Bend Magazine - March + April 2022

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COLUMBIA GORGE

THE SOUL OF CENTRAL OREGON

Getaway

g n i t a g l i Ta

PARKING LOT PARTIES WITH STYLE

ADRENALINE JUNKIES REPORT for YOUR NEXT ADVENTURE

DELECTABLE DONUTS SATISFYING SWEETS from LOCAL SHOPS



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NeighbORly [ INSPIRING KINDNESS ACROSS OREGON ]


Neighbors fighting wildfires together. Delivering food in times of need. Standing up for each others' rights and hopes. Our communal hardships have rekindled in us a great, unifying strength — kindness. So elemental, yet so brave. Awakened by an urgent need for connection and compassion. Kindness has inspired us to listen. To learn. To lend a hand. To take care of each other. Now we have the opportunity to keep it lit. Let's not let it smolder. Let's fan the embers in our hearts. Let's keep kindness at the forefront of our lives, and live as open examples of it. Kindness inspires kindness. And here, in our Oregon, that is what makes us — neighborly.

LEARN | CONNECT | DONATE | GET INSPIRED |

O R EG O N C F.O R G /N E I G H B O R LY


94 ADRENALINE JUNKIES

When the need for speed is high, where do Central Oregonians go for thrills? Read about high-flying, deathdefying activities that keep the heart racing, and consider giving one of them a try. WRITTEN BY NOAH NELSON

TABLE of CONTENTS Features

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March \ April 2022

TAILGATING

Everyone loves a good tailgate, but some Bendites take their setups to the next level. Learn about the dedicated tailgaters of Central Oregon who turn parking lots, and their rigs, into unique gathering spaces. WRITTEN BY TIM NEVILLE

COLUMBIA GORGE

THE SOUL OF CENTRAL OREGON

Getaway

ng

Tailgati

PARKING LOT PARTIES WITH STYLE

ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

From nature-based education and outdoor classes to dual-language programs, a look at the non-traditional schooling methods on the rise with increased enrollment in Bend. WRITTEN BY LUCAS ALBERG

ADRENALINE JUNKIES REPORT for YOUR NEXT ADVENTURE

DELECTABLE DONUTS SATISFYING SWEETS from LOCAL SHOPS

ON THE COVER

Tailgaiting 101: All you need is a truck, a dog and a beer. PHOTO BY MIGHTY CREATURE

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M A R C H \ A P R I L 202 2


Room to roam. Find yourself a world apart and close to all you love. At Tartan Druim, each luxurious home is situated on a spacious site with unspoiled mountain views. Miles of preserved land beckon you out your door to enjoy nearby snow play, biking and more. www.tartandruim.com

Roam even closer to home and you’ll find Tartan Place, the community park designed for lingering with family and neighbors around barbecues, fire pits and acres of lush lawn. Explore. Breathe. Dwell. There’s room for you here. Priced from 2.2 million.

Brokers: Stephanie Ruiz 541.948.5196 Jordan Grandlund 541.420.1559


TABLE of CONTENTS March \ April 2022

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Departments TOUR OF AMERICA Bend resident Rue McKenrick has a big dream—to create the American Perimeter Trail. Read about what it takes to map a thru-hike. WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW

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EXPLORE

The return of trail races | Madras’ new mountain bike playground | Historic charm and modern style at the Gorge

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COMMUNITY

The quest for a new major thru-hike | An upgrade for Hospice House | Sweat out the bad stuff with a mobile sauna

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HOME

Fresh design for a family home in Tetherow | Rescuing, repairing and repurposing furniture

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VENTURES

The many companies named after Bend | A Central Oregon farm trades in global flavors

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PALATE

The best donuts from around town | Badlands Distillery brings music and food trucks to La Pine

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BEND NEWS COCC gains national accolade | Improvements planned for OSU-Cascades | Downtown Bend considers paid parking CO NEWS Bend man’s record-breaking catch | Sunriver upgrades public safety | New law clears youth arrests

ARTIST Valerie Winterholler’s landscape acrylics CULTURE Hoodoo Spring Fling | Maragas Winery wins big at largest competition of North American wines AESTHETIC Tough, rugged and practical ukuleles

Front Deck

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Back Deck

Also in this issue 18

Contributors

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Greetings from Bend

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Connect with Us

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Parting Shot

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MARCH \ APRIL 2022


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WORDS and PICTURES

Contributors

LUCAS ALBERG Lucas Alberg is a native Kansan who ventured west after college in pursuit of outdoor adventure in the mountains. Finding his happy place in Oregon, he soon combined his creative pursuits with his new home. Lucas currently works for a Bend-based outdoor company, has published two books including the children's title Goodnight Great Outdoors, has released two albums and spends the bulk of his free time traipsing through the woods with his wife and two kids. In this issue, Lucas wrote about alternative schooling options in Bend (pg. 86). JENNIFER DELAHUNTY Jennifer Delahunty writes, edits and appreciates all kinds of music from her home in Sisters, Oregon. Nietzsche’s quote—“Without music, life would be a mistake”—could be her next tattoo. Jennifer earned an MFA in creative nonfiction, and her work has been published in The New York Times, Blue Mesa Review, and Fourth Genre, among other publications. She is the editor of I’m Going to College, Not You: Surviving the College Search with Your Child An amateur cellist, she was delighted to learn about the all-weather stringed instruments being made in Bend by Outdoor Ukulele (pg. 121).

BENJAMIN EDWARDS Benjamin Edwards is a wedding, portrait and humanitarian photographer based out of Oregon. Whether documenting a bride’s perfect day or the crisis in the Congo, Benjamin relies on his faith, caffeine and love of his craft to ensure the image is captured. In May of 2011, Benjamin was featured on Framed, an inspirational and educational web series for photographers. The episode revolved around Benjamin’s passions, fears and hope for his photography. In this issue, he photographed students in the alternative schools feature (pg. 86). See benjaminedwardsphotography.com. THE MIGHTY CREATURE COMPANY The Mighty Creature Company is the dynamic duo of Adam McKibben and Ryan Cleary. They believe in an unabashed artistic vision, one grounded in authenticity, and that the people they work with are just as important as the work itself. The Mighty Creature Company keeps things simple by balancing hard work and lightening the mood with good laughs. They believe their work should be impactful and indelible, and put their best in everything they do, always coming prepared for whatever is thrown our way. In this issue, they photographed Bend's tailgaters (pg. 78). See mightycreatureco.com. NICK ROSENBERGER Nick Rosenberger is a freelance writer and journalist based out of Bend. An avid reader, eater and traveler, you can find him out running, learning how to blast down the mountains on. a cheap pair of skis or cooking delicious food with his roommate. Nick has worked for various outlets as a journalist, writer and editor and has published stories across the Pacific Northwest, including in the East Oregonian, Bend Bulletin, Willamette Week and more. In this issue, he wrote about spring foot races (pg. 34). You can find more of Nick's work at nickrosenberger.com. KURT WINDISCH The moment Kurt Windisch landed a software engineering job he could do remotely in 1997, he packed his bags and headed for the Oregon Coast, and its mediocre surf scene. After a decade, the wind blew him out of there, and to Bend. His left-brained day job demands a creative outlet, so he draws on a hobby that started in childhood with a Pentax K1000 to enhance his exploration of the outdoors. Kurt has had his work published in The Daily Beast, Bend Magazine, Motorcycle Escape, Confluence, and others. For this issue, Kurt photographed dirt biking for the adrenaline junkies story (pg. 98). See kurtwindisch.com.

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MARCH \ APRIL 2022


Traditional

541.388.2107 mockingbird-gallery.com 869 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR


Publishers HEATHER HUSTON JOHNSON ROSS JOHNSON Editorial Editor in Chief KIM COOPER FINDLING Managing Editor TERESA RISTOW Staff Writer NOAH NELSON Copy Editor STEPHANIE BOYLE MAYS Design Creative Director TIFFANY PAULIN Associate Creative Director KELLY ALEXANDER Graphic Designer ALEX JORDAN Graphic Designer CALI CLEMENT Production Assistant JEREMIAH CRISP Print Consultant CLARKE FINE Sales Senior Account Executive SUSAN CROW Senior Account Executive RONNIE HARRELSON Business Development SAGE GRIPEKOVEN Sales and Marketing Assistant TOM GILLESPIE Marketing Marketing and Projects Manager KATRYNA VECELLA Digital and Office Manager HEATHER RENEE WONG Web Development ZACK JENKS - LITEHOUSE TECH Audience Development Circulation Manager AMARA SPITTLER Newsstand Coordinator ALAN CENTOFANTE Circulation Consultant KERI NOLAN Contributing Writers LUCAS ALBERG, JENNIFER DELAHUNTY, LEE LEWIS HUSK, SUZANNE JOHNSON, TIM NEVILLE, NICK ROSENBERGER Contributing Photographers JON ABERNATHY, BRIAN BECKER, MIGHTY CREATURE CO., MARIE-SOLEIL DESAUTELS, BENJAMIN EDWARDS, NATALIE GILDERSLEEVE, STEVEN HEINRICHS, JOE KLINE, TAMBI LANE, KIM MCCARREL, TIMOTHY PARK, GRACE PULVER, CODY RHEAULT, JAYDE SILBERNAGEL, MARK STOCKCAMP, GLENN TACHIYAMA, KIMBERLY TEICHROW, MARVIN WALDER, KURT WINDISCH Follow Bend Magazine FACEBOOK.COM/BENDMAGAZINE INSTAGRAM: @BENDMAGAZINE TWITTER: @BENDMAG BENDMAGAZINE.COM Subscriptions BENDMAGAZINE.COM/SUBSCRIBE

PUBLISHED BY OREGON MEDIA, LLC 974 NW RIVERSIDE BLVD. BEND, OREGON 97703 OREGONMEDIA.COM All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronically or mechanically, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written permission of Oregon Media. Articles and photographs appearing in Bend Magazine may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. Bend Magazine and Oregon Media are not responsible for the return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily those of Bend Magazine, Oregon Media or its employees, staff or management. Proudly printed in Oregon.


You don’t have to go to the depths of the ocean to be a discoverer. Or produce one of the world’s first maps of the ocean floor, like Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose important work helped bring to life the unknown ocean world. You just have to chart your course to Discovery West. Nestled in Bend’s Westside, this community is alive with the spirit of discovery. Not to mention proximity to schools, parks, close-by trails and more. Visit discoverywestbend.com to learn about the neighborhood, Marie herself – and how you could even find your new home on Tharp Avenue. Or head on over to our Discovery Pod at the corner of Skyline Ranch Road and Celilo Lane and map out your future.


GREETINGS from

Better Together We are at our best when we are together. If the challenges of the past two years have revealed anything, it is this—more is accomplished, more is healed, more is illuminated when we pool our talents and resources and come together to work for common good. We at Bend Magazine and Oregon Media know this better than anyone. We are blessed with an incredible team of creatives, visionaries and just plain hard workers who come together to create publications that shine a light on the finest and most innovative aspects of our community every day. Our team is but one of so many incredible micro-communities within our greater community. In this issue, read about individuals who banded together to create amazing things, from mountain bike trails to donuts, running races to whiskey, ukuleles to a new home for hospice. As we enter spring and the season of renewal, consider what has been realized by teamwork and the triumph of the human spirit, whether within the walls of your home, the city limits of our town, the greater community of Oregon, and beyond. We couldn’t do it without you, Bend. Keep inspiring us with your desires to make life better for us all. Share your favorite moments with our community by tagging #thisisbend and @bendmagazine on your favorite social media channel. See you around the Bend,

Kim Cooper Findling, Editor in Chief

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Heather Johnson, Publisher

Ross Johnson, Publisher

bendmagazine.com

MARCH \ APRIL 2022



CENTRAL OREGON LIFE & ST YLE

CONNECT WITH US

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MARCH \ APRIL 2022


DISCOVER NEWPORT A trip to Newport means outdoor exploration and indoor adventures, forest foraging, Yaquina Bay crabbing, chowder bowl comfort, bakery shops, coffee stops, early morning fog, and late night bonfires.

Your adventure starts here:

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people where nnture OUTNUMBERS

Wander where the Tallest redwood trees grow.


Front Deck

new & next

BEND NEWS + CENTRAL OREGON NEWS + BREW NEWS

N AT U R E

Bend’s Tree Campus CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE SITS ON A GREEN, tree-filled campus where

PHOTO TIMOTHY PARK

many Bendites enjoy walking, running and playing with their dog. Recently, COCC was nationally recognized by the Arbor Day Foundation as an official Tree Campus–any campus of higher education that follows five tenets, including creating a campus tree committee, coming up with a plan to care for the campus’ trees, allocating funds to that plan, completing a tree-related service learning project for students and of course, observing Arbor Day as a holiday. COCC has hit all of these marks, and even planted enough trees on campus to be declared an arboretum. As an official Tree Campus, COCC has a commitment to reducing energy costs related to running the college, planting more trees to offset the campus carbon footprint, and taking care of natural, green areas on campus to provide green space for students, which can help alleviate anxiety and and create a setting for recreation and wellness. COCC has become the eighth official Tree Campus in Oregon and the 393rd to be recognized in the nation. COCC has about sixty unique species of trees planted on the 200-acre campus, which is open to the public. This year, Arbor Day falls on April 29. See arborday.org and cocc.edu. M A R C H \ A P R I L 202 2

bendmagazine.com

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Front Deck bend growth

A New Innovation District for the West Side

parking

Downtown Parking Improvements Sought Trying to find a parking spot in downtown Bend can be difficult, especially on busy nights and weekends. The Parking Services Division of the City of Bend has been crowdsourcing public opinion to see what solutions Bendites prefer. The Division has announced a potential plan to include more paid parking or time limits in the downtown area, especially on busy streets such as Wall Street, with a goal that when someone is looking for parking, they should

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be able to find one or two spots on each block, even at peak hours. Tobias Marx, the Parking Services Division Manager for the City of Bend said, “For most people, paying a small fee is easier than driving around the block three times and then leaving because you couldn’t find a spot.” All funds collected would remain in the downtown area, to be used on potential new beautification projects to improve the district, such as the Minnesota Promenade, a proposed concept to turn downtown Minnesota Avenue into a pedestrian promenade for dining and entertainment. See bendoregon.gov.

development

Mixed-Use Development Near Old Mill District Plans have been unveiled to develop the vacant lot adjacent to Crux Fermentation Project and the Box Factory District. The twenty-one acre lot formerly housed the KorPine Mill, but will soon be developed with a mix of apartments, affordable senior housing, single family homes, a hotel and other retail space. The old KorPine mill was constructed in the 60s, but was mostly used for storage and parking for decades, until its roof collapsed under heavy snow and the building was razed in 2017. The developments are being led through a partnership between Hooker Creek Companies’ CEO Matt Day and California-based real estate investment firm, Kennedy Wilson. “We are thrilled to expand our presence in Oregon and to partner with Matt Day and his family in bringing a thoughtfully and sustainably designed project to one of the most exciting and rapidly growing markets in the western U.S.,” said William McMorrow, chairman and CEO of Kennedy Wilson. “Through this joint venture with local partners, we look forward to working closely with the city and community stakeholders to develop a smart growth plan that will help address the need for additional housing and infuse new life into an area crucial to the future of Bend.” See bendoregon.gov.

bendmagazine.com

MARCH \ APRIL 2022

PHOTOS MARVIN WALDER

OSU-Cascades plans to construct around 500,000 square feet of mixed-use office, retail and housing, as well as outdoor gathering and event space, adjacent to the existing west side campus, in a trend that has been seen in major universities across the nation typically called an innovation district. These locations near a major university are designed for both population growth and to support innovations within the industries important to the economy of the community. In practice, this innovation district from OSU-Cascades will look like a vibrant urban area with housing, retail, entertainment and, if all goes to plan, groundbreaking companies. Workers can live, play and work without leaving the area. An added benefit for any business is the easy access to OSU-Cascades’ student population and faculty, as well as university research. For students, the district will support programs that prepare them for a future with more complex and specialized degrees and jobs. Students are more likely to make connections with future employers and industries that they can thrive in. While there has been no official timeline announced by the university, the plans are already underway. OSU has been holding several market sounding sessions to garner community opinion and potential business connections for the new district, since January 2022. See osucascades.edu.


LIVE & LEARN!

At Central Oregon Community College, you’ll find a vibrant campus community, engaging student activities and our new Residence Hall, offering suite-style living and one of the best views in Bend. It features: • • • • • •

Lounges Study rooms Community kitchen Suites with semi-private baths Gym access On-site laundry room

Apply now for Fall Term 2022 at: cocc.edu/housing

COCC is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.

