Issuu on Google+

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

D A I LY E M E R A L D . C O M

" MUSIC

VINTAGE GUITAR HEROES FOUNDED IN 1981, MCKENZIE RIVER MUSIC SPECIALIZES IN VINTAGE GUITARS.

Despite its expensive taste, the store also sells affordable stringed instruments for Eugene’s newest music enthusiasts

M A R K S : S T O P T H E T E X A S B AT H R O O M B I L L

!

R U T H Y H E BA R D’ S I M P R E SS I VE F R E S H M A N YE A R

!

I D E N T I F Y I N G D I S C R I M I N AT I O N PA R T : I V


OPEN 6AM - 8PM WED - SUN 6AM - 3PM MON - TUE

WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS!

NOW USING HUNGRY DUCKS

GLUTEN FREE PANCAKES!

OPEN SINCE 1965

Photo by Michael Shaw

MORE COVERAGE, MORE PHOTOS,

MORE DISCOVERY. 541-343-7523 • 782 East Broadway, Eugene

Corner of Alder & Franklin Blvd. ADDITIONAL PARKING BEHIND CAFE YUMM! (WEEKENDS ONLY LOOK FOR SIGN) PA G E 2

|

EMERALD

|

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

Plus reader polls, videos, and reader comments.

We give you more, and that makes college better.

www.dailyemerald.com


EMERALD MEDIA GROUP

NEWS

According to the ID Card Services website, the following schedule indicates when students, faculty and staff can pick up their cards:

!e new ID card design that will be implemented this Fall. (Courtesy of UO)

NEW UO ID CARDS REQUIRED STARTING IN MAY # EMMA

!e Emerald is published by Emerald Media Group, Inc., the independent nonprofit media company at the University of Oregon. Formerly the Oregon Daily Emerald, the news organization was founded in 1900.

GET IN TOUCH EMERALD MEDIA GROUP 1395 UNIVERSITY ST., #302 EUGENE, OR 97403 541.346.5511

Masters/PhD

Seniors

Last name A–M: March 6–10

Last name A–M: Jan. 9–13

Last name N–Z: March 13–17

Last name N–Z: Jan 16–20

Faculty and Staff:

Juniors

Last name A–B: Jan. 9–13

Last name A–M: Jan. 23–27

Last name C: Jan. 16–20

Last name N–Z: Jan 30–Feb. 3

Last name D–E: Jan. 23–27

Sophomores

Last name F–G: Jan. 30–Feb. 3

Last name A–M: Feb. 6–10

Last name H–J: Feb. 6–10

Last name N–Z: Feb. 13–17

Last name K–L: Feb. 13–17

First Year

Last name M: Feb. 20–24

Last name A–M: Feb. 20–24

Last name N–O: Feb. 27–March 3

Last name N–Z: Feb. 27–March 3

Last name P–R: March 6–10

Law

Last name S: March 13–17

Jan. 9–13

Last name T–Z: March 20–24

HENDERSON

Starting this term, University of Oregon ID Card Services will be giving out new, pre-printed ID cards to all students, faculty and staff. !e old ID cards will not work anywhere after May 1. From January 10 to March 24, students can pick up new ID cards for free if they bring their old ID. !e ID Card Services desk has scheduled blocks of time to avoid long wait times. !e schedule is based on an individual’s last name for UO employees, and by year for students — freshman, sophomore, junior or senior. Seniors are scheduled to pick up their IDs at the beginning of the term, then juniors and sophomores, and finally first-year students can get their new ID at the end of the term. !e website also instructs individuals who missed their scheduled block to pick up their new cards after the distribution period has ended, on March 24.

VO L . 1 1 8 , I S S U E N O. 4 1

Students:

NEWSROOM EDITOR IN CHIEF COOPER GREEN X325 EMAIL: EDITOR@DAILYEMERALD.COM PRINT MANAGING EDITOR BRAEDON KWIECIEN DIGITAL MANAGING EDITOR MEERAH POWELL ART DIRECTOR RAQUEL ORTEGA MANAGING PRODUCER CHRISTOPHER TROTCHIE OUTREACH DIRECTOR ANNA LIEBERMAN

“!ey’re pre-printed, so it’s just a matter of handing in your old one and getting your new one,” said Laurie Woodward, EMU director. “If it were me I would go early in the morning or later in the afternoon when the lines are less likely to be long.” UO students, faculty and staff in Eugene can get their new ID at the ID Card Services office (located on the bottom floor of the EMU) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Students, faculty and staff in Portland can get their new ID at the White Stag Building. Students at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology can exchange their ID cards at the Charleston campus, according to an AroundtheO press release. After the deadline, the old ID cards will be deactivated. !e old ID will no longer function as a pass for the bus, for campus cash, for parking, or to open doors, Woodward said.

ENGAGEMENT EDITOR MARK KELLMAN NEWS EDITORS NOAH MCGRAW MAX THORNBERRY WILL CAMPBELL A&C EDITORS CRAIG WRIGHT CARLEIGH OETH MATHEW BROCK OPINION EDITOR ALEC COWAN SPORTS EDITORS KENNY JACOBY JONATHAN HAWTHORNE JARRID DENNEY

!e new ID card has an illustration of the UO campus and has the SAFE hotline on the back. UO student Kathleen Darby designed the new card, after winning a campus-wide contest to update the ten-year-old design. A group of students and staff chose the new look, all with experience in graphic design, Woodward said. UO ID ard services will also be offering a new community card for people who use University of Oregon services, but are not students, faculty or staff, such as spouses and people with campus recreation passes, Woodward said. !e card recognizes you as a member of the university community, but is white instead of green. “We’d updated the university look in so many ways and the ID card is the first thing that you get that says you are a duck,” Woodward said. “It’s your official ‘I belong at the University of Oregon,’ and we wanted it to reflect today’s campus.”

