Bend Magazine - July/August 2020

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HIGH DESERT

stargazing

SURF INTO

SCENIC DRIVES

Delightful DAY TRIPS FOR THE family

GRILL THRILL

Local CUTS FOR YOUR barbecue



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PNW’S BIGGEST PLAYGROUND. Summer adventures await at Mt. Bachelor! Drop in on over 13 miles of downhill trails at our lift served downhill Bike Park. Feel the adrenaline rush as you soar amongst the trees on our new dual-line, three-stage Zip Line. Cool off on a Sun Country Tours whitewater excursion, and cap it all off with an elevated dining experience at the mid-mountain Pine Marten Lodge. Summer is here – Let’s play!

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CRAFTING COCKTAILS Mix up refreshing summer cocktails using liquor from one of Central Oregon’s craft distillers. WRITTEN BY NANCY PATTERSON

FRESH TRACKS

Skip the lift lines (and traffic) and head to Mount Bailey this winter for an epic backcountry skiing experience.

TABLE of CONTENTS Features

84

FLAVOR FOR THE GRILL

Fire up the barbeque and throw on some juicy, sizzling beef from one of Central Oregon’s local ranches. Learn which cuts are best for grilling and get some direct-from-the-range cooking tips. WRITTEN BY CATHY CARROLL

HIGH DESERT

stargazing

SURF INTO

SUMMER ADVENTURES

Summer isn’t cancelled. From camping and swimming to exploring Bend’s best patios, for music and brews, see how many of these don’t-miss activities you can pack in before the leaves start changing colors. WRITTEN BY BEND MAGAZINE STAFF

SCENIC DRIVES

Delightful DAY TRIPS FOR THE family

GRILL THRILL

Local CUTS FOR YOUR barbecue

ON THE COVER

Hitting the waves at Bend’s whitewater park. PHOTO BY ADAM MCKIBBEN

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PHOTO TA MBI L ANE

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July \ August 2020


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TABLE of CONTENTS July \ August 2020

41

Departments

33

EXPLORE

Scenic Central Oregon road trips for beating cabin fever this summer

EYES ON THE SKY Central Oregon’s clear skies give way to dazzling and delightful stargazing opportunities.

47

COMMUNITY

Remembering the other quarantine | Pandemic Partners Facebook group crowdsources kindness

59

HOME

Riverside renovation in the heart of Bend | A modern remodel from the inside out

69 VENTURES

Behind the scenes with Bend TakeOut, Central Oregon’s delivery food service | Tech is booming for Bend’s Hand in Hand Productions

92

PALATE

Hawaiian-inspired deconstructed sushi at Poke Row | LaPine’s first cidery

Front Deck BEND BUZZ Bend police explore body cams | A new home for hospice CO NEWS Facebook data center | New housing for Redmond CRAFT BREWING Boneyard starts canning

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Back Deck ART BEAT Concept artist John Bell settles into Bend BOOKS Exploring rural America on the Oregon Desert Trail CULTURE BEAT Children’s Theatre creates old-fashioned serial

Also in this issue 16

Contributors

20

Editor’s Letter

22

Connect with Us

112

Scene & Heard

114

#bendmagazine

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PHOTO NATE W YE TH

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WORDS and PICTURES

CATHY CARROLL Writing for this issue about how our community responded to its last epidemic, polio in the 1950s, is the kind of story Cathy Carroll relishes—the chance to depict the caring, small-town culture that endures today (p. 53). It’s part of what lured her here from New York nearly twenty years ago, after reporting from around the world for Travel + Leisure, Travel Weekly and other national media. She’s a digital content creator, too, and loves making people laugh through sketch comedy, improv and more.

TAMBI LANE An entrepreneur at heart, Tambi has run a portrait photography business since 2006. She loves collaborating with, and supporting, other local artists. Currently, she is focused on food photography and shot our story on craft cocktails (p. 92) for this issue. She has been published in Sunset magazine and photographed two nationally published celebrity cookbooks. When she’s not cooking, eating or photographing food, you can find her in the garden, doing something outdoors or creating something new and fun. See tambilane.com and allthingsfoodbend.com. TIM LYDEN Tim Lyden relocated to Bend eight years ago after living over thirty years in Juneau, Alaska. Tim transferred his love for nature photography to Central Oregon where the roads wind longer and the sun shines brighter. That passion expanded to include Milky Way and night sky photography not readily possible with Alaska’s long summer days. You will find Tim exploring Pacific Northwest highways and byways by RV in pursuit of picturesque wildlife and scenery. His work is found in regional publications and websites. For this issue, he contributed photos to the stargazing story (p. 41). ADAM MCKIBBEN Adam McKibben likes taking pictures of people in places that make them feel the most stoked. When he was younger, he took the path given to most kids from the midwest and played in a death metal band. Maybe after a few beverages of choice, he’ll tell you about it. When not taking photos, find him riding bikes on the dusty trails of Bend, rock climbing, skiing, running, drinking coffee or eating tacos. Recently, Adam hung out at Bend’s Whitewater Park for awhile to take the cool cover image for this issue. NANCY PATTERSON Nancy Patterson was born and raised in Sonoma County, where being a ‘foodie’ is nearly a prerequisite for residency. She fell in love with Central Oregon’s eclectic restaurant scene after moving to Bend three years ago, documenting hidden restaurants, divinely crafted cocktails, and superlative dishes in her blog, Eat Drink Bend. Nancy spends most of her days photographing food and writing about all things culinary that feed her soul, including home cooking recipes she develops in the kitchen with her baking-enthusiast twoyear-old daughter, Gemma. In this issue, she wrote about craft cocktails from local spirits (p. 92). MATT WASTRADOWSKI Matt Wastradowski is a travel writer based in Portland, Oregon. He has written about beer, outdoor adventure and travel for numerous outlets—including the REI Co-op Journal, Outside, and Willamette Week—and is a co-author of the 2020 guidebook Moon Pacific Northwest Hiking. In this issue, Matt reached for the stars in our story about watching the night sky in summer (p. 41).

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Marco. Polo. Your next home is easy to ďŹ nd. Conveniently located in the middle of Bend’s west side, Discovery West is close to everything and away from it all. Near schools, parks, shops and restaurants. Intermingled with nature, trails, trees and bike paths. Discover the Bend life here. Find your way and learn more at discoverywestbend.com or visit our Discovery Pod, opening July 2020, at the corner of Skyline Ranch Road and Celilo Lane.


Publishers HEATHER HUSTON JOHNSON ROSS JOHNSON Editorial Editor in Chief KIM COOPER FINDLING Managing Editor TERESA RISTOW Design Creative Director TIFFANY PAULIN Art Director KELLY ALEXANDER Associate Creative Director and Photo Editor ALEX JORDAN Production Assistant JEREMIAH CRISP Account Executives SUSAN CROW, ELISE FRANKLIN, SAGE GRIPEKOVEN, RONNIE HARRELSON Digital Digital Manager HEATHER RENEE SPITTLER Web Development ZACK JENKS - LITEHOUSE TECH Audience Development Circulation Manager AMARA SPITTLER Newsstand Consultant ALAN CENTOFANTE Interns TOMMY GILLESPIE SAVANNA ROBINSON Contributing Writers JON ABERNATHY, CATHY CARROLL, BRONTE DOD, MARISA CHAPPELL HOSSICK, LEE LEWIS HUSK, NANCY PATTERSON, MATT WASTRADOWSKI Contributing Photographers PETE ALPORT, ROSS CHANDLER, MARISA CHAPPELL HOSSICK, EMILY JOHNSON, ALEX JORDAN, TAMBI LANE, TIM LYDEN, ADAM MCKIBBEN, TYLER ROEMER, JILL ROSELL, AUSTIN WHITE, NATE WYETH

PUBLISHED BY OREGON MEDIA Chief Executive Officer HEATHER HUSTON JOHNSON President ROSS JOHNSON Office Manager HEATHER RENEE SPITTLER Corporate Communications CLAUDIA JOHNSON Facilities BRIAN LEAHY OREGON MEDIA, LLC 974 NW RIVERSIDE BLVD. BEND, OREGON 97703 OREGON-MEDIA.COM Follow Bend Magazine FACEBOOK.COM/BENDMAGAZINE INSTAGRAM: @BENDMAGAZINE TWITTER: @BENDMAG BENDMAGAZINE.COM Subscriptions BENDMAGAZINE.COM/SUBSCRIBE All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronically or mechanically, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written permission of Oregon Media. Articles and photographs appearing in Bend Magazine may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. Bend Magazine and Oregon Media are not responsible for the return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily those of Bend Magazine, Oregon Media or its employees, staff or management. Proudly printed in Oregon.


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FROM the EDITOR

Simple Pleasures When in doubt, go outside and look up. A wise friend once said this to me, and I took these words to heart more than once this spring. The events of the first half of 2020 brought forth strong feelings for many of us. Fear. Challenge. Grief. Conflict. But a different species of feelings emerged during these times, too. Joy. Reprieve. Peace. Gratitude. Sometimes, it takes struggle to earn peace. Turbulence is unsettling, but it is also clarifying. In challenging times, we see what we are grateful for more clearly. We experience renewed appreciation for those Need Caption who matter to us, and find greater joy in simple pleasures that might otherwise have been taken for granted. In this issue, we celebrate connection with others and the many simple pleasures of life in summertime. Let’s start with stargazing. In our Nature story, writer Matt Wastradowski captures tips on an activity that is fun for the whole family and as old as time. Come August, go outside and look up, at the Milky Way and the Perseid meteor showers in the night sky. The Sunday drive is another classic family tradition. In our Explore story on scenic driving, we suggest bringing back the habit. In all directions from Bend are beautiful places of great natural variety just waiting for exploration and discovery. Grab the camera and the kids and hit the road. Or engage in no-frills activities in our summer don’t miss feature—take a dip in an alpine lake, hook a fish in a babbling stream, pitch a tent in a high desert campground, take a hike, float the river or bike a trail. Go outside and look up, at the sunny summer sky. Once you’re back home, mix up a fresh cocktail from the spirits of a local distiller with the recipes in our Palate feature. Then fire up the grill and toss on a steak from one of the local ranches featured in our story on regional artisan beef purveyors. Or maybe don’t cook at all, and instead kick back and order food delivered by business Bend Takeout, featured in our Ventures section. Even during the long sunny days of summer, arts and culture needn’t be neglected. See the modern paintings of artist John Bell in these pages, learn about the new book from renowned high desert author Ellen Waterston, and observe a mechanical pony re-envisioned in paper mache for a charity project by Bend artist Shelli Walters. Finally, on page 112, take in images of the marches for justice and equality that took place in Central Oregon in late spring. May we keep opening our minds and hearts, hold on to our gratitude, support one another, spread love, kindness and equality, and never take for granted the simple pleasures that give our lives meaning. Go outside and look up—to pause, to reflect, to hope.

Kim Cooper Findling, editor in chief

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At Seneca, our tree farm cleans the air of carbon dioxide from over 86,000 vehicles annually. Growing trees absorb carbon and release oxygen. When a tree is made into wood products, that carbon remains stored for the lifetime of the product. Seneca is proud to uphold its legacy of sustainable forestry.


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SOMETHING TO SMILE ABOUT

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Front Deck

new & next

BEND BUZZ + NEWS + BREWING

MIDTOWN

Redeveloping Bend’s Core Area THOUGH COVID-19 INTERFERED WITH THE PLANS for a $190-million-dollar transportation ballot measure this spring, the redevelopment of Bend’s midtown pushes steadily forward. On May 20, the Bend City Council adopted the plans contained in the Core Area Report, which has been in the works since early 2019. The new plan details the vision for the Core Area, which extends about three blocks east and west from NE Second Street, with northern boundaries near the top of NE Division Street and southern boundaries just beyond Crux Fermentation Project. The adoption of the plan approves property tax collection via tax increment financing, which means that property taxes from new stores, restaurants and apartments will be redirected back into the area for public projects. This is good news for the creation of a new and improved midtown, but forward momentum still depends on private investors to take the plunge and create new businesses, housing and other developments within the designated area. The Core Area has plenty of potential, and only time will tell what the future holds for Bend’s center. See bendoregon.gov for maps, plans and more information.