HEALTHY ADVENTURES AWAIT

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Front Deck central oregon fishing

Bend Man Catches Record-Breaking Fish Alex Dietz of Bend was fly fishing on a stretch of the Deschutes River just outside of Warm Springs in December when he hooked a mountain whitefish that weighed in at a whopping five pounds and twelve ounces–four ounces larger than the official world record, held by a Canadian man since 1995. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has already certified the fish as a new state record, as it shattered the old record by nearly a whole pound. Dietz’s whitefish was a full two feet long, nearly twice the length of the average size in the species, and the International Game Fish Association is currently in the process of certifying Dietz’ catch as a world record. The day of the catch, December 19, was a special one for Dietz, as it was his first fishing trip since he and his wife Andrea welcomed their first child into the world in November. “It was the first time I got the green light from my wife to go fishing, so big thanks to her, too,” Dietz said. Dietz typically fishes for trout and steelhead and releases everything he catches, however, to commemorate this potential world record, he decided to break that tradition and get his whitefish taxidermied. See dfw.state.or.us.

Youth Expunction Reform Act Helps Clear Arrest Records A new law is helping Oregonians who were arrested in their youth to clear their legal record. The Youth Expunction Reform Act, also called Senate Bill 575, was passed in the Oregon Legislature on June 26 and was enacted in January. This bill created a process in which those eligible will have a youthful arrest expunged from their record, automatically, when they turn 18. This law only expunges the records of teens and children who were arrested but not convicted. Supporters of the new law claim that this indicates that society is moving to a more realistic and compassionate state that understands how people grow and learn, and that childhood mistakes and misunderstandings should not permanently derail someone’s work, education and more. Critics of the law claim that it’s too lenient and creates a lack of accountability for young offenders. It’s expected that each year, the new law will automatically clear the records of more than 5,000 people. See olis.oregonlegislature.gov.

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police & fire

Sunriver First Responders get an Upgrade The city of Sunriver has needed a new public safety building for years, according to the police officers and firefighters who use the building. The current space is too small for the growing public safety force, which has a much larger job at hand during peak tourism months, when Sunriver’s population expands from 1,500 to an estimated 20,000. In January, commissioners unanimously decided to use money collected from taxes on hotels and vacation rentals to help create a new public safety building. Because the demand for more emergency services comes from tourists who visit Sunriver, not residents, the district decided that it was appropriate to ask for up to $10 million in room tax revenue from the county to help finance the project, which is estimated to cost between $16 million and $18 million; the Deschutes County Commission decided to allocate $8 million to this project over the next three years. Planned improvements include the ability to house police and fire operations under the same roof, building an interview room and a holding cell, and providing covered parking for police vehicles to improve response times in the winter months. The new building would also be equipped as an emergency center, providing support in the event of a natural disaster like an earthquake, wildfire or severe winter storm. See sunriversd.org .

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MARCH \ APRIL 2022

TOP PHOTO COURTES Y JA SON SCHREIBER, BOT TOM COURTSE Y SUNRIVER SERVICE DIS TRIC T

new law


Hometown connection, leading mortgage lender Because your life keeps moving, your financial picture needs to change and adapt to keep pace. When you’re ready to buy, invest in, or refinance a property, you often need to act swiftly on decisions that align with your overall financial goals. That’s when the advantages of working with local Wells Fargo Private Mortgage Banking can really make a difference. With Private Mortgage Banking, you may benefit from the following: • Competitive financing options for primary, second, vacation, and investment properties • A committed point of contact who manages the entire transaction • A dedicated underwriting team • A dedicated service line exclusive to Private Mortgage Banking customers • Full-service resource for buyers with complex asset portfolios I’m ready to answer any questions, listen to your goals, and help you bring your plans to life. Let’s connect. Steve Mora Private Mortgage Banker 541-633-1955 steve.mora@wellsfargo.com www.wfhm.com/steve-mora1 NMLSR ID 404066

Information is accurate as of date of printing and is subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. © 2021 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. NMLSR ID 399801. AS5271181 02/2022


Front Deck brewing WRITTEN BY JON ABERNATHY

bigger & better

Expansion for Boss Rambler, Wild Ride BOSS RAMBLER BEER CLUB IS GROWING!

Since opening in 2018, the company had been brewing at Silver Moon, but when RiverBend Brewing quietly closed at the end of 2021, Boss Rambler was able to take over the Division Street brewery, effectively quadrupling its capacity. “We’re excited to continue to expand and push the limits on our IPAs, but we’re also excited to expand our lager offerings as well as fruited beers which we’ve had a lot of fun with. The sky’s the limit!” says owner Matt Molletta. Beers from the new brewery are on the market now. Redmond’s Wild Ride Brewing is opening a second location—in Prineville. The new taproom space will feature a large patio with fire pits and food trucks. It won’t just be the brewery sending beer from Redmond, either—a five-barrel brewhouse will produce beer in-house as well. Wild Ride hopes to open in spring, so follow the brewery’s social media to stay up to date. See bossrambler.com and wildridebrew.com.

new brew

Van Henion Brewing & Tasting Room HAVE YOU DISCOVERED BEND’S NEWEST BREWERY YET? That would be Van Henion

Brewing, which was born out of the sale of Boneyard Beer to Deschutes Brewery last year. The merger of the two breweries consolidated operations at Deschutes, which left Boneyard’s former production brewery on Plateau Drive empty and available. Three former Boneyard brewers, Mark and Dana Henion and John Van Duzer, purchased this brewery, and began selling beer in January. Five other ex-Boneyard employees joined the new venture, but while Boneyard was primarily a purveyor of IPA, Van Henion also produces lagers and German styles. The first two beers on the market were Helles Lager and India Pale Ale, and the newest is Kolsch, a German ale style. Beers are available in cans and on draft at select places around town, including at the new tasting room—a feature new to the old Boneyard brewery space.

The tasting room has an indoor seating capacity of about two dozen, featuring pint pours, with food carts outside. It’s designed to “have a cozy vintage vibe, with swag lamps and wallpaper,” according to Dana Henion. “We will have a guest tap on, and will not allow minors at first. That will change when we expand to patio seating in the spring.” Between this new tasting room and drinkable, well-received brews, Van Henion is a vibrant new addition to the local beer scene. See vanhenionbrewing.com.

nanobrewery

SISTERS HAD LONG BEEN A ONE-BREWERY TOWN, since Three Creeks Brewing opened in 2008. But late last year, its brewery population doubled with the opening of Funky Fauna Artisan Ales. The nanobrewery is the brainchild of husband and wife team Michael Frith and Danielle Burns, with a focus on small-batch brews, barrels, and local ingredients and terroir. The beers cover a range and blending of styles from farmhouse ales to IPAs to lagers, brewed on a two-barrel electric brewhouse from Stout Tanks in Portland. Frith previously brewed for Our Mutual Friend Brewing in Denver. “I got to learn from some great brewers and even greater people,” he says of his time in Denver. “They were always a huge inspiration for us when it came to opening a brewery and starting small.” He helped with a local start-up brewery before opening Funky Fauna. Why Sisters? “Being a part of a neighborhood was always important to us when looking for a location,” says Frith. “When we originally visited the space here we immediately fell in love with the area and its potential to be something really cool for the locals, as well as tourists when they pass through.” Consider making the trek to check out the tasting room and try the beer; it’s located just north of Three Creeks’ production brewery on Sun Ranch Drive. In addition to the standard beers, look for “some fun saisons coming out of the barrel” in the months ahead. See funkyfaunabeer.com.

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TOP PHOTO JON ABERNATHY, BOTTOM PHOTO CODY RHEAULT

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COMMUNIT Y E VENTS

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TITLE HERE

Run Fast Jump High Heading Here Spring fun runs and serious races are back this season WRITTEN BY NICK ROSENBERGER

Subhead text goes here

S

BYannual NAME HERE ince the pandemic began two years ago, WRITTEN many of the foot races in Central Oregon were forced to postpone or cancel their events. Virtual races became common in 2020, followed by hybrid or downsized races in 2021. For many veterans and beginners, however, this spring offers a return to normal. This season presents an opportunity to return to the full experience of cheering crowds and thumping finish parties. Whether you are looking to knock out some cobwebs after a winter offseason or simply seeking a fun afternoon, spring will have no shortage of races to choose from in Central Oregon.

PHOTO GLENN TACHIYA M A

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hen Sister Catherine Hellmann arrived in 1948, Bend was an emerging mill town of 10,000 people. A nurse by training, Hellman was sent by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Indiana to work as the nursing supervisor at St. Charles hospital in downtown Bend. Hellmann, then just 27 years old, had dedicated her life to service. Though her initial stay spanned just three years, it had a lasting impression on Hellman that changed the course of health care in Central Oregon. Years before, a chance meeting on a ship returning from Ireland in 1908 between Father Luke Sheehan, a Catholic priest from Bend and founder of St. Francis Church and school, and Mother Gertrude Moffitt, a nun from Indiana, would mark the beginning

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Peterson Ridge Rumble

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TRAILS

Bend Marathon

While the St. Patrick’s Day Dash in Bend is canceled this year due to COVID-19, Kelly Bither of Run Sisters Run will be hosting the Lucky Leprechaun 5k/10k in Sisters on March 12. The race will start on the east side of Cascade Avenue and wind through the neighborhoods and town before finishing at a local restaurant with live music. Finishers will receive a custom and locally made shamrock medal and commemorative beer mug. “It’d be nice for people who aren’t super serious but want to get out in the community,” Bither said, adding that walkers are welcome. There will also be a Best-Dressed Lucky Leprechaun contest and beer from Three Creeks Brewing. See runsignup.com.

BEND MARATHON

A P R I L 10

After two years of hosting a virtual event, the Bend Marathon returns in person this year with options in the 5k, 10k, half marathon and marathon distances on Sunday, April 10. “We're really hopeful and excited, and desperately want to be able to bring this event back to the community,” said Kari Strang, a Bend Marathon race director. While the virtual events were great, she said, it just isn’t the same as a full in-person event. “There's something about that human element and that true connectedness that you get when you are out doing something challenging together,” she said. Participants can still register for a virtual Bend Marathon and can receive a full refund if the race is canceled due to COVID-19. See bend - marathon.com.

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PETERSON RIDGE RUMBLE

A P R I L 10

For those who feel a little more adventurous, the Peterson Ridge Rumble will also take place on Sunday, April 10, and will offer distances of twenty miles and forty miles. The race takes place on the Peterson Ridge and Metolius-Windigo trails near Sisters. Proceeds will go to help fund the Sisters High School cross country team. The Rumble, organized by Sean Meissner, is both cheaper and more easygoing than most races this length. Total elevation gain for the forty-miler is about 2,700 feet while the twenty-miler is about 1,000 feet, which contributes to a fast course. Instead of finisher shirts, runners will receive a pair of finisher socks. The race is old school and lowkey, Meissner said. “It’s just very runnable.” See runlikeardy.com.

SALMON RUN

APRIL 23

For those looking to race in Bend, the 2022 Salmon Run on April 23 has runners follow the flow of the Deschutes River before looping back with 5k, 10k and half-marathon options. “The Salmon Run is the oldest continuous race in Bend,” said Aaron Switzer, a producer for the race. “Of all the races,” he said, “I think it's one of the best ones to showcase Bend.” While the half marathon is usually the most popular event, Switzer said, the Salmon Run 10k is a very popular early-season race for those looking to shed their winter layers and work up to the half marathon distance. The event benefits the Environmental Center in downtown Bend, which directs the funds towards river restoration and habitat restoration. See bendraces.com.

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PHOTO LEFT MARK STOCKCAMP, RIGHT BRIAN BECKER

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M O U N TA I N B I K I N G

A New Playground Exploring the Madras East Hills Trail System

PHOTO COURTESY OF COTA - MADRAS CHAPTER

WRITTEN BY NOAH NELSON

M

ost avid mountain bikers from Bend probably know nearby popular routes such as Phil’s Trail like the back of their hand. As great as these tried-and-true trails are, it never hurts to add some variety to your life and try something new. The Madras East Hills Trail System is Central Oregon’s newest and potentially unique trail system, offering downhill-adrenaline and uphill climbs just an hour’s drive from Bend.

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The organization managing the trail system, the Central Oregon Trail Alliance, got involved back in 2019 after Brennan Morrow, who is now the Madras Representative for COTA, moved to Madras and noticed a lack of nearby mountain biking trails. Morrow approached the city about the land known as the East Hills, which is owned by the city of Madras and other private entities. “The city was excited to create a trail system to support healthy

living in Madras,” Morrow said. With approval from the land owners, COTA got to work on a trail system that breaks away from the norm in Central Oregon. While most trails in the region exist on federal land like the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests, and therefore have restrictions on what can be built on the trail, the Madras East Hills Trail System is privately owned and is exempt from these restrictions.

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This means that not only are class 1 ebikes allowed on the trail (ebikes with a capped top speed of 20 mph), but the trails themselves are covered in manmade features. “The East Hills offers many types of trails for all users from beginners to advanced riders. We have berms, drops, jumps, and excellent wood features,” Morrow said. The unique nature of the trails has contributed to their popularity among local mountain bikers. Most trails around Bend on federal land can have features,

“The city was excited to create a trail system to support healthy living in Madras.”

but they must be built into the natural environment and typically incorporate logs or rocks. It’s the sheer amount of manmade and constructed features that makes the East Hills so special. All together, mountain bikers have around fourteen miles of trails to explore, while horseback riders have six miles of trails for themselves. Along the way, bikers can test their skills with jumps of varying sizes, drops, tall, well constructed berms, paved corners and tons of wooden features to ride

PHOTO TOP LEFT COURTESY OF COTA - MADRAS CHAPTER, OTHERS KIM MCCARREL

FUEL UP IN MADRAS After a day on the saddle, take some time to explore the city of Madras and refuel for the next big ride. Madras Brewing offers pub fare featuring ingredients from nearby farms and craft brews made locally in Central Oregon. Known for authentic home cooking and burritos the size of your head, Pepe’s Mexican Restaurant is your stop for vibrant flavors and refreshing drinks.

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CYCLING IN MADRAS While you’re in Madras, don’t miss your chance to take your bike and pedal down the Madras Mountain Views Scenic Bikeway, a thirty-mile stretch of paved road, suitable for most riders year-round. The bikeway showcases some amazing high desert landscapes and passes through the towns of Madras, Culver and Metolius. Take some time to soak in the views at the many overlooks above Cove Palisades State Park and Lake Billy Chinook.

EXPLORE

Madras Mountain Views Scenic Bikeway

PHOTO STEVEN HEINRICHS, COURTESY OF VISIT CENTRAL OREGON

Gate

TRAIL MAP

Difficulty Rating Easy Moderate Difficult Very Difficult Horse Primary

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on. The passion and effort put into these trails is clear, and any biker enjoying the trails will notice that. The new trail system has helped put Madras on the map, and is a pretty popular spot on the weekends. Morrow remarked that many people use their weekend to travel out to Madras from Redmond, Bend, Portland and farther, because the East Hills have become a Central Oregon mountain biking destination. These trails are accessible year-round but have varying conditions, depending on the time of year. Dry summers call for lighter, dustier dirt while winters pack the dirt densely and sometimes reveal some mud on the trails. The East Hills Trails are accessible near Juniper Hill Park on East Ashwood Road. From the trailhead, bikers have three trails to choose from that all splinter off into several other sections, providing bikers tons of unique combinations to keep their riding fresh. With trail names like Gut Punch, Leap of Faith and Valley of the Bones, bikers should expect a day of fast-paced, intense downhill action.