PODCAST EDITORS FRANZISKA MONAHAN EMERSON MALONE

BUSINESS

WEB EDITOR PERI LANGOLIS

CHARLIE WEAVER X317 EMAIL: CHARLIE@DAILYEMERALD.COM

VIDEO EDITOR KYLIE DAVIS

VP OPERATIONS KATHY CARBONE X302 EMAIL: KCARBONE@DAILYEMERALD.COM

PHOTO EDITOR ADAM EBERHARDT DESIGNER EMILY HARRIS KELLY KONDO STACY YURISHICHEVA

PUBLISHER & PRESIDENT

DIRECTOR OF SALES AND MARKETING LINDSEY SMITH X303 EMAIL: ADS@DAILYEMERALD.COM CREATIVE DIRECTOR NICOLE PETROCCIONE X303 EMAIL: CREATIVE@DAILYEMERALD.COM

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES GREG BUTLER TAYLOR BRADBURY CARSON BIERAUGEL KYLE BESA RUBEN ESTRADA

ON THE COVER

A wall of guitars at Mckenzie River Guitar Shop. Photo by Samuel Marshall

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

|

EMERALD

|

PA G E 3


Portland Airport Transportation Since 1973

NO HASSLE BUS SERVICE, EVERY 2 HOURS, EVERY DAY Small enough to meet your neighbor, Big enough to meet your needs

One of America’s Top 12 GMO-Free Stores! – The Organic Consumers Association

All Organic: • Soups • Salads • Hot Entrées • Baked Goods • Raw Juice • Produce (or wildcrafted) Local merchants, the heart of our community

Transportation between Phoenix Inn, Eugene & Portland Airport

Reservations Required

541-33-GO-HUT (541-334-6488) HUTSHUTTLE.COM 24th & Hilyard 541-343-9142 open daily 7am-11pm (deli hours 11am-8pm)

A Eugene Tradition Since 1971

FREE WIFI!

Try our Burritos

Fresh, Fast Food with Flavor!

Hot Food Bar Salad Bar Entrées Pizza i h s Poke Bar u S h s e Fr y Deli Salads a w A e Soup Bar k a Gourmet T Sandwiches

MOC 143

BUY 1 BURRITO or BURRITO BOWL GET 1/2 OFF A SECOND ONE OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE GOOD THROUGH 1-31-17. LIMIT ONE PER VISIT.

OF CHOICE M7 am RKET - 12 am daily • 1960 Franklin Blvd.

1960 Franklin Blvd. Eugene, OR 97403 541.687.1188 PA G E 4

|

EMERALD

|

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT DAILY

541-687-1188 Coupon must be presented at time of purchase.

Redeemable at our FRANKLIN store ONLY.


EMERALD MEDIA GROUP

&

ARTS

CULTURE

Stage-to-screen adaptations like Denzel Washington’s recent project ‘Fences’ strive to find a balance between the limits of both film and theatre. (Image courtesy of Paramount Pictures)

‘Fences’ and ‘Angels in America’ make the case for stage-to-screen adaptations # SARAROSA

D AV I E S , @ S R O S I E D O S I E

!eatre is an art form that has been around for thousands of years with its origins in Ancient Greece. !e theatre’s counterpart, film, has had a relatively short history with the first movies being made in the late 1800s. Filmmakers and TV producers have been adapting theatrical works like plays and musicals to fit the big screen as long as the art form has been around. Stage-to-screen adaptations need to work out a balance between the original integrity of the stage production and the spectrum of choices available in film. !eatre is generally confined to a stage which limits what is physically possible for the setting and actors while film allows for more variables to be manipulated. Stage-to-screen adaptations have the potential to damage both the movie and original play’s reputation, but they also have the potential to elevate it. Fences by August Wilson and Angels in America by Tony Kushner don’t just function separately as theatre and film, but they make the case for the existence of stage-to-screen adaptations. Angels in America, a Tony award winning, twopart play about the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, was adapted for an HBO miniseries in 2003. It

received mixed reviews. While the whole play runs about seven hours and requires two separate visits to the theater, the miniseries is separated into six episodes that run about an hour each. !e screen adaptation may take less time to watch than the actual play, but it is split up so each episode can be consumed at a different rate. !is is fundamentally different than the experience of watching theatre. Yet, there are other ways in which the HBO adaptation succeeds in reproducing Angels in a theatrical manner. In Slate’s oral history of Kushner’s play, New York Times theatre critic Frank Rich says, “It’s one of the very, very few successful film adaptations of a major American play.” By using household names like Meryl Streep and Al Pacino, along with stage actors like Jeffrey Wright and Justin Kirk, director Mike Nichols found a way to meld the acting styles required of theatre and film. Nichols made a screen adaptation that still carried the dramatic weight of the original production. Denzel Washington’s adaptation of the Pulitzer prize winning play Fences is a recent adaptation that keeps the physical aesthetic of a play while

also succeeding as a movie. Fences has a relatively simple setting. !e only location seen is the backyard of a house. While other locations are discussed, the action happens in the same spot. Washington’s 2016 adaptation of the play also keeps the location simple, rather than choosing to change the play and make it ‘fit the screen.’ !e majority of the movie’s action happens in the same backyard that the play features. While there are three or four cutaways to other locations and one montage, they feel purposeful and add to the intensity of the acting. !e film version of Fences also features cinematography focused on the actor’s bodies. !e physicality the actors portray in Fences mirrors the grandiose ways in which theatre actors move. A scene where Denzel Washington’s character, Troy Maxson, swings a baseball bat at his son is electric because of the ways the camera focuses on Washington’s arms and their movement. Both Fences and Angels in America stand out as reasons that stage-to-screen adaptations should exist, even if most adaptations don’t rise to the occasion of the original play.

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

|

EMERALD

|

PA G E 5


" MUSIC

Emerald Recommends: Best Songs of 2016 Although 2016’s musical legacy is bound to be remembered more for the stars that died than the actual music itself, there was no shortage of great songs created. !e Emerald’s music writers have selected their favorite songs of the recently concluded year.

“Shut Up Kiss Me” - Angel Olsen Here’s the jam: sometimes you want to preserve a relationship that’s more trouble than it’s worth; sometimes communication in a tender love affair is distressing and liberating in equal measure. !is sentiment is scarcely as beautifully delivered as it is in this cut from Angel Olsen’s My Woman. !e perilous nature of love is being filtered through Olsen’s strained vocal chords: “At your worst I still believe it’s worth the fight / I could make it all go away / Tell me what you think and don’t delay / We could still

#

be having some sweet memories / !is heart still beats for you / Why can’t you see?” If nothing else, “Shut Up Kiss Me” is a plea for attention, an admission of vulnerability and a heartfelt need for respect. “Stop pretending I’m not there, when it’s clear I’m not going anywhere,” her voice shakes. “Shut up! Kiss me! Hold me tight!” she persistently cries, wanting to push away and embrace her lover all at once. Love, as it were, may be a battlefield, but it makes for an amazing pop song.

