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CRC HELPS STUDENTS STRUGGLING WITH ADDICTION BY DONNY MORRISON • TWITTER @DONNYMORRISON26

As the nation continues to grapple with what’s been coined the “opioid epidemic” — an influx of opiate and prescription-related deaths beginning in the late 1990s — college campuses around the nation are responding with a growing number of resources for students struggling with substance abuse. One of the resources at the University of Oregon is the Collegiate Recovery Center, which aims to offer a sense of community and a safe place for students actively seeking a sober lifestyle. Ezra Moss, a senior at UO majoring in international studies, currently interns under the Division of Student Life planning events and seminars for the CRC. He also collaborates with recovery groups from colleges all around the nation. Moss got sober near the end of his first year in college and has been a member of the CRC ever since. “I hit an emotional rock bottom while studying abroad my first year in college. I was in such a beautiful place, and I still couldn’t tell anyone why I was feeling so detached,” Moss said. “That’s why the sense of community at the CRC has been so valuable.” Moss first tried smoking pot in high school, quickly graduating to prescription pills such as Xanax and Vicodin. “I was smoking a lot of weed in high school and

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doing okay. But when I got into pills, that’s when my life slowly started to fall apart,” Moss said. “I would take whatever pills came my way. Sometimes I wouldn’t even know what it was.” Moss’s story is echoed around the nation. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the number of opiate-related deaths continues to rise nationally with 33,000 deaths in 2015. Kelly McIver, public information officer for the UO Police Department, spoke with the UOPD crime analyst, who says that UO hasn’t seen a rise in prescription drug arrests. “Occasionally there will be non-UO-affiliated people arrested for different violations, and among their illicit possessions, they may have prescription medication that was issued to someone else. But even that is uncommon,” McIver said. Despite the lack of increase in arrests, the CRC exists for those with an addiction looking to move away from drugs and recover. Currently, the CRC offers a variety of activities for members, including weekly seminars, yoga, trips to the art museum and hiking. “We try and switch it up and show people that they can have fun while being sober in college,” Moss said. “We also have events with universities around the nation. It’s a movement and its cool to witness hundreds of other students pursuing

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recovery in college. It’s something I would have never known had I not gotten involved with the CRC.” Dani Wilson, a graduate student in the PHD program for counseling and psychology, currently works with the CRC through the counseling department and checks in with students on a daily basis when they come to the center. Wilson described the center as a place like no other on campus and a haven for recovering students. “There’s a lot of things that are very typical for college students that aren’t necessarily good fits for someone trying to be sober, so we offer an alternative to that,” said Wilson. Oliver Barry is a freshman at UO who had been in contact with the CRC prior to moving to Oregon. He enjoys having a community to surround himself with when experiencing the highs and lows of campus life. “Even though I’m going to college, I don’t have to abide by the norms of constantly getting high or drunk. It’s not for me, and that’s fine. I can still have a positive experience,” Barry said. The CRC is open every weekday from 9 a.m. to 3 or 5 p.m., depending on the day. Weekly seminars are held on Wednesday evenings. The CRC office is located on the third floor of the EMU and can be reached at 541-346-6079.

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Maria Gallegos (center), ASUO president elect, and her running mates, Imani Dorsey (left) and Ivan Chen (right). Photograph by Madi Mather

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A NEWS Professor Bill Harbaugh. (Sarah Northrop)

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In the coming week, the University Senate will hold elections to slate a new vice president and presidentelect after it officially instates its new president, Bill Harbaugh. As Senate president, Harbaugh said he will focus on updating course evaluations, continuing the conversations on core education and improving the relationship between University of Oregon administration and the Senate. Harbaugh has been part of the Senate for eight years and was the president of the Senate last academic year. He ran to be the vice president for this year while he was still president. According to the Senate bylaws, the Senate vice president is elected at the last meeting of spring term. The vice president then becomes the president after serving as a vice president for a year. The vice president coordinates all of the committees within the senate and must stand in for the president if they are ever absent from a meeting. “The way it works is you are elected as vice president and presidentelect. So you really run a year before you actually become president so there’s kind of a training period,” said Harbaugh. The Senate president receives a raise of $30,000 and still teaches a full course load, according to Harbaugh. The raise can be used for research money or a summer salary, according to the Senate website. Comparable universities relieve their presidents from teaching courses and the president focuses solely on Senate matters, Harbaugh said. The Senate is negotiating with the administration to imitate

other university Senate structures, according to Harbaugh. Harbaugh said that one of the things he wants to address as Senate president is improving the relationship between the Senate and the administration. “I’ve worked pretty well with the administration, but they would prefer to make the large decisions themselves without consulting the Senate and the students,” Harbaugh said. “I need to push back on that as Senate president to make sure the Senate has an active role in running this institution.” One of the ways Harbaugh plans on achieving this is through reorganizing some of the Senate committees to work more efficiently with administration. University of Oregon political science student Jade Warner said she was unaware UO had a Senate and felt she and her fellow students do not know what they have power over. “They should definitely reach out to students,” Warner said. “We are the people paying for this institution.” Warner went on to say students themselves should strive to get involved as well. “If we can get from it what we want, it can be a better experience for everyone involved,” she said. Students have a lot of ways to get involved in the Senate to create change, according to Harbaugh. There are five student positions within the Senate, as well as opportunities to serve on the different Senate committees. “I encourage students if they are interested in a subject to let me know, and I will do my best to find a committee that’s within that area that they can serve on,” Harbaugh said.


A NEWS OREGON ATTORNEY GENERAL ELLEN ROSENBLUM DISCUSSES GUN CONTROL WITH STUDENTS BY MICHAEL TOBIN • TWITTER @TOBIN_TWEETS Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum met with a group of about a dozen University of Oregon students in the Knight Library on Thursday to discuss gun control and the state’s gun laws. At the beginning of the discussion, Rosenblum passed out one-page flyers explaining Oregon’s so-called “Red Flag Law.” The law allows a concerned spouse, intimate partner (such as a significant other), parent, sibling or family member to petition a county court to take a firearm from someone who presents a danger to themselves or others. Before any firearm is confiscated, a hearing is held by a court the same day or within 24 hours. If approved by the court, the order is effective for one year. “Maybe people didn’t know that the law existed and the idea is to get the word out,” Rosenblum said. “We are getting it into the hands of as many people as possible.” In addition to the Red Flag Law, Oregon recently closed the “boyfriend loophole,” which previously allowed intimate partners convicted of domestic abuse to purchase a firearm. During the hour-long discussion, which was not heavily publicized, students shared their thoughts and concerns about gun control with Rosenblum. Some students found that the lack of publicity added to the authenticity of the conversation. “I thought that [the] attorney general was very down-to-earth, and she was definitely herself, and I personally appreciated that because in politics it can be different and people aren’t who they appear to be,” said Jaria Martin, a senior majoring in family and human services. “I’m glad that the space was created in the first place for her to sit down with us and hear from us.” Lauren Walker, a sophomore psychology major, said that the group could have been more representative of the student body.

“I think it would have been nice if it was more publicized,” Walker said. “However, I felt that she genuinely wanted to listen to students and wasn’t doing it for the publicity.” While Rosenblum started the conversation by discussing the new Red Flag Law, students brought up related topics such as mental health and the overlap between gun violence and police brutality. “I think it was important that the topic of police brutality came up because it’s so prevalent today, and I think the attorney general understands that,” Martin said. “I think she realizes that although we’re a ‘blue state,’ racial violence and gun violence happens in Oregon.” Members of the College Democrats joined Rosenblum to share their insights, but no members of the College Republicans attended the discussion. Justin Myhre, the College Republicans president, said that the group was not aware of the meeting but would be happy to have a conversation about gun control with Rosenblum. In an interview with the Daily Emerald, Rosenblum, a Democrat, said that she wants to hear what UO students who identify as Republican have to say. “I would be delighted to have a conversation with College Republicans,” Rosenblum said. “I’m hopeful that Republican and Democratic students can work together to help solve this scourge. It’s a safety issue — that’s why I call it gun safety and not gun control. No one wants to feel unsafe.” Rosenblum said that students and young people help to keep public officials such as herself accountable. “Our students are a great voice and force. At first, I didn’t want to bother them, but I need them and I need the voices of young people,” she said. “They help keep me accountable and make sure I am doing my job.”