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S PA A N D H O T E L

Gorge Getaway The Society Hotel Bingen mixes historic charm and modern style WRITTEN BY KIM COOPER FINDLING

W

e arrived in the waning sunlight of an early spring day, pulling up in front of a classic historic schoolhouse perched on a steep hillside overlooking the Columbia River Gorge. My husband and I had just driven across the river from Hood River, where we’d stopped for a beer at pFriem Family Brewers and to watch the windsurfers at play in the chilly March waters. The creaky double doors of the former schoolhouse—recently transformed into the Society Hotel Bingen—welcomed us in to a warm and inviting library and common room, outfitted with old books and comfortable couches, just as the train rolled past outside along the waterfront, letting forth its old-timey whistle as if on cue. When the founders of The Society Hotel, located in a renovated historic building in Portland’s Chinatown, went looking for a second

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location, they were in search of more than a pretty place. “We were looking for a story—a place with a history that a design could latch on to, and not just a destination that would be all new,” explained coowner Matt Siegel, as he gave us a tour of the second Society Hotel, which opened in spring of 2019. The team found the story they were looking for in Bingen, Washington—a small, formerly industrial town just over the river from Hood River, Oregon. There sat an 80-year-old schoolhouse, built by the Civilian Conservation Corps and still boasting great charms and solid bones. The 7500-square-foot building served as the school for Bingen and White Salmon, Washington, from 1938 until the 1970s. In the 1980s, it became a hostel and inn to serve the burgeoning windsurfer crowds who had begun to descend on the area for the famous winds of the Columbia Gorge.

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“We were looking for a story—a place with a history that a design

art made into a guide to local adventures, crafted cocktails and fresh-made pastries and meals, and a vast collection of classic books acquired from a former college. Art accents throughout the property are old classroom posters, touting the tenets of the ABCs to the solar system. The gym is a classic open space perfect for weddings, gatherings, or shooting a few hoops. The sanctuary is an aesthetically amazing subterranean dome, a circular architectural feat built partly underground with carefully designed acoustics and a soft bamboo floor, where events from yoga classes to dance parties take place. The lodgings include, on the high end, individual cabins with full kitchens, views of the Columbia River and

GYM PHOTO NATALIE GILDERSLEEVE

could latch on to.”

The Society team acquired the property and got to work. The schoolhouse and equally historic gym were restored; adjacent, a brand-new structure of adjoining cabins and a state-of-the-art luxury spa were built. “We got to restore and build new,” said Seigel, adding that there were “elements of cuteness” that the team wanted to keep—blackboards set into walls, antique lockers for belongings and wooden bleachers in the gym. Alongside every charming historical element was placed a modern touch. The result is a campus of amenities both old and new, a meandering maze of spaces to explore and relax in, both indoors and out, over a weekend stay. The lobby doubling as a living room boasts a cozy fireplace, wall

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WHITE SALMON, WASHINGTON White Salmon, Washington is a mile uphill from Bingen and offers a majority of the services that support the Society Hotel Bingen. Grab a seat on the upper outdoor deck at Everybody’s Brewing for a view of Mount Hood and a pint. Catch live music on Mondays. North Shore Café is the spot for tasty breakfasts and a juice bar that pulls from plenty of local produce. The Book Peddler is piled to the ceiling with the titles you seek, both classic and new. The White Salmon River is popular with white water kayakers, and the White Salmon River Valley is dotted with wineries. Take a scenic drive and sip on local syrah and grenache.

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picnic tables and hammocks outside. On the affordable end, guests book a bed in the most luxurious bunk room they’ve ever laid eyes on, complete with bunks outfitted with charging stations for electronics, cubbies for personal belongings, reading lights and thick privacy curtains—all for under $50 a night. It is the spa at the heart of the Society Hotel at Bingen that draws the visitor in again and again, wedging itself into memory until the next visit. A beautiful structure of wood and glass sits in the center of the cabin ring, built around an indoor saltwater soaking pool, an outdoor hot pool, a cold plunge pool and a cedar sauna. Seigel had insisted that I try the cold plunge, no matter how unappealing an experience it might seem; he even suggested that I might find it weirdly addictive. Kept at a chilly 54 degrees, the cold plunge is said to promote health and well-being; the idea being that when submerged in cold, the blood pours to the

inner organs, resulting in an invigorating, stimulating sensation throughout the body. [Read writer Katryna Vecella’s own experience with cold/hot treatment in our Wellness story on page 55]. In the interest of scientific inquiry and journalistic integrity, I gave it a whirl. The shock of submerging brought to mind memories of being the kid brave enough to dive into an alpine lake in late spring; the seconds ticked by ever-so-slowly as the cold sunk in and I tried to count to ten; and then came my ever-so-quick return to open air and ultra-speedy journey to the sauna, where the dry heat and cedar scents soothed and warmed me to the bone. After the sauna, I took a soak in the outdoor heated pool, where the fresh air of the Columbia Gorge smelled of early spring and the sun was setting downriver. I had to admit that I felt amazing. So, the next morning, I did it all over again.

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PHOTO INSET CAVAN IMAGES / AL AMY STOCK PHOTO

RETREAT


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B AC K PAC K I N G

Hiking for a Purpose Rue McKenrick’s quest to build the American Perimeter Trail WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW

PHOTO MARIE-SOLEIL DESAUTELS

On the Ritter Range in the Sierra Nevadas of California, 1,000 miles into a scouting journey

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R

ue McKenrick has spent much of his life relying on his own two feet to take him places, a decision that has led to great accomplishments, but also challenges. As a hiker, backpacker and cyclist, McKenrick has traveled the country extensively. Most notably, he’s hiked all three of the country’s major thru-hikes—the Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail and Continental Divide Trail—a feat only about 525 people have accomplished. Back home in Bend, where he’s lived since 2010, he travels around town without a car, walking and biking everywhere. McKenrick’s journeys, while rewarding, haven’t always been easy. He’s pushed his body to extremes while backpacking, with overtraining sending him into the early stages of organ failure. He’s been knocked unconscious by a tree falling on him while he slept and been lifted several inches off the ground in a roadside tornado, he said. He’s hiked with broken bones and countless internal ailments, battled extreme thirst and cramps in the desert and been left to refuel himself on only gas station snacks for days at a time. And in Bend, his decision to walk and bike everywhere has led to five collisions with cars and a cycling crash that caused a traumatic brain injury.

Yet, McKenrick still walks everywhere, still cycles, and for the past two-and-a-half years, has dedicated his life to his latest thruhike expedition—the scouting, route-planning and establishment of the new American Perimeter Trail. It’s something McKenrick has dreamed of creating for years—a massive thru hike established not just for recreation, but as a means of conserving the land for generations to come. “I’m not creating the next great thru hike, I’m creating America’s next biggest volunteer and conservation project through this thru hiking,” McKenrick said. After years of dreaming, McKenrick took off from Bend in July 2019, hiking continuously for thousands of miles over the next fifteen months in an effort to establish the trail’s route. As he hiked, McKenrick began to pick up steam with online supporters, including Leilah Grace, a Pennsylvania physical therapist who initially reached out to help McKenrick with a back injury he posted about on social media. “There was this little voice in my head saying, this guy needs some help,” said Grace, who began helping McKenrick with social media posting and today serves as vice president of the American Perimeter Trail Conference, a nonprofit established in 2020 as a way to give McKenrick’s dream “some legs,” she said. “When I first learned about it, I thought it was just really, really

PHOTO COURTESY OF OUT CENTRAL OREGON

Clockwise: Headwaters of the Mississippi River, Minnesota; At the summit of Mount Whitney, California; A lonesome tree near Charbonneau, North Dakota

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PURSUITS

cool and interesting,” said Grace, who volunteers her time with the APT Conference. “I was hooked on this idea of having a hiking trail that you could get on anywhere in the country… But now it’s the conservation piece that has hit home for me—it’s not just a trail, it’s about preserving the land that’s around the trail.” While overtraining during his fifteen-month expedition did a number on McKenrick’s body and sent him home twice in late 2020 and again in 2021, he’s committed to closing the full perimeter loop this year. When finished, the American Perimeter Trail will roughly trace the perimeter of the contiguous United States, starting and ending in Bend. Establishing the trail means pinpointing the route mile by mile, identifying suitable public lands and in some cases pursuing easements, followed by physical trail building in some areas, done in partnership with groups such as AmeriCorps. While few people are likely to hike the entire perimeter trail, they may choose to hike pieces of it, and establishing the route and conserving the land is beneficial for public recreation and for the environment. “It’s about leaving this place better than you found it,” McKenrick said. “And I think time is of the essence.” While out scouting the 12,000- to 14,000-mile trail, McKenrick is weaving together networks of forest roads and existing trails,

using a compass and paper maps to track his progress each night and make notes about the route. “People see the compass and map, and they think I’m crazy,” said McKenrick, who doesn’t rely on GPS navigation and isn’t fussy about which type of gear or brands of equipment he uses. “The most important piece of gear you can have is an open heart,” he said. The American Perimeter Trail Conference nonprofit is based here in Bend, but draws support from across the country, with the majority of the organization’s founding members coming from outside the area, including many from McKenrick’s hometown in Pennsylvania, along the Appalachian Trail. Supporters can become members of the organization, with regular donations helping to support the conference’s effort to formally establish and build the new trail. This spring or summer, McKenrick plans to head back out to close the loop on the first full scouting mission of the APT, connecting the last piece of the trail in Washington and then heading south back to Bend for a summertime celebration. Learn more at americanperimetertrail.org.

Counterclockwise: McKenrick’s nightly homework, identifying possible routes for the next day in the North Dakota Badlands; Backpacking in the Missouri River drainage of Montana’s Great Plains; Hiking in Clausen Springs, North Dakota

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HELPING HELPING HANDS HANDS

TITLE HERE

Heading Here Subhead text goes here WRITTEN BY NAME HERE

PA L L I AT I V E C A R E

New Home for Hospice House A place of comfort and care for families facing end-of-life decisions WRITTEN BY KATRYNA VECELLA

PHOTO COURTES Y OF AL SC ARCHITEC TURE

F

or Deborah Adams, clinical operations director of Partners in Care, the new Hospice House is an opportunity to advocate for her staff who have done incredible work in an aging building with a less-than-optimal environment for today’s standards. At the open house of the new building, watching the faces of the team of physicians and registered nurses of Partners in Care looking at the building they’ll soon provide patient care in was a memorable experience for Adams. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for most to have an experience of having been part of creating a building like this and watching it open,” said Adams. Hospice House is the only specialty hospital in Oregon east of the Cascades, and there are only three in the entire state. Partners in Care serves a 10,000 square-mile region of Central Oregon, offering hospice, palliative care, home health, transitions and grief support in addition to the Hospice House, where end-of-life care is given. Patients that come to Hospice House receive 24/7 care by a nurse, are seen by the inhouse physician daily and have access to a fully stocked pharmacy. “Hospice House comes into play when a patient is at home being cared for by our team on hospice care and something happens where maybe they have a pain management need or symptoms that can’t

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be adequately or fully addressed in a home setting,” said Marlene Carlson, director of development and communications. “The patient can come in here to have those symptoms managed. Sometimes they go home again after they’re able to, and sometimes they pass away here at Hospice House.” The new Hospice House, located next door to the original Hospice House on the eastside of Bend near the hospital, features twelve rooms in a homelike environment that feels like an oasis of tranquility and peace. The modern design includes a great room with a fireplace, an activity room, a full-service commercial kitchen and kitchenette, a medicine room and a beautiful chapel complete with a sound bowl—all surrounded by the comforting elements of earth, air, fire and water. “I like to stand in my favorite spot here [in the heart of the patient area] and look up and down the two wings—six rooms on each wing with curved hallways designed to be calming, pleasing, homelike and accessible—very functional, but also just very attractive,” said Carlson. “Considering this could be a high-stress time of somebody’s life, you want to do everything you can to meet those needs.” Each room is named for a unique feature of Central Oregon landscape and has artwork reflecting the landscape on the walls. All

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HELPING HELPING HANDS HANDS

patient rooms have large windows that let in abundant natural light and can be opened to bring in fresh air, also giving views of a rock garden just outside. In addition to state-of-art technology, the rooms have personal touches including a donated handmade quilt, a lantern welcoming visitors to the room, and ample visiting space with a private bathroom. The rooms were designed by architects experienced with hospice homes and a working group team from Partners in Care who met with the current Hospice House for recommendations. Partners in Care provides an important service to the community, and it was time for an upgrade. “Our old building was, well, old. It was a lovely building that was a community effort over about twenty years ago, and it was almost out of date the minute we moved in,” said Adams. “There are a lot of features for providing optimal patient care that are standard of care now that were missing, and with only six beds and the growth in this area, we were looking to the future.” The new 14,600 square-foot Hospice House cost $12 million. Partners in Care’s reserve, accumulated over the years, covered half the cost, and the community raised the other six million. Many donations came from locals who had a personal hospice experience and the medical community, including grants from St. Charles Health and Summit Health. The new Hospice House anticipates opening its doors to patients soon, with continued patient care at the current Hospice House until then. “We’ve always been centered on the patient and their family, and now it’s going to be an enhanced experience for them—more space to spread out, more amenities, and we’ll be able to serve more respite patients who have often been on a waiting list because we’ve had such a small facility,” said Carlson. “We’ll serve more people, serve them better and be seen by the whole region as an asset.” For more information, or to volunteer or donate, visit partnerbend.org.

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No matter the challenges our community faces, we’re here for you. Our mission is the same as it has been for over 40 years—to provide the best healthcare possible to the women in our community. From adolescence through menopausal years, we offer a full range of women’s healthcare services, including obstetrics, gynecology, midwifery and more. Since the beginning, generations of women have come to trust the compassionate care we give. Now accepting appointments.

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WELLNESS

H O T/C O L D T H E R A P Y

Just Add Sauna Revitalizing a Baltic-Latvian tradition to heal body and spirit through sauna WRITTEN BY KATRYNA VECELLA

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PHOTO JAYDE SILBERNAGEL

eeply rooted in Northern Europe as a place for community gathering, socializing, healing, and even birthing over thousands of years, traditional saunas have evolved into an often out-of-reach luxury in the Western world. Halina Kowalski-Thompson is breaking through these limitations to bring Gather Sauna House to Central Oregonians using authentic fundamentals—connection to loved ones, community, nature and self. Gather Sauna House is a mobile Baltic style wood-fired sauna, thoughtfully handcrafted by Kowalski-Thompson's husband, Dorian Thompson, and made from locally-sourced juniper and other sustainable materials. The sauna is on wheels, for greater accessibility and also with the intention of relocating to different bodies of water and nature to employ the cold therapy aspect that often goes in tandem with a sauna.

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“...the things that sauna can impact are really the issues of our time, the physical and mental health issues that we're dealing with.” snowy winter weather. Against all logic, I dumped a bucket of cold water over my head for the cold cycle and immediately felt an indescribable feeling of clarity and euphoria. During the rest and rehydrate cycle, I sat comfortably in a wet bathing suit in twentydegree temps before heading back into the solitude and warmth of the sauna to repeat the cycle. I headed home feeling reset and revitalized by three rounds of hot to cold. For a similar experience, guests can book a ninety-minute private session in the Covidsafe, sanitized sauna with up to four others at one of Gather Sauna House’s pop-up community events. The sessions include a knowledgeable sauna guide who will teach the traditional sauna methods, tend the fire, set up the cooling station, and provide complimentary herbal infused water, locallysourced rehydrating tea, and house-made signature sauna body cream. Guests can also opt for a private, overnight experience where they can create their personal wellness

retreat in the privacy of their home or selected location. The sauna is delivered and set up for use with a tutorial of best practices. Kowalski-Thompson’s creation of Gather Sauna House came at perfect timing for the mobile sauna movement that has swept over the United States and Europe. "It's so well-timed because the things that sauna can impact are really the issues of our time, the physical and mental health issues that we're dealing with. There's a reason it's survived as a basic healing practice. It's been overlooked for all these years," said Kowalski-Thompson. Kowalski-Thompson's vision is to create Gather Sauna House into a space for the community to feel held and supported. "I feel like on some level there's magic in this, and I not only wanna pursue it for myself, but I want to share it,” she said. "I want to share this healing mechanism." Learn more at gathersaunahouse.com.