EMERSON MALONE

“ Suede” -by Nxworries (Anderson Paak. & Knxwledge collaboration) Coming off of Nxworries debut LP, Yes Lawd!, Suede features R&B singer Anderson Paak.’s smooth vocals and is complemented by legendary LA producer Knxwledge’s groovy beat. The song’s lyrics describe Paak.’s somewhat unique relationships with his female companions. He uses car parts as metaphors for sexual innuendos in the first verse, while

the chorus explains that when he calls his women “bitches” he doesn’t mean any offense. Allowing the beat room to breath, Paak. picks when, and more importantly, when not to sing. Giving his cadence perfect timing on this track. This song earned the top spot of my list because of it’s upbeat, west coast style and it’s catchy chorus.

ZACH PRICE

#

“Fill in the Blank” - Car Seat Headrest “I’m so sick of fill in the blank/accomplish more, accomplish nothing,” Will Toledo practically yelps in the opening track of Teens of Denial. University of Oregon grad Andrew Katz’s frantic drumming and Toledo’s fuzzy riffs move the song forward to the climax: “You have no right to be depressed/you haven’t tried hard enough to like it.” “Fill in the Blank” is a song for those moments of

#

catharsis that 2016 was full of. It’s a song that fits its album, its time and its place. It stands at the top because of the way it exists inside and outside of the context it was born in. 2016 was a year for fuzzy guitar riffs and lyrics detailing angst, and 2017 might need those sounds, too. Car Seat Headrest’s “Fill in the Blank” is my song of 2016 because it can and will exist long after Dec. 31 rolls by.

S A R A R O S A D AV I E S

“Hands Together” -The I Don’t Cares Paul Westerberg has been a world-class songwriter since his days with the Replacements, but rarely have his lyrics packed such a devastating punch. On “Hands Together,” the closing song on Wild Stab, Westerberg analyzes his life by taking inventory of his relationship with household items including “a cup of coffee that likes to be called a mug,” the TV, newspapers and, most hauntingly, the bed he alone occupies after a divorce in 2014: “The pillows are exhausted to hold my head again so soon / The dreams I had before are now too bored to even show up / And the blankets are embarrassed / It’s only me that

#

they cover up.” Westerberg sings like he’s telling a secret he’s not entirely comfortable sharing, but the 12-string guitars and I Don’t Cares’ partner Juliana Hatfield allow him ample freedom to navigate his thoughts. It’s chock full of witticisms and sarcastic self-deprecation, but in the end, Westerberg seems to conclude that loneliness is an inherent part of the world: “Give my regards to midnight / Tell him he ain’t changed a bit / Long, tall, dark and handsome, still lonely as shit.” “Hands Together” is easily the best song Westerberg has written since 1987’s “Can’t Hardly Wait.”

CRAIG WRIGHT (All pictures Courtesy of Creative Commons)

PA G E 6

|

EMERALD

|

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7


No Place Like

home

Join the Emerald and find your new perfect place!

February 15th 11 am - 4 pm Ford Alumni Center

live it up with T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

|

EMERALD

|

PA G E 7


$ COVER

Mckenzie Music Matchmakers #CRAIG

W R I G H T, @ WG WC R A I G

With a dirty white cinder block exterior and a blue awning over the modest front entrance, Eugene’s nationally renowned guitar and instrument shop, Mckenzie River Music, boasts a large selection of vintage and high-end guitars, basses and various string instruments. Due to the recent snow and ice storm, two humidifiers run in the main room to maintain a humidity level appropriate for the storage of guitars. !e main room is lined by four walls of floor-to-ceiling guitar racks. !e glass counters on the right side of the store hold a selection of new and used effects pedals, electronics and various other gear and accessories. McKenzie River Music was founded in 1981 by Bob November, a Southern California transplant. !e shop was located across from Max’s Tavern, but has since moved to 11th Ave. Prior to coming to Eugene, November was a musical instrument dealer at Bob’s House Of Guitars, where he had developed a keen sense of knowledge regarding vintage guitars, especially Martins, one of the most valuable guitar brands available. His knowledge of Martin guitars put him into contact with Charlie Longstreth, a luthier, or a stringed instrument care and repair specialist, who still works at the shop doing custom set-ups for patrons who are looking for that perfectsounding instrument. Longstreth met November through the sale of a Martin guitar that a family was fighting over. !e owner wanted to sell his guitar rather than give it to either family member that demanded the instrument. “He was an older guy, and he couldn’t pick someone to give it to and said he was just gonna sell it,” said Longstreth. “I was sorta the broker to put those two together and that’s how I met Bob.” Longstreth and November’s introduction led to Longstreth eventually being offered a part-time job. Between 1982 and 1990, Longstreth split his

Mark Schneider (left) and Arte Leider (right) play guitars in their shop on Jan. 11, 2017 in Eugene, Oregon. (Samuel Marshall)

Guitars hanging in the McKenzie River Music Shop. (Samuel Marshall)

PA G E 8

|

EMERALD

|

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7


Emerald Media Group

CAL

NDAR

Jan. 12- 19

This weekend in Portland:

Author and musician Franz Nicolay to speak at Powells books Friday January 13th

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

|

E ME R A L D C A L E N DA R

|

PA G E 1


" CALENDAR

Franz Nicolay: Author, Musician and “professional traveler” Franz Nicolay. (Creative Commons)

!

C R A I G W R I G H T, @ WG WC R A I G

On Friday, Jan. 13 author, musician and “professional traveler” Franz Nicolay will speak with fellow author Cari Luna at Powell’s City of Books in Portland. Nicolay is best known as the sharply-dressed multiinstrumentalist for bands such as !e Hold Steady, !e World/Inferno Friendship Society and Against Me!, but he recently released his first book !e Humorless Ladies of Border Control: Touring the Punk Underground from Belgrade to Ulaanbaatar. Armed with an accordion, a banjo, a guitar and a suitcase of merchandise, Nicolay and his wife Maria played for audiences across the former Communist world that often did not speak the same language as him. !e Emerald spoke to Nicolay about his experience traveling, rejoining the Hold Steady, and Nicolay’s future plans ahead of Friday’s book talk. Emerald: Has traveling always been something that interests you? Nicolay: Absolutely. I mean, I grew up in a really small rural town in northern New Hampshire, and we didn’t get out much. So basically I moved to New York when I was 17, which at that point was about as far away as I could get psychologically without getting too far physically, just in case something went terribly wrong. E: A lot of !e Humorless Ladies seems to talk about how you see the world differently after traveling. Do you think travel is something that makes us rethink how we view the world?