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UNIVERSITY WEBSITE UO FIND PEOPLE CONNECTS EVERYONE BY CASEY CROWLEY • TWITTER @CASEYCROWLEY55 If you’ve ever wondered how a complete stranger is able to find your phone number, you’re probably not aware that it and other personal information is available to anyone via the site UO Find People. If you are a student at the University of Oregon, anyone who knows your first and last name can find your phone number, email and other personal information. They can do this through the website, UO Find People. The directory is intended to connect anyone, whether it’s a professor’s office or a classmate’s phone number, says UO spokesman Tobin Klinger. If a student has fully opted into the service, the search will display the phone number, email, major, address and whether the person is in a undergraduate or graduate program. ASUO election commissioner Ram Sharma said he has been aware of the site and that there are some pros and cons to it. “On one hand yes I do feel weird that someone can type in my name and get my number and that stuff, on the other hand I can see it being useful,” said Sharma via text. Oliver Aguire, Brian Cruz and Taylor Camarena are all UO students who had no knowledge of it, and felt weird that anyone could find their phone number or email address. “I don’t think I’ll be using it. Honestly I think it’s

kind of weird but it could be useful to students,” said Aguire, a freshman majoring in business. For faculty and staff members, the site provides the job title, department, office address, email and phone number. The page is often used by Emerald reporters when trying to contact sources affiliated with the university. On average the site has about 103,000 page views per month. This equates to about 3,000 page views per day. Only one percent of those who have their information the site completely opt out of the service. Klinger says that the service is fairly universally known by members of the UO faculty and staff. Klinger said that university websites are expected to have some kind of site that allows people to get direct contact information for students or faculty members. Many other universities have similar service and are often called directories. Both Oregon State University and Portland State University have similar services available. The UO is able to share the information because during the registration process students are presented with options of how much of their directory information they want available on the site. Cruz, Aguire and Camarena all said that do not

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remember doing this during the registration process. Klinger says that the site does not receive any specific promotion. “Generally speaking we as consumers of information on the web we have an expectation when we visit any organization website that there is going to be some component of it that leads you to the ability to contact specific people,” said Klinger. If a person wants to remove their some or all of their information they can go to DuckWeb, chose personal information, then online directory profile and follow the further instructions from there. Students can also update their information their information through DuckWeb. “It’s an essential and universal part of university websites because that ability to connect with people is essential to carrying out the business of the university,” said Klinger. When a student opts completely out of directory information that includes all information about their status as a student at the university. Klinger said that he has gotten calls from parents of students who made the Dean’s List, but had not been recognized by their hometown media because they had completely opted out of sharing directory information. “Back in the day we used to call them phone books,” said Klinger.

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DUCKS TOGETHER TRIUMPHS IN THE ASUO ELECTION BY RYAN NGUYEN • TWITTER @RYANJJNGUYEN Maria Alejandra Gallegos-Chacon, the ASUO president-elect, thought that winning the 2018 election with her all-queer, all-student-of-color presidential slate was going to be an “uphill battle.” Her campaign manager made sure of that. “I intentionally wanted to low-ball it,” said Tan Perkins, who managed Gallegos’ slate, Ducks Together. “I told our slate it would be an uphill battle.” Perkins feared that the opposing slate, United UO, had an advantage. Even when the 2018 ASUO regular election results finally did come out, Perkins told the campaign members that they shouldn’t get their hopes up and that they needed to wait to celebrate until the results were finalized. After Gallegos saw the finalized election results, she began crying — both with joy and disbelief. “I called my mom,” Gallegos said, “and my mom started crying too.” Gallegos added that her younger cousin messaged her to congratulate her, and she was proud that he could see her in a leadership position. “When I was his age, I really thought I was never going to college. Fuck, I didn’t even think that I was going to make it through high school,” Gallegos said. “So it’s really cool that the three of us and our slate members are widely diverse, but also this shows a pathway for younger students.” Gallegos will take office as ASUO president on May 23, replacing current president Amy Schenk. Schenk PA G E 8

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endorsed Ducks Together midway through the election season. After a contentious election involving multiple allegations of election rule violations, Ducks Together came out victorious in the 2018 ASUO regular election. Nearly all Ducks Together candidates won more than double the votes of their United UO competitors. Ducks Together is the first all-queer and all-person-of-color presidential slate to win in ASUO history, according to Gallegos. Perkins felt shocked. “The only thing I can keep referring back to is hard work pays off. We were out there every day, all day. This is because we’re organizers at heart,” said Perkins. “It’s so gratifying to see it come to fruition.” Now, Gallegos is the 2018-19 ASUO president. Ivan Chen is next year’s external vice president, and Imani Dorsey is next year’s internal vice president. When Dorsey saw the election results, she also started crying. “I knew we were doing something big here and really ambitious, being at a predominantly white institution like this,” Dorsey said. “This hasn’t happened for us, and it finally did.” Their platform emphasized “taking back student power,” and this is reflected in the campaign’s policy goals, such as ensuring that students have a say in proposed tuition changes, establishing student panels that help decide punishments for student

Maria Gallegos (center), ASUO president elect, and her running mates, Imani Dorsey (left) and Ivan Chen (right). (Madi Mather)

conduct code violations and securing funding for student services such as Safe Ride and the student food pantry. The slate is experienced. Gallegos, a junior, served as the senator representing history, English and foreign languages last year, and she is also the codirector of the UO Multicultural Center. Chen, a junior, works as the organizing manager at ASUO and has worked on several campaigns fighting hunger on campus. Dorsey is a sophomore and is the state affairs commissioner in the ASUO executive branch. Despite their experience in ASUO, the members of Ducks Together believed that they would lose because their slate had so many students of color, Perkins said. They were also fearful that United UO had already established support with students by illegally campaigning early. “I thought that we were just going to lose, because we’re at a white university and a white male ran and we’re so heavy people of color,” Perkins said. “I lowballed it because that’s internally what I thought this university was about.” Perkins submitted eight grievances to the ASUO Election Board accusing United UO of violating various election rules, including campaigning before it was allowed, canvassing in university housing and soliciting votes by bribing students with leftover campaign food. Of the eight grievances, only three resulted in the ASUO


This isn’t a resume builder for us; this isn’t a joke. To win is not about us. It’s about our slate, and it’s about the people that you represent at the University of Oregon.” TAN PERKINS Constitution Court penalizing United UO. Jacob Faatz, the United UO presidential candidate, maintains United UO’s innocence. Faatz said that it was frustrating that United UO lost. “I just wanted to make sure that I ran the best campaign that we could,” Faatz said. United UO filed three grievances on April 11 against Ducks Together, but they were all dismissed. In the hours before the election results were released, Gallegos, Dorsey, Chen and Perkins were so anxious that they all became physically ill. “This isn’t a resume builder for us; this isn’t a joke,” Perkins said. “To win is not about us. It’s about our slate, and it’s about the people that you represent at the University of Oregon.” Now, the members of Ducks Together say they’re glad that the election season is over. But when they were still forming their slate in fall term, Chen and Dorsey said that it was a challenge convincing Gallegos to run as the Ducks Together candidate for ASUO president. The Ducks Together presidential slate met through their mutual interests in ASUO, and eventually, the three slowly became good friends. It helped that they were all majoring in ethnic studies. Chen said that when he first reached out to Gallegos to ask if she would run as their campaign’s presidential candidate, she refused and said that she would be his chief of staff. But Chen kept trying because he believed she was the most qualified person for the job. “When I was thinking about it, president is a big job,” Gallegos said, “and I thought I wouldn’t be good enough for the student body, to be honest, because I feel like I have a lot of experience community organizing and not as much governing. I also don’t like being in charge of people; I like people to have their own autonomy.” During Ducks Together’s search for a presidential candidate, Gallegos realized that she was the one who had the experience scrutinizing the ASUO budget and connecting with UO administration during her stint as an ASUO senator. By the middle of winter term, she finally agreed to be the presidential candidate; however, she still has some anxieties. Gallegos said that the process has been humbling. “I just want to be able to