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Front Deck bend healthcare

A New Home for Hospice

After nearly twenty years providing endof-life care in a six-bed facility, Partners In Care is constructing a new twelve-bed Hospice House on its campus in Bend. DKA Architecture & Design is the chief architect on the project, with JBattleson as landscape architect and SunWest Builders leading the construction that just began in May. Partners In Care anticipates moving into the new 14,600-square-foot building in late 2021 and then remodeling their existing building to provide for more clinical, administrative, and community education space. These components, as well as the construction of a new parking lot, will cost an estimated $12 million. “The connection of the two buildings to the natural elements of the campus evokes a sense of tranquility and respite from the urban environment of Bend,” said CEO Eric Alexander. “My vision was to create an urban oasis that reinforced the dignity of the patients and their families using the facility.” The spacious suites will accommodate patients in a homelike setting. While it is not residential living, families will be able to spend the night, gather in beautiful common areas, or escape to private nooks to read or visit. Partners In Care is an independent nonprofit organization and Hospice House is the only facility of its kind in Oregon east of the Cascades. Over 200 staff and 150 volunteers care for hundreds of patients each day in their homes and care facilities.

education

COCC Nursing Program Gets a Boost

There’s good news for prospective students looking to join the nursing program at Central Oregon Community College. This spring the program received national accreditation and approval to expand enrollment, allowing for more future nurses in the classroom. College leaders started the lengthy application process for approval from the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing back in 2018. The new accreditation elevates the reputation of COCC’s program and allows future grads the opportunity to seek employment at veterans hospitals nationwide. Earlier this year, the Oregon State Board of Nursing approved COCC’s request for expansion in enrollment from 48 to 56 students in the nursing program annually. St. Charles Health System, the college’s primary partner for clinical education, was involved in the expansion process by permitting an additional clinical group of eight for the program’s on-site training visits. The change in cohort size will take place in the fall term, and a part-time instructor will be hired to help with the expansion. As the United States struggles with a nurse shortage, the expansion is a response to it. The nursing shortage in the U.S. is due to the baby boom generation growing older and needing care, and nurses leaving the industry that hail from the same generation. These new changes are positive news for the nursing program, which began at COCC in 1954.

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law enforcement

Bend Police Hoping to Add Body Cams

Just as protests against police brutality and in support of the Black Lives Matter movement were gaining traction across the country and here in Central Oregon, the Bend Police Department sought approval to pursue a body camera program, something the department has pursued in the past but doesn’t currently have. The department got the thumbs up June 17 to spend $100,000 to start the program, with that initial cost covering evaluation of different cameras to decide the products that would work best. Actually outfitting the department’s officers with cameras could cost upwards of $1 million, and there would be additional ongoing costs for staff and equipment to maintain the footage, fulfill public records requests and other costs. There isn’t a definite timeline for when officers would start using the body cams, and funding cuts because of the impacts of COVID-19 could complicate things, but the effort is a step toward boosting transparency when it comes to situations with law enforcement.

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Front Deck central oregon housing

New Housing on the way in Redmond A new project by Hayden Homes is poised to boost the housing supply in Redmond by 128 units in the next year, if all goes as planned. The company is aiming to break ground on Cinder Butte Village on the north end of Redmond by late fall. The project, planned for a 19.2 acre property near Tom McCall Elementary School, earned approval from the Redmond City Council during a virtual meeting in late April. The development area at NW Tenth Street and NW Upas Avenue is primarily outside city limits, but Redmond plans to annex in the land after the housing is built. The development will include seventy-five single-family homes and fiftythree smaller, higher density cottage units, a mix of housing options for prospective buyers. Developers say the new homes will be offered in line with average prices in Redmond. The first of the new homes could be available as early as next spring.

outdoors

Trail Permitting System Now Launching in 2021 It will be a bit longer before a trail permitting system for Central Oregon’s national forests will be put in place. An initial plan called for a permit requirement in certain areas of the Deschutes and Willamette forests beginning in May, but due to delays related to the COVID-19 pandemic, that date was push back a year, to May 2021. The new permitting system aims to help with overcrowding on popular trails, reduce trail widening and littering and free up parking in popular areas within the Cascades. The system will apply to nineteen of the seventy-nine hiking trails and all overnight use within the Mount Jefferson, Mount Washington and Three Sisters wilderness areas. When the system does launch in 2021, the permits will be required starting the Friday before Memorial Day through the last Friday in September. Though the permits themselves will be free, expect a small charge from recreation. gov. These permits will help regulate access to the beautiful mountain peaks within the Cascade Range, high alpine and wildflower meadows, lava flows, lakes, forests and more, for use hiking, backpacking and horseback riding. Learn more about the permitting system at fs.usda.gov.

tech

Facebook Again Breaks Ground in Prineville Social media king Facebook is once again investing in Prineville, this time with its ninth data center building in the small Central Oregon town of about 10,000 people. The social media company announced in June that construction had begun on a new building for its corporate data hub there, adding a 450,000-square-foot structure. When complete in 2023, the campus will have nine buildings totaling about 4 million square feet. Tech companies like Facebook and Apple have been drawn to Oregon’s rural communities, taking advantage of the state’s tax breaks for data centers. While the centers are huge, they aren’t big employers, only requiring a few hundred people to operate. But development on the campus, which has been ongoing for thirteen years, has kept the construction industry busy. Once the latest building is completed, Facebook will have spent more than $2 billion on the campus since first moving into Prineville, according to the company.

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Front Deck brewing WRITTEN BY JON ABERNATHY

what's brewing

Three Questions with Dustin Kellner of Worthy Brewing DUSTIN KELLNER HAS BEEN WITH WORTHY BREWING SINCE THE DOORS OPENED IN 2013, and he became brewmaster when

founding brewer Chad Kennedy departed in 2015. Kellner got his start in the industry at Seabright Brewery in Santa Cruz in 2005, before moving to Portland for a short stint at BridgePort Brewing and then landing at Laurelwood Brewing, where he worked with Kennedy for the next seven years. Before becoming a brewer, Kellner built boats and shared that he “loved the attention to detail that type of work provided.” We reached out to pose three questions to him for some behind-the-brews insight. What are your favorite styles of beer to brew, and to drink? Favorite style to brew is IPA. There seems to be no end in sight to how that style continues to evolve and include every flavor under the sun. Favorite styles to drink are definitely lagers. I love beer and I want to enjoy more than one. You can’t argue with the low ABV (alcohol by volume) and crisp, refreshing mouthfeel.

What Worthy beer are you most proud of? I’m most proud of Strata IPA. We have been brewing some version of that beer since Chad Kennedy was here. The opportunity to have access to that hop has made experimenting with it so much fun. Our beer has evolved over the years as the hop has matured with each generation and taking a silver at GABF with it was a highlight for all our brewers. If you were going to create a brew inspired by Central Oregon, what would that be? I kind of feel like we did that with Tenmile Lager (Worthy’s summer seasonal). Central Oregon for me is summed up by abundant outdoor recreation, hot summers, a deep appreciation for craft beer and an even deeper respect for Mother Nature. A crushable lager with a big dry hop nose that comes in an eco-friendly package and can be enjoyed before, during, or after any outdoor activity sums it up for me.

on tap

Boneyard in a Can The pandemic changed many things, including how people drink beer. With closures of on-site dining, draft beer sales plummeted. A Brewers Association survey in April revealed that on-premise sales declined more than 70 percent. But off-premise packaged beer saw a sales bump—with people stocking up to drink at home. Boneyard Beer felt the hit. Before April, Boneyard was exclusively all draft. After the quarantine went into effect, the brewery was

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left with unsold beer—some 3,000 kegs in warehouses around the Northwest, according to owner Tony Lawrence. Fortunately, Boneyard was able to pivot quickly into canning. “We feel very fortunate that the strength of the brand will allow us to switch to this strategy,” Lawrence said. It’s a move the brewery’s fans are loving, with its most popular beers, including RPM IPA, Incredible Pulp and Hop Venom, available now in six-packs on retail shelves.

tasting notes

Exploring New Hops with Bevel Craft Brewing Are you a hop head, always on the lookout for the latest hop varieties? If so, Bevel Craft Brewing has you covered. Hops are head brewer and co-owner Nate Doss’ preferred ingredient—he developed Bevel’s Hop Tour IPA series around the concept of showcasing individual hops to highlight their unique characteristics. Each release starts with a simple malt bill and features one hop throughout. “I use a very small amount in a first wort addition then evenly distribute between whirlpool and dry hop,” Doss said. “The idea is to accentuate each phase of the hop; bitterness, flavor and aroma. Most of the recipe decisions are based on letting the hops shine.” Recently featured varieties include Cashmere (with notes of lemon, lime, peach and melon) and Sabro (tangerine, coconut and tropical fruit). Watch for the Enigma version this summer; it’s an Australian hop that promises notes of pinot gris, raspberries and red currant—a perfectly hoppy summer spritzer!

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EXPLORE

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tock the car with a picnic, water, the kids and the dog—it’s time for a road trip! From Bend, picturesque driving opportunities can be found in all directions. Here are three of our favorite scenic byways to get you out of the house and into the beauty of Oregon in a halfday’s drive.

SCENIC DRIVING

Road Trip! Scenic byways make for vivid day trip exploration WRITTEN BY KIM COOPER FINDLING

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PHOTO AUS TIN WHITE

tock the car with a picnic, water, the kids and the dog—it’s time for a road trip! From Bend, picturesque driving and sightseeing opportunities can be found in all directions. Here are three of our favorite scenic byways to get you out of the house and into the beauty of Oregon in a half-day’s drive.

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EXPLORE

PHOTO LEFT COURTESY DESCHUTES LAND TRUST/JOAN AMERO

Give the high desert a fair chance to work its magic, and it surely will. The desert is one of the last best Oregon surprises for many people. The wide-open skies, expansive vistas and clarifying austerity dig their way into your psyche. Just a couple of hours south of Bend, off of Highway 31, is Oregon’s Outback. South of LaPine, the road travels through miles of pine forest before emerging into the sagebrush covered high desert, punctuated with rimrock and the occasional ranch homestead. First you’ll encounter Hole in the Ground, which is exactly what it sounds like. Hike its rim and continue to Fort Rock, a massive, eroded, volcanic tuff ring unlike anything you’ve ever seen. Capture a selfie with the looming monolith, and zoom south through the small town of Silver Lake. Soon enough you’ll climb over Picture Rock Pass, so named for petroglyphs carved into the rocks at the flat top of the summit. Take a walk and keep your eyes peeled—you’ll find the figures of animals and humans clearly visible in the rock. From here the highway drops down into the Summer Lake basin, the alkaline remains of the former Lake Chewaucan, one of the largest water bodies in the region, had you been here 13,000 years ago. This basin is now a flat, bleached expanse, at the south end of which is Summer Lake Hot Springs, a gathering place for hundreds of years, with hot, healing waters as the draw. Today, Summer Lake Hot Springs is a developed place of respite and lodging that remains a destination for desert-lovers and hot springs aficionados from all over the West. Stop in for a soak and then continue to Paisley and dinner at the historic Pioneer Saloon.

PHOTOS TOP ROW: FELIX WITTERN, GEORGE OSTERTAG / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO, JAK WONDERLY, BOTTOM ROW: ALEX JORDAN

OREGON OUTBACK

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EXPLORE

Summer Lake Hot Springs

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EXPLORE

t Obse Dee Wrigh

rvatory

Choose a beautiful summer day and head west out of Sisters past the high school to reach the outset of Highway 242. Casually, 242 is known as the Old McKenzie Highway. It was constructed as a highway in the 1920s, but the route already existed as a wagon trail, established in the 1860s. Today, 242 is open seasonally and offers tremendous views of the Cascade Range, up-close angles of lava beds and access to waterfalls and hot springs. Stop first at the Dee Wright Observatory, built by a Civilian Conservation Corps crew in the 1930s. This open shelter built from the volcanic basalt that surrounds it has open-air windows framing the Cascade peaks. A peak finder helps you name the mountains you see. Hike the half-mile Lava River Interpretive Trail, which begins at the observatory, and is paved and all-abilities friendly. Then continue west through a spectacular forest of Douglas fir, hemlock and alder. Near the west end of Highway 242, a short loop hike takes you to Proxy Falls, one of the most frequently photographed waterfalls in Oregon. Grab a picture and continue on 242 to where it joins Highway 126. Just past this junction you’ll find Belknap Lodge and Hot Springs. A natural hot spring source feeds the soaking pools, set in spectacular landscaped grounds with a view of the spring-fed McKenzie River.

Sparks Lake

Proxy Falls 36

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PHOTO LEFT ALEX JORDAN

OLD MCKENZIE HIGHWAY


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EXPLORE

Sparks Lake

Elk Lake

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Cascade Lakes Highway is Bend’s backyard playground. A wagon road was constructed between Bend and Elk Lake in the 1920s, and the region has been a destination ever since. This National Scenic Byway begins with the route from Bend to Mount Bachelor, which is open year-round. Beyond Bachelor, the highway is plowed and open in May or June each year. From there, the road hopscotches a series of mountain lakes to the west and south. Take in incredible views of Broken Top and the Three Sisters, and then make a steep and winding descent past Todd Lake and Sparks Lake, from which you can capture a cool view of the backside of Bachelor. All of these mountains are volcanoes, and the legacy of lava is everywhere. Catch the jagged lava flow on the right of the road just after Sparks Lake and before Devil’s Lake, which is also near the trailhead to the summit of South Sister, if you’re so inclined. At Elk Lake, grab an ice cream cone, a beach-front spot, visit the Elk Lake Guard Station, rent a standup paddleboard or a boat, or grab a burger or a six-pack. On the way back into town, consider partaking in a sunset dinner at Mount Bachelor (advance reservations required). Return to Bend with your scenery-loving soul satisfied.