PA G E 2

|

E ME R A L D C A L E N DA R

|

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

N: Oh absolutely. I mean any time you can get outside, especially when you’re talking about the way in which you see your own country, any time you can get outside, perspective is absolutely invaluable. !at’s the biggest thing I think about some of the reactionary voices we hear in American politics now is that there’s no sense of what America looks like from the outside. E: So obviously a few years ago you left the Hold Steady, which has an incredibly passionate fan base. In the book you said you wanted to go play for people who might not even speak the same language as you. !at seems like the ultimate musical challenge, so what made you want to do that? N: I needed another challenge as a performer ... If you’re playing for people who already know and love the band, the fix is this: Even if you play a shitty show, they’re probably going to love it. So in a way you’re not just stripping away the rest of the band, you’re stripping away the volume and the noise, but also stripping away having fans in a lot of cases. It seemed like the next logical step to push myself was to strip away all that stuff that was artificially propping up my idea of myself as a performer, so strip away all the volume, strip away the pomp and circumstance of a rock show, even strip away an audience that had any idea of who I was or why I was there. E: So then how did that compare to when you rejoined the Hold Steady in December for the 10th anniversary of Boy and Girls In America? What did it feel like to go back into

that band where the fans know every word to every song? N: Well it’s a lot of fun, of course. It didn’t seem as weird as I thought it would. It felt like slipping into comfortable shoes. It didn’t feel entirely like just rehashing all the old stuff because Steve Selvidge [guitar] was there. And so there was all this new stuff that we could figure out how to play. It wasn’t exactly everything that I did 10 years ago. It’s music that I’m proud of, and it’s super fun, and I was glad to have a chance to roll it out again and have that feeling again. E: Does the Hold Steady have any future plans that you might be a part of? N: I mean at this point we were just focusing on enjoying that weekend, that’s all I can say. !ere’s literally nothing else on the calendar. We’ll see where it goes. Nothing on the calendar, but nothing ruled out either. !ere haven’t been any conversations of any sort. E: Do you have any projects you’re currently working on? N: I’m writing a novel. I have two more book projects in the works. So those are the action items right now. New projects always present themselves. I can never let a project just go by the wayside once I’ve thought of it. E: What’s the novel about? N: I’d prefer not to say, lest I jinx its completion


" CALENDAR THIS WEEK IN M O N D AY

9

JANUARY

!

W E D N E S D AY

ZACH PRICE

! CASEY

Japanese Internment and Fight for Social Justice exhibit at the UO Law Library (1515 Agate St.) Library open 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. on weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends. Free.

John Doe plas base for X on the band’s 40th Anniversery tour. (Christopher Trotchie)

LEANNE HARLOFF

UO Ducks Hockey vs. Washington State University, The Rink Exchange, (796 West 13th Ave.), 7:00 p.m. !e University of Oregon men’s ice hockey team will battle it out with Washington State University this week during their first game back since early December. Coach Bill Leahy looks to lead the team to victory in his first season as head coach. !e club has been actively competing since 1989 and has been student-led each year along the way. !e organization has picked up three PAC-8 Championship wins since its inception. Students can bundle up, throw on some ducks gear and cheer on their team at the Lane County Events Center. For more information visit the UO Ducks Hockey website.

14

JANUARY

! DANA

F R I D AY

!

Quack Chats: Heart of the Brain at Falling Sky Pizzeria, Erb Memorial Union (1395 University St.) 6 p.m. Free.

S A T U R D AY

S A T U R D AY

13

MILLER

Professor and head of the University of Oregon’s department of psychology Ulrich Mayr will discuss the relationship of altruism and charity. He questions what motivates people to gives to charity, and whether it is true altruism or something else. Based on his research on cognition (how the brain processes information), Mayr will present his work about finding areas of the brain that are active in philanthropic decision-making. Mayr’s lab is part of the Posner & Keele Center for Cognitive Neurosciences. !is is one of many Quack Chats held on campus regularly, which features the work of University of Oregon faculty and many other researchers.

!e law library’s current exhibit examines the internment camps used to imprison Japanese-Americans during World War II through the life and career of University of Oregon graduate Minoru Yasui. While serving as member of the ROTC, Yasui earned both his undergraduate and law degree from UO. After graduating in 1939, Yasui went on to work for the Japanese consulate in Chicago. He left his position at the consulate following Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. He returned home hoping to enlist in the U.S. army to help fight in the war, but he was denied enlistment on nine separate occasions. Later, Yasui intentionally broke the curfew set by President Roosevelt in order to protest the constitutionality of such laws in court. Eventually, his case would be heard by the Supreme Court where the justices ruled that the U.S. had no right to restrict the rights of citizens, even during wartime. Yasui was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Obama for his courageous acts.

JANUARY

11

JANUARY

JANUARY

!

14

S A R A R O S A D AV I E S

See How We Are: John Doe and Exene in an Acoustic Performance at The Old Church, (1422 S.W. 11th Ave. Portland), 8:00 PM, $23 in advance, $26 at the door, all ages. John Doe and Exene Cervenka, the songwriters behind Los Angeles punk group X, will be performing an intimate acoustic set at !e Old Church, a historical landmark and non profit music venue in Portland. X performed at the Crystal Ballroom in Portland this past December to celebrate their 40th anniversary. While that set was brash and loud, this upcoming acoustic show offers a quieter alternative. !ose looking to see members of the legendary band in a different setting can visit the Ticketfly website for the show.

ALSTON

Brian Regan at Hult Center for Performing Arts (7th and Willamette) 8:00 p.m. Tickets $45-$51 !ose looking for a hilarious way to get through the weather can look forward to stand-up comedian Brian Regan’s set this Saturday. A Florida native known for his anecdotal style of comedy and self-deprecating attitude, Regan (born with seven siblings) cites Steve Martin and Johnny Carson as his two largest influences. He has been active since 1980, bringing laughs to audiences since he dropped out of college to pursue stand-up. Regan’s first comedy CD, Brian Regan: Live, was released in 1997. Since then he has starred in five separate specials and acted as a major influence to comedians like Louis C.K. and Jimmy Fallon. His sets take normally depressing or serious subjects (like a trip to the hospital) and turn them into riotous material. Tickets for Regan’s set at the Hull Center for Performing Arts are on sale now.

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

|

E ME R A L D C A L E N DA R

|

PA G E 3


12

examines photography’s multifaceted histories, visual culture, the photographic history of Slavery and Emancipation; contemporary women photographers and beauty.

JANUARY Thursday

LIVE: DROP-IN ENERGY RELEASE TECHNIQUES 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Learn unique, easy relaxation techniques that you can put to use daily for quick benefit. The first halfhour will include teaching you the techniques, with the rest of the time reserved for you to practice what you’ve learned in the Duck Nest. The free class will be led by Jude Kehoe, LPN, who is also a Healing Touch Certified Practitioner and meditation instructor. She has taught and practiced energy healing and meditation at University Health Center since 1998.