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PHOTO AMBER HOLM

With a background in mental health, Kowalski-Thompson’s passion for sauna stems from her own Baltic roots and from its benefits, particularly those of the hot/cool contrast therapy she promotes. "I have always loved studying different ways of healing, and I have a voracious appetite for learning different cultural ways that people have healed throughout time," she said. The hot/cool contrast therapy essentially acts as a pump for your lymphatic system, clearing out toxins while spreading around white blood cells and increasing immunity, Kowalski-Thompson said. She also listed off other benefits including improvements in cardiovascular health, metabolism, growth hormone pathways and athletic performance. It can cause a release of melatonin for improved sleep, can reduce the risk of dementia, and has positive effects on pain. Kowalski-Thompson also said sauna can mimic exercise, helping to reduce cortisol, lose weight and release endorphins. With the guided direction of KowalskiThompson, I sought to gain a few of these benefits in my first hot/cold session at the Coyote Den in Tumalo, where Gather Sauna House is often parked. In the sauna, I found myself completely disconnected from the outside world throughout the heating to hot cycle. Ten or fifteen minutes later—I lost track of time—I headed out into the


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Craven Haven A Bend family brings a fresh design eye to Tetherow WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW

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hen Sister Catherine Hellmann arrived in 1948, Bend was an emerging mill town of 10,000 people. A nurse by training, Hellman was sent by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Indiana to work as the nursing supervisor at St. Charles hospital in downtown Bend. Hellmann, then just 27 years old, had dedicated her life to service. Though her initial stay spanned just three years, it had a lasting impression on Hellman that changed the course of health care in Central Oregon. Years before, a chance meeting on a ship returning from Ireland in 1908 between Father Luke Sheehan, a Catholic priest from Bend and founder of St. Francis Church and school, and Mother Gertrude Moffitt, a nun from Indiana, would mark the beginning

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hen the Craven family zeroed in on a nearly half-acre lot to buy in Tetherow in the fall of 2019, it was empty, save for a couple of mature ponderosa pine trees near the center. Other buyers and builders might have seen the trees—required to stay put as part of the lot sale—as a challenge, but it was one that Mackenzie Craven and her husband Kenny were up for. The Cravens had settled in Kenny’s hometown of Bend in the early 2010s after meeting in college out of state. They lived in a home in NorthWest Crossing, and another in the Shevlin Park area before finding a lot in Tetherow and purchasing it with plans for a new build. Mackenzie, a former marketing professional, had taken up an interest in interior design, chronicling the couple’s DIY home updates in their first Bend homes on Instagram under the name Craven Haven (@craven_haven), and even going viral for a

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MODERN MEETS TRADITIONAL High ceilings, black framed windows and a few classic archway details work together in harmony inside the Craven home.

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bathroom remodel project. When it came time to plan out the Tetherow home, Mackenzie put her refined design eye to work. “I don’t have a background in interior design, but it’s just a passion of mine,” she said. “I have a pretty strong sense of what I like.” So while Kenny stayed busy with work as general manager of Bend’s Big Country RV dealership, Mackenzie took the lead on the new home project, while also pregnant with the couple’s third child. Along the way, she continued sharing her insights into design and motherhood on Instagram. The couple knew of a contractor they wanted to work with, David Burnham of Burnham Building Company, and had connected with architect Adam Peterson of Muddy River Design to begin the process of designing the home. The two pine trees in the center of the lot became the starting point, with an outdoor courtyard envisioned around the trees, and the house wrapping around the courtyard, with the central outdoor area visible from nearly every room inside. “Being able to see that courtyard was a big priority,” Mackenzie said. “We had to keep the trees and that definitely limited things, but it gave us a place to start.” The courtyard has an outdoor fireplace, which is double-sided, also serving as the focal point of the living room inside. The 3,245-square-foot home features four bedrooms and threeand-a-half baths, a suitable size for the young family, which includes the boys—4-year-old Hart and 2-and-a-half-year-old Smith—and 1-year-old girl, Merritt. Downstairs is the primary bedroom, which features a pair of walk-in closets, one of which is currently set up as an indoor exercise area. The connected

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FUNCTIONAL LUXURY TOP Durable luxury vinyl flooring downstairs was the logical choice in the Craven’s three-child home. BOTTOM An outdoor seating area shares a double-sided fireplace also anchoring the living room indoors.

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FAMILY-FRIENDLY DESIGN LEFT The Craven kids can sometimes be found splashing around in the wet room, an enclosed area with both a shower and tub inside. RIGHT A kid-friendly living area is situated at the top of the stairs.

bathroom includes a glass door to enter the wet room, which has both a shower area and tub within it, with all the walls covered in vibrant, emerald green tile. The tile is zellige, a unique style that is handmade in Morocco. Mackenzie said that the tile and other green highlights, along with a mostly black and white color palette throughout the home, help to evoke an organic style that blends in nicely with the nature seen outside. Opposite the main bedroom is another small bedroom that the Cravens first used as a nursery for Merritt and are now converting into an office. The heart of the home is most definitely the kitchen, centrally located and anchored by an oversized island and row of barstools and highchairs to accommodate the kids. “Everyone just always ends up in the kitchen,” Mackenzie said. “My kids are there 24/7, eating their meals or drawing.” Highlights of the kitchen include custom cabinetry by Brian’s Cabinets, a black and gold Hallman range appliance and the glass and metal shelving units on either side of the stove that look as though they could be custom built,

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but were actually a shopping find of Mackenzie’s that happened to work out perfectly. Upstairs at the Craven home is the kid zone, with two kids bedrooms, a bathroom and second living area perfect for cartoons and playtime. It’s been about a year since the Cravens moved into their new house, and while there are still a few smaller design updates and projects on their to-do list, the space is proving to be functional and homey for the family of five. A few family-friendly musts decided on during the process included indestructible luxury vinyl plank f looring instead of hardwood, and performance fabrics on the furniture for easy cleanup of kid messes, such as crayon marks and chocolate milk spills. When not at home, and between preschool, kids activities and errands, the Cravens sometimes squeeze in family outings to favorite Bend spots like the west side Bangers and Brews. “Anywhere with a soft pretzel is a win with my kids,” Mackenzie

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CENTRALLY LOCATED

HOME

The white oak kitchen island is a common gathering area for the family of five.

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said. In the summer, camping trips or visits to the family cabin at Odell Lake are often on the agenda. A decade after landing in Bend and finally settling into their Tetherow home, Mackenzie said she feels grateful for the opportunity to call such a beautiful place home. “People here are so friendly, and it’s really cool to be raising my kids in a place with so much access to outdoor activities.” Mackenzie said she isn’t sure if the newly completed build will be the family’s

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forever home, but it’s a perfect space for now. “It’s not really the house that makes the home, it’s the people.” In the meantime, she plans to continue sharing on Instagram, chronicling design updates and family life inside the Craven Haven.

Resources

Designer: Mackenzie Craven Builder: Burnham Building Company Architect: Muddy River Design

COZY AT HOME TOP Layers of bedding and a soft, plush rug make for an inviting main bedroom. BOTTOM Bold wallpaper accents the family’s otherwise light and bright laundry room.

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HOME STYLE

ed tReclaim -foo le seven

arkab de This rem g table was ma n i n i ouse d h square carriage ld o r a e 00-y lvaged out of 1 oards sa b g n i r f loo adise, 018 Par 2 e h t from . nia f ire Ca lifor

FURNITURE

Repurposed

Rescued from decay, fire and tear-downs, old wood finds new purpose WRITTEN BY GERTIE ROGERS

PHOTO GR ACE PULVER

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on’t be surprised if one day you come across Missy and Brent Taylor wandering around in the woods gathering old pieces of ponderosa pine or old-growth juniper. The pair, owners of Redmond-based Cabin Creek Furniture and Design, have been creating unique pieces of furniture since 1997. “We begin by foraging old and left-behind wood from the forest with permits, or from private property with permission,” said Brent Taylor. Four to six weeks later, the wood has been crafted into log furniture and custom home décor pieces. “My father was a wood-shop teacher, and I began working with wood at a young age,” said Brent. “I was always drawn to rustic, log-style furniture and would study the different types of joinery and design.” A recent Cabin Creek project began as nearly petrified two-hundred-year-old oak floorboards, weathered and reclaimed from outside an old mill. These were upcycled into several statement pieces of furniture. Another recent project, pictured above, began when the Taylors got their hands on one-hundred-year-old flooring boards from a carriage house, salvaged from the remains of the 2018

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Paradise, California fire. Missy and Brent crafted the reclaimed wood into a remarkable, one-of-a-kind, seven-foot-square dining table, accompanied by nine custom lodge chairs and a bench, also crafted from the same reclaimed wood. In addition to dining tables, Cabin Creek creates built-in bunk beds, custom bed frames and headboards. The Taylors sell their work at the Sisters and NorthWest Crossing farmers markets, in season, where they display smaller pieces of furniture and art, such as elevated dog feeders, small stools and benches, picture frames, free-standing coat trees and their very popular hanging wall trees. One of the Taylors’ favorite kinds of projects are custom—truly custom, using wood that clients bring to them that has some special meaning. Transforming lumber that means something to a family into works of art they can treasure for generations to come is very satisfying, says Brent. “I continue to learn, enjoy and create one-ofa-kind pieces.” Learn more at fb.com /cabincreeklogfurnituredesign.

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VENTURES

LOCAL PRODUCTS

Put a Bend on It Bend-branded companies reflect the best of the community WRITTEN BY TERESA RISTOW

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hen it comes time to name a new startup, business owners look for something easy to identify and spell, check for originality, and often, look for names that ref lect their personal experiences and the things that have inspired them to become entrepreneurs. For those starting a business in Bend, naming often involves taking a look around at the community—drawing inspiration from places like the Deschutes River, the Cascade Mountains, the volcanic landscape and the native plants and animals. For some emerging companies, the most logical choice is naming their venture after their home—Bend. Adding “Bend’’ to a business name is nothing new, from long standing establishments such as Bend Brewing Co. (opened in 1995) or Bend Burger Company (opened in 2008) to newer businesses such as Bend Sauce (launched in 2019), which all pay homage to Bend with their company names. Here’s a look at some of the businesses that wear the Bend name proudly.

BEND SOAP COMPANY

What started as a quest to help their son get relief from eczema a decade ago turned into a family soap and skincare business for Dwight and Marilee Johnson. Bend Soap’s first product was a simple, goat’s milk soap using milk from their family farm. It helped their son’s skin and inspired the Johnsons to pursue a business. When it came time to naming the new company, they wanted something simple and traditional,

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Marilee said. “We’re old school and homegrown in so many ways,” she said. “Many establishments in the past would name their companies simply after their location. Since we are here in Bend, it just made sense to give a nod to our roots, mimicking that vintage way of life.” The company has since grown into a multi-million dollar business, with sales across the country of soaps, lotions and more, all bearing the “Bend” name. “We hope the fact that we have built a

lifestyle brand and remained a constant in people’s lives, gives credibility to the Bend community,” Marilee said. “We hope it’s something the Bend locals can be proud of. We see folks sending the Bend Soap products all over the country to their loved ones, and being proud that it is made here in their hometown.” BEND SOAP COMPANY 63257 Nels Anderson Road, #110 bendsoap.com

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BEND SAUCE

When dining at The Victorian Café one summer weekend in 2019, Craig Reinhart found himself wishing the restaurant offered a rich chipotle sauce. “That same day, we went to Newport Avenue Market and bought the best ingredients to play with, including organic chipotles from New Mexico and Jacobsen Salt from the Oregon Coast and created Bend Sauce,” Reinhart said. The decision to name the product Bend Sauce was instantaneous after making the first batch and realizing the name was available, Reinhart said. “We love Bend, Oregon and knew that as our brand grew, we would plant a special image in the mind and bellies of all who tried it,” Reinhart said. “I’m sure we sell more Bend Sauce in Central Oregon because of our name. Nationally, the sauce has to stand on its own and as it grows we hope our success ref lects Bend positively.” BEND SAUCE 212 NE Revere Avenue, Bend bendsauce.com

“This all started because he loved Bend so much.”

BEND CIDER CO. 64649 Wharton Avenue, Bend bendcider.com

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PHOTOS BOTH PAGES COURTES Y OF MT. BACHELOR

BEND CIDER CO.

After attending college to become a wildlife biologist, Kelly Roark moved to Bend to start his new career. When he couldn’t find a job in the field, he opted to stay anyway, spending time with friends and trying out a new hobby of making freshpressed hard cider. “This all started because he loved Bend so much,” said Roark’s wife, Tammy Roark. “He gave up his career essentially because of this calling to be in Bend.” What started as a hobby and part of a quest to live sustainably slowly morphed into a bootleg cider business as the popularity of Kelly’s homemade libations took off. When it came time to officially launch the business in 2019, the Roarks tossed around a few name ideas. They wanted a name that represented their values and beliefs and reminded them of why they were here in Bend in the first place. “We wanted something that people could remember and something that was simple—like if they tried something on draft, the name was recognizable,” Tammy said. The couple decided on Bend Cider Co., and aimed to build a brand that reflects the best parts of Bend. “People have a fondness of Bend—whether it’s from coming on their family vacation here or the memories they’ve made in Bend, there’s just a nostalgic feeling to the name,” Tammy said. “We decided if we were going to name it that, we wanted a brand that really represented Bend.”


BEND BREWING

While co-owner Packy Deenihan wasn’t the original founder of Bend Brewing Co. (he and his father purchased the downtown brewery six years ago) he acknowledges the obvious appeal of naming the spot after the city. As for whether the Bend-centric name brings the brewery and restaurant more business? “It certainly doesn’t hurt,” Deenihan said. “I think if you’re visiting Bend and plan to check out a brewery or two, coming to Bend Brewing is a pretty obvious choice. That said, our goal is to make BBC their favorite brewery during their time in Bend and when they go home they tell their friends.” Deenihan said one perk that’s likely related to the name of the brewery is the popularity of merchandise they sell. “We are always surprised at how many people buy our apparel,” he said. While it’s fun to be named after Bend and attract some visitors because of it, Deenihan said the business is also really proud of its local following. “It’s not really because of our name why they keep coming back—it’s the great beer, food, service and atmosphere.” BEND BREWING 1019 NW Brooks Street, Bend bendbrewing.com

“I definitely think that the name Bend represents who we are and we do have a great reputation.” BEND BURGER COMPANY

When owners Jon and Kristy Hayes opened Bend Burger Company in downtown Bend in 2008, they asked friend Ramona Newman to help get the front of the house running for the new business, named after the town. She agreed to come on board for the first six months, but thirteen years later, she’s still proudly serving as manager. Newman said that while the name Bend Burger Company probably attracts some customers, she believes it’s more likely the fresh, high-quality burgers and word-ofmouth that have led to the restaurant’s success. “I definitely think that the name Bend represents who we are and we do have a great reputation,” Newman said.

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“But I also believe it has more to do with our product than the name.” Originally opened downtown in 2008, the company later opened locations in Redmond (Redmond Burger Company) and a second Bend Burger Company on Third Street in Bend, and closed the downtown spot to focus on the two others. Menu items also highlight some of Central Oregon’s most popular locations, with burgers like The Bend Burger, Pole Pedal Paddle Burger, Broken Top Burger and other choices like the Newport Avenue Salad and the Paulina Peak Chicken Sandwich. BEND BURGER COMPANY 1939 NE 3rd Street, Bend bendburger.com

HANDMADE BEND

Fine art ceramics company Handmade Bend was conceived in early 2017, when couple turned business partners Kim Tallent and Michael Knapek left behind their high-pressure careers in hopes of starting a new artistically driven business. The duo dreamed up the new venture, utilizing Knapek’s skills in fine art, mold making and bronze casting and Tallent’s expertise as a photographer and business administrator to create nature-inspired pieces including sculpted ceramic vases, mugs and bowls. When it came time to name the company, Tallent and Knapek wanted to emphasize the time and care put into each product. “The ‘handmade’ part seemed to fit naturally,” Tallent said. “Next, we focused on what inspired the business. The beauty in and around Bend was the inspiration for the first works, making Bend the next logical part of the name… and thus, ‘Handmade Bend’ was born.” HANDMADE BEND handmadebend.com

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Summit Bank Vice President Jill Cummings and Old Mill District developer Bill Smith


INTERVIEW

FA R M A N D T R A D E

Mueggenburg Farms A Culver operation trades global flavors through Central Oregon to the world INTERVIEW BY KIM COOPER FINDLING Echinacea

Rose Petals India

Oregon Grape Root Cascadia

he Mueggenburg Group was founded in Germany eighty years ago to trade herbs and spices around the globe. In 2014, the company set up a North American branch in Culver, Oregon. More than 700 different botanical products pass through the warehouse for processing and distribution annually. Bend Magazine sat down with CEO Nils Mueggenburg to learn about the global business of botanicals.