look at my family and tell them I didn’t do anything to make them feel like they raised me wrong,” Gallegos said. “My dad said yesterday night, ‘Remember where you came from, regardless of what fancy title you get.” This year’s ASUO has faced a continually decreasing budget surplus, the leftover money from university contracting that is used for funding student clubs, in addition to another year of tuition increases. These issues carried over from last year and will continue to carry over into next year, but Gallegos said she feels prepared to tackle them. Few students feel well-informed about the functions and actions of ASUO. According to a 2017 Emerald survey, 83 percent of students do not feel wellinformed, and less than 4 percent of the student body voted in last year’s election, when Schenk’s slate ran unopposed. This year, 8 percent of students cast ballots. ASUO members influence the administration’s policy decisions. ASUO is split into three branches: executive, legislative and judicial, similar to the structure of the federal government. The ASUO Senate manages the $16 million dollar Incidental Fee budget, which is what students pay every term to fund student groups, free Lane Transit District tickets and free University of Oregon athletic tickets. Now, Gallegos and her slate are focused on the future. Their first day in office, Gallegos wants to include more student voices, down to having students involved in the decorating process of the ASUO office. Gallegos suggest students bring their art to be displayed in the ASUO office. “Students don’t like to come in because it’s intimidating, because it looks like an office space,” Gallegos said, “and it doesn’t look like a student center.” Gallegos said that her campaign is not entirely radical but that there are some things she wants to change. “We’re not trying to burn down the ASUO,” Gallegos said, “but I do want to rework a lot of things. I want to unpack some things. I do want to dismantle some things and restart them.” She said she’s not afraid to have to work against the administration’s wishes to best serve students, either. “I’m not here to get recommendation letters,” Gallegos said.

2018-19 ASUO LEADERS President — Maria Gallegos External Vice President — Ivan Chen Internal Vice President — Imani Dorsey

Senate: Seat 1 PFC: Kezia Setyawan Seat 2 PFC: Marian Fragoso Seat 4 EMU Board: Andrea Vanessa Seat 5 EMU Board: Ethan Shafer Seat 7 ACFC: Caitlin Saavedra Seat 9 DFC: Abdullah Al-shbanah Seat 11 Journalism: Jasmine Jackson Seat 14 Business: Xiao Dai Seat 16 Life Sciences: Alina Salagean (United UO) Seat 17 Social Studies: Daniel Smith Seat 18: Physical & Computer Sciences: Brian Sun Seat 19: Psychology, Sociology & Humanities: Arie Markowitz

Finance Committees: ACFC At-Large: Cynthia AguilarArizmendi ACFC At-Large: Rumeez Haq DFC At-Large: Ethan Faust EMU Board: May Dinh EMU Board At-Large: Clarice Beasley EMU Board At-Large: Charlie Keene PFC At-Large: Miles Larson PFC At-Large: Carly Ebisuya SRC Advisory Board: Samantha Heimler (United UO) SRC Advisory Board: Akshat Nema (United UO)

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OPINION (Illustration by Maddy Wignall)

HOW TO BE ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY SARAH LOVELY

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Social media is here to stay. That is something that professionals around the world can agree on. And as it has been integrated into our daily lives, it is going to be integrated into our professional lives as well. College students’ ability to understand what it means to use social media professionally is becoming one of the most important things they can do to succeed. How to be professional on social media The professional world has a few approaches to using social media. According to the Harvard Business Review, professionals can opt to use the Open strategy, where they use their social media as they please and allow any audience to view it. This strategy allows professionals a platform with which they can connect on a personal level with the public, and if used correctly, can further the public approval of a person or business. If that is too personal, professionals might choose to use the Audience strategy, where they limit their social media following to close friends and family. This method allows professionals to create boundaries in their life that give them privacy and keep their professional lives professional. Regardless of the way that you decide to handle your social media, it still needs to be representative of a professional human being. This is good to keep in mind during these wild college years because of the ageold saying that “everything on the internet is there forever.” Why be professional on social media? The ability to represent oneself positively over social media is essential to show to a future employer because you might be the next person to represent them. And while you won’t necessarily be the face of the company, the company must feel comfortable hiring you. In most serious hiring processes, you will be asked to provide the username of all of your social media platforms so that the company can create a judgement of your character. “Your social media presence is the most prominent way you are out there online,” said Lisa Heyamoto, senior instructor of journalism at UO. “It can be a real help by boosting and connecting you with the right people and also a real hindrance, and you don’t want to be held back when you are supposed to be launching

yourself as a professional.” Creating content that is representative of the kind of person you want to advertise to potential employers is essential when formulating a post on social media. This is especially relevant in business and journalism professions. Applying for a job and knowing how to use social media platforms in a positive way will give you the upper hand compared to other applicants. Companies use social media to communicate with the general public, and if you can navigate platforms with the a company’s goals in mind, you are already a fantastic candidate for hire. What the professionals are saying about social media professionalism When UO professors were asked about the importance of social media professionalism, it was clear that understanding how to use it and apply it to the professional world is a key strength that we can bring with us to an employer. “There is no denying that social media is here to stay, and those of you that are millennials have been digital natives and been using social media for a long time. Organizations have begun to realize how important that is as a tool in their strategic communications,” professor of public relations Connie Chandler said. Using this advantage will help us on the path to success. We will be the group that will lead the way to connecting with each other on a global scale. Skills like problem solving and investigating are things that our generation does every day using these kinds of platforms. And again, these skills are especially relevant when working in fields that deal with world-wide information. “In the journalism world you are dealing with information – that’s your job and since that is what social media is as well, you should probably be really good at it,” Heyamoto said. “You should be writing well, your grammar should be on point – it should be insightful but concise.” The importance of presenting oneself on social media platforms as a professional, or at least someone who is respectable, is the new “thing.” It has become necessary to take successful strides toward launching careers out of college. Social media professionalism should be the new trend. Tell your friends.


9 OPINION

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM ASUO 2018-2019 BY BILLY MANGGALA AND JADYN MARKS

Ducks Together won the 2018 ASUO elections by a landslide last week. Students have learned about each campaign’s ambitions and goals throughout the election process, but now that we know who will be taking over, what should we expect? Ducks Together’s slate focused its campaign on “taking back student power” by protecting student voices and funding student aid services, such as mental health counseling and a food pantry. As students, you can expect that the 2018-2019 ASUO administration will prioritize marginalized student communities, push back against administration and get an early start on their agenda. Supporting marginalized students Diverse students and minority groups can look forward to support from ASUO. The Ducks Together slate includes many minorities, including people who are working class, queer, trans, immigrants, disabled and people of color. These minorities can expect to have their voices heard with representation in ASUO. Beyond that, president-elect Maria Alejandra GallegosChacon wants to make supporting marginalized communities a priority. “This position comes with an enormous amount of power and privilege, and I just want to make sure that all of that goes back to benefitting the marginalized communities on campus and hopefully for the [larger] community, because this was a largely community-led campaign,” Gallegos said. One way Gallegos plans to support marginalized students is by re-working the stipend model given