LEARN: “VISUALIZING THE BLACK BODY IN PHOTOGRAPHY AND POPULAR CULTURE” 2016-17 O’FALLON LECTURE 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Lillis Business Complex, 955 E. 13th ave. , Eugene, OR Deborah Willis is University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts, and an affiliated faculty member of Africana Studies in the Department of Social & Cultural Analysis at New York University. She teaches courses on Photography & Imaging, iconicity, and cultural histories visualizing the black body, women, and gender. Her research

OUR BODIES, OUR COUNTRY, OUR WORLD 4 p.m. Global Scholars Hall, 1710 E. 15th ave. Eugene, OR 97403 “This is your country, this is your world, this is your body and you must find some way to live within the all of it” ~ Ta-Nehisi Coates Sparked by this quote, students in the Fall 2016 AAD 199: Portable Life Museum First-Year Interest Group engaged in ways in which the art world responds to concepts of bodies, country, and world. Most particularly, we paid attention to questions of identity, inclusion, belonging, and (in)visibility. AVALANCHE AWARENESS CLINIC 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Practice identifying avalanche terrain, assessing snow pack, and using beacons and other rescue equipment in the Room 008 in the Outdoor Program Office. This clinic is a required pre-trip for the Avalanche Awareness Outing. If you attend this clinic, you get free admission to the McConkey Movie Night! Sign up at the OP Office in the EMU – $5.

EAT: DRINK WHEEL THURSDAYS! 10 p.m. - 12 a.m. Agate Alley, 1461 E. 19th ave. Eugene, OR 97403 Come to Agate Alley for Drink Wheel Thursday. We roll out the giant drink wheel each Thursday night at 10 and give it a spin each

facebook.com/ emeraldphotobooth @Emeraldphotobooth @emeraldphotobooth

half hour until we just can’t spin it anymore. All drink specials are $2.50. Spin the wheel to reveal your future (for the next half hour, anyway). Look out for those jello shots, though! Whatever your fortune is, you’ll be one of the fortunate ones just taking in the spectacle! Feel the Suspense! Feel the Drama! The weekend starts one day earlier at Agate Alley Bistro!

PLAY: COMEDY NIGHT - STAND UP SOCIETY 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. Falling Sky Pizzeria and Public House, 1395 University Street, Eugene, OR 97403 University of Oregon Stand Up Society hosts a comedy night at Falling Sky PIzzeria every Thursday evening! Pizza and Laughs begin at 9pm. Budding comedians encouraged to perform! Arrive early for complimentary pizza bites – as supplies last. All ages welcome. No cover charge. GRATEFUL JAM NIGHT 10 p.m. Luckey’s Club, 933 Olive St., Eugene, OR 97401 Bring your own instruments Sign Up is at 9 p.m. DUCKS AFTER DARK: KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS 8:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 This weeks movie is Kubo and the Two Strings. Come make origami with us before watching this fun and beautiful film. Movie plot: A young boy named Kubo must locate a magical suit of armor worn by his late father in order to defeat a vengeful spirit from the past. Rated: PG Bring your valid UO Student ID for free admission, giveaways and snacks. Doors at 8:30pm, Film at 9pm. non-UO

We bring the camera, lights, props and staff. You bring your fabulous self.

students may attend for free if accompanied by a UO student. Ducks After Dark is every Thursday night weeks 1-8 Fall, weeks 1-9 Winter and Spring. Come play games, meet new friends, have a snack and watch a fun movie!

13

JANUARY Friday

LEARN: OUR BODIES, OUR COUNTRY, OUR WORLD 4 p.m. Global Scholars Hall, 1710 E. 15th ave. Eugene, OR 97403 “This is your country, this is your world, this is your body and you must find some way to live within the all of it” ~ Ta-Nehisi Coates Sparked by this quote, students in the Fall 2016 AAD 199: Portable Life Museum First-Year Interest Group engaged in ways in which the art world responds to concepts of bodies, country, and world. Most particularly, we paid attention to questions of identity, inclusion, belonging, and (in)visibility.

, Eugene, OR 97401 Genre: Prog-Rock Stick Men: Tony Levin and Pat Mastelotto, the powerhouse bass and drums of the group King Crimson for a few decades, bring that tradition to all their playing. Levin plays the Chapman Stick, from which the band takes it’s name. Having bass and guitar strings, the Chapman Stick functions at times like two instruments. Markus Reuter plays his self-designed touch style guitar – again covering much more ground than a guitar or a bass. And Mastelotto’s drumming encompasses not just the acoustic kit, but a unique electronic setup too, allowing him to add loops, samples, percussion, and more. Advance tickets will cost $20.00 Tickets day of show will cost $25.00 R.A. THE RUGGED MAN WITH A-F-R-O 8 p.m. The WOW Hall, 291 W. 8th ave., Eugene, OR 97401 Cost: $17 Advance, $20 Door

14

JANUARY Saturday

LEARN:

PLAY: DUCKS HOCKEY VS. WSU 7 p.m. The Rink Exchange, 796 W. 13th ave., Eugene, OR 97402 STICK MEN FEAT. TONY LEVIN AND PAT MASTELLOTO OF KING CRIMSON 8 p.m. - 11 p.m. Hi-Fi Music Hall, 44 E. 7th ave.

OUR BODIES, OUR COUNTRY, OUR WORLD 4 p.m. Global Scholars Hall, 1710 E. 15th ave. Eugene, OR 97403 “This is your country, this is your world, this is your body and you must find some way to live within the all of it” ~ Ta-Nehisi Coates Sparked by this quote, students in the Fall 2016

AAD 199: Portable Life Museum First-Year Interest Group engaged in ways in which the art world responds to concepts of bodies, country, and world. Most particularly, we paid attention to questions of identity, inclusion, belonging, and (in)visibility

PLAY: DUCKS HOCKEY VS WSU 7 p.m. The Rink Exchange, 796 W. 13th ave., Eugene, OR 97402 BRIAN REGAN LIVE 8 p.m. Hult Center for the Performing Arts, 7th and Willamette, Eugene, OR 97401 Brian Regan has distinguished himself as one of the premier comedians in the country. Brian’s non-stop theater tour has visited more than 80 cities each year since 2005 and continues through 2017. It is the quality of his material, relatable to a wide audience and revered by his peers, which continues to grow Brian’s fan base. The perfect balance of sophisticated writing and physicality, Brian Regan consistently fills theaters nationwide with fervent fans that span generations. Currently a regular on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, Regan made 28 appearances on Late Show With David Letterman, the most of any comic in the show’s 22 years on CBS. OREGON MEN’S BASKETBALL VS OREGON STATE 7:30 p.m. Matthew Knight Arena, 1776 E 13th ave. , Eugene, OR 97403

EVERGREEN NUTRITION

15% OFF CBD OILS from CV SCIENCES IN JANUARY

Studies show that CBD oil is neuroprotective & can be helpful for anxiety, stress, sleep, nausea, psoriasis, muscle spasms & more.