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PHOTOS TOP TO BOTTOM ALEX JORDAN, BUDDY MAYS, DENNIS FRATES / AL AMY STOCK PHOTO

CASCADE LAKES HIGHWAY


find your space to play.

It’s summer and you want to play. It’s okay, you can with a few rules. Distancing is a must when you visit a Bend Park & Recreation District park, trail, recreation center and even the river. •

Stay six feet from others, indoors and out.

Visit less popular parks and trails or at less busy times.

Go only with your household or in a small group.

Keep dogs on leash. It’s the law in Bend.

Wash your hands before and after a visit.

Follow local and national health guidance.

If you’re sick, stay home.

For more on distancing done right and playing it safe this summer, visit bendparksandrec.org.

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NATURE

NIGHT SK Y

Just Look Up Summer stargazing dazzles and delights WRITTEN BY MATT WASTRADOWSKI

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how long it took light to travel that distance). “If you think about it, you’re looking back in time every time you look through a telescope,” he said. Here in Central Oregon, very little light pollution dampens the nighttime glow, and the Cascades break up most storms before they arrive in the region—leading to clearer skies with fewer clouds. Even better is that starry night skies are free for all to enjoy. All you have to do is step outside. If you’d like to try stargazing this summer, here’s what to know for getting started—and what you might see on a given night. You’ll have millions of years’ worth of galactic wonders to keep you busy.

PHOTO TIM LYDEN

hen most of us look to the night sky, we see pulsing planets and satellites skittering across the stars. If we’re lucky, we might catch a meteoroid burning up in the Earth’s atmosphere. But when Bob Grossfeld looks into the night sky above Central Oregon, he sees multiple galaxies and millions of years into the past—literally. Grossfeld, observatory manager at the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, said the closest neighboring galaxy sits roughly 2.5 million light-years away from our Milky Way. So, when he peers into a telescope to spy the Andromeda Galaxy, Grossfeld sees what it looked like more than 2 million years ago (since that’s

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NATURE

HOW TO GET STARTED AS AN AMATEUR ASTRONOMER

Most telescopes—the kind you find at big-box stores—do some things well, but nothing well enough to justify the investment, according to Grossfeld. Instead, he recommends a decent pair of binoculars. “Usually, binoculars are more usable than the telescope would have been,” he said. Grossfeld also suggests downloading a mobile app—Star Chart and Sky Guide, to name two—for basic details, such as stars, planets and constellations. The apps use augmented reality to identify visible features in the night sky—requiring only that users point their phone or tablet skyward to identify what they’re currently viewing. For a deeper dive, Grossfeld recommends reading Astronomy Magazine for star charts and in-depth information about what you may see in a given week—such as satellites, comets, and more.

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PHOTO TOP NATE WYETH, BOTTOM AUSTIN WHITE

WHERE TO GO STARGAZING

The most important piece of equipment isn’t a telescope or binoculars; it’s the dark night sky, Grossfeld said. “You just need to be able to get away from city lights as much as possible,” he said. Nearby mountain highways and the endless high desert alike offer ample opportunities for easy, yet rewarding stargazing. One idea is to visit the sno-parks surrounding Mount Bachelor—like Dutchman Sno-Park. You’re at a high enough elevation and far enough away from the city to enjoy dark night skies, he said, and the iconic peak makes a nice backdrop as the stars come out. East of Bend, try the Oregon Badlands Wilderness and small communities, such as Brothers. You’ll find almost no light pollution between Bend and Burns, leading to darker, more dramatic skies.


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NATURE

Dark skies over Central Oregon mean an embarrassment of astronomical riches for even first-time astronomers. For instance, nearly a dozen major meteor showers can be seen this summer—including the famous Perseid meteor shower, taking place between mid-July and mid-August. Stargazers can also spy Jupiter and Saturn—which Grossfeld calls “the two best planets to look at in the sky.” Jupiter’s moons can be seen with a pair of binoculars, as can Saturn’s iconic rings. To the south, the Milky Way can be seen on moonless nights— specifically, the area of the Milky Way where new stars are formed. Grossfeld said, “With a pair of binoculars, you can see most of the cool features in the center of the galaxy.

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PHOTOS TIM LYDEN

WHAT CAN YOU SEE IN CENTRAL OREGON’S STARRY NIGHT SKIES?



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COMMUNITY PHIL ANTHROPY

A New Life for Cassidy Bend artist reimagines a pony in support of meaningful cause WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARISA CHAPPELL HOSSICK

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PURSUITS

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ou remember them. The ponies that would wait anchored at the door of the grocery store to delight children. A spare quarter brought a land of imagination, a few moments locked in an unwinnable race with the neighboring child and pony. These halcyon throwbacks of childhood have all but disappeared, but long forgotten moments have a way of bubbling back to the surface in the most unexpected ways. Last fall, local artist Shelli Walters was asked to use her beautiful collage talents to re-imagine one of those mechanical ponies, pulled from storage and unused for decades. Walters is the only artist from Central Oregon chosen to join a team from across the country to participate in the Pony Up Quarter Horse Project. When complete, a collection of thirty “quarter horses” will travel throughout the United States before they are auctioned as pieces of art. Proceeds from the project will support a nonprofit called Wade’s House, which provides a peaceful sanctuary on the Oregon Coast for free to grieving families who have lost children.

Walters had an instant connection to the project. Aside from a lifelong love of horses and nature, her family knows the loss of children. Two of her older sisters tragically passed away young. For Walters, there was no question about getting involved. When her pony arrived, it was completely white, a blank slate waiting for a new story. The Grateful Dead song “Cassidy” came to Walters’ mind right away. Her older sister Rhonda was a huge fan, so the song’s musings about the cycle of life seemed to fit. The notion of how when something ends, something else begins, resonated. Walters noticed the copyright date on the bottom of the horse was the same year her sister was born, and on a whim, she added up the individual digits of the patent number to find that sum equaled the age Rhonda was when she had died. “It felt like an invitation from the universe to play. I would layer thoughts, memories, experiences and part of myself in this piece to create something new while honoring my sisters,” Walters said. Initially challenged by Cassidy’s plastic saddle, an unwanted tether to a former life, Walters decided to build up the pony’s body with paper mache. “I wondered how I could free her from this encumbrance,” Walters said. “I thought about how we must move on from the trappings of our past in order to find our true paths. How could

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hen Sister Catherine Hellmann arrived in 1948, Bend was an emerging mill town of 10,000 people. A nurse by training, Hellman was sent by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Indiana to work as the nursing supervisor at St. Charles hospital in downtown Bend. Hellmann, then just 27 years old, had dedicated her life to service. Though her initial stay spanned just three years, it had a lasting impression on Hellman that changed the course of health care in Central Oregon. Years before, a chance meeting on a ship returning from Ireland in 1908 between Father Luke Sheehan, a Catholic priest from Bend and founder of St. Francis Church and school, and Mother Gertrude Moffitt, a nun from Indiana, would mark the beginning

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PURSUITS

Cassidy start fresh? The smooth new lines created by the paper mache set her out on her new life with a robust body to hold a big heart and an even bigger spirit.” From that point on, Walters said, “working with Cassidy was like butter. The project flowed that easily.” Walters thought about all the children who had climbed on Cassidy’s back. All the adventures the pony had through those young and free imaginations. The new coat of Cassidy would be a storybook of these adventures—wild places to explore in the mind through mountains, rivers and untamed landscapes. Walters describes her artistic process as getting into a flow state where she is no longer thinking, she is just doing. As she layers paint, torn pieces of sheet music, painted paper, handwriting and scraps of topographical map, organic shapes begin to form. After a while, Walters could clearly see the shape of a bird in flight amongst the layers of collage. This fit. The theme of being wild and free kept coming up, inspiring the addition of a whimsical bird perched on Cassidy’s back. Both animals are rooted in earthy browns and rusts, creamy whites and

natural grays and blues. The color palette feels like an abstract nod to the patchy look of a painted pony. Walters is exuberant about the final product. “I feel honored to have been given the delightful opportunity to create a new life for Cassidy,” she said. “I wanted to set her free, back into nature with a big heart and a joyful spirit. I love how the paper mache gave her a bold new shape and the arrival of her feathered friend means that she will never be alone.” Cassidy, along with Walters’ other works of art, give the viewer an opportunity to look deeply into the image of a landscape or animal. Each person sees something a little different, drawing from their own memories and experiences. As her website describes, Walters’ pieces come from moments when she has been “awake with nature and tapped into its incredible spiritual energy and infinite beauty.”

“The smooth new lines created by the paper mache set her out on her new life with a robust body to hold a big heart and an even bigger spirit.”

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To enjoy more of Walters’ art, stop by Tumalo Art Company and visit her online at shelliwaltersstudio.com. To learn more about Wade’s House, see silverherongallery.com/ programs.wadeshouse.cfm

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HERITAGE

19 50 s

The Other Quarantine One Bend family’s efforts to overcome the polio epidemic WRITTEN BY CATHY CARROLL

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arnings everywhere to wash hands. Fever monitoring. Quarantine. Events cancelled, theaters closed and a massive push for a vaccine. It may sound like the stuff of 2020, but it played out across America before, and not all that long ago. 1952 was the peak of the country’s polio epidemic, which resulted in decades of crippling and deaths for thousands. Like coronavirus, the first major outbreak of polio in the U.S. struck in New York, in 1916. The scourge spread west, gripping the country with fear along its trajectory. Polio didn’t spare its wrath in Central Oregon, a small, tight-knit timber town with a fraction of the population it has today. “We were like the entire country,” said Kelly Cannon-Miller, executive director of the Deschutes County Historical Society. “From 1915 to 1955, every summer was polio season. Every summer, parents were afraid. Boomers now in their 70s and 80s remember their parents checking them for fever, intestinal discomfort, any sign that their arm, leg or neck was not moving right.” During polio season, health officials employed many of the same tactics as those used to f latten the curve of COVID-19. The two viruses also share the insidiousness of ability to spread by people who have no symptoms of the illness, but who carry and transmit it. Panic around polio began in the late 1940s, as outbreaks in the United States grew, mainly targeting children, although perhaps the disease’s most famous victim was an adult, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The epidemic reached a crescendo in 1952, when about 58,000 contracted the disease and more than 3,000 died.

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The race for a vaccine was on, led by the March of Dimes, which recruited millions of volunteers who collected dimes in cans and raised hundreds of millions of dollars for the cause. By 1954, with the grassroots movement funding the research of Dr. Jonas Salk, nearly two million school children participated in the vaccine’s field trial. Starting on April 26 of that year in Virginia, it was the largest medical experiment in history.

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HERITAGE

LEFT The highly infectious virus polio could paralyze the lungs as well as the limbs. The iron lung, invented in the 1920s, was a mechanical respirator that helped polio sufferers to breath. Here, George Ray reclines in an iron lung in Portland in 1954. BELOW When St. Charles Hospital acquired an iron lung in 1958, The Bend Bulletin reported on the story. BOTTOM George Ray, pre-polio, 1950.

POLIO PLAYS OUT IN BEND

Across the country a few weeks later, George Ray was celebrating Father’s Day in Bend with his wife, Shirley, and their 2-year-old daughter, Myrna. George, 27, had been promoted to a sales job at one of Bend’s major timber firms, Leonard Lundgren Lumber Company. He’d worked his way up from jobs in the woods and on the “green chain,” pulling boards out of the sawmill, and now had the chance to leverage his degree from Oregon State University. Shirley told him to treat himself to some fishing with a buddy that Father’s Day, and that night they went to the drive-in to catch The Moon Is Blue, starring William Holden. The next day, George told Shirley he was feeling achy. By Tuesday it was worse. By Wednesday he was in St. Charles Hospital and quickly transferred to Portland, where doctors were more experienced in treating polio. Paralysis struck his legs, arms and respiratory system. Doctors slid him on a cot into an “iron lung,” a long metal tank respirator, the precursor of the modern ventilator. By fall, Ray was able to breathe on his own and return to Bend. Undaunted by his paralyzed legs and left arm, he returned to work. His new sales job was done mostly by phone and he had enough strength in his right arm to use one. He couldn’t push himself in his wheelchair, but after reading a magazine article about the latest electric model, he eventually found one, said his daughter, Myrna Ray Klupenger, who now lives in Florence, Oregon. Polio may have stolen her father’s mobility, but not his entrepreneurial skills or the dedication of friends—making possible

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HELPING HERITAGE HANDS

his civic involvement and philanthropy which reverberates through the community to this day. One of those friends was Norbert “Blackie” Schaedler, a mechanic at the Lundgren mill. “He designed Dad’s little red car,” Klupenger said. The electric, threewheeled vehicle, inspired by a golf cart, was level to the curb so Ray could roll his wheelchair onto it. The steering wheel was like a boat tiller which he could operate single-handedly. “It was amazing,” Klupenger said. “It was completely open to the weather—Mom would bundle him up. It had a strap kind of seat belt and he went off to work on his own. There was a seat in back for me and Mom. People all over town knew him and that little red car and he went to all the football, basketball and sporting events.” Schaedler also devised a lift with straps that could carry his friend from his wheelchair to the family station wagon, his bed and bath. Ray became an independent lumber broker and partnered with another friend from the mill in opening a lumber yard. Shirley worked full time, managing The Pine Tavern restaurant, co-founded by her aunt, Maren Gribskov. “They decided to live on one income and save the rest, and Dad liked the stock market,” Klupenger said. “They were wise investors and not spendthrift.” The Rays supported St. Charles Hospital and Shirley organized local fundraisers for the March of Dimes. After George died of pancreatic cancer in 1988 at age 61, Shirley continued supporting local nonprofits including the Central Oregon Community College Foundation, Cascade Culinary Institute and OSU-Cascades before she died in 2018 at age 91.