to ASUO-funded groups on campus, which became a hot issue during the ASUO town hall debate prior to the election. Gallegos believes that changing the stipend model will benefit large student groups who bear a tough workload with little pay. “The stipend model really hurts some groups. Some of the larger groups don’t get a very beefy stipend. ... Only certain staff members get stipends, but if you have more [members] then it kind of punishes groups for hiring more students,” Gallegos said. “I think that’s a good thing the senate will be able to work on over the summer.” Challenging Administration Another thing students can be sure of: Gallegos isn’t afraid to challenge the current UO administration. “I think it is important to have [us] work against administration sometimes,” Gallegos said. During the 2016-2017 school year, she witnessed ASUO president Quinn Haaga advocate for last year’s 10.6 percent tuition increase “because [President Schill] basically told her to.” “It does a disservice [to students] because we’ve seen that [working with administration] doesn’t work. We’ve seen that president Schill will discount [students] for being friendly,” Gallegos said. “I kinda know where president Schill stands. … I’m not here to get a recommendation letter.” Getting an early start Gallegos has already started conversations about what to do better next year with current ASUO president Amy Schenk. Schenk’s main suggestion, one which Gallegos took into account

before the elections, was to start early — Gallegos made plans to stay over the summer “just in case” she won. She anticipates that having the opportunity to stay in Eugene with other ASUO members will give next year’s slate a head start on their agenda. “Since [this year’s ASUO administration] didn’t have the summer to work as much, I think that kinda delayed them setting forth their agenda until fall term,” Gallegos said. She hopes to be able to start work on fixing the stipend model, funding the food pantry and begin meeting and working with student groups over the summer. It’s also important for her to be present for student conduct code meetings and as a check on UO administration. “The administration takes advantage of students being gone over summer break, over winter break. ... historically some things will pass when no students are there to know about [it].” But Gallegos and her “core team” will be there. Only 1,846 students voted in this year’s elections, but the decisions that ASUO administration makes affects every student at some level. Having a say in these decisions goes beyond voting — it is our responsibility as students to hold ASUO administration accountable for what they do and how it affects the university. Ducks Together emphasized taking back student power, and students are the only ones who can ensure that happens. The 2018-2019 ASUO elected slate will take office on May 25.

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9 OPINION

NIKE NEEDS TO STEP UP AND

PROMOTE WOMEN AND MINORITIES BY EMMA SPAETH In recent months, Nike has been criticized for not hiring and promoting enough women. There have also been reports of “inappropriate workplace behavior.” The company wants to “include different perspectives,” but it will not be able to do this unless it has a better representation of women and minorities — Nike’s executive leadership is predominantly white and male. By failing to represent minorities and uphold standards of respect for all employees, Nike will struggle to maintain its position as the world’s largest footwear manufacturer. As Nike is the predominant sponsor of the University of Oregon — a university with such strong beliefs in equality — it is alarming that Nike does not prioritize those standards. In early April, Nike HR Chief Monique Matheson released a memo stating that the company has “failed to gain traction” in hiring and retaining female and minority employees. Only 29 percent of Nike vice presidents are women, and only 16 percent of VPs are non-white. Nike has announced it plans to cut 1,400 jobs, equivalent to 2 percent of its global

workforce. This is likely a result of Nike’s steady decline of sales in North America — something that can be connected to the lack of diversity in Nike’s executive board: “Research shows that these most diverse companies tend to actually perform better financially than the overall market,” CNBC reporter Bertha Coombs said during DiversityInc’s event in 2017. While these statistics are not unlike those of many companies, Nike promotes a facade. Nike’s mission for diversity and inclusion isn’t reflected in its employment, and it is a major flaw in the company’s branding. Through advertising and the use of professional female athletes, Nike promotes its workforce as inclusive and valuing diversity. One example of this is the recent commercial featuring pro tennis player Serena Williams in an effort to inspire the public and impart the impression that Nike is inclusive of all genders and ethnicities. Nike has championed off of black bodies since the dawn of the corporation, one of the most popular examples being Michael Jordan and his basketball career in the late 20th century. Much of Nike’s success was

made possible by minorities and women, so to see that these groups are not being fairly represented in the workforce is alarming. Nike needs to increase its efforts to hire and promote women and minorities. In order to compete in an increasingly diverse industry, Nike must focus on how to create a more inclusive workplace. To fix Nike’s company culture, current leaders need to be held responsible for representing all people. Women and minorities should be treated more fairly at work and this shift in attitude will have to begin in the upper ranks of the company. Since Nike sponsors the University of Oregon, we as students and athletes should be concerned that our biggest supporter hasn’t done what they claim to. The University of Oregon has stressed for so long the importance of inclusivity, yet we have accepted millions of dollars from a company that has not upheld those standards. As students and members of the UO community, we should speak up and encourage Nike to move forward with plans to diversify their workforce and create a company culture that is respectful and representative of all people.

Nike Headquarters, located in Beaverton. (Creative Commons)

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SPORTS

OREGON FOOTBALL CATCHES

FORTNITE FEVER

(Courtesy of the UO Athletic Department)

BY GUS MORRIS • TWITTER @JUSTGUSMORRIS An addiction is spreading throughout the Oregon football program. For hours most nights, dozens of players shut themselves away in their rooms, ignoring calls and texts from family, friends and significant others. Everyone affected says the same: Once introduced, it’s a tough habit to kick. “Started getting into it around Christmas time,” linebacker Lamar Winston said. “Ever since then, I haven’t stopped.” Winston is talking about the popular video game “Fortnite,” a third-person shooter sandbox survival game (think of a cartoon version of “The Hunger Games” mixed with “Minecraft”) that has taken the gaming world by storm since its free multiplayer version was released in September 2017. By February 2018, more than 40 million people worldwide had downloaded the game, a number which includes a majority of Oregon’s football team. For the Ducks, the game has become a weekly, if not daily, ritual. Players log hours online, almost always playing with teammates in four-person squad or two-player duo matches, racking up kills, building forts (hence the game’s name) and sometimes letting days pass by. “I’d have to say 14 hours,” said defensive

lineman Popo Aumavae when asked what his longest session was. The Ducks admit that they mainly use the game as a way to unwind from long spring days filled with practices, tutoring and classes, but they also insist that there are skills that translate onto the field. Players specifically pointed to the communication aspect of the video game, a necessity for success when trying to outlast up to 98 other competitors or navigate complex college football offenses. “In ‘Fortnite,’ you have to give exact coordinates as to where targets are or where you want to go, and that’s what I need to let my teammates know,” Winston said. “Especially when a Y-off is coming across to block my other outside linebacker or something, then pre-snap reads and communicating, that kind of stuff.” Always looking for a leg up in the recruiting world, Oregon’s athletic department even recently entered the “Fortnite” realm. Last month, five-star football recruit Chris Steele tweeted out a photo of himself depicted in a “Fortnite” Oregon-themed edit that the program made for him. The post garnered over 200 retweets and over 1,200 likes on Twitter. “The best edit I’ve ever had made for me,” Steele told The Oregonian. Similar to many popular games before it,

“Fortnite” has become a rallying point for players up and down Oregon’s roster. Winston said he finds himself playing with guys from every position group, including quarterback Justin Herbert, whose presence online surprised many of his teammates. “He plays that,” Winston said. “I don’t see him playing anything else but that.” Jalen Jelks added about his quarterback: “When I see him on, I’m like, ‘I have to play with Herb’ because he’s good.” Herbert claims that former wide receiver Charles Nelson first introduced the game to the Ducks during last fall camp. Others remember their teammates showing them the game months ago, but many recall how they met those recommendations with skepticism. The game was, after all, designed for younger teenagers and its cartoonish graphics are a stark contrast with the hyper-realistic designs of more marquee titles like “Call of Duty” or “FIFA.” Still, the attraction to the game is very real and the pull to play is difficult, if not impossible, to ignore, even at the risk of shirking more important responsibilities. “At first I was so critical about the game. I didn’t like it. It’s a cartoon,” Winston said. “Then I started playing it, and I couldn’t stop playing it. My girlfriend would agree with that.” M O N D AY, A P R I L 1 6 , 2 0 1 8