CV Sciences’ CBD oil is the most affordable CBD on the market. It is non-psychoactive & comes in several potencies for oral & topical use. We make events better.

• Chemical-free CO2 Extracted

• Non-GMO

• Gluten free

M-F 9-6 • Sat 10-5 • Sun 11-5 1653 Willamette Street • 541-485-5100 • www.evergreennutrition.com FREE OFF-STREET PARKING • A LOCALLY-OWNED FAMILY BUSINESS


Are you covered at UO? SUMMER CANNIBALS, GAZEBOS, AND BOYFRIENDS 8 p.m. The WOW Hall, 291 W. 8th ave. , Eugene, OR 97401 Door Time: 7 p.m. Cost: $10 Advance, $12 Door

15

JANUARY Sunday

LEARN: INSIGHT SEMINARS: PAINTING IN SPAIN’S ‘GOLDEN AGE’ 9:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Baker Downtown Center, 975 High Street, Eugene, OR 97401 The 16th and 17th centuries were the Golden Age of Spanish art. Funded by the profits from the New World, led by connoisseur-kings, and fueled by the counterreformation, painting thrived in Spain as never before. Study the cultural conditions of the era and the works of key artists like El Greco and Velazquez. $100 OUR BODIES, OUR COUNTRY, OUR WORLD 4 p.m. Global Scholars Hall, 1710 E. 15th ave. Eugene, OR 97403 “This is your country, this is your world, this is your body and you must find some way to live within the all of it” ~ Ta-Nehisi Coates Sparked by this quote, students in the Fall 2016 AAD 199: Portable Life Museum First-Year Interest Group engaged in ways in which the art world responds to concepts of bodies, country, and world. Most particularly, we paid attention to questions of identity, inclusion, belonging, and (in)visibility.

EAT: MIMOSA SUNDAY 12 p.m. - 6 p.m. Sweet Cheeks Winery, 27007 Briggs Hill Rd, Eugene, OR 97405 Grab a friend and a picnic and join us Sundays from 12-6pm for a relaxing day on the patio. Mimosas will be served accompanied by live music performances from 2-4pm. See you soon!

PLAY: HALF-PRICED POOL (All Day: Sunday) Luckey’s Club, 933 Olive St, Eugene, OR 97401 1/2 Price Pool Every Sunday and Monday! FREE GRATEFUL DEAD JAM 8 p.m. Hi-Fi Music Hall, 44 E 7th ave. , Eugene, OR 97401 FREE Grateful Dead Jam every Sunday 21+

16

JANUARY

1/17 through Friday 1/20, 10 am- 12, EMU at 13th street in front of the Bike Program space. Free for students and co-op members THE GOOD FIGHT 8 p.m. - 9 p.m. Straub Hall, 1451 Onyx Street, Eugene, OR 97403 The Good Fight is a college-age campus ministry. We meet together on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Straub Hall 156 on the UO campus for preaching, worship, and fellowship. Throughout the week we have small groups (aka Fight Clubs) all over campus. If you have more questions about getting involved, connect with us on social media @ufcgoodfight.

Find out more about the UO Student Health Benefits Plan at healthcenter.uoregon.edu/insurance. Open enrollment now available!

Health care can be complicated; we can make it simple.

University Health Center 541-346-2770 EO/AA/ADA institution committed to cultural diversity.

Monday

PLAY: HALF-PRICED POOL (All Day: Sunday) Luckey’s Club, 933 Olive St., Eugene, OR 97401 1/2 Price Pool Every Sunday and Monday! COLORING PARTY FOR ADULTS 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Sheldon Branch Library, 1566 Coburg Rd., Eugene, OR 97401 Drop in at a “Coloring Party for Adults” to color for fun, creativity, and relaxation. Coloring sheets and colored pencils are provided. Participants are also welcome to bring additional supplies. Coloring Party for Adults is held every Monday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Bethel Branch and Sheldon Branch of Eugene Public Library.

17

JANUARY Tuesday

LIVE: BIKE APPRECIATION WEEK 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Celebrate Bikes! This week we will make loving your bike easy. Join the UO Bike Program every morning for free coffee, treats, bike repairs, bike lights, reflectors and a flat fix clinic. Be ready to model your noble steed for our photo shoot; pictures to be displayed in the Outdoor Program Barn art walk. Every morning Tuesday

LEARN: TAYTU’S FEAST: NATION, FOOD, AND HISTORY IN ETHIOPIA 12 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Dr. James McCann (History, Boston University) “Taytu’s Feast: Nation, Food, and History in Ethiopia” The African Studies Program encourages teaching and scholarship on sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, and the wider African diaspora. The program offers a minor, develops courses related to Africa, promotes study-abroad programs and internships, raises funds to expand African Studies resources, and organizes campus and local community events pertaining to Africa. In addition, the program supports faculty and student research on Africa and facilitates dissemination of research through the African Studies Lecture Series, for faculty and guest presentations, and the Acacia Seminars, for presentations of student research and experiences. DEPARTMENT OF ART VISITING ARTIST LECTURE- BENJAMIN H. BRATTON 6 p.m. Lawrence Hall, 1190 Franklin Boulevard, Eugene, OR Benjamin H. Bratton’s work spans Philosophy, Art, Design and Computer Science. He is Professor of Visual Arts and Director of the Center for Design and Geopolitics at the University of California, San Diego. He recently founded the school’s new Speculative Design undergraduate major. He is also a Professor of Digital Design at The European Graduate School and Visiting Faculty at SCI_Arc.

Action Surplus has military surplus clothing that is great for hunters, law enforcement and workers. New and used military surplus clothing is, durable, comfortable and priced right.