Tell us about your company and background. We are a fourth-generation, family-owned and -operated business which supplies dried raw botanical and spice ingredients to the tea, food, homeopathic and nutraceutical industries. These ingredients include roots, barks, leaves, berries and gums. With over eighty years of trading herbs globally, we have established long lasting partnerships with companies and farms around the world to provide high quality organic and non-organic herbs. In addition to our facility in Culver, we currently have operations in Germany, Poland, and Appalachia. The Mueggenburg Group is managed by Dirk Mueggenburg and his two sons, Jan and Nils. Tell us a little about the business of botanicals. Although the herbs and spice industry has changed significantly over the years, one thing has stayed the same: family. Family operations are responsible for most harvests—whether it’s a family farm that grows echinacea and valerian on their land, or a family practice to harvest slippery elm bark in the woods

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Marigold Egypt

for extra income each spring. The harvests are then purchased by companies like ours, who then prepare the products for the global market. Once received, we analyze the products for pesticides, heavy metals, and any dangerous pathogens, and determine what industry this material is best suited for. Next we process the product accordingly—usually by cutting, sifting, and/ or powdering. We heat-treat material to ensure dangerous pathogens are killed and the product is safe for consumption. Once we have completed this processing right here in Culver, the botanical product will be shipped to our customers. Why did you choose Culver? This farm was owned by an old family friend whose tea company went out of business. We realized the farm had good potential to be our new North American branch and purchased it. It was a regular farm with mills and warehousing space. In the last couple years, we’ve transformed the facility from a traditional farm to a food-grade botanical warehousing and manufacturing operation. Currently we process and handle approximately one million pounds of herbs and botanicals at our Culver location annually. What is grown onsite at Mueggenburg Farms? On our humble ten acres of certified organic farmland, we are growing alfalfa and goldenseal. Alfalfa is known to grow well in the

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area, but in 2021 our alfalfa fell through due to the drought, as the little water we had went to our new project—goldenseal. Last year we started a cultivation of goldenseal, an endangered species which must be artificially propagated and certified by the Department of Fish and Wildlife to be exported overseas. It’s a long-term project to keep a sustainable supply of this item for our partners. What are products you import or collect domestically and what are they used for? Domestically, we get Oregon Grape root and Cascara Sagrada bark out of the Cascades. Oregon Grape is used for its anti-bacterial properties and Cascara Sagrada is commonly used in laxatives. Out of Appalachia we harvest items such as Slippery Elm Bark, used in teas, as well as black cohosh root which is commonly used in women’s health products. From South America we import botanicals such as pau d’arco bark, guarana seeds, and sarsaparilla root. Through our sister companies in Europe, we regularly import immune boosters, such as elderberry and echinacea, but also items like valerian root, licorice, passionflower, and juniper berries. Occasionally we’ll also import kava kava root from Fiji, green tea from China, or even yohimbe bark from Cameroon. Who are your clients? How do they differ? Our clientele varies greatly: tea companies, extract manufacturers, breweries and distilleries, pet food manufacturers, dietary supplement companies, herb and spice shops, homeopathic companies, skin care companies, flavor companies, as well as pharmaceutical companies. One of our core strengths is flexibility, as we can offer various cut sizes of the same product. What are some industry challenges? One of the big challenges we face is increased standardization. The consumer side of the industry requires consistent, standardized product. But the supply side is the exact opposite—nature will give us good crops and bad crops; strong oil content and weak oil content; strong

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Luis Haro, warehouse and production manager and Nils Mueggenburg, CEO.

assays one year and weak the next. It’s difficult to navigate at times, which is why supplier relationships are crucial to maintain. Our harvesters and growers are the first to know what the harvest will be like, and the more we communicate, the better we can prepare ourselves and our customers for inevitable fluctuations. Your products are natural plants that largely rely on Mother Nature. What global climate change impacts are you and your partners experiencing? Increased unpredictable weather leads to unpredictable crops, which causes price fluctuations and uncertainty. In other words, it makes prices go up when we are less sure about a harvest. We saw several Oregon growers last year completely cease their growing operations due to the drought, which was quite sad to see. There’s not much we can do when something like this happens, and the unfortunate result is just a decrease in confidence in that growing region. It’s

hard to imagine that in ten years’ time things will be better. Climate change was absolutely a contributing factor to why we have pivoted our primary operations from a farm to a manufacturing operation. What are your goals and plans for future? The new manufacturing facility has allowed for significant increase in productivity which will allow us to offer our milling services to third parties. Also known as “toll work,” customers can send us their product and we can cut, blend, and powder it for them. Additionally, we’re looking to expand our small-volume side of the business. Currently our volumes we offer start at around fifty pounds which is too large for many small businesses who may just need one to five pounds of a product. We’re hoping this can help grow our business while also getting us more involved with other Central Oregon businesses. And who knows, maybe we’ll make some friends along the way!

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Providing strategies that can help you reach your goals. We are built for the long run. PAUL WALTON First Vice President | Financial Advisor 541-617-6038 Paul.Walton@morganstanley.com NMLS# 1906183 | Lic.# 4104014 HILLARY BEELKE Financial Advisor 541-617-6009 Hillary.Beelke@morganstanley.com NMLS# 1920555 | Lic.# 4008541 LAURA THOMPSON-BALL Senior Registered Associate 541-617-6023 Laura.Thompson-Ball@morganstanley.com The Tumalo Ridge Group at Morgan Stanley 705 SW Bonnett Way, Suite 1200 | Bend, Oregon 97702 advisor.morganstanley.com/the-tumalo-ridge-group Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. CRC3612704 06/2021

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THE QUEST FOR THE BEST AND BRIGHTEST PARKING LOT PARTY EVER WRITTEN BY TIM NEVILLE PHOTOS BY MIGHTY CREATURE CO.

Ah, spring. The days last longer, the sun hangs higher, and the winter storms that bully our mountains are finally starting to chill. After a big day of play it’s time to kick back with refreshments, friends and a little entertainment, too. Want to up your own tailgating game? Learn from these Central Oregonians who take après outdoor gatherings to a championship level.

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KEEPERS OF THE NADINE RUTH AND THE CHIX ON STIX If you head up to Mount Bachelor on a warm spring day and see some ladies with flashy tie-dyed scarves dangling off the backs of their helmets, you should bow in awe before these “Chix” and then ask to follow them to their boisterous hang-out for lunch, the PALL. “That’s the parking lot lunch lounge,” says Nadine Ruth, the 75-yearold “fearless leader” of the Sunriver-based Chix on Stix. “We’re just a group of very active women.” The Chix on Stix clique goes back to at least 2005 when about a dozen women, nearly all of them retired and over 50, got together once a week for a day of skiing. Since then, the group has expanded to nearly sixty women, many of whom meet on Thursdays at ski racks outside the Sunrise Lodge.

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They’ll split up for the morning by ability and then meet back at the parking lot where Ruth’s pick-up truck acts as the gathering spot. You can find her rig quite easily as she built a collapsible warming hut in the back of her truck using about $100 worth of PVC piping and sheets of heavy, clear plastic she picked up at Joann Fabrics. A portable propane fire pit keeps the space toasty while carpets make the bed less slippery in ski boots. If you’re still not sure, look for the words, Chix on Stix, emblazoned on the side. Typically, everyone just brings their own lunch, but birthdays are cause for celebration. For Ruth’s seventy-fourth birthday last March, someone brought a barbecue and s’mores and fired up the tunes for dancing. “We all share a love for being outside and skiing,” she says. “I don’t ever want to give that up, which is why I have a new knee.”

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We all share a love for being outside and skiing. I don’t ever want to give that up, which is why I have a new knee.

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UP YOUR GAME Propane fire pits are easy and fun to look at, but for a real fire that kicks off some warmth that you can cook on, too, check out BioLite’s Fire Pit+. Unlike a Solo Stove (also great), this pit features collapsible legs to keep it off the snow for better air circulation and a rechargeable, battery-powered blower that eliminates smoke, makes lighting even wet logs a breeze, and reduces everything to ashes to make clean up a cinch. You can even use it to charge up your Bluetooth speaker and phone that died in the cold ($300, bioliteenergy.com). Stop buying those wasteful green canisters of propane gas and leave the giant twenty-pound tank at home. Instead, invest in a mini, fivepound tank that saves on space, won’t break your back and can be refilled anywhere propane’s sold. Find one at Lowe’s or online (about $60). Your Bi-Mart camp chairs are awesome and cheap but upgrade to the GCI Outdoor Firepit Rocker Chair that collapses down to the size of a lawn chair and comes with a spring mechanism for a relaxing rock (gcioutdoor.com; On sale at REI for $56).

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I’m just trying to bring some of the fun.

THE MASTER OF CAMERON HALMRAST If you head up to Benson Sno Park near Hoodoo Ski Area off Santiam Pass on a Friday or a Saturday night, chances are high you’ll find a crew of hard-bitten skiers and snowboarders sitting around watching a movie outside. There’ll be a fire going and maybe even a tuning bench set in the snow, complete with a hot iron to wax your boards. And is that a pot roast you’re smelling? Why, yes, it just might be. Cameron Halmrast and his friends have their post-ski situation dialed. The 36-yearold web developer manager for Springfieldbased Richardson, a performance headwear company, started skiing at Willamette Pass before switching to Hoodoo, where he has held a season pass for years. Being up there almost every weekend allowed him to quickly fall in with employees and friends who “post up” at Benson. “We don’t

plan,” he says. “We’ll just connect with one another once we’re up there.” Together they’ve created the ultimate place to recharge. Halmrast scored a $5,000 Panasonic projector for less than $100 at a sale in Eugene. With additional help from an Amazon Fire Stick, his phone and a 360-degree speaker, Halmrast can project ski flicks onto a 120-inch screen he brings along for immersive, al fresco entertainment. They’ll play bocce ball and build a fire. To refuel after a hard day of running laps off the Big Green Machine lift, Halmrast breaks out an Instant Pot to whip up meals like jambalaya, huevos rancheros and even a roast. Another friend went so far as to bring a smoker up there to finish it off. “The only issue was having the silverware to cut it,” he says. Halmrast jokes the only thing they’re missing is the kitchen sink. “I’m just trying to bring some of the fun,” he says.

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THE GUY WITH THE

JEFF HARRIS You’ve probably seen it parked against the snowbank at the Sunrise middle lot at Mount Bachelor and wondered: Is that a spaceship that crashed into a Ford? A James Bond villain vehicle? A steampunk’s fever dream? Nope, it’s Jeff Harris’ custom late-1960s vintage camper, the rig so many people naturally gravitate to when the day is done. “My three design words are submarine, UFO and log cabin,” says Harris, 33, who teaches skiing and snowboarding at Mt. Bachelor. “I’m just really drawn to that ‘60s deco style because it’s fun and unique. I think I’ve built pretty much one of the only ones like this anywhere.” Harris has spent years and untold thousands of dollars rebuilding and customizing the cab-over camper using the dilapidated husk of a Avion-brand frame he found for $1,600 on Craigslist. He knows what he’s doing. He first moved to Bend a few years ago to work on restoring vintage Airstreams for a small company in town and once

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even converted one of the classically retro silver tubes into a two-chair hair salon for a client in California. With his own rig, he’s installed steel plate countertops, a futon and floating, movable tables that can become a ski tuning bench. There’s a thirty-two-inch Smart TV up over the cab and LED lights that cast a cozy glow across his powder boards stored inside. An open floor plan means he can stretch out. “Even with people hanging out in here, it isn’t cramped,” he says. Harris often takes his rig down to Wanoga Sno Park where the scene can get rowdy with snowmobilers tailgating after ripping around in the woods. Other times you’ll find him at Kapka Butte (“more mellow”) or even in Bend near the Old Mill when concerts are in town. “I can pump out some sound,” he says. “I mean, everybody is attracted to the thing. It’s pretty awesome.”

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THE TRAILHEAD TOBIAS SCOTT CARLETON You bought a portable fire pit. You’ve got your gravity chairs and a folding table that’s perfect for holding an infrared, no-flare-up grill. Maybe you even have some battery-powered Christmas lights for extra ambiance when the sun dips low. But does your set-up include a portable wood-fired sauna? Tobias Scott Carleton’s sure does. “I’ve always really enjoyed building stuff like saunas and hot tubs,” says the 25-year-old Central Oregon Community College student. “The ability to have a sauna I can bring around to places, it’s awesome.” Carleton got his skills serving in the Coast Guard as a damage control guy who specialized in welding, plumbing and carpentry. He spent about forty hours building the sauna out of cedar fence wood mounted in the back of a trailer converted from a cheap truck bed he found online. Inside he added benches for six people with built-in firewood storage, a porthole

window for watching the snow fall, string lights and a small wood stove that hunters might use in a warming tent. Metal tubing and flanges connect the interior of the stove to the exterior of the trailer to suck in fresh air that gets the fire roaring. “I also didn’t want to be competing with the fire for oxygen.” “The stove gets ripping to the point it glows red,” he says, adding that a pot of water with eucalyptus oil atop the stove adds the vapor. You can find Carleton at any number of the local trailheads where he loves to cast off on long mountain bike rides or at scenic viewpoints along Tumalo Creek. Last fall, scores of grateful kayakers piled into it at Benham Falls, where about sixty paddlers had gathered on a freezing day for an informal race to raise money for kayaker Alex Kollar, 28, who went missing on the Deschutes River in October. Chances are good you may see two of these saunas floating around Bend soon, too. “I’m selling this one to build another one,” he says. “I’m always looking for my next project.”

I’ve always really enjoyed building stuff like saunas and hot tubs. The ability to have a sauna I can bring around to places, it’s awesome.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT The thing that separates memorable tailgating sessions from the mediocre really boils down to one thing: food. Burgers and dogs are great—especially if you make your own kraut!—but try these easy, make-ahead treats that you can heat and serve out of a pot.

CHICKEN AND DUMPLINGS: Thick and

gut-warming, add a splash of extra veggie or chicken broth to the pot before warming.

JAMBALAYA: Shrimp, sausage, chicken, ham: all the food groups in one delicious bowl; add a splash of broth to the pot before reheating. Serve over rice or with tortillas. CHILI: Because, chili.

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CHICKEN TIKKA MASALA: Make it in an Instant

Pot at home. Reheats beautifully.

TORTILLA SOUP: Don’t forget to garnish with fresh cilantro, diced onions, radishes and avocado. SAUCY GRITS: This is actually quite easy to make on site, requiring about 20 minutes of simmering. Spoon into bowls; let guests add hot sauce, black beans,

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radishes, butter, cheese, avocado and green onion. A splash of chicken broth or milk prevents pastiness. Serve with naan warmed over your wood fire pit.

RAMEN: Technically, a twopot endeavor but very easy and guaranteed to impress. Make the broth ahead of time and reheat when needed; cook noodles in a separate pot. Use tongs to dish wet noodles into a bowl, add paper thin slices of raw steak, bok choy,

mushrooms and green onions to bowl; ladle piping hot broth over noodles and serve immediately. Let guests add their own chili oil, sesame oil, and shichimi togarashi, the Japanese seven-spice condiment that adds some kick. Savory Spice in the Old Mill sells it.

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THE RISE IN CENTRAL OREGON’S NON-TRADITIONAL SCHOOLING OPTIONS WRITTEN BY LUCAS ALBERG

airy snowf lakes gently fall on the high Fat,desert just east of Bend on a cold, brisk January

l o o h c S t s e r o F Bend

PHOTOS BEN JA MIN EDWARDS

day. The silent world resembles a pristine Central Oregon snow globe with freshly dusted junipers and sagebrush. The silence is quickly broken, however, as a dozen children rush out into the landscape, filling the air with shouts, laughter and gleeful squeals. School is now in session for the first and second grade students at Bend Forest School (BFS). Bend Forest School is one of a growing number of non-traditional schools on the rise in Central Oregon, catering to the demands of families looking for a different model of education for their child. According to the BFS website, the inclusive natureimmersion play-based early education program aims to educate and connect children to nature through interest-led, unstructured play outside, creating healthy and confident children who find joy and ownership in their own learning.

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Founder and Executive Director Rae Alberg said she has seen outdoor education grow in popularity over the past five years but has seen an even sharper increase since the pandemic. “Bend is filled with people who love the outdoors and know the value that a connection to nature provides,” said Alberg. “In four short years, we’ve seen demand grow exponentially, and this year we’ll be adding third through fifth grades to our program in the fall.” From reducing anxiety and depression to improving cardiovascular fitness, the positive mental and physical health benefits of nature are well documented. Alberg believes this directly applies to education in nature as well. “Being outdoors is not only fun for the child, but it also supports emotional, behavioral and intellectual development,” she said. “Kids really develop a sense of self in addition to the connection to the world around them.” While Alberg acknowledges tuition can be an obstacle for many parents, she said the school recently created a foundation to help. “We provide scholarships for those who fit within the criteria and next fall we’ll be implementing a sliding tuition scale,” she said. “Creating a more equitable program is very important to BFS.” Rachel and Josh Kelley’s daughter has attended BFS since pre-school and is now in the first grade. The parents say one of the biggest benefits of learning outside is that their daughter has a chance to be a kid for as long as possible. “I didn’t want her to have the stress that can come with being in a traditional classroom for six-plus hours a day at such a young age,” said Rachel. “We have always seen that she is her happiest when she is outside. With the small class sizes and the one-on-one teacher support, she has all the tools she needs to be a confident learner, not be afraid to ask questions or make mistakes, and she’s eager to go to school each day.”

