic moves while top roping and auto-belays let you feel more sequential moves and get you higher off the ground. We typically start people on auto-belays as it’s a great way to get to know the movements of climbing in a comprehensive way.” At press time, BRG was closed per COVID-19 precautions. See the website for details before you visit.

Climbing Lingo

Here are just a few climbing terms to get you started (you know, so you don’t sound like a complete newbie!) APPROACH the walk (or hike) to the crag CRAG a climbing area CRIMP small hold CRUX the hardest part of a climb PITCH/MULTI-PITCH one pitch is equal to one rope length. Mutli-pitch routes are anything longer than one rope length. PROBLEM similar to a route but without a rope (as in bouldering) ROUTE set course in rock climbing (either inside or outside) involving a rope PROJECT the route you’re currently working on SEND used to describe successfully climbing a route

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Lizzy VanPatten, owner and founder of She Moves Mountains, at Smith Rock

THE HOLY GRAIL

INTO THE GREAT Out doors

You’re feeling comfortable at the gym, the staff knows you by name, you have the lingo down, and you’ve even sent that boulder problem you’ve been working on for weeks. You think you’re ready to venture outside. But where? And more importantly, how? First things first, grab a buddy. Or better yet, two. Climbing can be a very safe sport, but unless you’re Alex Honnold of free-solo-climbing fame, it’s not one that can easily—or safely—be done solo. With a friend nearby to spot you, and a crashpad below in case of a fall, try your hand again at bouldering—this time on real rocks. Central Oregon Bouldering, a 2017 guidebook by Jason Chinchen, is a great resource to bouldering in the area and includes all the hot spots right outside of town that locals have been hitting for years. Bend is fortunate to have a number of options within a few minutes’ drive, including one beginner friendly spot just off the Deschutes River near the Meadow Camp trailhead.

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If you’re up for a bit more vertical, head to the birthplace of US Sport Climbing, Smith Rock State Park, located a quick fiveminute drive from Terrebonne. With many routes developed in the 1980s by climbing legend and Bend resident Alan Watts, Smith Rock has something for everyone. “Smith remains a mecca for climbers the world over,” said Wright, who’s been guiding at the park for years. “It has something for everyone and often all within a stone’s throw of each other. You can go out with someone who can barely belay and someone who’s trying to crush and have two great routes for both, all within a thirty second walk.” According to Watts’ 2010 guidebook, Rock Climbing Smith Rock State Park, there are over 1,800 routes at the park and surrounding areas—many set by Watts himself. With so many routes, however, it’s best to start at Smith with knowledgeable guiding services. Smith Rock Climbing School, Chockstone Climbing Guides and Now! Climbing Guides are among the most well-known, and She Moves Mountains is a great option for women looking for female guides and mentors. (Oregon State parks were closed at press time per COVID-19 precautions; check online for current access information.) Lizzy VanPatten, owner and founder of She Moves Mountains, said guiding services help climbers navigate to the best places for their abilities. “It’s tough to find the best routes if you’re unfamiliar with an area, and especially if you’re new to the sport,” she said. “Guiding companies not only find the appropriate routes for your abilities, but also provide details like where the shade will be during a hot summer day, or the sun on a cold winter day.” Additionally, VanPatten commented that guiding services help meet climbers where they’re at with their skill level. “Our goal is to cultivate an experience that leaves the client feeling empowered,” she said. “No matter gender, body type or experience, we believe that all people belong in climbing.”

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L ARGE PHOTO ADA M MCKIBBEN

Smi t h Rock STATE PARK


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Gear Up

Wow, gear overload! Yes, climbing has a lot of gear, and yes, it can be expensive, but fear not, you can start small. In fact, it’s recommended. Chris Wright recommends starting with rentals at the gym until you’re both knowledge about the gear, and comfortable using it. “Start small with climbing shoes and a chalkbag,” he said. “You can always rely on quality gear through guides, and then start to accumulate your own over time as you get more into the sport.”