ACTION SURPLUS 4000 Franklin Blvd, Eugene 541-746 -1301

College Students save

$5*

ow *when they sh oof pr student ID or en of enrollm t

lab's

h Radio it w e c n ie c S Inside

h c i w l u r K t r Robe 8:00 pm

y 21 at r a u n a J , y a d r Satu ckets now: ti r u o y t e G • nter At the Hult Ce .682.5000 1 4 5 • g r o r. e t HultCen


BE HEARTISTIC 7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 The BEseries is pleased to partner with the University of Oregon Department of Theater Arts to bring amazingly talented Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) actress, Christiana Clark to the campus! Trained at American Academy of Dramatic Arts, Ms. Clark has spent the past four seasons at OSF and played the parts of: Lion in The Wiz; Horatio in Hamlet; Beatrice in Much Ado about Nothing; Proteus in The Two Gentlemen of Verona; Helena in A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Antony and Cleopatra; Into the Woods; The Taming of the Shrew. Besides the OSF, Ms. Clark has played in numerous theaters across the nation and taught workshops for young and old. Join the BEseries and UO Department of Theater Arts as we welcoming this amazingly talented actress to our campus to talk about her amazing artistic path, her influences and inspirations. BE heARTisitic!

EAT: TACO TUESDAYS (All Day: Tuesday) Agate Alley, 1461 E. 19th ave. Eugene, OR 97403 Tuesdays are for tacos and Agate Alley has the best in town! The fiesta runs all day long and features both food and drink especiales!

PLAY: RELAXATION YOGA A.M. 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Come join us for a drop-in yoga break focused on relaxation and breath work. We have the mats; all you need to bring is yourself! This weekly class, guided by a student instructor from the Student Recreation Center, is scheduled for 30 minutes. We will have the space set up for 30 additional minutes after the end of the class so you can spend as much time as you need soaking up all those relaxing vibes. We hope to see you there! RELAXATION YOGA P.M. 5 p.m. - 6 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Come join us for a drop-in yoga break focused on relaxation and breath work. We have the mats; all you need to bring is yourself! This weekly class, guided by a student instructor from the Student Recreation Center,

is scheduled for 30 minutes. We will have the space set up for 30 additional minutes after the end of the class so you can spend as much time as you need soaking up all those relaxing vibes. We hope to see you there! ONCE 7:30 p.m. Hult Center for the Performing Arts, 7th and Willamette, Eugene, OR 97401 Winner of eight 2012 Tony Awards® including BEST MUSICAL, ONCE is a truly original Broadway experience. Featuring an impressive ensemble of actor/musicians who play their own instruments onstage, ONCE tells the enchanting tale of a Dublin street musician who’s about to give up on his dream when a beautiful young woman takes a sudden interest in his haunting love songs. As the chemistry between them grows, his music soars to powerful new heights…but their unlikely connection turns out to be deeper and more complex than your everyday romance. Emotionally captivating and theatrically breathtaking, ONCE draws you in from the very first note and never lets go. It’s an unforgettable story about going for your dreams and the power of music to connect us all. AMUSEDAYS! COMEDY NIGHT WITH SETH MILLSTEIN 9 p.m. Luckey’s Club, 933 Olive St, Eugene, OR 97401

18

JANUARY

Wednesday

LIVE: BIKE APPRECIATION WEEK 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Celebrate Bikes! This week we will make loving your bike easy. Join the UO Bike Program every morning for free coffee, treats, bike repairs, bike lights, reflectors and a flat fix clinic. Be ready to model your noble steed for our photo shoot; pictures to be displayed in the Outdoor Program Barn art walk. Every morning Tuesday 1/17 through Friday 1/20, 10 am- 12, EMU at 13th street in front of the Bike Program space. Free for students and co-op members

BE WELL WEDNESDAYS 2 p.m. - 2:50 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Are you feeling stressed? Join us for Be Well Wednesdays—a weekly interactive workshop. Learn to identify and reduce your own stress through relaxation and stress management techniques. No sign-up required, all students are welcome to drop in.

LEARN: OREGON RARE BOOKS INITIATIVE - FROM HERE TO UTOPIA: IMAGINING BETTER WORLDS FROM THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY TO TODAY 4:45 p.m. - 5:45 p.m. Knight Library, 1501 Kincaid Street, Eugene, OR Thomas More was not the first to imagine a world in which peace and plenty had been achieved, but his 1516 book gave this vision its modern name: “utopia.” This word, which More coined, comes from the Latin for “no place” (u-topia), but More was fully aware that his new term also sounded like “good place” (eu-topia). This ambivalence – the best place is by definition one that doesn’t exist – has dogged the concept ever since. How did we get from More’s earnest “good place” to today’s disdain for “utopian thinking”? This talk will consider the modern evolution of utopian thought in Western literature and related arts, looking for clues to help understand the shift from the Renaissance’s faith in the possibility of a better world to today’s pop culture obsession with dystopian visions. One important turning point, I will argue, came during the Romantic Era, when the democratic visions inspired by the French Revolution gave way not only to the Terror and the Napoleonic Wars, but also to a dispiriting conservative backlash following Napoleon’s defeat. Ever since, I will argue, utopian visions have frequently been met or accompanied by skepticism and even cynicism. But with ecological catastrophe looming, can we really afford to give up on imagining a better world? SHANGHAI XIAN DAI ARCHITECTS LECTURE 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Lawrence Hall, 1190 Franklin Blvd., Eugene, OR Learn about how the fast-paced development of Chinese cities is being


orchestrated by young designers. Top architects from Shanghai Xian Dai Architectural Group will show projects that earned them a paid sabbatical to study sustainable design at the University of Oregon. Xian Dai is a “Top 100 Global Companies” and one of the most influential architectural, engineering and construction firms in China. The group has designed many award-winning hospitals, campuses, mixed-use complexes and historic renovations including Shanghai World Expo buildings and has partnered on the Shanghai World Financial Center and the Hongqiao Airport expansion.

EAT: DOLLAR BEERS 9 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. Taylor’s Bar and Grill, 894 E. 13th ave. , Eugene, OR 97401 You pay $1 as cover and then all microbrews on tap are $1!