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not s i s r o o d t u Being o child, e h t r o f only fun orts p p u s o s l but it a nd a l a r o i v b eh a , l a n o ti o em ment. p o l e v e d l intellectua


Forge

PHOTOS COURTES Y OF FORGE

FORGING A NEW PATH

Another school integrating nature-based learning as part of its curriculum is Forge, a fourth through twelfth grade private school that aims to better prepare youth to enter the adult world. Co-founders Jackie and Todd LaFrenz created Forge’s curriculum after decades of educational experience, much of it in Central Oregon, and based their new school on three principles: selfdiscovery, nature and culture. “As teachers, we are most inspired about discovering a child’s passions, gifts and possibilities,” said Jackie LaFrenz. “Even the best schools—and school districts—are still run according to an industrial-age model focused on standards, where there is little time, space or investment in that pursuit. We are creating a model that is all about unlocking a child’s vast potential and guiding him/her to build a more meaningful and impactful life. We want our students to have a strong sense of self, know their place in the world and feel as if they can do or be anything they aspire to.” Calling itself “earth centric in a digital world,” Forge offers students an impressive Innovation Lab that would make most R&D departments jealous, with equipment ranging from 3D printers, laser cutters, robotic components and kits to sewing, woodworking and shop tools alongside the traditional computer workstations.

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ve We want our students to ha a strong sense of self, know d their place in the world an be feel as if they can do or anything they aspire to.

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According to Todd LaFrenz, Forge hopes to bridge technology and the environment to create better leaders for the future. “It’s not enough to equip our students with the latest in digital tools,” he said. “The leaders of tomorrow will be ambidextrous—as versed in the environmental as they are in the technological. This kind of dynamic balance, where kids are immersed in nature, while learning advanced technologies, yields leaders that can connect dots and cross bridges.”

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PHOTOS THIS SPRE AD BEN JA MIN EDWARDS

FROM THE COMFORT OF HOME

During the pandemic’s rise in the spring of 2020, education was turned on its head when schools closed their doors and students went virtual with their classes. Once classes returned to in-person in the fall, some families opted to continue at home but via a different pathway—homeschool. Homeschooling can take on several forms and factors, from the idea of “unschooling,” which lets the students choose their own path of learning through an unstructured format, to a more traditional curriculum-based approach simply with more control on what to learn and when. Lauren and Benjamin Edwards of Redmond have been homeschooling their children on and off for more than a decade. According to Lauren, the initial decision to homeschool was primarily due to bullying and the learning environment for their first son. “His ADHD made it difficult in the classroom so we wanted to try a more individualized approach,” she said. “He acted out in a lot of ways that other kids didn’t understand. We wanted to take him out of those negative situations.” Edwards said her experiences within the public school system also made her realize the gaps her children were missing. “One of the reasons I love homeschooling is because we’ve been able to take on a more classical approach to learning,” she said. Going broader and deeper on subjects such as personal finance and home economics help the kids to be more self-sufficient and independent, according to Edwards. According to the High Desert Education Service District (ESD), the number of families registering to homeschool children in Central Oregon shot up over 500 percent during the pandemic to more than a thousand registered home school students in the 2020/2021 school year. While High Desert ESD Home school Coordinator Jamie Benton says numbers have since dropped for the current school year, they remain well above pre-pandemic levels. Benton also speculates that many of the students who have transitioned back into the public school system may still be at home, taking advantage of the several new at-home virtual learning environments offered by Bend La-Pine Schools. Though reasons vary by household, Benton said one reason for the return to public school could be cost. “Home schooling can be difficult and expensive since parents pay the tuition and provide the curriculum,” she said. From books and materials to online memberships and field trips, costs of homeschooling can quickly add up—not to mention that at least one parent must devote much of their time to schooling their children rather than working for pay. “Going virtual at a public school helps to solve that,” Benton said. Bend-La Pine Schools offers a range of online learning programs for students and families, from structured and teacher supported to fully independent and family supported. Programs can be tailored for lifestyles and needs, whether a family travels or a child is neurodivergent and needs an environment that a school cannot provide. Online learning programs are offered from kindergarten through the twelfth grade and can be full-time, supplementary or in addition to on-site classroom work. Like all public schools, registration is free and open to all students residing in the district boundaries.

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CHOICE (OPTIONS) AMONG THE TRADITIONAL

Cost aside, for most families, home schooling or virtual programs may not work regardless due to single-parent households or when both parents work outside the home. Fortunately, there are non-traditional options with the Bend-La Pine Schools at on site locations as well. Bend-La Pine currently offers six “choice option” schools, or programs with non-traditional learning pedagogies, as well as five schools that are combination choice/neighborhood schools. Parents of high school students have two possibilities amongst the choice option schools with Realms and Bend-Tech Academy at Marshall High School. The latter offers students programs focused on STEM, engineering, construction technologies, business marketing and entrepreneurship and health occupations. Meanwhile, Realms High School was an expansion from the successful middle school magnet program and is an EL Education model based on the same approach and philosophy, which is a focus on challenge, teamwork, service and compassion, and an active inquiry-based learning. Parents of elementary-aged children have six different options for their family, in addition to traditional neighborhood schools, which students are assigned to based on geographic location within the district. (Note: parents who wish their children to go to another school may submit an Attendance Area Change Request (ACR), which is due by March 1 of each year). Ranging from a focus on collaboration and a sense of community (Amity Creek Magnet at Thompson School) to technology (Juniper Elementary Technology Magnet), dual languages (Spanish Dual Immersion program at Bear Creek and R.E. Jewell Elementaries, and continuing through High Desert Middle School and Caldera High School) and a democratically driven, community learning environment (Westside Village Magnet at Kingston), the range of pedagogies is wide and diverse.

Bend-La Pine Schools Deputy Superintendent Lora Nordquist said the breadth of choices caters to the diversity of learning styles. “Choice options are important to our students because they help provide alternative approaches to learning that may be more effective for some students,” she said. At Highland Magnet at Kenwood School, students learn through the Scottish Storyline Method, where children create a setting, become characters and overcome obstacles as the story unfolds. Parents Erika and Robert Sommer feel Highland’s unique approach completely immerses their two daughters in learning. “They come home and can articulate facts and concepts that amaze me for their ages,” said Erika. “It’s not about memorizing facts; it’s about putting themselves into a situation.” Sommer says the “sneaky” approach to the Storyline Method is an advantage in getting kids engaged and invested. She gave the example of one daughter’s experience with a surfing storyline that focused on geography, science and art through an immersive experience. “They don’t pull out their social studies book or science book,” she said. “They are given a ‘plane ticket,’ teachers act as airport personnel and they ‘board’ a plane to Indonesia.” The Spanish Dual Immersion program is a research-based twoway immersion program model that pairs native English-speaking students with native Spanish-speaking students and follows the same curriculum as the traditional classroom. The difference, however, is that beginning in kindergarten, 80 percent of the classes are taught in Spanish. As students get older, more and more English is taught until fifth grade when it’s half English, half Spanish. According to Bend-La Pine’s website, “bilingual skills are shown to increase critical thinking, creativity and problemsolving.” With a balanced class of both native English and Spanish

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PHOTO LEF T COURTES Y OF BEND-L A PINE SCHOOL S , RIGHT KIMBERLY TEICHROW PHOTOGR APHY

Realms High School

*photos without masks were taken before COVID-19 bendmagazine.com

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PHOTO TOP KIMBERLY TEICHROW PHOTOGR APHY, BOT TOM J OE KLINE

Dual Immersoion Program

speakers, children are taught their regular school subjects in both languages, and often outperform their monolingual peers in both languages over time. Beau Eastes, whose daughter attends the sixth grade at High Desert Middle School and has been in the program since kindergarten at Bear Creek, said their experience has been a very positive one. “Obviously you go in for the fluency in both languages,” he said. “But the biggest benefit is the cultural part of the program.” Eastes, whose family is white and native English-speaking, noted that in a town like Bend that is often cited for its lack of diversity, the dual immersion program immerses children in it. “The program really breaks down cultural barriers,” he said. “The norm of the entire education model is diversity. Because of who she goes to school with, because of her friends and teachers, she’s got a better understanding of Latin American culture. For us, bridging that cultural gap is the coolest thing.” For children who are native Spanish-speakers, the program offers the chance to receive an education in their first language, removing language barriers that can make learning any number of subjects more difficult, while simultaneously improving their English skills. Jasmin Tebbs, who teaches second grade in the dual immersion program at Bear Creek and who identifies as Hispanic, said, “The beauty of being able to learn in your native tongue validates the home language and creates a sense of self confidence that's not historically been granted to Spanishspeaking children. Research has shown that Hispanic children who are in a dual language program who are educated in their native tongue perform far better than Hispanic children in traditional classrooms.” Aside from improved classroom performance, the dual immersion program grants Spanish-speaking parents the opportunity to play an active role in their children's education. “Being able to communicate with your children’s teacher and understand the language of their schoolwork might sound like a basic necessity, but many Hispanic parents have not had that privilege. Dual immersion breaks that barrier and more.”

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of The beauty learn being able to in your native t he tongue validates an d e g a u g n a l e m ho of creates a sense self confidence.

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THE LUCK OF THE DRAW (AND DISTRICT)

If there’s a drawback to Bend-La Pine’s choice option schools, simply put, it’s that it’s difficult for most families to get in. The programs are popular, which means they are also highly competitive, based on a lottery system, and one must have a bit of luck on their side to pull the winning ticket. Though Bend-La Pine doesn’t publish application numbers, Assistant Director of Communications Alandra Johnson said it depends on the program and school.

Bear C reek For the Sommer children at Highland Elementary, it was the luck of the Scots for their oldest daughter. “As soon as we moved to Bend and were starting to research schools, Highland was always at the top of people’s list,” said Erika. “We nervously entered the lottery as it seemed like we could have easily messed up our submission. I remember receiving the letter via snail mail and opening it and exclaiming ‘Oh my gosh, she got in!’”

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Adrenaline

JUNKIES REPORT FOR DUTY HIGH ADRENALINE SPORTS AND WHERE TO PURSUE THEM IN CENTRAL OREGON WRITTEN BY NOAH NELSON

Do you have a need for speed? What about a delight for height? If you’re the kind of person who daydreams about flying through the air and white-knuckling some handlebars, then Central Oregon is the place for you. From skydiving and paragliding to dirt biking and even some high speed go-karting, Central Oregon has the people, places and passion to help you scratch that adrenaline itch.

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Skydiving

We’ll start this list off with a bang, because what could be more adrenaline inducing than jumping out of a plane soaring at 14,000 feet with nothing but a piece of fabric to break your fall? “Skydiving is such a unique experience,” said Drew Smith, owner of Skydive Awesome!, which operates in tandem with the Madras Municipal Airport. “The best way to describe it is that the sensation of skydiving feels like

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relaxed adrenaline. The spectacular views calm all your nerves as you are free falling.” Relaxed adrenaline might sound like an oxymoron, but don’t worry, the spectacular views of the high desert and the Cascade Range won’t stop skydivers from experiencing nearly a minute of absolute freefall, in what Smith describes as “the pure adrenaline” that keeps people jumping again and again.

Newbies to the sport can jump with Skydive Awesome!’s experienced team of instructors in a tandem jump, or a jump in which the new skydiver is strapped to the front of the instructor so that they can enjoy the freefall while the professional deals with the other details like opening the parachute. After twenty-five tandem jumps, skydivers become eligible for a skydiving license that allows them to jump solo.

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K1 Speed

Go-Karting

and the race begins, guests spend the first lap driving their kart at a limited power so that they can get comfortable, warm up the tires and learn the turns in the track. Once the warmup is over, guests automatically unlock the second-highest speed setting. To unlock full speed, guests must exhibit exemplary driving skills by avoiding crashing, spinning out, bumping other drivers and ignoring rules. Drivers looking for the thrill of competition will want to check out the various sanctioned K1 Speed races. Who knows, you might just end up in the World Championship! Even drivers looking to drift along the track are welcome, and there are events dedicated to learning skills like drifting that you can attend, just check their website for event times.

PHOTO M ARVIN WALDER

Free falling down to earth is great and all, but where do you go when you want to safely tear up the black top? K1 Speed, a nationwide kids and adult go-karting chain with a location in Bend, can offer guests adrenaline in safe doses. The karts at K1 are not like the ones guests find at other go-karting locations across town, like Sun Mountain Fun Center. While Sun Mountain is a great option for kids, K1 offers the chance to drive electric karts with a top speed of forty-five miles per hour. You read that right. Here’s how a day at K1 Speed goes: guests arrive and go through a short introductory training to ensure that they are ready to handle the karts. The names of the racers will be announced over the loudspeakers, signaling that the time has come. Once the flag drops

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"IT'S THE NEXT BEST THING TO FLYING AND IN MOST INSTANCES EVEN MORE INTENSE." 98

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Dave Wachs (left) riding with friends

Dirt Biking PHOTOS KURT WINDISCH

Now for something a bit dirtier, but equally as thrilling: dirt biking. “It's the next best thing to flying and in most instances even more intense,” said Dave Wachs, a veteran of the sport who spent his youth tearing up the desert outside Tuscon, Arizona on his mini-bike. Wachs describes dirt biking as an experience that feels similar to intense alpine skiing, only the medium is essentially opposite. Instead of carving down a hill of fresh powder, dirt bikers are hitting the trails, riding berms, climbing dirt hills and in some cases, catching some air on their bike. “Adrenaline is certainly a component of the experience but there's also a very calming sensation as well,” Wachs said. “Leaving other thoughts behind can be therapeutic and helpful for most of us who are truly engaged in the sport.”

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For someone with no experience to get into the sport, Wachs recommends they start on a small bike, riding around in an open area of familiar terrain where making a mistake and tipping over won’t result in serious injury. New riders should consider enrolling in a Team Oregon program, which teaches the basics of dirt biking and grants riders a motorcycle license by the end of the program. A unique aspect of this sport is its versatility. Wachs used to race in hare scramble and enduro races (off road racing events), but now prefers long-distance, multi-day trips across the country. “Last year I rode over 5,000 miles through five states on three different trips and I’m planning this summer's rides right now.”

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"FLYING CAN BE A HIGH ADRENALINE EXPERIENCE, OR AS MELLOW AS SAILING ON A LAKE." 100

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AND BOT TOM LEF T HE ATHER A M ARYLLIS

PHOTO FACING PAGE AND THIS PAGE TOP

Paragliding Alright, enough of this down-to-earth stuff; who wants to go flying? “The feeling of being able to fly, it feels like some kind of magic,” said Harrison Ruffin, owner and flying instructor at Astro Paragliding. While paragliding, pilots are suspended twenty-five feet beneath a huge parachute, shaped like a glider. With the assistance of pulleys held in both hands, the pilot can direct themselves through the air and even use rising air to gain altitude, sometimes up to thousands of feet. “The sky's the limit,” Ruffin said. “Pilots have flown hundreds of miles and stayed in the air for twelve hours plus.” Just east of Bend, Pine Mountain is a prime location for paragliders in Central Oregon. The average day in the skies for Ruffin begins when he gets off work at five in late May when the days have grown longer. Letting the air fill his glider, Ruffin lets the ground slip underneath him as he ascends into the skies. Affectionately referring to his glider as “my swingset in the sky,” Ruffin

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can spend an entire afternoon in the clouds; enough time to watch the sun begin to set under his feet. Ruffin says that paragliding is really what you make of it. “Flying can be a high adrenaline experience, or as mellow as sailing on a lake. Most new pilots take it easy for the first few years, then they find a specialty that appeals to them. For me, it’s acrobatic maneuvers, my own roller coaster in the sky. For others it's seeing just how far they can fly cross country, or just getting in the air to watch the sunset from the sky. I highly recommend the average person give it a try, as anyone of any ability can learn to paraglide.” Alright adrenaline-junkies, see something you like? Reach out to the businesses mentioned and get your own dose of adrenaline. Who knows? Soaring through the sky and tearing across dirt might just become your new habit to scratch that adrenaline itch.