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Q SPORTS SPECIAL TEAMS COACH’S INTRIGUE IN OREGON GOES BACK TO ‘90s

Oregon Ducks Alyssa Tobita celebrates during her doubles match. (Devin Roux)

BY SHAWN MEDOW • TWITTER @SHAWNMEDOW Oregon football’s special teams coordinator, Bobby Williams, first came to Eugene in 1998 during his time as a coach at Michigan State. It didn’t go according to plan for the Spartans that day, as the Ducks beat them 48-14, but Oregon caught Williams’ eye. “I’ve always been intrigued by Oregon,” Williams said. “It wasn’t a good result for Michigan State because they got beat pretty good, but [I was] always watching the program from afar.” Then, Williams got another good look at Oregon when he was at Alabama in the 2014 season for the College Football Playoff. “We got a chance to break down Oregon, and [I] was really impressed by the style, the flair of the program,” Williams said. Now, Williams is hoping to bring his over three decades-worth of experience to Oregon’s special teams. His time with Oregon head coach Mario Cristobal at Alabama helped lure him to Eugene. “He’s the special teams coordinator so it is his baby,” Cristobal said. But Williams isn’t in it on his own. Cristobal says that all assistant coaches help on special teams as players from both sides of the ball get involved in special teams play. Just like getting coaches involved in special teams, Oregon has to get a variety of

Ducks special teams coordinator Bobby Williams talks to the media prior to practice. (Ben Green)

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players involved too. “We have to develop and find more special teams players,” Cristobal said. “You know how the season goes. If your starters are getting every single rep on offense and defense, and you have to take every special teams rep, it gets exhausting.” With the NCAA approving a new kickoff rule that allows teams to call fair catches inside the 25yard line to result in touchbacks, adjustments for special teams will have to be made this upcoming season. What could be the consequences of this rule change? “Ball being mishandled, ball being kicked out of bounds a bit more,” Williams said. “It’s gonna be experimental.” At Alabama, Williams had success in the kicking game and says that the Oregon players have accepted and embraced what his plan is for the kicking units. And with five national championship titles in six appearances, Williams has a good idea of what he’s doing with the special teams as he looks to try get Oregon back to a national championship game. “They had a taste of being in that championship arena, so they know what it’s like to be there,” Williams said. “Just get the program over the hump to eventually win a national championship.”

WOMEN’S TENNIS MAKES QUICK WORK OF UTAH ON

SENIOR DAY

BY SHAWN MEDOW • TWITTER @SHAWNMEDOW During the doubles of Oregon women’s tennis match on Sunday, several men’s tennis players gathered around court No. 4 for senior Alyssa Tobita’s final doubles match on her home court. With the players sarcastically cheering mistakes, Utah’s Taylor Calton had enough. The junior turned around, pointed directly at the three rows of bleachers and expressed her frustration with their comments. Tobita and Rifanty Kahfiani went on to win that match and claim the doubles point for the Ducks. All went pretty much according to plan in a chippy match for No. 30 Oregon, as the Ducks (14-8, 5-5) bested Utah (10-12, 1-8) 4-0 on Saturday at the Student Tennis Center in Eugene. Behind dominant doubles play and aggressive singles play, the Ducks managed to get the job done in under two-and-a-half hours as they honored Tobita and fellow senior Nia Rose. “I think their legacy for sure is the start of the tradition of excellence that we have here and being a program to be reckoned with — top in the country,” head coach Alison Silverio said. The Ducks took the doubles point quickly with wins from Tobita/Kahfiani (6-1) and Shweta Sangwan/Julia Eshet (6-1). Eshet returned to the court for singles in the No. 6 spot and once again got the job done in swift fashion, beating Victoria Robertson 6-0, 6-2 on court No. 3. But the drama from doubles escalated when singles rolled around. Calton moved to court No. 1 to take on Daniela Nasser, and the men’s players followed, as did the sarcasm. Then, she exploded. “Can someone kick them out?” Calton said, looking at several ITA umpires. Calton then used some colorful language and was backed up by Utah head coach Mat Iandolo, who came over to the edge

of the court to talk to the players. “Don’t be smug with me, male tennis players,” Iandolo said. The players responded with, “We beat you yesterday,” referring to their 4-3 win over the Utes in Salt Lake City on Friday. Calton lost both matches she played, falling to Nasser 6-3, 6-1. With the Ducks getting the third point from Nasser to take it 3-0, Oregon was looking at a second clinch victory in a row. That’s when it fell to Tobita and Sangwan, who were neck-and-neck. “I saw her deuce point,” Tobita said, recounting Sangwan’s deuce at 5-4. “We’ve had that a couple matches, but that’s what we want. Although it’s competition between our teammates, it’s a good thing to have on the team.” Tobita beat out Sangwan, who finished her match tied 5-5 in the second set, with Tobita going without losing a point in her final game. Just how you’d want it scripted, Tobita, the Ducks only ranked singles player at No. 49, clinched the fourth team point, winning her match 7-5, 6-3. “A lot of emotions, and it’s kind of cool that I got to clinch it for the team today,” Tobita said. “Just another happy ending I guess.” Now, Tobita plans to pass the torch to Sangwan as the team’s leader. “[Sangwan has] had three amazing years of experience here, and she’s been playing in the top three spots since she was a freshman,” Silverio said. “Alyssa has been a great example of what it means to take responsibility and ownership of that No. 1 spot.” But before that happens, Tobita and the Ducks still have a job to do: finish the season with a successful Pac-12 Tournament. “There’s another challenge ahead of us,” Silverio said. “We’re certainly going to celebrate the seniors today, but we’ll be right back at it next week.”


Q SPORTS

DUCKS FAIL TO SWEEP SUN DEVILS BY SHAWN MEDOW • TWITTER @SHAWNMEDOW Oregon softball had swept Arizona State in every series over the past three seasons, but on Sunday, the Ducks couldn’t make it four as the No. 7 Sun Devils shut out the No. 3 Ducks 4-0 in Tempe, Arizona. Oregon (34-7, 9-3) couldn’t get a run on the board while managing just three hits against Arizona State. The Ducks used all three pitchers, starting with junior Megan Kleist, who pitched two innings, allowing two hits and one run — she was handed the loss. Maggie Balint relieved her in the third inning and surrendered two runs before she was pulled after 1.1 innings. That brought in Miranda

Elish, who gave up the last run over 2.2 innings pitched. The loss is Kleist’s fifth of the season, as her record drops to 13-5 on the year. No Duck had a multi-hit game with Jenna Lilley, Mary Iakopo and DJ Sanders each providing singles on the day as Oregon left five runners on base. Gwen Svekis was hit by a pitch in the fourth inning and walked in the seventh inning — she was stranded on both occasions. The Ducks return home for one game against Oklahoma on Thursday before Stanford pays a visit to Eugene for a three-game series starting Friday.

Oregon Ducks guard Aina Ayuso (31) stretches before the start of practice. (Adam Eberhardt)

THREE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL PLAYERS LEAVE PROGRAM BY SHAWN MEDOW • TWITTER @SHAWNMEDOW When Oregon women’s basketball was knocked out of the Elite Eight for the second consecutive season, things were still looking up for the Ducks as the team would lose just two players to graduation: Lexi Bando and Justine Hall. But, this past week has seen some changes. After just one season with the Oregon women’s basketball program, freshman Aina Ayuso signed with an agent and plans to go pro in her home country of Spain. Then, according to a report from the Register-Guard’s Austin Meek, sophomore forward Sierra Campisano has asked for her release from the program followed by an announcement by TCU that freshman Anneli Maley would transfer to the Frogs. Oregon head coach Kelly Graves told the Emerald that Ayuso left the program after a club in Spain made a spot open for her on their team and that Ayuso wanted to major in physical therapy — something UO does not offer.