T he essent ials

CLIMBING SHOES for a beginner, climbing shoes can feel a little strange (and tight—yikes!) so it’s a good idea to rent them to start, try a few different ones to get a feel for them, and then consider purchasing at a local retail shop like Mountain Supply or REI once you’re comfortable and confident in what you like. CHALK & CHALKBAG GUIDEBOOKS

Level up

PHOTO LEF T ADA M MCKIBBEN, RIGHT RYAN CLE ARY

HELMET a must once you start venturing outside HARNESS a great item to rent before purchasing your own CRASHPAD for bouldering ROPE, QUICKDRAWS AND A BELAY DEVICE for longer routes

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Breaking DOWN THE DISCIPLINES

AID CLIMBING using gear to ascend a section of rock; often used to bypass difficult sections of a route that cannot be free climbed. BOULDERING a form of climbing typically close to the ground and without the use of a rope; minimal in nature. FREE CLIMBING using your hands and feet to ascend natural features on a rock. FREE SOLOING a form of free climbing without using protection. In short, mega consequences if you fall so best not be a hero (or statistic). LEAD CLIMBING a more advanced style of climbing that requires the climber to protect themselves on the way up with a rope secured from below. SPORT CLIMBING rock climbing using pre-placed protection such as bolts along the route, usually involving difficult or dynamic moves that allow you to push your free climbing skills. TRADITIONAL CLIMBING rock climbing where removable protection is placed by the lead climber and removed by the second (or last) climber. Also called “trad� climbing. TOP-ROPING a low-consequence form of climbing where the climber is secured using a rope attached to the top of the pitch, ensuring falls (if they happen) are short distances.

MAKING THE Grades

PHOTO ADA M MCKIBBEN

Climbing routes are graded on a system ranging from 5.0 to 5.15c, easiest to hardest. Typically, beginner routes range from 5.0 to 5.9, while intermediate routes range from 5.10a to 5.11d, advanced 5.12a to 5.13d, and pro 5.14a to 5.15c. Central Oregon offers opportunities for all skill levels from beginner to a 5.14d at Smith Rock State Park.

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Back Deck

art & events

ART + BOOKS + CULTURE + CENTRAL OREGON STRONG

ARTIST

The Music Man Boswell custom guitars strike a personal chord with each musician WRITTEN BY JON PAUL JONES | PHOTOS BY TOBY NOLAN

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ARTIST

W

hen it comes to skill, style and creating a niche in a genre, individuality is key for musicians. Each artist, playing type, and creative ability resonates differently. And Butch Boswell has the ability to capture that individuality, creating one-of-a-kind masterpieces of instrumentation. The Boswell Guitar workspace is tucked into a small shop near downtown Bend. The space reflects Boswell’s style of simplicity combined with historically rooted-techniques, and is vacant of tech and glamour you might find with the industry’s larger manufacturers. This is exactly how Boswell has intended it. “I build my guitars by hand, in small batches of two to three guitars at a time. I only use the finest materials I can find, and my search for those materials never stops. I take

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every possible unknown into consideration, and if it has the potential to make the guitar sound better, I’m going to use it,” Boswell said. Boswell has been able to master his craft over the years, while sustaining his passion for the work. But working as a luthier, or guitarmaker, was not always his dream. In fact, Boswell recalls getting into guitars “almost accidentally.” When he first graduated high school, he immediately started his college career at Cal Poly University to pursue his then-passion of architectural engineering. But after college, he spent fifteen years repairing instruments with some of the nation’s best repair groups including Taylor Guitars and Rudy’s Music Soho, eventually turning from repair to building his first acoustic guitar. Boswell’s customers wanted a repairman who could also build guitars, so he got

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“Why would any two Boswell

ARTIST

guitars be the same when every player is different?”

to work with his first design, and hasn’t looked back since. In 2015, he decided to move his operation to Bend, and local musicians have been benefitting ever since. For Boswell, the guitar-build process starts with finding the best wood. “I am absolutely a wood junkie. I’m always thinking about wood, always looking for wood, always talking about wood,” Boswell said. “Old growth material is hands-down the best, and what I try to use exclusively, but it is getting harder and harder to come by.” Older woods like Brazilian Rosewood and Adirondack Spruce lend themselves well to Boswell’s work due to their stability, strength, lack of absorptioncapacity, and in many cases, their beauty. After all of the measuring, cutting, sanding, staining and crafting of an instrument, his lofty goal of creating the, “absolute best guitar there is,” is finished with finite attention to the details that substantiate a true Boswell guitar. Though he loves his current solo-act as guitar repairman and builder, Boswell has his sights set on future goals. Eventually, he wants to open a high-end repair and consignment shop, and grow a team of people to help accommodate the demand for his work. Often, he finds himself wanting to take on more work for his customers than time will allow, and having a trained team to expand his creative reach would bring value to his customer’s needs.

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Boswell’s customers deliver many glowing reviews. “Butch is the epitome of a master luthier,” wrote Bend resident John Luce, in a Facebook review. “His guitars consistently possess that magic that only occasionally exists in other high-end instruments. His tireless attention to build quality, aesthetics, and most importantly the tonal properties of virtually every piece of wood result in what can only be described as the finest new flat top guitars attainable.”