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Sweetheart Donuts of Bend's famous ring donuts with sprinkles.

Donuts Dreamy, Delightful & Delicious

Super shops satisfy with decadent donut deliverables

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WRITTEN BY SUZANNE JOHNSON | PHOTOS BY TAMBI LANE

aple bars oozing with custard. Pink glazed rings with sprinkles, Homer Simpson style. Cinnamon twists and rolls heavy with frosting. Got your mouth watering yet? Donuts are a classic comfort treat, but they’re not just for breakfast anymore. A fresh batch of Central Oregon bakers are taking donuts to the next level of dessert decadence, just right for special events or for everyday indulgence.

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PALATE

Celebrating with Donuts When Shelbi Bloc added a breakfast pastry to her menu at Too Sweet Cakes, her boutique bakery in Bend, she knew no ordinary donut would fit. She developed her own croissant donut, a tall, flaky, melt-in-your-mouth ring dusted with sugar and dripping with glaze. The buttery dough is folded 100 times, to create steamy pockets that keep the layers airy and light. It’s no wonder her creation transcended the breakfast crowd and landed in special occasions. “Donuts are so popular for weddings and events because these days people seek the familiar. Donuts remind us of home and of childhood—and they’re even better when they are really special,” said Bloc. Since launching Too Sweet Cakes in 2018, Bloc has opened locations in Lake Oswego, Oregon, and Scottsdale, Arizona. Black Rock Coffee shops throughout Oregon also carry her pastries.

Lavender almond, vanilla sprinkle, cherry chip, maple, and chocolate croissant donuts at Too Sweet Cakes.

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Gourmet Flavors At Chalk to Flour, a cottage bakery in Bend, owner Kristina Serhan agrees that the gourmet donuts trend stems from cravings for comfort food, beautifully crafted. Serhan began with a high-protein donut that reflected her passion for CrossFit training. Currently she focuses on mini- and full-size cake donuts that are baked, not fried. “The minis are just right for baby showers or any event needing a little delicious treat,” said Serhan. Serhan bakes desserts to order, and sometimes the requested flavors are surprising. She recently created an Elvis-themed donut modeled after his favorite sandwich: banana and bacon, with peanut butter and jelly. And her own current favorite? “Definitely the Aztec chocolate donut—the spice glaze has cinnamon, chipotle and cayenne. Just enough kick to complement the sweet,” she said.

From top to bottom: birthday cake: vanilla cake with vanilla glaze and sprinkles; Aztec: chocolate cake with spiced chocolate glaze and sugar; churro: vanilla cake with cinnamon and sugar; Elvis: banana cake with peanut butter glaze, strawberry jam and bacon crumbles.

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Clockwise: cake with chocolate sprinkles, Oreo, cake with peanut topping, cake with colored sprinkles, salted caramel, blueberry sprinkle.

Twists on the Classics

The Dough Nut's PB&J is jam-filled and topped with peanut butter frosting.

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Traditional donuts range from glossy, yeast-leavened pillows of dough to dense cake donuts covered in sprinkles to fritters cobbled together with fruit. At The Dough Nut, a Bend take-out donut shop with midtown and westside locations, owners Kirk and Sidonie Heppler offer all the classics, plus add a few unique twists. “We have fun with toppings and seasonal flavors, like pumpkin chai in winter and strawberry shortcake in summer, but we make our signature donuts year-round,” said Heppler. Heppler’s favorite is their PB&J donut, jam-filled and topped with peanut butter frosting. Another signature combo is the French toast donut: a raised donut drenched in an egg wash, grilled, and drizzled with maple glaze. For a more substantial snack, they slice the French toast donut, add ham and swiss, and grill it again for a Monte Cristo sandwich. Occasionally, the Hepplers team up with other Bend establishments. Their donuts are the foundation for J-Dub’s breakfast sandwiches, and they’ve collaborated with a local brewery on stout-infused donut holes. Homespun recipes mean the donuts are made from scratch with no trans-fats or corn syrup.

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PALATE

Extra--Large At Wickiup Junction in LaPine, roadtrippers stop to fuel their vehicles while filling their bellies with supersized handmade donuts. Sarah Maurer, the pastry baker, arrives at 2:30 each morning to begin the lengthy proofing process. She keeps an eye on the weather—humidity and temperatures impact how yeast behaves, and she’s looking for maximum rise. By 6 a.m. she begins frying what she describes as “all-day donuts, meant for sharing.” The display case soon fills with apple fritters and cinnamon rolls the size of dinner plates, bear claws and donut rings big enough for two…and then come the bacon maple bars. Maurer drops hot grilled bacon bits into the maple glaze, melting into the topping. “My favorite part is hearing people’s reactions when I bring out a full tray of these bars,” said Maurer.

A Wickiup Junction apple fritter for two, but we won't tell if you don't share.

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Just a Nibble

For donut lovers who crave just a bite, Grandma B’s Mini-treats in Redmond fills a unique niche. Emily Brattan, owner and baker, uses her own recipes to re-create pastries she loved as a child, such as powdered mini-donuts, whoopie pies and Pop-Tarts. “A mini-treat is a small commitment—it’s just enough to feel good about,” said Bratton. Her version of the Pop-Tart folds a crunchy buttermilk crust around traditional fillings like strawberry, brown sugar, and s’mores. Grandma B’s Mini-treats are available at the Honey & Pine Coffee kiosk in Redmond, or by special custom order.

Grandma B's mini-donuts in powdered sugar, vanilla with lemon glaze, cinnamon and sugar, and vanilla with chocolate glaze flavors.

Donuts for the People

Donut fans in Bend never need to travel far to get their fix. On the north end of town, in the Bend River Promenade, Delish Donuts stands out for their generous donut toppings and their old-fashioned buttermilk bar, shaped to dunk in coffee (see on page 130). And at Sweetheart Donuts, an easy stop centrally located on Business 97, every box of donuts should include a Big Foot, their Bismarck-style donut shaped like a Sasquatch footprint.

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Fan Fave

Ask any long-time Bendite where to find great donuts, and they’ll surely mention Richard’s Donuts, Bend’s longest-running donut shop. “We’re pretty traditional with our donuts and how we make them,” said Joy Khamphanh. Her parents, Thong and Kham Khamphanh, own and operate the business, and Joy manages the shop. It’s no surprise the shop has thrived for more than two decades: the atmosphere is inviting, the donuts are consistently delicious (Khamphanh’s favorite is the cherry tiger-tail twist) and the owners love their customers. “Making the donuts is fun, but for my mom it’s all about the customers. She knows all the families who come in, and has watched kids grow up. This community means a lot to her,” said Khamphanh. Because bringing a little sweetness into customers’ lives is what the donut business is all about.

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Old fashioned, cruller, donut holes and the cherry tiger tail twist from Richard's Donuts.

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LOCAL FLAVOR

Autumn roots

WHISKE Y

Badlands Distillery Food trucks, craft whiskey and even authentic bagels arrive in La Pine WRITTEN BY NOAH NELSON | PHOTOS BY TAMBI LANE

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LOCAL FLAVOR

Junior’s Grill mac and cheese

Badlands vodka makes a great Bloody Mary, weekend mornings or anytime.

T

revor Mayfield wanted to try something new. The owner and distiller of Badlands Distillery considered opening up a brewery before landing on a distillery, and considered Bend before choosing La Pine. The result is a restaurant, whiskey bar and food truck combo, based around a “non-typical distillery” that began with a commitment to high-quality distilling and an emphasis on using real ingredients that push boundaries while never cutting corners. “I saw that Bend was already full of breweries, but I thought that we were lacking in quality local distilleries,” said Mayfield. “That realization plus the greater regulations and red tape you have to cut through to make a business in Bend pushed us out towards La Pine,

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where they were lacking the entire brewing, distilling and food truck scene.” Located just off the main highway that cuts through La Pine just thirty minutes south of Bend, Badlands Distillery recently unveiled a new tasting room, restaurant and retail space that includes plenty of patio space for summer drinks, room for kids to run around and even a stage on which local musicians can perform. The building was originally a Mexican restaurant that had packed the interior with as many tables and booths as possible. Part of the renovations included a new black and grey color scheme for the entire building, as well as efforts to clear up the interior to add more space. Many touches add a rustic feel, like cow skulls on the wall, black metal

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Junior’s Grill mac and cheese

“When it comes down to it, we make some of the highest Badlands’ bagel sandwich paired with a whiskey cocktail

accents, and tabletops made from cross sections of large trees. While Badlands is officially a restaurant, bar and retailer, Mayfield sticks to his roots as a former Bendistillery employee and lifelong homebrewer, and maintains that the distillery is still his top priority. “When it comes down to it, we make some of the highest quality liquor around. Some people ask us why we only produce four liquors while some Bend distilleries have twenty or thirty to try,” Mayfield said. “Then I just ask back ‘well, did you like any of them?’ and the answer is almost always a hesitant ‘kind of.’” While Badlands currently only distills four liquors–cucumber gin, plum & sloe berry vodka, wine cask vodka and double-barrel rye whiskey–Mayfield prides himself on only producing at a very high quality with fresh, local ingredients. “Some other distilleries will make one vodka, and then just add some artificial flavor or concentrate to create different varieties, and we don’t do that here. The

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quality liquor around.”

cucumber gin uses only peeled and natural cucumbers to achieve that flavor. The plum vodka uses tons of real plums, nothing fake, ever,” Mayfield said. “People who are really into tasting these liquors will always tell the difference.” From the commitment to never adding sugar, artificial flavor or color, to the use of high quality water from the Newberry Caldera Springs, every step of Mayfield’s distilling process is drenched in quality and attention to detail. While distilling is number one, Badlands has brought to La Pine a trend often seen in Bend: a central location serving food and drinks that hosts both food trucks and musicians. On the menus, Badlands offers standard fare from coffee and warm bagels to sandwiches and salads. Looking for something else? Check out Junior’s Grill, a mac and cheese focused food truck that has BBQ inspirations, parked just outside. In collaboration with Badlands, the BBQ sauce they use on their pulled pork is made with their double-barrel rye whiskey.

“We saw how successful and fun the food truck pods in Bend were, and wanted to bring that to La Pine. In the summer this place is amazing. You see people getting lunch, grabbing a cocktail made with our liquor and heading out to the patio to enjoy some live music and let the kids run around. We want this to be a place for everyone,” Mayfield said. Vowing to never cut corners, Mayfield has plans to expand the distilling operation into the future to accommodate growing sales and the potential for new liquors to be added to the menu. As an added bonus, Badlands Distillery is working on getting new food trucks to park at their lot. When the weather warms up, expect to see a full lineup of local musicians playing on the patio.

BADL ANDS ARTISAN DISTILLERY & BISTRO 51500 US-97, La Pine badlandsdistillery.com

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EAT

EXPLORE CENTRAL OREGON

Restaurants in the region continue to be nimble, with many offering outdoor seating, takeout and dine-in service, when permitted, while following social distancing guidelines and safety protocols. Central Oregon restaurants would love to receive your order. As always, buying a gift card is a great way to support your favorite eateries any time of the year. Contact individual restaurants for details.

COMPANY NAME PIZZA MONDO Fir aremus praes vident. locals’ Obus Pizza Mondo, a longtime intrur se serving quam award henfavorite,quium has been deroximis imentum inprave rniwinning pizza from its landmark hil te movitudem ia vis, ad downtown Bend patus location since novid ius conteri ptius, 1996.C. Byiamdiis the slice or whole pie. sendac nonsuliam. FuisTake-outfuidit; and delivery available. sulicam ex maximus et videSeasonalet;pizzas, fresh salads and mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. NW craft beer. Vemnicastra 811 NW Wall St., Bend

(541) 123 W 6th St, city,330-9093 zip | (512) 123-4567 pizzamondobend website.com.com

COMPANY BANGERS & NAME BREWS Same Greatpraes Family Fir aremus vident.Owned Obus Restaurant withse a quam NEW hen2nd intrur quium Location the Eastside of Bend. deroximisonimentum inprave rniStop and checkpatus out our Dog hil te by movitudem ia vis, ad Friendly novid C.Heated iamdiis Patio. ius conteri ptius, sendac fuidit; nonsuliam. FuisLocal Food. Beer. et videsulicam et; Local ex maximus mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 1462 NE Cushing Dr. #140, Bend (541) 123 W 6th St797-6886 | (512) 123-4567 bangersandbrews website.com.com

COMPANY NAME ACTIVE CULTURE Fir aremus praes vident. lunch Obus Enjoy a healthy breakfast, intrur quam henor dinnerquium on oursepatio. Sip on a deroximis imentum inprave rnismoothie, shake, glass of wine hilbeer te movitudem patus iabowls, vis, ad or on tap. Burritos, novid C.wraps iamdiis and ius conteri ptius, salads, so much sendacSkip fuidit; Fuismore! the nonsuliam. line by ordering sulicam et; ex maximus et videvia our website. mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 285 NW Riverside Blvd., Bend 123 W (541) 6th St241-2926 | (512) 123-4567 website.com.com activeculturecafe

COMPANY NAME PFLÜCKE Gather for Springpfest at pflücke Fir aremus praes vident. Obus Public welcome to intrur House! quiumAllsearequam henpfrolic & pfeast on inspiring old deroximis imentum inprave rniworld pairedpatus with European hil te cuisine movitudem ia vis, ad and cheer: ius unique seasonal novidlocal C. iamdiis conteri ptius, cocktails, sommelier select wines, sendac fuidit; nonsuliam. Fuisand the et; biersexofmaximus BavarianetKings. sulicam videCome for a wine or aprèsmum avem, caetasting, tem, Catquam. ski by the fire with live music. Vemnicastra 123 WNW 6thCrossing St | (512)Dr., 123-4567 2747 Bend website.com (541) 241-0224 pflucke.com

COMPANY NAME POKE ROW At Row our vident. focus isObus on Fir Poke aremus praes fresh, quality intrur high quium se and quamhealthy henpoke bowls! Orders can rnibe deroximis imentum inprave placed online, deliveries through hil te movitudem patus ia vis, ad DoorDash or BendTakeOut and novid C. iamdiis ius conteri ptius, you can fuidit; always nonsuliam. come build Fuisyour sendac own bowl.et; ex maximus et videsulicam mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 2735 NW Crossing Dr. #105., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St306-6796 | (512) 123-4567 pokerow.com website.com

COMPANY NAME ELLY’S ICE CREAM Elly’s Ice Cream is a modern Fir aremus praes vident. Obus ice shopse with nods to intrurcream quium quam henthe classics servinginprave the very deroximis imentum rnibest locally-sourced, hil te movitudem patus ianatural vis, ad ingredients. creates novid C. iamdiis Elly’s ius conteri ptius, artfully super premium sendac delicious fuidit; nonsuliam. Fuisice cream with perfectly sulicam et; treats ex maximus et videendless combinations. mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. Vemnicastra 921 NW Mt. Washington Dr., Bend (541) 123 W 6th St728-2390 | (512) 123-4567 ellysicecream .com website.com

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COMPANY NAME KEFI FRESH Fir aremus praes vident. Obus We are a Greek-inspired, fastintrur family-run quium serestaurant quam hencasual, with deroximis imentum inprave rnian emphasis on healthy eating. hil tefeature movitudem ia vis, ad We fully patus customizable novidand C. iamdiis ius conteri bowls wraps, crafted fromptius, five sendac fuidit; different protein nonsuliam. choices and Fuisover et; ex maximus et videasulicam dozen fresh veggies. Gluten-free mum avem, cae are tem, and vegan options alsoCatquam. available. Vemnicastra 20520 Robal Ln., # 120, Bend 123 W (541) 6th St797-6554 | (512) 123-4567 kefifresh .com website.com

COMPANY NAME TAKE OUT TODAY Fir vident. Obus We aremus provide praes a better standard intrur henfor ourquium driversseandquam restaurant deroximis imentum inpraveevery rnipartners and get better hil movitudem ia vis,the ad day.teWe would likepatus to thank novid iamdiis conteri ptius, great C. people of ius Bend for almost sendac fuidit; nonsuliam. Fuistwenty-five years of support, and sulicam ex maximus et videwe look et; forward to serving you mum avem, cae tem, Catquam. some more. Vemnicastra 61396 S Hwy 97, Bend (541) 123 W 6th St382-8844 | (512) 123-4567 website.com bendtakeout .com