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LEFT Shirley and George Ray were thrifty and philanthropic, and their contributions to Bend linger to this day. Here is the couple with an iron lung in 1954. TOP RIGHT George Ray at a family gathering in 1981, seven years before his death at the age of 61 from cancer. BOTTOM RIGHT A friend and mechanic designed and built this vehicle for George Ray, which he called his “little red car,” pictured here in 1956. With it, he was independent despite paralysis, and could get himself around town on his own.

“Shirley Ray’s philanthropy is becoming legendary now, but they were very quiet about it,” said Cannon-Miller. Cannon-Miller reflected on the era before vaccines eradicated so many diseases. “We have lost our use and practice of quarantine as a first line of defense,” she said. “Modern medicine has made that largely unnecessary for humans for several decades now. It’s harder for us to accept and understand what’s happening because we’re out of practice. We haven’t had to do this for a very, very, very long time.”

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HELPING HANDS

CONNEC TION

Crowdsourcing Kindness How a Facebook group helped Bend through the COVID-19 pandemic WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW

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t was a couple weeks before much of Central Oregon would shut down and days before toilet paper would become strangely in-demand. But talks of staying at home were looming, and Pastor Morgan Schmidt of First Presbyterian in Bend was brainstorming with other pastors about how to stay connected while staying home. “We were discussing, how do we stay in touch, stay connected and keep caring for our community in the midst of whatever this was going to turn into,” Schmidt said. At 35 and a female, Schmidt isn’t your typical pastor—she runs the teen group at First Presbyterian and hosts Tap, a Sunday evening church service with beer and kombucha. So it’s only fitting that Schmidt had a modern idea for staying connected during the pandemic—a Facebook group. It would be a digital bulletin board where people could seek out items and information, and others could reply and provide what was needed. Within the first six hours after Schmidt created the group, named “Pandemic PartnersBend,” it had grown to 3,000 members. “All I did was invite my friends, and they invited their friends,” she said. “A lot of it was kind of the timing of people who were panicking a little bit, and facing the unknown.” The group became wildly popular overnight, with dozens of posts from residents seeking information, food and supplies and others looking to help. Someone nervous to leave the house was seeking lemons and honey. Another was offering up their unused meal kit. There were lots of trips to The Giving Plate, offers to go grocery shopping, and porch pickups and drop-offs of necessities. “The way the community responded was incredibly humbling,” Schmidt said. The group grew to more than 11,000. Schmidt connected with local nonprofits to help ensure residents were finding the best resources, and brought on about fifteen other people to help moderate the J U LY \ A U G U S T 202 0

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conversations, no small task. A phone helpline was launched to take requests from people who weren’t able to use Facebook. Soon, Schmidt was helping people in other communities start their own Pandemic Partners groups, with dozens of new chapters launching. She watched as community members connected with people they may never have otherwise. “Someone from Awbrey Butte was taking propane to someone camping off the grid in China Hat,” Schmidt said. “Neighbors are seeing each other in different ways, as human beings.” As the impacts of the pandemic lessen, Schmidt isn’t sure what the future of the group holds, but she hopes the kindness practiced will continue in the community. “There will only be a new normal, and we get to have a part in writing that story and deciding what the new normal looks like,” Schmidt said. “I think probably the energy will change, but I think there is always room for kindness.”

Compañeros en Pandemia As the Pandemic Partners crowdsourcing group exploded in popularity this spring, Jason Villanueva watched, eager to bring the same concept to the Spanish-speaking community of Central Oregon. “I wanted to create a platform to gather information and resources that were coming about, posting them in Spanish and providing assistance and connecting families in need,” said Villanueva, who is a community health worker at Mosaic Medical in Redmond. Villanueva connected with Schmidt at Pandemic Partners, who helped provide a logo, and launched Compañeros en Pandemia, a Spanish language group with a similar mission. With so much news and information coming out about the pandemic, Villanueva said it was important to provide a place for accurate, reliable info and resources for Spanish speakers in Central Oregon. The group has allowed families to receive food boxes, financial assistance and other help and has become a safe, trustworthy place for info.

Pastor Morgan Schmidt

Villanueva hopes to use the group as a foundation to build a permanent organization or resource center for Spanish speakers. He said, “I think the possibilities through this could be endless.”

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Jayson Bowerman

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t’s hard to imagine a home more perfectly aligned with a family’s narrative than the Jayson and Megan Bowerman home located on the Deschutes River between the Bend Whitewater Park and Drake Park. The renovated residence blends a historic Craftsman bungalow with a contemporary addition for a home befitting their love of the river and the eclectic neighborhood of “Whiskey Flats” in the heart of Bend. “I literally grew up in the bottom of a canoe,” said Bowerman, who was raised in Sunriver. “The Deschutes River has been my teacher my entire life, as well as my training grounds when I was a competitive whitewater kayaker as a young man.” As a member of the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance, he helped raise community support and funding to build the whitewater park before its completion in 2015. Megan and Jayson met while Jayson was living near Tumalo, from which he felt “enslaved to my steering wheel while driving to Bend all the time.” Meg was living only blocks from where they currently reside, and Jayson realized that he had a “deep need” to be back in the heart of the community. The couple bought the home in 2013, believed to have been built by Bend ski pioneer Nels Skjersaa in 1917. They loved the location and the structure’s historic roots, despite the dilapidated kitchen and the cottage’s small size (1,040 square feet). In 2016, with their first child on the way, they hired longtime friend and home designer, John Jordan, to envision a remodel that would preserve the original house as much as possible, while integrating a new two-story addition.

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THE CHALLENGE BEGINS

Creating enough space for a growing family would hardly be a straightforward task since the footprint of the dwelling would be tightly constrained by the small lot size and a forty-foot riparian setback from the river’s steep, diagonal bank, as required by Bend city code. The first major decision was what to do with a beloved detached “boathouse” near the water’s edge. In 2015, the boathouse had flooded, and Jordan suggested that if they demolished the structure, new design opportunities would open up. The Bowermans decided to tear it down. The next big decision was what do with the century-old house— demolish it too, and start anew, or preserve the old? The structure wasn’t square to the property lines, it had been sitting on soggy, water-table soil and a new roof installed in the 1990s was underbuilt. The builder they chose, Dean Edleston of Monolithic Builders, faced many logistical challenges, including finding a drop site for materials and tools, parking for subcontractors and bringing crane to the site multiple times to supply the addition. But the character, history and appearance of the home were important to the Bowermans, and consistent with the neighborhood, so they decided to build an addition that would straddle a second story over the original craftsman and create new space extending off the backside. Jayson said they spent two years developing plans and let the architectural vocabulary of the early craftsman—from gables and molding to door styles—dictate overall design. To tie the two structures together, the design would match roof pitch, siding and

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windows and copy bracing and other features of the original home but in a larger, more contemporary format throughout the addition. In 2018, with permits in hand, they demolished the master bedroom, kitchen and sunroom. They removed some of the original lath and plaster walls and parts of the hand-stacked foundation to incorporate structural steel framing to support the second story. “It was a big job,” Edleston said, adding that Bend Welding spent a couple days bolting the steel supports to the foundation. The remodeled home would end up with 2,700 square feet of combined space encompassing four bedrooms, three-and-a-half baths, laundry and mud room, with river views from nearly every room, as well as two covered decks. Exterior colors—aspen bark and red clay for trim and sage green for the body—create a seamless impression from front to back. “The plan was to make the new and old look like they’ve always been there,” Edleston said. “Kudos to John and Jayson who spent a lot of time on the initial designs.” The final layout retained the front porch and front door, which lead to a “pick-n-parlor” music room. Jayson completed a luthier apprenticeship with Kim Breedlove in the mid-1990s and after fifteen years at Breedlove Guitar Co. went on to form Bowerman Guitars. Today he handcrafts custom guitars, mandolins and other string instruments for musicians worldwide. The historic first floor also includes a guest bedroom, bath, mechanical room, and utility and laundry room. A hallway ushers

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guests out of the traditional bungalow into a contemporary craftsman structure with 21st century amenities and upgrades. The wood-beamed great room is cozy yet open. The panoramic four-panel glass (yes, glass) door opens wide to extend the living room outside to the covered deck in warm weather. A mudroom with lockers for each family member is conveniently accessed from the kitchen and leads to the garage and backyard. The second story, which overlaps part of the original structure, contains three bedrooms and a deck off the master.

INFUSING ARCHITECTURE WITH PERSONALITY

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The Bowermans’ personal touch and stories permeate the remodel. The window, door, baseboard and box-beam trim came from reclaimed fir bleacher boards which Jayson found in Seattle and hauled back to Bend in a trailer during the “snowpocalypse” of 2018. “We spent days scraping miles of bubblegum off the wood,” Edleston said with a laugh. He estimates that they plugged about 1,500

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bolt holes, but the result is trim that “looks historic and will age beautifully.” The couple retained the original front door, including its skeleton key lock. And instead of ripping out the old fir floors, they stripped the fir and chose a compatible narrow-plank white oak for the new section. “Those guys have really good taste,” Edleston said. The family searched out vintage fixtures for the old house, including a cast-iron enamel laundry sink from the historic Dalles Hotel, and rejuvenated the plaster walls with ageappropriate push button light switches. The couple built the fireplace mantel and kitchen pantry shelving from a windfall maple salvaged from the farm of Bill and Barbara Bowerman, Jayson’s grandparents. The two decks are wide-plank Port Orford Cedar, a durable Oregon timber that Jayson says never splinters and remains soft to bare feet. With the help of interior designer Kelly Warner, the couple chose slabs of quartzite that mimic the river. Edleston said it’s “the most beautiful quartzite I’ve seen in my life.” The kitchen also has a unique window cabinet through which the outside shines through. The couple is grateful to its team of designers and builders who persisted through various challenges. “We have an addition that is both beautiful and functional while meeting our design goal of being a modern home which received its architectural bloodlines very clearly from the old mill house,” Jayson said. In late 2019, the Bowerman family, which now includes their second child, moved into the home. They look forward to daily canoe paddles with their two young boys. And anyone who knows Jayson suspects it won’t be long before his kids are riding the waves with him.

Resources

Designer: John Jordan, Evolution Home Design Builder: Dean Edleston, Monolithic Builders Interior: Kelly Warner, Kelly Warner Interior Design Landscape: Chris Hart-Henderson, Heart Springs

Landscape Design

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Modern Masterpiece Stripped to the studs and rebuilt, this remodel exudes contemporary cool PHOTO BY AMY BILLINGS

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collaboration between Design Bar LLC, LivBend Real Estate and Trueline Capital, this full-home remodel was a true ‘f lip.’ “We gutted the home down to its studs, redesigned the interior space plan, and rebuilt it from the inside out,” said designer Anne Mastalir. The team blended modern finishes and rustic character with cool, industrial twists, creating a gorgeous final product. “The stunning result showcases a fusion of aesthetics, a strong indoor/outdoor connection and globally inspired custom elements, making the project truly unique and truly Bend.”

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Hardwood floors: Duchateau, Chateau white oiled, sold through Design Bar

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Fireplace stone: Calacatta Cressa stacked stone ledger panels Countertops: Misterio by PentalQuartz, installed by Leading

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4 Occasional Chairs: Barcelona chairs by Knoll; Sectional Sofa: By Minotti

5 Custom barn doors designed by Design Bar

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TA K E O U T

VENTURES

Delivering the Goods Locally built Bend TakeOut links restaurants and hungry homebodies WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW

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VENTURES

“I remember the driver actually stopping at the store and getting a bottle of ranch for the customer.”