A custom creation can inspire a musician to take their music further, according to Boswell. “Why would any two Boswell guitars be the same when every player is different?,” he said. “As a hand builder, that’s the luxury I have: to be able to craft each instrument specifically for each player. I want to provide a guitar that will inspire even the most discerning players, compliment their playing, and accompany them into new musical territory.”

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Back Deck books READS

A Thrilling Story Bend author Dave Edlund crafts character-driven drama on the page WRITTEN BY BRONTE DOD

E

very good thriller series has an iconic lead. There’s James Patterson’s Alex Cross, Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan and Kathy Reichs’ Temperance Brennan. Closer to home, Bend author Dave Edlund has crafted a series of thrillers around Peter Savage, an ordinary guy who finds himself in extraordinary life-or-death situations. “He’s not a Bond character. He’s not Jason Bourne. He’s an ordinary guy,” said Edlund over the phone. “He doesn’t have all of these special training and strengths that you would see in most thriller heroes.” Instead, Savage is a character filled with self-doubt who constantly second-guesses his actions. It’s what makes him a real and relatable character, and what has propelled Edlund into a successful second career as a novelist, judging by the fact that the Peter Savage novels have landed on the USA Today Bestsellers list. It was Clive Cussler’s books that got Edlund obsessed with the thriller genre in his midtwenties and also inspired his dive into writing just over a decade ago. He wrote the first Peter Savage novel, Crossing Savage, as a gift for his 9-year-old son, who had started reading Cussler’s novels at the time. Edlund was familiar with nonfiction writing, but had always harbored a fantasy to try his hand at his own thriller. “It’s just because I have an active imagination, and that can be applied to science or fiction,” Edlund said.

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The crime and mystery publishing genre made $782 million in 2018, according to Statista, second behind romance. But penning the next lucrative thriller series isn’t Edlund’s main goal. Writing bestselling novels is actually just a side job for Edlund. After graduating from University of Oregon and getting his PhD in chemistry, Edlund moved to Bend in 1987. He worked for Bend Research for nine years before starting his own venture. Since then he’s cofounded two companies. His latest is Element One, which develops technology related to hydrogen generation, or clean energy. “It’s very exciting to be involved in something where you’re doing good,” Edlund said. He’s also contributed writing to science and technical books and is an inventor on hundreds of patents in the United States and abroad. He travels often for his work, and finds time to write his novels in airports, airplanes and hotels. His science and technology background is evident throughout his novels, which are deeply researched and plotted with real life scientific and ethical dilemmas. It’s a conscious decision

to not only have an interesting plot point, but also to inspire curiosity in his readers about the technological and scientific advancements that are at the forefront of his novels. “I’m not just aiming for entertainment,” Edlund said. “I hope that readers will take away some knowledge, some interesting or useful information.” Edlund’s writing talent is in his storytelling. The Savage novels, published by Light Messages in North Carolina, move at a quick pace and make even expository paragraphs on genetic engineering fly by. The latest two novels in the series, Lethal Savage and Hunting Savage, are set in Central Oregon, and readers will enjoy recognizing familiar businesses and landmarks in the story. Edlund raised his two kids in Bend, and still lives here with his wife and three dogs. With five Peter Savage novels published, Edlund is ready to move on to a new central character. He’s currently working on a new thriller series with Danya Biton, a female character from the Savage novels, as the lead. Watch for the new series and find the Peter Savage books at independent bookstores in Central Oregon and online.

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BURNING MAN ON THE HORIZON

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Burning Man Project, a nonprofit benefit corporation In partnership with

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Be Safe, Be Strong, We’re With You


Back Deck art & culture television

Central Oregon-themed Series “Adventure Calls” Launches Long in the national spotlight for outstanding recreation and lifestyle opportunities, it’s about time Bend got its own TV show. This spring, Visit Central Oregon launched the first of seven episodes in the series, “Adventure Calls with Chad Copeland.” For now, the series is available on the Visit Central Oregon website with plans for it to air on Amazon Prime in the future. “Adventure Calls” highlights adventure, food and the arts in Central Oregon. Its host is Chad Copeland, a photographer who’s traveled the world capturing exotic places and wildlife for the likes of National Geographic, Microsoft and BBC’s “Planet Earth.” Copeland now lives in Bend. The first episode, “Winter Haven,” takes viewers through Central Oregon in the winter. “It was a fun episode—we skied, went dog sledding, snowmobiling and even made a midnight polar plunge in Elk Lake,” Copeland said. The episode also includes the vocal ensemble, Bend Camerata, singing inside a cave, and features fine dining at Elk Lake Lodge. Upcoming episodes will include the Deschutes River and its impact on the region, summer in the Cascade Mountains, local timber to tourism heritage, outings with your best friend (think dog), Western culture including local rodeos and the history of the military in Central Oregon. Look for a new episode every two weeks and in the future on Amazon Prime. See adventurecalls.visitcentraloregon.com.