Ayuso, a Barcelona, Spain, native, played in 31 games, averaging 8.1 minutes and 2.2 points per game in her freshman season. She hit internet fame with her crossover during the Pac-12 Tournament in early March. Maley appeared in 37 games for Oregon this season and averaged 2.2 points and 2.5 rebounds per game. Campisano played in 35 games her freshman season, averaging 3.1 points and 1.7 rebounds per game but only logged playing time in 23 games as a sophomore this season. Maley joins former Oregon women’s basketball player Jayde Woods, who also transferred to TCU after last season. Oregon has signed Nyara Sabally, the younger sister of freshman Satou Sabally, and Taylor Chavez, the Arizona Gatorade Player of the Year. The Ducks will also get Erin Boley into the lineup after the former Notre Dame player sat out during the 2017-18 season.

Ducks pitcher Maggie Balint (25) celebrates another strikeout. (Ben Green)

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Emerald Media Group

CAL

NDAR April 16-22

FORMER ‘NAT GEO’ EDITOR SEEKS TO INSPIRE STUDENTS


8 APRIL 16-22 CALENDAR

THIS WEEK IN

EUGENE FRI

WED

18

SPRING CAREER FAIR EMU BALLROOM, 12 TO 4 P.M., FREE AND OPEN TO ALL UNIVERSITY OF OREGON STUDENTS

According to the event page for the fair, over 70 companies and organizations are attending the UO Career Center’s Spring Career Fair to promote their employment opportunities for students. Students who plan on attending the fair should bring copies of their resumes and wear business casual attire. This is the culminating event

(Emerald Archives)

20

THURS

19

SUSTAINABLE FOOD AND BEVERAGE CONFERENCE LILLIS BUSINESS COMPLEX 5:30 TO 8:30 P.M, FREE AND OPEN TO UNIVERSITY OF OREGON STUDENTS

The Pacific Northwest is driving innovation in the sustainable food and beverage markets. From food justice advocates to produce farmers and livestock raisers, people in the food industry are trying to make their products more environmentally friendly in a time of unprecedented ecological impact. University of Oregon Net Impact Undergraduate is presenting the

THURS

19

FRANKIE COSMOS AT WONDER BALLROOM 128 NE RUSSELL ST., PORTLAND DOORS AT 8 P.M., TICKETS $15 IN ADVANCE, $17 AT THE DOOR, ALL AGES Indie-pop group Frankie Cosmos is returning to Portland after its quiet set at MusicFestNW presents Project Pabst this past summer. The quiet, lo-fi group, started by Greta Kline as a Bandcamp project, released its first major album, “Vessel,” on Sub Pop in March. But the group has a few other full-length albums filled with short but sweet songs behind them. Clocking in at 18 songs — almost all of them under

four minutes — “Vessel” is a spunky addition to the band’s discography. “Being alive/Matters quite a bit/ Even when you/Feel like shit,” Kline sings in the song “Being Alive,” her light voice almost a croon. When the Emerald spoke to Kline this summer, she said she wanted her next show in Portland to be all ages. Her group is fulfilling that promise this Friday. Ian Sweet opens.

MON

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of Spring Career Fair Week, which features a variety of workshops leading up to the fair designed to prepare students for Wednesday. For example, practice interview sessions are being offered at the Career Center throughout the day and the center is hosting a networking event in the EMU Ballroom that evening.

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Douglas Fir National Monument Presentation at EMU, 6 p.m., free

Sustainable Food and Beverage Conference to connect people interested in using business to help create a more socially and environmentally sustainable world. Speakers will include Chip Heim and Megan Shea of The Soulfull Project, Karen Edmonds of Food for Lane County, Lucas Ahlquist of Young Mountain Tea, Zoe Anton of Craft Crickets and Franklin Smith of Guayaki.

AN EVENING WITH KEVIN SMITH HULT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS (1 EUGENE CENTER), 8 P.M., TICKETS $35 TO $51

Kevin Smith debuted as a humble filmmaker producing future-cult comedies in the compact convenient store in which he worked. After the success of “Clerks” in ‘94, Smith went on to direct multiple flicks: a few “Clerk”-like comedies, a horror film and even a buddy cop feature. His relevance expands to many realms of popular culture as well; he’s a highly frequent podcaster and his comic book store, “Jay and Silent Bob’s Secret Stash,” is the setting for

TUES

17

BE Activist with Charon Asetoyer at EMU Redwood Auditorium, 5:30 p.m., free

his reality show on AMC, “Comic Book Men.” His mid-brow, stoner-ish comedy has caused his fanbase to adore him even further. Smith has held many funny Q&A sessions with fans, even releasing a movie in 2002 featuring highlights of his Q&A tour across a few American colleges. With Thursday night’s event sharing the same title as Smith’s Q&A flick, much of the same witty Smith can be expected.

WED

18

Short Films from the 2017 Ashland Independent Film Festival at JSMA, 7 p.m., free


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. COVER

FORMER ‘NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC’ PHOTOGRAPHER

DENNIS DIMICK VISITS UO

BY MAX EGENER

Dennis Dimick speaks to a crowd about the impact of climate change. (Courtesy of Dennis Dimick)

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Major Sponsor:

Spring

CAREER FAIR

WEEK

APRIL 16–19, 2018 career.uoregon.edu Contributing Sponsor: EO/AA/ADA institution committed to cultural diversity. Accommodations for people with disabilities will be provided if requested in advance by calling 541-346-4676.

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Get Ready BEFORE

Scoping it out • Browse through the attending employers list and research organizations that interest you. • Set a goal such as talking to one employer or leaving with a better understanding of how the fair works. Your goal will help you stay focused and avoid getting overwhelmed. • Review your résumé and skill set with a professional in the Career Center.

Spring

CAREER APRIL 18

FAIR

EMU BALLROOM NOON–4:00 P.M.

Seeking Job or Internship • Make a list of the top 5–10 companies or organizations you want to talk to. Do some research to understand what their organization is about and available opportunities. • Write out and practice your answer to “tell me about yourself” or your introduction speech. Employers want to get to know you at the fair just as much as you want to get to know them. Reflect on your skills, experiences, and characteristics and put together a concise answer.

AFTER

DURING

• Prepare questions for the employers. Balance asking technical questions like, “When is the deadline to apply?” and “What qualifications are you looking for?” with exploratory questions like, “What is the culture like at your organization?” or “What do you like most about working here?”

• Career Center staff attend every career fair to answer your questions and guide you through the fair. • Spend the first 10–15 minutes walking through the fair. It is perfectly okay to do your first round without talking to anyone. • Start conversations. Be confident and remember there are many employers to talk to if your first conversation does not go as you hoped.

• Find the employers you are interested in talking to on the map. • Start conversations with employers and talk about your skills and experiences, what you’re interested in, and ask questions. • Do not get discouraged if the companies you are interested in are not offering internships or full-time positions at the time. The most important thing is to build a positive relationship with them and follow up.

• Get contact information from the employers you connect with.

• Be sure to get contact information from the employers you connect with.

• Send thank you emails to the employers you connected with. Even if you’re not looking for a job or internship opportunity right now, this builds relationships and creates a good impression for when you are looking.

• Follow up. Send thank you emails to the employers you met. Let them know if you apply to a position they have open. Include something about yourself and the conversation you had to remind them who you are.

• Meet with a professional at the Career Center. Debrief how the fair went and determine what your next steps should be.

• Prepare for interviews by setting up a practice interview at the Career Center. • Follow up, again! Stay in contact with employers. Periodically send an email letting them know you’re still interested and excited about their organization. Periodic follow-ups will keep you in the employer’s mind—they meet a lot of people, and you want them to remember you.