Angie Bove and Phil Geiger

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hen Phil Geiger moved to Central Oregon in the late 1990s to snowboard, he held a few different jobs before signing on to be a driver for a small restaurant takeout delivery business. But before he even got comfortable in the new position, the company’s owner told Geiger he was behind on payments to restaurants and planned to declare bankruptcy. In an effort to keep the business running, Geiger bought the company for $1 from the original owner, agreeing to slowly pay

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the restaurants back if they would continue working with him. “I went to every restaurant we delivered for, and said that I would take on his debt,” Geiger said. All of the restaurants— about a dozen—agreed, and just like that, Bend TakeOut had a chance at survival, and success. In those early days, Geiger was busy building the company’s first website on dialup internet, uploading copies of menus from the restaurants they worked with. It was years before a company like GrubHub would make its way to Central Oregon and a decade before DoorDash was even conceived, so not

everyone really got what Geiger’s company was all about. “People didn’t understand what we were doing—they would think they were calling the restaurant, even though it was our number on the site,” he said. Staff spent a lot of time on the phone, describing menu items to customers, placing orders and then using walkie talkies to relay directions to drivers. Drivers then used map books to navigate around town. Geiger remembers instructing his employees to “stand in a certain spot, and hold the radio above your head to get better reception.” To keep busy and continue growing their customer base, the company rarely said no to requests, even those that were a bit off the wall. “We’d never say no,” Geiger said. “I was just trying to keep drivers as busy as possible.” Co-owner Angie Bove, who started with Bend TakeOut about ten years ago as a driver, said she remembers drivers stopping by the store to pick up extra things for customers on their way to deliver orders. Bove recalled one regular customer who loved ranch dressing and had requested it from a restaurant that was all out. “I remember the driver actually stopping at the store and getting a bottle of ranch for the customer,” Bove said. Over the years, the company has grown to serve more restaurants around the region, and technology, including tablets for restaurants and an app for customers, has evolved to make the process of ordering and delivering simpler. The company also launched its takeout delivery service in Redmond. “We’ve been in town fifteen years now, and we have a big customer base,” said Bove, who worked her way up from a

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driver, to dispatcher, to account manager and part owner over the years. Both Bove and Geiger agreed that when companies like GrubHub, DoorDash and UberEats started serving Central Oregon, they worried it might impact their business. But the company is local and does things a bit differently, Bove said. “We all have different models of business,” she said. “And we think there is enough delivery business for everyone.” For one thing, Bend TakeOut works with a courier service to ensure someone is always on staff to deliver, unlike some of the apps that allow drivers to set their own schedules, risking having no one available on a busy night. Bend TakeOut also has a minimum order amount and sets delivery fees based on the distance between a restaurant and delivery address—an amount that goes directly to a driver. This spring, business was busy, but different, at Bend TakeOut, as restaurants navigated the impacts of COVID-19. The company started working with new restaurants and receiving more individual orders, but less big office orders, Bove said. Today, the company works with about fifty restaurants, many of whom also work with other delivery services, offering customers more options.

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And while that competition keeps the takeout delivery space more competitive in Central Oregon, the owners say what sets Bend TakeOut apart from its competitors is that the company is local. “We’ve lived in Bend for a long time, and we love it here,” Geiger said. “And if you have a problem, you can always pick up the phone and talk to someone.”

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INTERVIEW

VIDEO

Hand in Hand Productions Matt Hand provides tech help for the masses in the digital age INTERVIEW BY KIM COOPER FINDLING

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att Hand started his career in 1994 at BendBroadband, where he built COTV BendBroadband Channel 11. Ten years later, he established his own company, Hand in Hand Productions—the name stemming from his own surname as well as his skills at working hand in hand to help clients and organizations with their video production needs. Today, his company creates story videos, produces content, live-streams meetings and handles all things audiovisual. Here, Hand answers questions about the power of video, compelling storytelling and our pivoting tech-life during COVID-19.

Your Facebook page refers to you as a “card-carrying AV geek.” Tell us about your love of all things AV and how it came to be. My third-grade teacher was the person I can credit with beginning this journey. We made a class film. Yes, it was film as it was shot on super 8 film. This process created a passion for visual storytelling and the way that audiovisual can combine to become a better way to tell stories. All through junior and high school I always knew that I loved working on videos and as time progressed, I just got more and more into it. You’re a Bend native, right? What’s it been like to be in this town for so many years, and grow a business here? While I am not a true native, I moved here when I was 3 and have lived here ever since. It has been truly interesting watching this town grow into a city. Advances in technology have allowed me to stay here in Bend and give back to the community I grew up in.

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Behind the scenes at a live production.

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You’ve worked on some big deal events around town over the years, including TEDxBend, Bend Venture Conference, Bend Design, EDCO’s Pub Talk and EDCO’s Annual Lunch, to name a few. How do you handle the pressure? Interesting question, really. I build great teams around me. I have been incredibly fortunate to find some very talented people in the community. I allow them to help me sort things out. My brain seems to be wired to continually strive for improvement which allows me to see my way out of some complex situations.

Coffelt. We decided to just start doing programming for businesses. In the process of building the shows she and I were working on, the doors opened up to more and more clients that needed high-production for virtual events. Affton pivoted her business and fortunately got busy—she occasionally still joins me. My biggest focus now is directing virtual events that engage people from around the nation and, for a couple of projects, from around the world. It is so enjoyable to be able to help provide better production in this time of chaos.

COVID-19 made AV capability suddenly crucial to a lot more people. Tell us what changed for you and your business during this time and how you responded. I had been specializing a lot on story videos and on-location production. When the lockdowns started, I suddenly became unemployed. I had been working on a podcast with Broken Top Candle Company’s CEO and Founder Affton

What do you love most about your work? What is your biggest challenge? I love the stories that I get to tell and share through the interviews, events and videos I help create, manage and produce. The biggest challenge is the daily grind of constant improvement in technology and being able to offer our clients these improvements.

Got any good AV disaster stories? No comment! Seriously, I have been pretty fortunate over the years. The projects I have learned the most from were those in which I pushed to do something bigger and ran out of time to make it as big as I wanted. However, failure is an event, not a person, as Zig Ziglar once said. We pick up the pieces and move on with a greater amount of knowledge. Anything else you’d like us to know? I launched the local interview podcast, “Show Up Central Oregon,” right at the start of the COVID-19 quarantine. I have been incredibly moved by all of the stories of compassion that have revealed themselves. It is such a privilege to be doing regular interviews with community and thought leaders including State Representative Cheri Helt, Business Oregon’s Tom Schnell, Mayor of Bend Sally Russell and Affton Coffelt from Broken Top Candle Company. I truly feel blessed to live in this community. You can find more information about Show Up Central Oregon at facebook.com/showupcentraloregon.

BY THE NUMBERS

TECH OVERLOAD Use of remote video and other tech explodes in 2020

Sources: OKTA, Zoom, NPD

DAILY ZOOM MEETING PARTICIPANTS

300 million+ – April 2020

GROWTH IN APP USE FROM FEBRUARY TO MARCH 2020

10 million – December 2019

Zoom +110%

200 million – March 2020

DURING ONE WEEK IN APRIL… +70% networking equipment sales + 86% TV sales +147% microphone sales over 2019

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ong before the ski lifts, the wave park and the mountain bike trails, Central Oregon’s rolling grass meadows and forest wilderness were home to cattle ranches. This region, with air fragrant with sage under pure blue skies, is a perfect setting for raising beef. As we fire up our grills this season, we’ll want to bring local beef goodness, sizzling and juicy, straight to our plates. Take our advice—make a beeline (or go online) to local ranchers who toil year-round to deliver terroir to your palate. We talked to a few local ranchers and beef purveyors about everything from how their practices affect the quality of their products, to the best cuts for grilling and direct-from-the range cooking tips.

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Blue Mountain Ranch JUST OUTSIDE THE TINY TOWN OF PAULINA, where the deer and antelope graze, so do the red and black Angus cows of Sarah and Allen Teskey of Blue Mountain Ranch. Their herd roams about 100,000 acres, feasting on grass meadows in spring and forest wilderness all summer. At “the Blue,” the Teskeys focus on using regenerative, holistic practices to improve the soil, and grow better grasses, which means superb-tasting beef. A Teskey family favorite is the tenderloin, including the cut-with-afork filet mignon. Another is the T-bone, with the bone imparting flavor that cowboys once called “prairie butter.” “The best tip I can give for grilling is to not overcook the meat,” said Sarah Teskey. “I understand not everyone likes their steaks medium rare, but it is

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better to pull the meat off the grill and let it rest a little longer, which will allow it to continue to cook internally while keeping the juices intact, instead of leaving it on the heat. The meat will tend to dry out.” For a quick and easy dish, her go-to is carne asada, for fajitas, salads and tacos. She marinates their thinly sliced skirt steak with a citrusy sauce, grills it for ten seconds on each side and it’s done. “The boys (sons, Lucas, 15, and Todd, 12) enjoy the steak, but hands down they love the burger,” she said, adding that grass-fed beef tastes earthier than sweeter, grain-fed beef. “When I eat it, I feel healthy knowing where it comes from and where it was raised,” she said. Order at bluemtnranch.com.

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Allen and Sarah Teskey on the ranch with their sons

WHEN I EAT IT, I FEEL HEALTHY KNOWING WHERE IT COMES FROM AND WHERE IT WAS RAISED.

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2Sisters Ranch

ON 140 ACRES IN TUMALO, a small herd of cows graze on grass and hay made nutrient-dense by the altitude, cold nights, strong sun and volcanic soil. With nary an ATV, drone, or corralling horse in sight, they live out their days in bucolic calm. This is a main tenet of 2Sisters Ranch—to raise the full-blooded wagyu cows just as farmers do in Japan, where the breed originated. Low stress promotes wagyu’s off-the-chart marbling and rich flavor which is revered worldwide, said Renee Bouma, who owns the ranch with her family. The most important thing to remember when grilling wagyu is to preserve that fat content, essential to its taste and tenderness, said Bouma. With the exception of their wagyu hot dogs, exposing their meat directly to flame could melt away that highly prized marbled fat. It’s possible to grill it quickly

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on high heat, though, turning it frequently, she said. She suggests using a cast iron pan on the grill or cooking it sous vide (vacuum-sealed in a BPA-free bag in temperature-controlled water), then quickly searing it. “The biggest recommendation, whether it’s on the grill or in cast iron, is attentiveness,” she said. “Set a timer and flip it every thirty seconds to keep the juices in. A one-and-half-inch thick piece should take about eight minutes to be medium rare.” Then savor the umami, what the Japanese call the fifth taste after sweet, sour, salty and bitter. The explosive, robust savoriness, Bouma said, is the hallmark of her beef, because it is certified, full blooded wagyu—not cross-bred. Order at 2SistersR anchWagyu.com.

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Renee and Brian Bouma

THE BIGGEST RECOMMENDATION, WHETHER IT’S ON THE GRILL OR IN CAST IRON, IS ATTENTIVENESS.

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EVAN MORAN HAS HIT ON A FLAVOR TRIFECTA: beer, booze and beef. The pharmacist-turned-rancher laces his pasture with local brewery byproducts such as barley and yeast and Bendistillery’s spent grains, giving his cows what he calls a “beer and whiskey finish.” The sugars of his distinctly Bend concoction amp up the marbling and tenderness of the meat from his sixty cows that also graze on his thirtyacre pasture between Bend and Sisters. His method also matters, Moran said. His “extended finish,” of feeding the grains to the cows over nine months, rather than the standard grain finish of three months, helps the intramuscular fat, the marbling, develop. “You can tell there’s a big difference. I figured out it’s something you can’t really rush,” he said.

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When it comes to grilling, he takes a simple, straightforward approach that lets the meat speak for itself. He favors a juicy ribeye, coated in extra virgin olive oil, and dredged in coarse ground salt and pepper or a dry rub, preferably one loaded with garlic, and quickly seared. “Meat absolutely has to have salt,” said Moran. “It just brings out the flavor.” He takes the same approach with burgers, sprinkling a generous layer of salt on each side and letting them rest in that palate-pleasing, natural crystalline mineral for a half hour before setting them on a hot grill. Available at Pioneer Ranch’s Tumalo store at 64702 Cook Ave., Primal Cuts, West Coast Provisions, Newport Market, Sunriver Country Store, Sunriver Marketplace and pioneerranch.com.

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PHOTO EMILY J OHNSON

Pioneer Ranch


Amanda and Evan Moran

PHOTOS TOP RIGHT AND BOT TOM EMILY J OHNSON

YOU CAN TELL THERE’S A BIG DIFFERENCE. I FIGURED OUT IT’S SOMETHING YOU CAN’T REALLY RUSH.