rodeo

Celebrating 75 Years of Cowboy Culture in Prineville In Crook County, it’s the “Year of the Cowboy.” 2020 marks the 75th running of one of Oregon’s oldest familyfriendly events—the historic Crooked River Roundup. Held annually in June and July at the Crook County Fairgrounds in Prineville, the Roundup Association produces a PRCA rodeo and the largest pari-mutuel horse races in the state of Oregon. This year’s rodeo is slated for June 25-27, with horse-racing action scheduled to follow July 15-18. “The Crooked River Roundup is an e, 1947 iconic part of the fabric of the Prineville community,” said le Parad Prinevil Jason Snider, president of the all-volunteer Crooked River Roundup Association. “It’s a family-friendly tradition that dates back generations—providing us an opportunity to celebrate our cowboy roots, reconnect with neighbors, and welcome new friends and visitors.” The Crooked River Roundup rodeo was conceived in the early 1940s when a group of ranchers decided to pool their resources and create an event that would embody all that Crook County had to offer. As of press time, the Roundup was still a go, though COVID-19 clouded events with uncertainty. Whether or not we all gather at the rodeo this year, the year of the Crook County cowboy and a celebration of Western heritage remain something to celebrate. See crookedriverroundup.com. 102

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THROUGH OUR

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CENTRAL OREGON STR NG

Tiffany Larson Kathy Weissgerber

Cricket Daniel

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Staying home saved lives, so that’s what we did. We stayed six feet apart. We sewed masks. We created things. We cared for one another. We made the best of it, and kept hope alive in our hearts. Bend Magazine reached out to the community to submit photos of life during #stayhome. Here are some of our favorites of the many photos we received from you, the greater Bend community. Together, we are Central Oregon Strong. 105


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Cinda Johnson

Dannika White

Jill Rosell

Andy Abelein 106

Kristy Harrison

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W h ere Bend go lf be g a n, B e nd liv ing be g in s .

Bend’s endless love affair with the links can easily be traced to the picturesque Ponderosa grove southeast of downtown that a handful of enthusiasts turned into the Bend Golf Club back in the mid-1920s. Nearly 100 years later, that special enclave finally has a place for golf lovers to call home. Welcome to 1925, Arrowood Development’s vibrant collection of single-level townhomes adorning the Golf Club’s 10th fairway. Now, with floor plans ranging from 1,803 to 2,431 square feet, you can make Bend’s first home for golf your finest home ever. Starting at $659,000.

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CENTRAL OREGON STR N G

Cliff Hamilton

Jill Rosell Candace Pecaut

Katie Hilt 108

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EAT EAT

EXPLORE CENTRAL OREGON

Many restaurants across Oregon are closed this spring, but there are still ways to show your support to our local food service industry. Some dining establishments remain open for takeout and delivery, and would love to receive your order. For those that are closed, consider purchasing a gift card to show your support and look forward to the time that they reopen. Contact individual restaurants for details.

EXPLORE CENTRAL OREGON COMPANY NAME PIZZA MONDO

Fir aremus praes vident. locals’ Obus Pizza Mondo, a longtime intrur se serving quam award henfavorite,quium has been deroximis imentum inprave rniwinning pizza from its landmark hil te movitudem ia vis, ad downtown Bend patus location since novid iamdiis conteri ptius, 1996.C.By the ius slice or whole sendac fuidit; nonsuliam. Fuispie. Dine in, take-out, delivery. sulicam ex maximus et videSeasonalet;pizzas, fresh salads and mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. NW craft beer. Vemnicastra 811 NW Wall St., Bend

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COMPANY KEBABA NAME Fir aremus vident. Obus From its praes Westside Bend intrur quam henlocation,quium Kebabaseoffers a unique, deroximis imentum rniaward winning take inprave on modern hil te movitudem patusFresh ia vis,and ad Middle Eastern food. novid C. iamdiis ius conteri ptius, delicious. Special diet friendly. sendac fuidit;cocktails, nonsuliam. Great craft beerFuisand sulicam et; ex videwine. Open formaximus lunch andetdinner. mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 1004 NW Newport Ave., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St 318-6224 | (512) 123-4567 kebaba.com website.com