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art & culture

ART + CULTURE + AESTHETIC

A B S T R AC T S

Landscape to Canvas Bend native Valerie Winterholler brings the atmosphere of the high desert to life in acrylics WRITTEN BY LEE LEWIS HUSK

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ARTIST

A

life-long resident of Bend, artist Valerie Winterholler is rooted in the landscapes of Central Oregon. She was born here, and except for college in Ashland and a stint in Durango, Colorado—where her time was spent as a self-proclaimed “dirtbag skier”—Winterholler has put Bend’s mountains, forests and deserts at the center of her life and art. Sculpture was her passion while earning an art degree at Southern Oregon University. After college, she lived in a tiny one-bedroom apartment in Durango, sharing it with roommates, where she found that she didn’t have space to weld, mix concrete and shape metal for the large pieces she liked to create. “I started doing tiny watercolors—dragonflies and butterflies. That’s what you do as a twenty-five-year-old,” she said, laughing. She returned to her hometown in 1997, got married and found jobs in the recreation field, working at Mt. Bachelor and Sun Country Tours, where she photographed rafters on the Deschutes River. She has cross-country skied all her life, and also snowboards, mountain bikes, hikes, stand-up-paddleboards and wanders the backcountry. She owns and manages an apartment complex in northwest Bend that doubles as an office and studio. In 2003, she attended Art in the Mountains, a contemporary painters’ workshop that kick-started her painting career. “I realized that this (fine art painting) is what I want to do,” she recalled. Soon after, she had her first solo show at Magnolia, a used clothing store,

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where she sold all her paintings during a First Friday Art Walk. Today, at 50, Winterholler is wellensconced in the Northwest art community and has shown work as a solo artist as well as in group shows in galleries around Oregon and California. She’s one of the top selling artists at the Peterson Contemporary Art gallery, which recently expanded into a large

“My work is the record of my experiences and the mark of my place in the world.”

space in downtown Bend and represents artists from around the Northwest. Her early works were influenced by several artists, including American painter Richard Diebenkorn, whose mid-20th century abstract expressionist and figurative paintings earned him worldwide acclaim. “I was blown away,” she said of a Diebenkorn exhibit she saw at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

In particular, she appreciated Diebenkorn’s delineation of space, which evoked a perspective of landscapes viewed from an airplane. Winterholler’s early works explored an aerial perspective of the earth: “the weight of things, the pull of lines and atmosphere,” she said. “The perspective was more 2D than 3D, like looking through a microscope.” In recent years, her abstract work entices viewers into atmospheric landscapes that glow with earth tones, often punctuated with spikes of red, black and gold. She jokes that she needs to put away the color blue, which, along with white, shows up in most of her work. Today’s favorite color is an acrylic called “parchment,” a greenish off-white “that looks good with everything,” she said, lamenting that it only comes in small tubes. She starts with wood panels with a Masonite back and clay surface, sized from 24- by 36-inches to 48- by 60 inches, and uses a household paint brush to layer the base colors, which she’ll wash back and then layer in again and again, watching to see what colors release themselves in the drying and burnishing process. “It’s intentionally accidental, and sometimes magic happens,” she said. “Her style feels open and airy and invites people into the setting of what she’s laid out,” said Jeanne Giordano of New York City, who bought a Winterholler painting last summer while visiting Bend. “The painting has a distinguished horizon line that made me feel immersed in water. It was very reflective and peaceful. I love her sense of color with all sorts of variations on a neutral background.” The piece is hanging in Giordano’s second home in Portland; she’d been looking for something special, by an Oregon artist, to hang there. “It really fit the bill. I love looking at it.” Winterholler spends about three-quarters of her time painting and one-fourth running her rental property. And then there’s her free time, where her passion for the outdoors converges with her love of expressing herself through art. “My work is the record of my experiences and the mark of my place in the world,” she said. See more at valeriewinterholler.com.

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AESTHETIC

MUSIC

On a Wild Note Outdoor Ukulele brings music playing outdoors WRITTEN BY JENNIFER DELAHUNTY

MARCH

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AESTHETIC

Scott Seelye

“Q

Ukulele color inspirations drawn from Deschutes Brewery brown and Stella Artois green

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uintessentially Central Oregon” is just one way to describe Outdoor Ukulele—a local company making stringed instruments that can weather any kind of wild. Outdoor Ukuleles have sailed the Arctic Ocean, paddled down the Amazon River, hiked the Pacific Crest Trail and climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. They are not only waterproof and indestructible, they have a remarkably rich tone rivaling that of wooden instruments and are, according to musicians, a dream to play. Plus, they are simultaneously playful and works of art, with colors drawn from beer and saké bottles: Deschutes Brewery brown, Japanese saké blue and Stella Artois green. Outdoor Ukulele, the only company making composite polycarbonate instruments through injection molding, is the brainchild of Bend residents Scott and Jennifer Seelye. In the early 2000s, these native Oregonians built the world’s largest online skateboard retailer (Nowadays). After selling that company, Scott watched a CNBC story and learned that 90 percent of all ukuleles were being made overseas. Lightbulb moment! Their next manufacturing venture was born with a typical Bend twist: instruments for the outdoors. The company’s tale is one for the entrepreneurial textbooks. Making polycarbonate instruments through injection molding—something that hadn’t been done before—was

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“I had to balance technology with tradition.”

TOP: Finishing touches are added to the instruments. BOTTOM: Outdoor Ukuleles are as pretty as they are functional.

a vexing challenge requiring Scott’s inventiveness and patience. “We lost a year working with one manufacturer trying to get it right,” Scott said. Early days also found Scott tweaking the design. “I had to balance technology with tradition,” Scott said. “While the software indicated a square neck would be stronger, most performers wanted a round one.” Buyers from different cultures had preferences, too. While Americans didn’t want solid-friction tuners, the Japanese preferred them. Today, the company uses custom-made precision tuners. Today the instruments are molded at 600 degrees Fahrenheit under 420 tons of pressure by a manufacturer in Albany, Oregon. The materials—polycarbonate reinforced with carbon fiber strands—give the instruments a natural grain structure that greatly increases strength and acoustics. The instruments are assembled, customized and shipped from Outdoor Ukuleles’ offices in northwest Bend. Outdoor Ukulele makes soprano and tenor ukuleles and also banjo ukuleles (or “banjoleles”), an instrument popular in the 1920s. A sleek, black guitar was added to the company’s lineup eighteen months ago. During the first year of the pandemic, when all the world was looking for something new to do at home, sales at Outdoor Ukulele doubled. Twenty thousand of the Seelyes’ instruments have been sold since 2015. “We’ve very lucky to have something of a cult following now,” says Scott. Several modifications and advances now create instruments that sell all over the world. “The dealer’s store in Beijing looks like

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AESTHETIC

Tiffany’s,” said Scott. Ukuleles are especially popular in China and Japan, he surmises, because of residents’ smaller homes. About 1.2 million ukuleles are sold in North America each year—and about 2,500 of them ship from Outdoor Ukulele. The indestructible nature of the instruments makes them popular for children, and Outdoor Ukuleles are used for music education in schools across the country, including Bend. When the roof on the gym at Bend’s Kenwood Elementary collapsed in 2017, video showed that the Outdoor Ukuleles survived. “They were lifted right

out of the wreckage, still on the holder, completely intact,” Scott said with a laugh. Scott and Jennifer are the definition of “makers”—those who use their hands and their wits to make beautiful products. Jennifer, a passionate knitter, is also developing a vineyard, orchard, olive grove and farm in the Willamette Valley. Ironically, neither are musicians, which Scott feels is an asset. “We are not bound by tradition or playing habits.” OUTDOOR UKULELE 543 York Drive, Suite 140, Bend 541-392-9937 outdoorukulele.com

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE First made in Portugal in the 1880s, ukuleles found a home in the Hawaiian Islands when Portuguese explorers landed there. During the 1920s, the instruments moved to the mainland and became icons of the Jazz Age. From the 1940s to 1960s, millions of plastic ukes were used for teaching music in schools. Tiny Tim made the ukulele famous in 1968 with Tiptoe Through the Tulips.

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SIGNATURE DESIGN

The design on the back of the banjolele is characteristic of Outdoor Ukulele— whimsical, beautiful and functional. “The design comes from the 1978 Trans Am snowflake wheel, the car featured on Smokey and the Bandit,” said owner and designer Scott Seelye. Whereas most banjos have only a single bar along the back, the snowflake design strengthens the instrument and enhances its resonance.

Ukulele

Neil Armstrong played the ukulele in quarantine after he landed on the moon. Several of the Beatles played ukuleles. Interest reawakened in the 1990s when Hawaiian musician Iz (Israel Kamakawiwo’ole) played a ukulele in his rendition of Over the Rainbow. Today, both Bruce Springsteen and Taylor Swift, among others, play the ukulele on stage.

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SHOP

EXPLORE CENTRAL OREGON

BRONWEN JEWELRY Artisan jewelry designed for active women. Delicate and durable, our jewelry is handcrafted in Bend and embodies the spirit of travel and adventure. Our sunny downtown store also sells a beautifully curated selection of unique artisan gifts from near and far.

Find your natural beauty & individual expression. Explore the timeless Marimekko and the iconic Onitsuka Tiger at Moro Moro in downtown Bend. Feel inspiration and bring joy into your everyday adventures with Scandanavian & Japanese design.

124 Minnesota Ave., Bend (541) 640-4509 bronwenjewelry.com

945 NW Bond St., Bend (541) 936-7315 moromoro.life

CONFLUENCE

Oregon Body & Bath is a local, independent boutique in Downtown Bend. We carry a variety of body & bath products, and especially love our locallymade lines. We are known for having the softest pajamas and robes in town.

375 SW Powerhouse Dr. #100 (541) 678-5633 confluenceflyshop.com

1019 NW Wall St, Bend (541) 383-5890 oregonbodyandbath.com

GATHERED WARES

Expedition Club & Supply is a new outdoor hobby shop and adventure club, providing curated gear and custom experiences for astronomy, birding, rockhounding, foraging, photography, and more. Come by for a tour and learn about membership.

What you will find here is one bright, welcoming, stimulating, creative and beautiful space. A carefully crafted space where you will find unique, one a kind, vintage treasures to adorn the spaces you love.

5 NW Minnesota Ave. #106, Bend (541) 316-3761 expeditionclub.co

50 SE Scott St., Bend (541) 389-2566 gatheredwares.com

SCOUT AND PINE

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OREGON BODY & BATH

Flyfishing customers and craft beer fans alike – have a new spot to grab a pint! Confluence’s awesome fly shop vibe has been enhanced by the addition of an 8-tap bar and outdoor patio. Come enjoy a cold beer, while you shop one of the region’s most broad-reaching product collections.

EXPEDITION CLUB

MARCH

MORO MORO

VOLTAIRE CYCLES

Adventure is calling! Mountain themed clothing, gifts and home goods boutique located in historic downtown Bend, Oregon.

Voltaire Cycles is a specialty bike shop specializing in cycling solutions including electric-assist, recumbents, trikes, cargo & special needs. If there is a transit need, we have a cycling solution. Your choice for electric fun.

126 NW Minnesota Ave, Bend (541) 797-6797 shopscoutandpine.com

19650 Sunshine Way, Bend 1-844-394-3809 voltairebend.com

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Change Change aa Life Life ~ ~ Donate Donate Today Today


Back Deck art & culture

wine

Maragas Winery Brings Home Medals from San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition Maragas Winery, just ten minutes north of Redmond in Culver, won eleven medals in the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition this January, including two gold and two double gold medals. The event is a blind wine competition and the largest competition of North American wines.

“Although we’ve consistently won medals in the competition over the last thirteen years, this year was a breakthrough into the double gold category and confirmation that our wines are world class,” said Doug Maragas, owner and winemaker at Maragas Winery. “Pretty good for an agricultural business that was originally considered very improbable for success by the community, wine establishment and even Oregon State [University].” Maragas Winery is the founding winery and vineyard of Central Oregon, established in 1999. The winery produces European varietals using low intervention techniques. The winery is dedicated to organic grape growing and naturally made wine. See maragaswinery.com .

ski life

Hoodoo’s Spring Fling There’s nothing like the first day of ski season, when excitement is in the winter air and the long alpine sports season lies ahead. But the end of the season is cause for celebration too, and the time that a resort’s culture really shines. Dress up in your funniest costume and say a farewell to ski season at Hoodoo’s Annual Spring Fling on Saturday, April 9 at Hoodoo Ski Area. The late-season celebration is free for all to attend, and is presented by Moosejaw and Laird Superfood. Hoodoo’s Spring Fling will include a costume contest and pond skimming battle royale, bringing out the bravest and craziest skiers and riders as they attempt to cross a stretch of icy water. See skihoodoo . com .

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Back Deck art & culture tourism

CASCADES THEATRE PRESENTS

Sustainable Tourism Lab to Launch

Ken Ludwig's

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SIH 3

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07:30

3/18

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148 NW G

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Sandy Sil

MARCH 18 - APRIL 3 THURS - SAT 7:30 PM SUN MATINEE 2:00 PM

Bend is a growing city with an economy partially based in tourism; specifically, outdoor tourism. Recently, thanks to financial support from Visit Bend, Oregon State UniversityCascades announced plans to launch a new kind of research facility. The Sustainable Tourism Lab, created with the help of a $125,000 contribution from Visit Bend, will focus on researching the local tourism industry in hopes of finding ways to support both the industry and the community it exists in. This includes how to market Bend as a tourism destination, regulating that tourism in a way that benefits both the tourists and the community, and ensuring that community members who support the tourism industry are paid a living wage and treated with respect. The director of the new lab, Todd Montgomery said, “Tourism brings economic benefit to destinations, but left unchecked, it can also degrade the natural areas that make these places desirable to visit and live in. We not only want to help sustain what makes these destinations special, but also balance issues like fair wages and affordable housing for tourism workers in these communities.” See osucascades .edu.

541-389-0803 CASCADES THEATRICAL.ORG Presented by arrangement with Concord Theatricals on behalf of Samuel French, Inc. www.concordtheatricals.com

theater

PHOTO COURTES Y OF OREGON S TATE UNIVERSIT Y – C A SC ADES

Shakespeare in Hollywood Postponed from a previous season due to COVID-19, Shakespeare in Hollywood by Ken Ludwig will be presenting March 18 to April 3 at Cascades Theatrical Company. The comic romp is set in 1934 and based on the 1935 Max Reinhardt film, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Shakespeare’s famous fairies, Oberon and Puck, mistakenly find their way to the Warner Brothers Hollywood set. Smitten by the glitz and glamour of show biz, the two are ushered onto the silver screen to play themselves. “It’s time for audiences to get back into humor and bring that back into their lives, and I can guarantee they will definitely get that with Shakespeare in Hollywood,” said Sandy Silver, director. “It’s a time to sit back, laugh, enjoy the performances that are outstanding by our cast, and just to have a good time.” See cascadestheatrical.org.

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DISCOVER NEWPORT A trip to Newport means outdoor exploration and indoor adventures, forest foraging, Yaquina Bay crabbing, chowder bowl comfort, bakery shops, coffee stops, early morning fog, and late night bonfires.

Your adventure starts here:

D I S C O V E R N E W P O R T. C O M 1-800-COAST-44

fit for

your play Every day of every season, there’s something for you with Bend Park & Recreation District. You’re invited to come play, learn and refresh in thousands of recreation opportunities. Check online for: Fitness | Swimming | Ice & Roller Skating | Sports Creative Arts | Child Care | Outdoors | Parks | Trails

For information, visit bendparksandrec.org

LARKS P COMM UR UNITY CENTE R NOW OPEN


PARTING #THISISBEND SHOT

A plate of deliciousness from Delish Donuts in Bend, including the pink Homer Simpson donut, Oreo, white cake and buttermilk bar.

PHOTO TA MBI L ANE

The only circle of trust you should have is a donut.

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Old Mill District/saxonsfinejewelers.com


Stay the Course We’ve all learned how to do this now. Call on our ability to adapt, shift perspectives or change direction—all while moving forward with intention and positivity. We’ve become pretty good at making the most of every moment, while still planning for what’s next. Thoughtful strategies for the long-term have always guided us as we’ve helped our clients consider and plan for their best future. Our goal? To always show up with compassion, share insights, and continue to make you our top priority. You can count on us to be here for the long haul. Give us a call today!

Serving the Pacific Northwest asiwealthmanagement.com

800.377.1449


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