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KEEP SUMMER FOMO AT BAY BY CHECKING THESE DON’T-MISS ACTIVITIES OFF OF YOUR LIST WRITTEN BY BEND MAGAZINE STAFF

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ummer is always about packing in as much as possible. From sun up to sun down, adventure, fun, food and entertainment abound, and the test is to see how much you can do before fall. This year more than ever, we’re beyond ready to soak up every summer experience we can. Here’s our round up of some of the very best, tried-andtrue, don’t-miss experiences to be had in Central Oregon during the sunny summer season.

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SOME SAID THIS WOULD BE THE SUMMER

the music died. COVID-19 took a huge toll on the music and performance scene this spring, and it’s still true that this summer, we will not be lining up to get the perfect spot at Les Schwab Amphitheater for what once looked like a pretty awesome concert season. But music, it turns out, is way too important to our hearts and souls to stay down long. Many local venues and musicians created music to share digitally throughout the spring, and many are beginning to dip their toes into delivering live music—safely, with social distancing, and adhering to state requirements—this summer. Here are a few options that were popping up at press time to get you your music fix this summer. River’s Place Taphouse and Food Cart Yard plans to host regular live music from its small outdoor stage a couple of times a week. The Tower Theatre has considered many creative options, including a drive-up movie night or a local musician’s showcase. Watch the website. Sisters Folk Festival debuted The Bandwagon, a flatbed trailer on which bands play for small socially distanced crowds, while touring neighborhoods. Stay tuned for more events like this. Volcanic Theatre Pub opened their doors in early June after months of closure, with small events planned throughout the summer.

BUILD A SURFING WAVE in the middle of town? Five years ago, Bend Parks and Rec said, sure, why not. Now the Bend Whitewater Park in McKay Park near the Colorado Bridge is the place to be on a hot summer day. The sandy beach or the footbridge are great places to watch the action (mind Parks and Rec guidance for social distancing). Surfers line up to hop on the wave, catching a ride for as long as they are able before splashing out into the current. Maybe you’re one of those surfers—in that case, bring your board, your wetsuit, your patience and your courage and get in line. For just a taste of the whitewater, rent or buy a floatie, follow the rules of the river and float your way from the Old Mill District to downtown. The mellower rolling rapid for floating courses right by the wave park, giving you a close-up view of the surfers of Bend.

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PHOTO THIS PAGE AUSTIN WHITE, OPPOSITE PAGE RIGHT ADAM MCKIBBEN

A TRIED AND TRUE OREGON TRADITION, a summer without camping is like a campfire without s’mores. When some campgrounds reopened in late May, outdoor lovers rejoiced. Try these three camping spots for tent, RV or car-top tent camping this season. Camp Sherman, a mere 45-minutes from Bend, is a reliably peaceful getaway for its old-timey feel and cell-service free airwaves. A series of small campgrounds run by the US Forest Service front the scenic Metolius River. Make reservations in advance and fish and relax under a canopy of trees. La Pine State Park fronts the Deschutes River under ponderosa and lodgepole pine. Plenty of sites and small crowds make this place popular. Bring your mountain bike and hit one of the nearby trails. Tumalo State Park is tucked under rimrock along the Deschutes River northwest of town. Plan ahead and score one of seven yurts onsite, or bring a tent or RV.

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some big water and even bigger rainbow trout. The Metolius River winds past Camp Sherman and is as beautiful as it is tricky to fish. Here you’ll find bull trout and some rainbow trout, as well as a narrow and brushy river with super clear, cold and flat water. The trout here are really great at hiding from you, so if you catch one, your bragging rights are well-earned. The Fall River is one of the lesser known in the area, though it boasts a fish hatchery that makes its rainbow trout count plentiful. There are plenty of quiet, lovely places to cast your line here, under giant ponderosa pines.

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PHOTO T YLER ROEMER

DESERT RIVERS WERE MADE FOR trout fishing. Tour these four awesome fishing rivers around Central Oregon and see how many trout you can catch this summer. The Crooked River winds through a sagebrush desert under stunning rimrock between Prineville Reservoir and Prineville. Stay upstream towards the dam for the best luck at catching this river’s fine desert rainbows. The Deschutes River is Central Oregon’s main attraction, and offers plenty of places to fish along its banks and in its waters. Choose a spot along Cascade Lakes Highway to try your fly, or head north to the lower Deschutes for lots of action. Between Trout Creek and Maupin you’ll find


PHOTO TOP VISIT CENTRAL OREGON/STEVE HEINRICHS, BOTTOM ALEX JORDAN

SOMETIMES YOU JUST WANT TO let someone else show you the sights and thrills. If that’s the case, there are plenty of tour operators ready to take the wheel and show off what Central Oregon has to offer. Guides with Bend’s Wanderlust Tours offer guided hiking trips or can take you on the water somewhere new. Check out the Brews & Views canoe tour, where a naturalist will show you around a pristine mountain lake and you’ll get to sample brews from Cascade Lakes Brewing Company. For a high desert rambling experience, book an ATV tour with Bend’s Outriders Northwest. Tour operators will guide as you drive through old lava flows and show you where to spot wildlife near Bend, Sunriver and the Newberry National Volcanic Monument. For a tour with less adrenaline, The Bend Tour Company offers walking or open-air electric car tours of downtown and the Old Mill District, with guides full of knowledge about the city’s history, arts and culture— even a local will learn a thing or two they didn’t know before. Also in town, several companies offer tours of the local brewery scene, including Cyclepub, which offers the fun experience of pedaling through town from one tasting to another.

FOR A SHORT BUT STEEP HIKE with a payoff of amazing 360-degree views of the Cascade Range, make the climb up Black Butte. Find the trailhead west of Sisters and power up the 1.9-mile trek to the summit, gaining 1,600 feet of elevation along the way. It’s not an easy hike, but it’s worth it. Travel through ponderosa pine and wildflowers and peer down to the golf courses of Black Butte Ranch below as you get higher, eventually arriving near the base of a fire lookout actively used today. Complete the full loop for a 3.6 mile hike. For a hike on a trail along rushing waters, follow Century Drive out of town to the Meadow Camp picnic area, which is a good starting point for the

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Upper Deschutes River Trail. Take the full 8.5 mile trail to Benham Falls, or opt for just a section from Meadow Camp to Lava Island, Lava Island to Dillon Falls or Dillon Falls to Benham Falls for shorter hikes. All the options have lots of shade and parallel the river. For great views within Bend, follow the road or trail that spirals around Pilot Butte. At the top, informational signs point out the mountains of the Cascade Range and all of Bend can be seen in the foreground. To the east, see the Paulinas and the Ochocos. Take a break on a bench and enjoy the breeze before heading back down to complete the 1.8 mile out-and-back hike.

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PHOTO TOP T YLER ROEMER, BOTTOM LEFT NATE WYETH

WHEN IT’S HOT IT’S GOOD and when it’s cold it’s...good. What’s summer without a dip in a chilly alpine lake? These five lakes are the best for swimming. Elk Lake’s South Beach is a perennial Bend favorite, which means it can also be busy. Get there early and stake your claim on a little piece of beachfront paradise, Central Oregon style. The flatwater means paddling as well as swimming is easy here. Suttle Lake’s beach hugs the lake all around its eastern end, offering a view down the length of this oblong-shaped body of water. Wade out quite a ways before it gets deep, or kick your inner tube out a little deeper. South Twin Lake is great for kids. It’s shallow, warm and small. Rent a pedal boat and some life jackets and keep your offspring entertained and happy. Grab a burger at the restaurant after. Scout Lake is another hidden gem that’s great for families. Also small and shallow, the kids can practically walk the whole thing later in the summer when the water gets low. Set them loose with a float ring and relax on shore. Lake Billy Chinook holds the biggest water around, so here’s where you go to jump in and dive deep. This lake is known for motor boating, boat houses and leaping in for the biggest splash of the day.


THERE’S A REASON BEND IS OFTEN NAMED among the best mountain biking cities in the country, and hitting the trail should be a must on the summer to-do list. Grab a helmet, dust off your bike or pick up a rental and find a new trail to explore. Set out on an all-day adventure riding from Paulina Peak down the Newberry Crater Rim Trail, through lava flows and thick forest. Or head out to Smith Rock State Park to power over hard-packed clay and sand and among towering rock formations.

DRINKING CRAFT BEVERAGES OUTDOORS

in Bend is a well-honed artform, and not all patios are created equal. Here are some of our favorite places for grabbing a drink outside. West Bend’s GoodLife Brewing is tucked away in a small development off Fourteenth Street, but behind the tall fence is a huge yard, with ample room for food trucks, a fire pit with adirondack chairs, lawn games and space for spreading out with friends, kids, dogs and of course, with a good beer in your hand. Enjoy beers and great food at 10 Barrel Brewing Co., a modestly-sized brewery on Galveston Avenue. In the summer, bartenders flip back and forth between serving the indoor bar and open bar window outside.

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Stay tame with a relatively flat trek along the Deschutes River Trail as it winds south out of Bend, or ride into the Phil’s Trail network, southwest of town, for endless combinations of riding on hundreds of miles of trails. Go big with downhill biking at Mt. Bachelor Ski Area, where lifts will drop you at the top of about a dozen miles of trails to explore, including the resort’s new advanced jump line trail, Redline, a flowy track full of berm jumps, rollers and table tops under the Red Chair lift.

Bring your own blanket or plan to snag a picnic table on the lawn at Crux Fermentation Project, where you can sample a variety of brews, Crux cider or the latest barrel-aged varieties on tap. Order from the food trucks alongside the lawn, or from Crux’s own menu of sandwiches, pizza, salads or a pretzel. Monkless Brewing offers tasty Belgian beer flights or specialty cocktails with a fun view. Grab a spot on the back patio, up above the Deschutes River near the Box Factory and Old Mill District. Peer over the balcony to see tubers prepare to splash down the rapids and enjoy tasty eats like bratwurst or a schnitzel sando. Downtown’s Bend Brewing Co. pops up a tent

outside in the summer for serving a few of their signature brews, or you can stop inside for the full selection. Claim a picnic table on the lawn for a big group, park yourself at the high top open seating along the building’s outside wall or be seated on the back patio for full restaurant service.

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PALATE C O C K TA I L S

THE

OF DISTILLATION Mix up a cocktail with libations from local distilleries WRITTEN BY NANCY PATTERSON | PHOTOS BY TAMBI LANE

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n Central Oregon, pizza might be said to be a melting pot. Bend may not be known for any particular style of pizza, but locals and transplants have brought a variety of techniques from their travels across the U.S. and beyond. Do you prefer your pizza ‘party cut’ (round pizza cut into squares) or served in an ‘isosceles’ (the perfect slice from a perfectly round pizza)? Maybe you seek a slice with the ideal ‘cheese pull’ (the tantalizing stretch of cheese when pulling two slices apart), or a piece that won't ‘avalanche’ (when all of the toppings fall off as you pick up the slice). After scouring peaks and buttes, we think we've found some seriously noteworthy pies.

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PALATE

C

raft: to make or manufacture with skill and careful attention to detail. When Deschutes Brewery launched in Bend over thirty years ago, it set a precedent for the more than thirty craft breweries that now reside in Central Oregon. But in recent years, distilleries have popped up across Bend and northern Deschutes County. From the abundance of western juniper to copious Cascade mountain water, the region possesses great characteristics for spirit distillation. This spring, with many bars and restaurants closed, craft cocktail enthusiasts tapped into their inner mixologists, concocting at-home happy hour libations and late-night aperitifs. Liquor stores and distilleries offered curbside pickup, and in the case of Crater Lake Spirits, home dropoff delivery services. Many facilities produced hand sanitizer, so it's not uncommon to receive a complimentary two-ounce bottle of sanitizing solution with a liquor purchase these days. Whatever summer brings, we can continue to hone our at-home skills to prefect our favorite craft drink. Here are a few recipes to get you started.

CASCADE STREET DISTILLERY Siblings Katie and Nick Beasley started Cascade Street Distillery in 2015 in Sisters. The company, which is now owned by Wild Roots Spirits, makes award-winning products derived from pristine local ingredients such as Sisters water, Central Oregon juniper berries, high desert sage and ponderosa pine pods. The South Sister Gin is used for a cocktail that pays homage to Buck Norris, the 10-year-old buck infamous for his residence in Bend and Central Oregon over the years. What some may know as a Tom Collins is served at their downtown Sisters tasting room on Cascade Avenue.

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BUCK NORRIS 1 1/2 oz South Sister Gin 1/2 oz simple syrup Juice of 1/2 lemon Soda water Shake gin, simple syrup and lemon juice over ice. Fill glass with ice and strain. Top with soda water and gently stir. Garnish with an orange slice and maraschino cherry.