COMPANY NAME POKE ROW At Row, ourvident. focus is on Fir Poke aremus praes Obus fresh healthysefood, in a cozy, intrurandquium quam hencasual environment. poke bowl deroximis imentum Ainprave rniishilessentially deconstructed sushi, te movitudem patus ia vis, ad put together just the way youptius, like! novid C. iamdiis ius conteri Voted Local Bowl byFuisThe sendacBest fuidit; nonsuliam. Source. us in NWX! sulicam Come et; ex visit maximus et videmum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 2735 NW Crossing Dr. #105., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St306-6796 | (512) 123-4567 pokerow.com website.com

COMPANY ACTIVE CULTURE NAME Fir aremus Obus Active Culturepraes cafe isvident. locally owned intrur quium serving se quam henand operated up healthy deroximis options forimentum breakfast,inprave lunch rniand hil te movitudem vis,our ad dinner. Escape thepatus cold iawith novid C. iamdiis conteri ptius, fresh soups madeiusdaily or stop in sendac fuidit; nonsuliam. Fuisfor a mason jar of organic chicken sulicam et; Download ex maximus videbone broth. ouretapp for mum avem,and caefree tem, Catquam. easy reorder delivery! Vemnicastra 285 NW Riverside Blvd., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St 241-2926 | (512) 123-4567 activeculturecafe website.com .com

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COMPANY NAME PHO VIET CAFÉ Fir aremus praes vident. Vietnamese standards likeObus pho intrur quium hen& noodle bowlssearequam served in inpraveNow rniaderoximis modest, imentum relaxed space. hil te movitudem ad serving Bun Bo patus Hue/ia vis, Spicy novid C. iamdiis ius Pho conteri ptius, Lemongrass Base Noodle sendacOpen fuidit;Christmas nonsuliam. Soup! day,Fuisjoin sulicam et; ex maximus et videus to celebrate! mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 1326 NE 3rd St., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St382-2929 | (512) 123-4567 website.com phovietandcafe .com

COMPANY NAME BALDY’S BARBEQUE Voted “Bestpraes BBQ”vident. in Central Fir aremus Obus Oregon every year! intrur quium se Slow quamsmoked henmeats and imentum homemade sides. Full deroximis inprave rnibar outdoor patus seating at all hil teand movitudem ia vis, ad locations. Openiusforconteri lunchptius, and novid C. iamdiis dinner sendac every fuidit; Tuesday-Sunday. nonsuliam. FuisTake out et; andexcatering too.et videsulicam maximus mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Multiple locations in Vemnicastra Bend & Redmond 123 W (541) 6th St385-7427 | (512) 123-4567 website.com baldysbbq .com

PHO COMPANY HOUSENAME Phoaremus House in Fir praesspecializes vident. Obus gourmetquium Vietnamese intrur se quamcuisine henusing onlyimentum the finest, deroximis inpravefresh rniingredients. Toppatus notch hil te movitudem ia vis,pho ad made C. with utmost authenticity, novid iamdiis ius conteri ptius, and friendly TakeFuisout, sendac fuidit;service. nonsuliam. delivery et; through DoorDash, and sulicam ex maximus et videcurbside. Be cae pho-filled! mum avem, tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 1604 S. HWY 97 Suite 9, Redmond (541) 123 W 6th St526-5474 | (512) 123-4567 website.com .com phohouseredmond

COMPANY LA ROSA NAME Fir praesMost vident. Obus Onearemus of Bend’s Awarded intrur se quam hen-a Mexicanquium Restaurants serving deroximis imentumoninprave rnifresh perspective authentic hil te movitudem patusmargaritas ia vis, ad cuisine with signature novid C. iamdiis ius conteri for over 15 years. Enjoyptius, the sendac fuidit; nonsuliam. traditional favorites and Fuisfresh sulicam et; ex maximus new creations at one etofvideour mum avem, caelocations. tem, Catquam. family-friendly Vemnicastra 2763 NW Crossing Dr., Bend 19570 Dr., Bend 123 W Amber 6th St Meadow | (512) 123-4567 website.com larosabend .com

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CENTRAL OREGON STR N G

Jill Rosell

Maureen Dooley

Jessica Stockel

Beth Evanson

Ryan Cleary

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We’re with you. Community has always been at the heart and soul of our business. It’s the relationships we build all around us that enrich our personal and professional lives and bring us to work with gratitude every day. During challenging times, we’re here for our clients, our friends and family, and our neighbors to answer questions, encourage good will, and to inspire you to support your local businesses and donate to your community’s vital non-profits. Experience tells us that tough times don’t last but strong people do.

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