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CAREER FAIR WEEK

Sunday JC Penney SUIT UP 11:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m. Valley River Center Monday–Thursday Drop-In Advising 1:30–3:30 p.m. Career Center Monday Presentation Workshop 5:15–6:15 p.m. Career Center Tuesday Résumé Check with participating companies 11:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m. Rec Center Spring Networking Night 5:00–7:00 p.m. EMU Ballroom Wednesday Spring Career Fair noon–4:00 p.m. EMU Ballroom

APRIL 15–19

Thursday Spring Fair Interviews 9:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m. EMU Ballroom

PEER ADVISING Want to prepare for the upcoming Career Fair and other career events? Come by the Career Center and see a peer advisor! In peer advising, trained student employees offer drop-in advising to discuss different career topics including résumés, cover letters, and the job search process.

Benefits of Peer Advising • More advising hours—drop-in advising allows you to speak with an advisor without an appointment • Talking with a fellow student can be less intimidating than speaking to a full-time professional advisor • Peer advisors can discuss their personal experiences with applying and participating in jobs and internships If you would like to see a peer advisor during the spring 2018 term, come to the Career Center (220 Hendricks Hall) and drop in for a 15-minute session Mondays–Fridays, 1:30–3:30 p.m. If you have questions about the peer advising program or would like to connect with a peer advisor: Contact a peer advisor at ccpeeradvisor@uoregon.edu

WANT CREDIT FOR YOUR INTERNSHIP?

ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS The following employers will attend the Career Fair on April 18 as well as conduct interviews on April 19. Take this opportunity to network with professionals and follow up with real interviews that could lead to your future career. Sign up on Duck Connect at career.uoregon.edu/duckconnect

Career Fair Week Interviews Thursday, April 19 Amica Buckeye International Cintas Country Financial Enterprise Rent-A-Car Igus Insight Global RISE Services Rite Hite Corporation Techtronic Industries Xezo Questions? Contact Tina Haynes, On-Campus Recruiting Coordinator, at 541-346-6006

Find out how at career.uoregon.edu/internshipcredit

Thank You to the Career Center Partners

Titanium Partners

Gold Partners

Silver Partners

Fisher Investments United States Marine Corps

Alsco PacificSource Health Plans Sherwin Williams TEKsystems Willamette University Early Career MBA

Boly:Welch

Platinum Partners Country Financial Enterprise Rent-a-Car Oregon Community Credit Union Fred Meyer/Kroger

Bronze Partners Alacrity Foresters Financial Target Corporation

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INVEST IN YOUR

FUTURE

Public Safety Career Fair APRIL 20th - April 21st 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

APPLY TODAY Graduate Programs

• M.A. Criminal Justice • M.A. Interpreting Studies

SEASONAL JOBS

Now Hiring for the City of Eugene Public Works Division

Oregon Public Safety Academy

• M.A. Teaching (Initial License)

to schedule interview 4190 Call Aumsville Hwy SEan Salem, OR 97317

(541) 683-1757

• M.M. Contemporary Music

Meet recruiters from city, state, county, tribal and federal public safety agencies, recruiting to fill o�er ��� positions statewide. Discover job opportunities in public safety for both sworn and non-sworn positions

• M.S. in Education • M.S. in Ed. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education • M.S. in Ed. Information Technology

Public Safety Career Fair Daily scheduled panel April 20th - April 21st

• M.S. in Ed. Special Education • M.S. Management and Information Systems

discussions with those in the 10a.m. - 2 p.m. profession

• M.S. Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling • Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Specialization • Elementary Mathematics Instructional Leader Specialization/ Certificate • ESOL Endorsement/Certificate • Instructional Design Certificate • Reading Endorsement/Certificate

wou.edu/grad Questions:

graduateprograms@wou.edu

TOGETHER WE

SUCCEED

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Meet recruiters from city, state, county, tribal and federal public safety agencies, recruiting to fill over 500 positions statewide. Discover job opportunities in public safety for both sworn and non-sworn positions Daily scheduled panel discussions with those in the profession

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The Newsroom News Reporters

Help inform the UO community

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Arts & Culture Reporters Connect students to art and events.

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campus stories with video. The PhotoBooth is a customized backdropped photo set-up thatTell allows guests Emerald is moments in time. The PhotoBooth has been a staple of at your Photobooth events to capture looking PhotoBooth isforapersonable, customized photo set-up allows guests the Emerald Media Groupand for backdropped 3 years and has continued to grow inthat popularity hard working students withto thecapture community. We to can helpinyou set up anywhere and give your our events moments time. The PhotoBooth hasguests beenana staple of join our team! amazing experience and honestly quite a fun one too. We create custom props Emerald and Media yearsfilmand has grow in popularity print Group all photosfor onto3 special strips, justcontinued like we used to to get as kids. Create client and in-house promotional videos. Responsibilties Include: h the community. We can help you set up anywhere and give your guests an • Event Set Up azing experience andAttendees honestly quite a fun one too. We create custom props • Photographing Collaborate on brand and layout projects. • Printing Out Images print all photos onto special film strips, just like we used to get as kids. PHOTOBOOTH (2 HOURS) HEADSHOTS • Enthusiastic, Upbeat Attitude

Business Departments Videographers

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Bicycle $500Delivery /Street Teams

Distribute publications across campus and Eugene. is a customized backdropped photo set-up guests Emerald Photobooth looking for a UO Departments $650thatisallows o capture moments in time. The PhotoBooth been aof staple of creative designer inhas charge making UO and has $750 dia Group Outside for 3 years to grow popularity funcontinued photo props andinbackdrops. Boost engagement and plan in-house marketing. nity. We can help you set up anywhere and give your guests an $550 nt Groups Extra Hour 1 Hour $300 nce and honestly quite a fun one too. We$100 create custom props PHOTOS/EVENTS CANDID otos onto special strips, just like we used to get as kids. Emailfilm spuccinelli@dailyemerald.com or

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Where Ducks go to earn their MBA Join us at the Fall Career Fair on April Nov. 9 14th February 18th University of Oregon graduates admitted to Willamette’s Early Career and Career Change MBA Program are eligible for our Pacific Northwest merit scholarship, ranging from $19,000 to full tuition. “Getting my MBA degree after graduating from UO Business School was one of the best decisions I have made.” — Ina Song UO’15, Willamette MBA’17

willamette.edu/mba

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Spring

CAREER APRIL 18

FAIR

Check-In

EMU BALLROOM NOON–4:00 P.M.

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Ballroom Lobby

Career Center Partners

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Event Services

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Corporate Organizations 35

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Government Organizations 60

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All Star Labor & Staffing Alsco, Inc. American International Forest Products Amica Mutual Insurance Antra Inc Apex Asante AXA Advisors Bankers Life

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Black Diamond Camps Bridgeway Recovery Services Buckeye International CampusPoint Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare CINTAS City of Eugene College Possible Consolidated Electrical Distributors

83 37 36 71 57 1 38 61 6 60 54 8 45 17

Coquille High School COUNTRY Financial Coyote Logistics DiscoverOrg E & J Gallo Winery Emerald Media Group Enterprise Rent-A-Car Environment Oregon Eugene Area Radio Stations, EARS Eugene Emeralds (Ems) Baseball Club Expensify FBI Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Fisher Investments

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Foresters Financial Gozzer Ranch Golf and Lake Club GroupM HELP International High Desert Trading Inc. igus Inc. Independent Environments, Inc. Insight Global Jackson Family Wines. Kelley Imaging Systems Lane County Government Lane United Football Club Looking Glass moovel NA Morgan Stanley Mu Sigma Inc NAVEX Global Nearby Nature Northwest Youth Corps Oath OneMain Financial Options Counseling and Family Services Oregon Community Credit Union Oregon State University OSPIRG Pacific Capital Resource Group Pacific Office Automation PacificSource Pentagon Federal Credit Union Portland Fire & Rescue Portland Police Bureau Richardson Sports Rise Services Inc Rite Hite Corporation-Arbon Equipment Corp. Riverside Homes, LLC Shadow Hills Country Club ShelterCare Song Sells Homes LLC. TSA Techtronic Industries, NA (TTI) TEKsystems The Hershey Company The Hertz Corporation United Rentals, Inc. University of Oregon University of Oregon Education Studies UO Army ROTC UO Housing US Army US Navy Recruiting Portland USMC OFFICER PROGRAM Vector Marketing Willamette University Early Career MBA Wyndham Vacation Ownership Xezo