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CRATER LAKE SPIRITS Crater Lake Spirits is a distilling pioneer of Bend. They launched in 1996 and relocated production to their now twenty-four-acre farm in Tumalo. There, find them roasting their own hatch chiles sourced from a single farm in New Mexico, to infuse their spicy Hatch Chile Vodka. Year-round, they source juniper berries from the Central Oregon high desert and Cascade mountain water for gin. Lava rock is used to filter all of their spirits, including the Hazelnut Espresso vodka made using Sisters Coffee (which is now available on most Alaska Airlines flights). Try this refreshing summertime cocktail.

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PALATE

LEMON BERRY MERINGUE 1 1/2 oz Crater Lake Northwest Berry Vodka 4 oz lemon juice 1 oz vanilla simple syrup Splash of half and half Combine all ingredients in a pint glass with a shaker. Shake vigorously, strain into a martini glass and enjoy.

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NEW BASIN DISTILLING COMPANY On a chilly evening in 2012, Rick Molitor and four of his friends were gathered around a campfire with their drink of choice: a glass of whiskey. Together, they decided that they should turn their love for the dark liquor into a side hustle. The five Madras natives launched New Basin Distilling Company and bottled their first vodka, gin and whiskey in 2015. Molitor co-owns and operates the business daily, sourcing grains from two of the co-owners who work full-time as farmers. Molitor made New Basin his full-time career in 2017 when the total solar eclipse brought heaps of visitors to Madras. Their Madras Mule is a huge hit amongst whiskey lovers and New Basin's staff.

MADRAS MULE 1 1/2 oz American Strong Whiskey 4 oz ginger beer 3 lime wedges Combine ginger beer and whiskey over ice in a copper mug. Squeeze the juice from two limes and garnish with the remaining lime.

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Wh ere Bend golf b e g a n, B e nd liv ing be g in s .

Bend’s endless love affair with the links can easily be traced to the picturesque Ponderosa grove southeast of downtown that a handful of enthusiasts turned into the Bend Golf Club back in the mid-1920s. Nearly 100 years later, that special enclave finally has a place for golf lovers to call home. Welcome to 1925, Arrowood Development’s vibrant collection of single-level townhomes adorning the Golf Club’s 10th fairway. Now, with floor plans ranging from 1,803 to 2,431 square feet, you can make Bend’s first home for golf your finest home ever. Starting at $659,000.

1925townhomes.com

Contact Femke van Velzen, Brand & Design Director | femkev@arrowooddev.com | 541.390.2259 Offered by Arrowood Development LLC, a licensed Oregon Real Estate Broker.


PALATE

MELON RICKEY 1 1/2 oz Oregon Spirit Dry Gin 3-4 cubes fresh watermelon 3 slices cucumber 3-4 mint leaves ¾ oz lime juice ½ simple syrup In shaker tin, muddle melon, cucumber, mint and simple syrup. Add gin, lime juice and a large scoop of ice. Shake until chilled. Strain into tall Collins style glass, top with soda water. Garnish with melon wedge and mint leaf.

OREGON SPIRIT DISTILLERS Brad and Kathy Irwin founded Oregon Spirit Distillers in 2009. The brand was launched to distill American whiskey but has since expanded to include the production of gin, vodka and absinthe. During these expansions, they've grown their team from two to over twenty full-time employees, distributing products nationwide. Their unassuming distillery just east of downtown Bend offers "full service" spirit tastings, which include distillery tours mini cocktails and an authentic absinthe experience—all of which can be enjoyed on their outdoor patio when the weather permits. 98

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Discover Newport at Sunset The Coast You Remember

1-800-COAST44

DISCOVERNEWPORT.COM


LOCAL FLAVOR

POKE

A Slice of Island Life Sushi’s Hawaiian sister makes an entrance in Bend at Poke Row

J

ustin Chu was raised in a Bend restaurant family, but owning his own Central Oregon dining establishment wasn’t always in the plan. The owner of NorthWest Crossing’s 2-year-old poke restaurant Poke Row, Chu was born in Bend and graduated from Mountain View High School. His mother, Lilian Chu, co-owns downtown Bend’s renowned 5 Fusion & Sushi Bar, and she had another local Asian restaurant many years ago. But Justin had gone his own way, settling in Los Angeles after college and launching his own company, an outdoor advertising firm called OutWerks. Still, perhaps the restaurant business was always waiting for Chu, even if he didn’t know he was waiting for it.

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“Poke Row was never planned,” he said. “It just came together as an opportunity.” While the NorthWest Crossing residential and retail building Fremont Row was under construction three years ago, the developers approached Lilian Chu about opening a second 5 Fusion in the signature restaurant space. At the same time, Justin was considering a move back to Bend from Southern California. He and his wife had young twins, and were looking to be closer to his parents, in a more family-friendly community than Los Angeles. Lilian wasn’t interested in a second 5 Fusion, but the query got the wheels turning for the Chu family. “We’d traveled to Hawaii a lot and

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PHOTOS ALEX JORDAN

WRITTEN BY KIM COOPER FINDLING


LOCAL FLAVOR

“It’s healthy and

Owner Justin Chu

fresh, and gives you that sushi fix without the $100 price tag.”

PHOTOS LEFT AND RIGHT ALEX JORDAN

Hawaiian shave ice

had been introduced to true authentic poke,” recalled Justin. Poke means “to slice” in Hawaiian, and began hundreds of years ago as fishermen’s simple snack—take the cut-offs from your catch, season them, pop ‘em in your mouth. Modern poke is diced raw fish, usually ahi, sometimes octopus, flavored with a variety of sauces, tossed with toppings, sometimes served with rice. On the Hawaiian islands, poke is easy to find. The average deli or grocery store will typically have several fresh varieties on hand. It was just a matter of time until the food trend hit the mainland. “Poke restaurants were starting to turn up in Los Angeles right before we moved back to Oregon. My wife and I love sushi, but going out for a full sushi meal can be an expensive prospect,” Chu said. “Poke is basically deconstructed sushi. It’s healthy and fresh, and gives you that sushi fix without the $100 price tag.” Even though Poke Row and 5 Fusion are separate entities, Poke Row benefited greatly from the 5 Fusion team’s expertise. Chef Joe Kim and his cohorts masterminded the sauces, ingredients and recipes for Poke Row. By the time the business opened in August 2018 in a “small, simple space” in Fremont Row, the poke dishes were tried and true. The menu allows for creativity, with the build-your-own-bowl as the most popular option. “We also offer signature bowls, created by the chefs.” Chu’s favorite of the signature bowls is the Tyler Bowl— spicy tuna, salmon, tuna, cucumber, edamame, carrots, mango,

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sweet onions, sesame soy, spicy mayo, seaweed salad, tobiko, ginger, furikake, fried onion and avocado. “It’s a nice balance of all the ingredients,” he said. Bowls come with greens, rice or both. The menu also offers miso soup, and, for dessert, the delicious treat of Hawaiian shave ice—soft serve ice cream topped with shaved ice and your choice of flavored syrup, including pineapple and coconut. Beer, wine, sake and kombucha are available in the casual space, which has a few tables inside and out, but does mainly take-out. Two years into his own restaurant adventure, Chu has faced no shortage of challenges, from juggling life with twin 4-year-olds, continuing to run his advertising business and navigating the COVID-19 complications. “We stayed open for take-out through the spring,” he said. “I’m so appreciative of our customers. The great feedback they give us and their repeat business are the biggest rewards so far of Poke Row.” “We’re considering a second location down the road,” Chu said. “My simple hope is to continue to serve the community.” Poke Row 2735 NW Crossing Dr #105, Bend Monday-Saturday 11am-8pm Sunday 12pm-7pm 541-306-6796

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IMBIBE

CIDER

Legend Cider Company LaPine’s first cidery takes a fresh approach WRITTEN BY MATT WASTRADOWSKI

W

hen Tyler and Adrianne Baumann started making cider in 2015, the husband-and-wife team was admittedly nervous about public reaction. After all, neither had made cider before—Tyler’s only industry experience came as a bartender—and both were intimidated by big-name competitors throughout the Pacific Northwest. In a way, though, Adrianne Baumann said that outsider mindset gave them free rein to take a different approach. “We were looking at the cider market with a fresh perspective,” she said. “We didn’t go to school for this or come from a long line of brewers. We’re just looking at it with fresh eyes and creating something new.” Clearly, the Baumanns are onto something. In August 2019, the co-owners of Legend Cider Company opened a taproom in La Pine—beating a brewery to the city, a rare occurrence in beer-crazy Central Oregon—and have since earned a loyal following for their tap list of balanced, yet fruity flavors. Adrianne believes that acclaim reflects the cidery’s continued desire to do things differently. For instance: Legend uses beer yeast, rather than cider yeast, to create more complex flavors. “People can kind of pick up on it,” she said. “It has that more mellow finish.” Legend also abstains from artificial sweeteners, flavors, or fruit concentrate— using only 100 percent fruit juice in a move that Adrianne said creates a cleaner, crisper, juicier finish. “A lot of people are surprised when they try our cider,” she said. “They take their first sip and say, ‘This tastes like juice.’ And that’s because it is juice.” Those flavors show up in Legend’s lineup of fruit-forward beverages— like the PCT (Pineapple, Coconut, and Tiki) Punch, a tropical, piña colada-like cider, and the Columbia Gorge Grape cider. “That’s like a grape juice box, but all grown-up, and with all-natural ingredients,” Adrianne said. “People get the real grape taste and are like, ‘This is really good!’”

PHOTO ALEX JORDAN

Legend Cider Company 52670 US-97, La Pine Legendcider.com

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EAT EAT

EXPLORE CENTRAL OREGON

Many restaurants across Oregon reopened this summer in some capacity, allowing guests to dine in by following social distancing guidelines and safety protocals. Most dining establishments also remain open for takeout and delivery, and would love to receive your order. As always, buying a gift card is a great way to support your favorite local restaurants any time of the year. Contact individual restaurants for details.

EXPLORE CENTRAL OREGON COMPANY NAME PIZZA MONDO

Fir aremus praes vident. locals’ Obus Pizza Mondo, a longtime intrur se serving quam award henfavorite,quium has been deroximis imentum inprave rniwinning pizza from its landmark hil te movitudem ia vis, ad downtown Bend patus location since novid ius conteri ptius, 1996.C. Byiamdiis the slice or whole pie. sendac nonsuliam. FuisTake-outfuidit; and delivery available. sulicam ex maximus et videSeasonalet;pizzas, fresh salads and mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. NW craft beer. Vemnicastra 811 NW Wall St., Bend

(541) 123 W 6th St, city,330-9093 zip | (512) 123-4567 pizzamondobend website.com.com

COMPANY KEBABA NAME Fir aremus praes Bend vident. Obus From its Westside location, intrur quam award henKebaba quium offers aseunique, deroximis imentum inprave rniwinning take on modern Middle hil te movitudem patus ia vis, ad Eastern food. Serving fresh novid C. iamdiis ius conterisalads, ptius, and delicious kebabs, sendac nonsuliam. Fuishummus,fuidit; falafel and much sulicam et; ex diet maximus et videmore. Special friendly. Patio mum caeavailable. tem, Catquam. gardenavem, seating Vemnicastra 1004 NW Newport Ave., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St 318-6224 | (512) 123-4567 kebaba.com website.com

COMPANY NAME POKE ROW At Row, ourvident. focus is on Fir Poke aremus praes Obus fresh healthysefood, in a cozy, intrurandquium quam hencasual environment. poke bowl deroximis imentum Ainprave rniishilessentially deconstructed sushi, te movitudem patus ia vis, ad put together just the way youptius, like! novid C. iamdiis ius conteri Voted Local Bowl byFuisThe sendacBest fuidit; nonsuliam. Source. us in NWX! sulicam Come et; ex visit maximus et videmum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 2735 NW Crossing Dr. #105., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St306-6796 | (512) 123-4567 pokerow.com website.com

COMPANY ACTIVE CULTURE NAME Fir aremus vident. Obus Enjoy the praes hot summer days intrur se quam hen-a on our quium patio while you enjoy deroximis imentum inprave rnihealthy breakfast, lunch or dinner. hil patus ia vis, ad Sipteonmovitudem a smoothie, shake, glass novid C.or iamdiis ptius, of wine beer ius on conteri tap. Burritos, sendac fuidit;wraps nonsuliam. Fuisbowls, salads, and so much sulicam et; ex maximus more! Download our app et forvideeasy mum avem, cae delivery. tem, Catquam. reorder and free Vemnicastra 285 NW Riverside Blvd., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St 241-2926 | (512) 123-4567 activeculturecafe website.com .com

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COMPANY NAME PHO VIET CAFÉ Fir aremus praes vident. Vietnamese standards likeObus pho intrur quium hen& noodle bowlssearequam served in inpraveNow rniaderoximis modest, imentum relaxed space. hil te movitudem ad serving Bun Bo patus Hue/ia vis, Spicy novid C. iamdiis ius Pho conteri ptius, Lemongrass Base Noodle sendacOpen fuidit;Christmas nonsuliam. Soup! day,Fuisjoin sulicam et; ex maximus et videus to celebrate! mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 1326 NE 3rd St., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St382-2929 | (512) 123-4567 website.com phovietandcafe .com