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Practice

INTERVIEW WITH REAL EMPLOYERS Nike April 30

Peace Corps May 15

Jerry’s Home Improvement Center May 2

E & J Gallo Winery May 16

Foresters Financial May 3 

US Air Force May 29 

phone interview

career.uoregon.edu/practiceinterviews


Dimick is motivated to work with SOJC students on finding ways to craft stories about our backyard ecosystem’s changing conditions. (Courtesy of Dennis Dimick)

When former National Geographic photographer and executive environment editor, Dennis Dimick, flies across the United States, he tries to get a window seat. He hopes for clear skies over areas facing unprecedented water, snowpack and land use challenges, such as the Southwest. Sometimes he gets a chance to take a photo of the Earth from above with his iPhone. Although he’s a reluctant flier because commercial jets burn large amounts of fuel, he says those rare flights are a bonus opportunity to document how people are changing the landscape. Dimick visited the University of Oregon last week to discuss what some scientists are calling the “Anthropocene” — a new geologic era defined by the ability to detect human impact in sediment records anywhere on the globe millions of years into the future. His visit included attending undergraduate and graduate classes, a rafting day trip down the McKenzie River and a lecture titled “The Human Age: Our Anthropocene Conundrum.” The UO School of Journalism and Communication Media Center for Science and Technology, which launched in the fall of 2017, invited Dimick back to his home state for the week. Since he left National Geographic in 2015, Dimick has worked to inspire the next generation of environmental photojournalists. He travels the country meeting with

college students and giving lectures at universities and conferences. He sees it as his duty to pass on the knowledge he has gained throughout his career. The natural world looks different than it did when Dimick was young, and he believes it’s important for people to document that change. Dimick grew up on a hay and sheep farm just south of Lake Oswego, Oregon. As a kid, he wanted to be a forest ranger. When he was 8 years old, he mailed a letter to the Forest Service asking to be stationed in one of Oregon’s many forest fire lookouts for the summer. The Service wrote back and graciously told him to come back in 10 years. As a teenager, Dimick baled hay on his family’s farm to pay for school at Oregon State University, where he majored in general agriculture. At the end of his freshman year, Dimick bought a camera, and his lifelong passion for photography began. “I was inspired by my beginnings on the landscape, as well as my education,” Dimick said during his lecture. “But early on, I learned that the things we perceive as injuries or insults can be a part of what people become.” In the early 1980s, the Federal Highway Administration began construction of Interstate 205, which now runs between Oregon and Washington. Dimick’s family had to turn over 37 acres of its farm to the federal government for the project. “With progress there is a price, and that became a very visceral truth for

SOJC students gather at Clear Lake Campground to discuss how the changing climate is affecting the McKenzie River Watershed. (Couresy of Dennis Dimick)

me at a young age,” Dimick said. Early in his career, Dimick worked as a photographer for several newspapers, including the “NewsRegister” in McMinnville, Oregon, the “East Oregonian” in Pendleton and the “Union-Bulletin” in Walla Walla, Washington. Dimick ended his newspaper work at the “CourierJournal” in Louisville, Kentucky. In 1980, he started working for “National Geographic” as a photographer. During his 35-year tenure at the magazine, Dimick worked on projects exploring how humans are transforming the planet in the name of progress. His work earned him some of the most prestigious photography awards in the U.S., including the National Press Photographers Association’s Joseph A. Sprague Memorial Award. “People don’t know where their water comes from,” Dimick said. “They don’t know where their food comes from; they don’t know where their energy comes from.” Dimick said that National Geographic was trying to artfully show people where their everyday resources come from. Dimick and his former National Geographic colleague, Jim Richardson, recently launched the “Eyes on Earth” project. They write about their experiences at National Geographic on the project’s website and provide advice to aspiring environmental photojournalists. The website also features plenty of inspirational photos. He says young people trying

to start a career in the industry should focus on photographing environments that show cause and effect and tell a story all in one photo. “Causation is the reason or force creating change,” writes Dimick on the Eyes on Earth website. “Pictures of environmental effects are relatively easy. Pictures of causation are difficult — but immensely more powerful.” Dimick says he thinks photography has the potential to affect people like no other medium can. He says people, including him, respond viscerally to photos that tell a story and reveal changes in the environment. According to Dimick, there’s value in showing people across the Southwest U.S. how people are living in Cape Town, South Africa, for example. He thinks the lifestyle in Cape Town can teach Americans in the Southwest important lessons about living in an increasingly waterdeprived region. During the Q&A session following Dimick’s lecture, a student asked him whether or not he’s optimistic about the planet’s environmental future. “Yeah I am, because you people are here,” Dimick said referring to the room of students. Many people in the audience laughed at his answer. “No seriously,” Dimick said. “I can list off the ten best ways individuals can help fight climate change, but you all are going to be the next generation of policy-makers and storytellers.”

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BECOMES

Design Interns Needed!

Learn first hand the ins and outs of a professional creative department while training to be a layout designer for Emerald Business Publications

dailyemerald.com/engage M O N D AY, A P R I L 1 6 , 2 0 1 8

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FUN & GAMES: CROSSWORD

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DOWN 1 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee with only one Top 40 hit 2 British ___ 3 Sign of puberty, maybe 4 For example 5 Certain horror film villain 6 Alma mater for David Cameron

7 Site of slippage … both geographically and in this puzzle 8 Thorough 9 “Make some ___!” 10 Calorie-heavy dessert 11 Richard ___, “War Zone Diary” journalist 12 What womanizers do 15 Glistening, as Christmas ornaments 21 Haunted house sounds 24 Actor Maguire 26 Lead-in to plane 28 Site of a piercing 29 Forest female 30 ___ Burgundy, the anchorman in “Anchorman” 33 Splenda competitor 34 Make pieces of pieces? 35 OPEC member: Abbr. 36 Barrett of Pink Floyd 38 ___ Israel Medical Center 39 Experiment site 42 The speed of sound 44 See 46-Down 46 With 44-Down, “key” invention of the 1830s 47 500 people? 48 Carefully examine

49 Appeared 50 Something to pare, informally 52 Genesis locale 53 Blocked vessel opener 54 Tore 56 Agenda part 60 One of the Bushes

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1 Flies (along) 5 Clutter 8 What spies collect 13 Voyaging 14 Flaming Gorge locale 16 Who has scored more than 850 points in an official Scrabble game 17 Frolic 18 “Beloved” author Morrison 19 Bagpipe music, maybe 20 Delt neighbor 21 You might slip on it 22 Fragrant compound 23 Lucy ___, title character in Sir Walter Scott’s “The Bride of Lammermoor” 25 Security Council veto 27 Sure-___ 29 Shellacs 31 First name in folk 32 ___ factor 37 Drippings, maybe 38 City in southern California 40 Unloading point 41 Food processor? 43 Overseas

44 Like some numbers and beef 45 Bill producers, for short 48 You might slip on it 51 Extemporizes 54 Theater’s ___ Siddons Award 55 Assign stars to 57 Distillery sight 58 Prefix with type 59 Plaintiff 60 Agree 61 Western German city 62 Shade providers 63 Genesis locale 64 Big name in tractors 65 ___-square 66 Wallop

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I N T S N O O H D I R I E S T N A P E E Y E T R H E S L O Q U A C U B B R O A D A D L I C E V E J I R E D S B E

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S M E S A U T A Y T O N B A N A T O N N O O T E D B S A R E B R E Y M E A A T M S C H O F H R A O S U N E L E T

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@greeneugenemag

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04/16/18 Emerald Media - Monday Edition  
04/16/18 Emerald Media - Monday Edition