COMPANY NAME PFLÜCKE Come pfrölic pfëastObus at Fir aremus praes&vident. pflücke Grillhausse& quam Biergarten! intrur quium henEnjoy our German local farerni& deroximis imentum& inprave cheer with haus smoked hil te movitudem patus ia meats vis, ad & pickled delights overflowing novid C. iamdiis ius conteri ptius, from famous Blüm Boxes. sendacourfuidit; nonsuliam. FuisProst sulicamtoet;our ex spacious maximus outdoor et videpatio open cae air dining room! mum&avem, tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 2747 NW Crossing Dr., Bend 123 W (541) 6th St241-0224 | (512) 123-4567 website.com pflucke.com

PHO COMPANY HOUSENAME Phoaremus House in Fir praesspecializes vident. Obus gourmetquium Vietnamese intrur se quamcuisine henusing onlyimentum the finest, deroximis inpravefresh rniingredients. Toppatus notch hil te movitudem ia vis,pho ad made C. with utmost authenticity, novid iamdiis ius conteri ptius, and friendly TakeFuisout, sendac fuidit;service. nonsuliam. delivery et; through DoorDash, and sulicam ex maximus et videcurbside. Be cae pho-filled! mum avem, tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 1604 S. HWY 97 Suite 9, Redmond (541) 123 W 6th St526-5474 | (512) 123-4567 website.com .com phohouseredmond

BETHLYN’S GLOBALNAME FUSION COMPANY Unique restaurant concept to Fir aremus praes vident. Obus crave your are intrur quiumtaste se buds quamwehenbringing recipes around the world deroximis imentum inprave rniunder one roof. From hil te movitudem patusEthiopian ia vis, ad to Thailand Mexico. It novid C. iamdiisto ius conteri ptius, accommodate diets. Healthy, sendac fuidit; all nonsuliam. Fuiscarnivore, gluten free and sulicam et;vegan, ex maximus et videworldlyavem, flavors. mum cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 1075 NW Newport Ave, Bend (541) 123 W 6th St 617-0513 | (512) 123-4567 website.com .com bethlynsglobalfusion

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Emerald

SISTERS, OR Diamond

541-549-9388

www.thejewelonline.com

Silver Jewelry

Natural Cross Agate

Hand Carved Sterling with Natural Gold Nuggets

Fine Minerals & Fossils

Hand Carved Bowls

30 YEAR

ANNIVERSARY Storewide

SALE

Architectual Alabaster & Lighting

221 W. Cascade Ave.

Oregon Sunstone


Back Deck ART + BOOKS + CULTURE

art & events

MODERN ART

John Bell Award-winning concept artist expands into mid-century modern paintings WRITTEN BY LEE LEWIS HUSK

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ARTIST

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end’s artistic heft got weightier this year with the addition of John Bell to the community. The internationally renowned concept artist brings decades of experience in the movie industry, television, video games and advertising. A chance encounter with a former colleague from DreamWorks eventually led him to leave his home in the Bay Area and relocate to Bend. “Last summer I was on LinkedIn and saw that she was working at Bend Studio,” he recalled. “I dropped her a line, asking if the studio was looking for concept artists.” She responded the next day, and by January, Bell was working at the Bend-based video game developer, a subsidiary of Sony Interactive Entertainment America. Bell created concept art and storyboards for blockbuster movies like Jurassic Park, Star Trek IV, Back to the Future II, ANTZ and Oscarwinning Revenant, and for the likes of filmmakers George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. His body of work represents a prodigious cross section of Americana that spans a quarter century, including images of the Grinch, Starship Trooper and the hover boards from Back to the Future II, Fat Tire beer labels, Nike Airwalk shoes and logos for Hammer Motorcycles. He and other team members received the top award from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts and an

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“I leave it up to people to

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interpret their meaning.”

Oscar nomination for special effects in Back to the Future II. As a concept artist at Bend Studio, he’s part of a team that brings new video games to players worldwide. “I enjoy what I’m doing, but in my spare time, I like to focus more on my personal art,” he said. He hopes to stay at Bend Studio “as long as they’ll have me,” while building a portfolio of paintings in his spare time.

PHOTOSHOP IN A PAINTER’S SHOP?

Bell’s style of painting draws from his years as a concept artist while revealing a softer, more abstract side. Of his paintings, he said the older forms were more intricate and detailed, the newer ones more simplified. The current pieces explore shape, texture and color with a mid-century modern aesthetic. The new paintings invite viewers into a landscape populated by cactus- and human-like shapes and orbs, or at least that’s the impression of some people. Others, including Bell, see car shapes and bones. “I leave it up to people to interpret their meaning,” he said. Bell starts with a thumbnail sketch of forms within a square and then scans the drawing into a computer to begin color mockups on Photoshop. Once he’s satisfied with the color mockup, he transfers it onto a wood panel

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of either mahogany or birch by hand painting the surface with oil paint. “The natural wood as a background has a very graphic quality,” he said. The individual pieces in the series he started last year, “Planet Life,” were small—10-by-10 inches—but have gotten larger over time. He has a 20-by-20-inch work on his easel now and has finished a line drawing for a 55-by-20-inch rectangular piece in the same series. He draws inspiration from painters Ed Mell of Phoenix and the late Brazilian, Roberto Burle Marx. After reading a book about Mell’s art, Bell wrote him a fan letter. “Ed Mell calls me, and we talked for hours,” Bell recalled. According to both artists, they became friends, and Mell eventually invited Bell to send paintings to his gallery for a group show this past November. “John has a very impressive resume, and a good design sense,” Mell said. “His pieces have a mid-century modern influence that caught on with the crowd. We sold all of them.” As a testament to his friend’s future in fine arts, he’s added some of Bell’s work to his own website. A resident of Central Oregon for only a short while, Bell has yet to show his work in galleries or other exhibit venues. But given his reputation in the art world, we can expect to see more of his paintings around town. To see his work, go to johnbell.studio.

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Back Deck books LITERARY NONFIC TION

Ellen Waterston’s Longest Chapter A literary mother of the high desert confronts land use issues and her own feelings about the arid West WRITTEN BY BRONTE DOD

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f Ellen Waterston had her way, the title of her new book would be “High Centered.” Like a truck stuck on a hardened mound of mud on a desert backroad, sometimes we must push ourselves back and forth on both sides of an issue to figure out how to move forward. Waterston, an Oregon poet and author with a long history of writing about the high desert, likes a metaphor. But her publisher, University of Washington Press, decided on something more straightforward. Walking the High Desert: Encounters with Rural America on the Oregon Desert Trail was published June 17. The literary nonfiction book chronicles her journey on the 750-mile Oregon Desert Trail, documenting the people, places and issues that she encounters along the way. This is Waterston’s seventh book and the most journalistic endeavor of her published titles. Her earlier books are memoirs or poetry collections. But land and place and the meaning of it all is a common theme throughout her writing. For Waterston, any person, especially a writer, cannot escape the nuances, details and meanings of where they plant roots. Of tackling this book, a travel memoir that also reckons with Oregon’s divided politics, she said, “It just wouldn’t go away. I just needed to do it.” Waterston came from New England, then found ranching in the eastern part of the state. Now living in Bend, she works as an advocate for emerging writers, Oregon’s literary world and for Oregon’s public land. She started the Writing Ranch in 2000, a series of workshops

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in remote locations designed to pull out everyone’s inner writer. She was the executive director of PLAYA at Summer Lake and is an instructor with Fishtrap, a writing conference in Joseph, Oregon. She has an honorary Ph.D. in humane letters from Oregon State University Cascades, is a two-time WILLA Award Winner in Poetry and the winner of the Obsidian Prize in Poetry. She founded the literary nonprofit Nature of Words, and six years ago, founded the Waterston Desert Writing Prize. She’s also supporter of the Oregon Natural Desert Association, although she doesn’t agree on all their points. But that connection drove her to the idea to hike the ODT and write about it. “In the simplest sense, I have a background as a rancher and a ‘townie,’” she said. “I am sensitive to both the perspective of those who live and work the land versus those who are more consumers and also environmental perspectives.” For Waterston, the place that has shaped her the most, that has called her onto its trails and into its small towns and beside its people, is the Oregon east of the Cascades. “It’s the sequence of the places we live that make up the chapters in our biography of place,” writes Waterston in her newest book. “The high desert is, without question, my longest chapter.” Readers of Oregon’s local history, advocates of the environment and high desert dwellers on the left and right side of the aisle will connect with this book. In Waterston’s classic voice that imparts her immense research while speaking

“It’s the sequence of the places we live that make up the chapters in our biography of place.” to readers like a friend, Walking the High Desert is an important addition to Oregon’s literature about place. She paints rural life without patronizing it, and earnestly fights for preservation without sacrificing the realities of rural subsistence. In the end, she may not have gotten the title she wanted, but she said that the book overall, “has been a wonderful experience for me as a writer.” Though, she still thinks it should have been called “High Centered.” “I think it’s apt because when we see things truly, it’s hard to take sides,” she said.

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Back Deck art & culture theater

From Stage to Screen

At least four times a year for over a decade, BEAT Children’s Theatre has produced a live theater production with an all-youth cast. This spring, COVID-19 precautions led to some innovative thinking, and the result is that the usual stage of this children’s theater group will leap onto the screen. A Midsummer Night’s Dream was rehearsed both virtually and in person, and filmed in various locations around Bend, including outside in the magical woods. The production will be released this summer as an old-fashioned serial, one act at a time, over five weeks. Magical flowers, fairy feuds, conquered Amazonians, rebellious daughters, a controlling father and a simple band of players—the world of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream is abundant with misdeeds and mischief. See how twenty-two actors between the ages of 9 and 19 adapted an Elizabethan-era play to the COVID-19-era. Video segments will be released on July 22 and 29 and August 5, 12 and 19. Ticket buyers can download each segment as it’s released or watch the entire series at the end. For more information see beatchildrenstheatre.org.

Quilt Show Goes Virtual

The world’s largest outdoor quilt show will look a little different in 2020. Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show organizers announced in April that the forty-fifth annual show would go on, but in a modified virtual format that has attendees celebrating their appreciation of quilting from home. Quilts will be displayed on the event website, organizers will still raffle off a show quilt (virtually) and there will online activities. The show typically includes hundreds of quilts, hung throughout Sisters and admired by locals and visitors alike. On July 11, the planned show day, The Stitchin’ Post in Sisters will hang twelve quilts outside the quilt shop in honor of the event’s first year, when just a dozen quilts were part of the show. Find more details of the virtual event at soqs.org.

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reading

Supporters of Literacy

A group of volunteers who previously organized book sales to support the Deschutes Public Library has joined together in a new nonprofit venture, aiming to provide funding to programs that help people learn to read in Deschutes County, like grants for local teachers, training for school staff and other initiatives to promote reading. The volunteers previously organized and managed book sales as part of Friends of the Bend Libraries, but when that group dissolved in late 2019, a new nonprofit formed in its place. The new organization, Supporters of Literacy in Deschutes County, or SOLID, is working to raise money that will be given out through grants. Part of the group’s fundraising efforts will include more community book sales, where shoppers can purchase donated books, music and DVDs for low prices. Find the latest information about SOLID’s next book sale at literacyindeschutes.org.

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BLACK LIVES MATTER

MAY THE POWER OF OUR VOICES TOGETHER BRING CHANGE. The recent incidents of violence, death, racial discrimination and social injustice we’ve witnessed in our communities remind us we have a long way to go in achieving equality for all.

We stand with our black neighbors and friends and those who work for equality and truth. All around us are people working tirelessly to illuminate and eradicate injustice. We see you, we hear you. Now more than ever we need to listen and support one another. As individuals and organizations, we need to examine our roles in creating inclusivity, equality and change.

PHOTOS GRANT TANDY AND JOEY HAMILTON

We can do more. We recognize the true leaders in our communities, the true change makers. We encourage community and unity in the fight to end injustice and brutality. May we all come together for change and healing, a rising tide of strength against injustice.

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At ASI, community matters. It’s the bonds that we’re forged with clients, family, friends and neighbors that give us purpose and make the work we do meaningful. So when our community is challenged, we’re moved to support those who are most vulnerable. Now, more than ever, our local nonprofits need us. Even in good times, most operate on slim margins — and many are now seeing an increased need for their essential help. At the same time, the majority have been forced to cut back on services while facing decreased budgets and lower donations. Together, we can make a difference. We encourage you to support our local non-profit organizations in any way you can. Just as they change lives in our community, so can you.

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Please join us in supporting our local non-profit organizations, a few of who are shown here. Every little bit matters. Visit asiwealthmanagement.com/market-education for a full list.