PLAY: FILM SCREENING: AND THE BAND PLAYED ON 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Allen Hall, 1275 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Join the University of Oregon’s School of Journalism and Communication and National Lesbian and Gay Journalist Association UO chapter for a special screening of the film And the Band Played On, based on the best-selling book of the same title by SOJC alumnus Randy Shilts. The story chronicles the early days of the AIDS outbreak, from 1977 to 1985, its implications for the LGBTQ community, and the political factions working against each other as the epidemic spread. Originally aired on HBO, the film adaptation went on to win several awards, including three Primetime Emmys. The screening takes place just one week before the SOJC’s on-campus event, Gay Storytelling Started Here: Memories of Randy Shilts, featuring narratives about Randy’s life and work from former Emerald colleague and Albany Democrat-Hearld editor, Graham Kilslingbury. GAME NIGHTS: BINGO 6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Tonight’s Game is BINGO! Come play games, eat snacks, win prizes and connect with other ducks.

tonights prizes will be UO prize packs. Connect the Ducks will be hosting game nights every other week this winter term! ONCE 7:30 p.m. Hult Center for the Performing Arts, 7th and Willamette, Eugene, OR 97401 Winner of eight 2012 Tony Awards® including BEST MUSICAL, ONCE is a truly original Broadway experience. Featuring an impressive ensemble of actor/musicians who play their own instruments onstage, ONCE tells the enchanting tale of a Dublin street musician who’s about to give up on his dream when a beautiful young woman takes a sudden interest in his haunting love songs. As the chemistry between them grows, his music soars to powerful new heights…but their unlikely connection turns out to be deeper and more complex than your everyday romance. Emotionally captivating and theatrically breathtaking, ONCE draws you in from the very first note and never lets go. It’s an unforgettable story about going for your dreams and the power of music to connect us all. FREE FUNK JAM! 9 p.m. - 12 a.m. Hi-Fi Music Hall, 44 E. 7th ave., Eugene, OR 97401 FREE Funk Jam! at Hi-Fi Lounge Every Wednesday! Show: 9pm 21+ FREE admission

19

JANUARY Thursday

LIVE: BIKE APPRECIATION WEEK 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 Celebrate Bikes! This week we will make loving your bike easy. Join the UO Bike Program every morning for free coffee, treats, bike repairs, bike lights, reflectors and a flat fix clinic. Be ready to model your noble steed for our photo shoot; pictures to be displayed in the Outdoor Program Barn art walk. Every morning Tuesday 1/17 through Friday 1/20, 10 a.m. - 12, EMU at 13th street in front of the Bike Program space. Free for students and co-op members

LEARN: “GENDER JUSTICE IN GUATEMALA: ADVANCES AND CHALLENGES,” A TALK BY ERIN BECK AND LYNN STEPHEN 3:30 p.m. - 5 p.m. EMU, 1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 UO professors Erin Beck and Lynn Stephen will discuss their research in this CLLAS Faculty Collaborative Research talk. Presentation Focus “In Guatemala, a woman is killed every twelve hours and her killer is likely to go unpunished. Feminicide— the killing of women based on their gender in the face of a negligent or complicit state—is the extremity of gendered violence, which includes sexual assault, gender-specific forms of torture, and economic and psychological violence towards women. Our project explores the accomplishments and challenges of Guatemala’s new feminicide law and specialized gender violence courts. We use in-depth ethnographic and qualitative analysis of the participants: judges, social workers, advocates in women’s organizations, those who train judges and advocates about gendered violence and its prevention, and survivors of gendered violence. This presentation will focus on the history of the feminicide courts and use the case study of indigenous Mam women from Todos Santos Cuchamatan, Huehuetenango to explore what the obstacles to women’s access to gendered justice are: including monolingualism, isolation and poverty, regional cultures of competing generational masculinities, and local justice systems that encourage women to reconcile with aggressors.” Erin Beck is an assistant professor in the UO Department of Political Science. CLLAS founding director Lynn Stephen is a Distinguished Professor, College of Arts and Sciences, in the UO Department of Anthropology. Their CLLAS-funded research is the first phase of a long-term collaborative project.

131 E. 5th Ave. • 541-687-2805 BUFFALOEXCHANGE.COM •

NEVER A COVER

DANCER AUDITIONS Call 541-517-7196

Nude Hours

12pm - 2:15am Daily Lottery Champagne Room Outside Smoking Drinking Patio

1836 South ‘A’ St., Spfld • 541.762.1503 Only 5 minutes from campus! www.sweetillusions.biz


FUN & GAMES: CROSSWORD

27

28

26 29 32

34

35

38

39

44

40

45

47

41

42

43

46

48

50 53

25

31

37

22

49

51

52

54

55

56

57

59

60

61

62

63

64

Lazar’s Bazar

Serving Students Since 1974

58

$5 OFF

Kratom Products - 1 oz. minimum | with this ad -

ACROSS

1 Peanut butter holder 4 Kilt wearer 8 Coffee lure 13 Penny prez 14 Have the ___ for 15 Singer Josh whose self-titled 2001 debut album went 4x platinum 16 Milky Way, for one 17 Comedian cultivates flowers? 19 Schlub 21 Toning targets, for short 22 What a court interprets 23 Poet inks a contract? 26 Nosh 27 The opposition 28 GQ or S.I. 29 Conundrum 30 Exhibit some grief 31 Looney Tunes devil, for short 32 Assassin John ___ Booth 33 Opera singer scrawls graffiti?

- Smoking accessories - Posters - Clothing - Incense - and More!

Open 7 Days a Week

57 W. Broadway • Downtown Eugene • 541-687-0139

SUDOKUS

36 Monasteries 39 Bagel topper 40 Sondheim’s “Sweeney ___” 44 Land of Minos 45 ___-pitch softball 46 Prefix with comic 47 Squealers 48 Actress stumbles? 50 Egg cells 51 “___ Wiedersehen” 52 Supporter of the arts? 53 Philosopher removes his clothes? 57 “___ don’t!” 59 Adjusts to one’s environment 60 “Tout ___” (“All mine”: Fr.) 61 Cable inits. for film buffs 62 Weighty books 63 Elects 64 Word after “you might” or “you don’t”

Down

1 Poke 2 Ornamental shell source

3 Send on a detour, say 4 Tatters 5 “As cold as the Rockies” sloganeer 6 Non-Rx 7 Disapproving cluck 8 Flight board column: Abbr. 9 Fishing shop purchase 10 Bunker Hill Monument, for one 11 Everglades mammal 12 They cross in a crossword 15 Yaks 18 Crew 20 Tiny excerpts 23 Part of the Iams logo 24 Apple variety 25 Graceful antelope 26 Gives support 29 Squealer 31 “___ the season …” 32 Medium for Madame Tussaud 34 New York city with an amusement park that’s a National Historic Landmark 35 Plane, for one

36 Trapeze artist, e.g. 37 Impressive show of courage 38 Early Sony recorder 41 Gives new-employee training, e.g. 42 Item on many a doctor’s wall 43 Spanish couple 45 Search (through) 46 Equilibrium 48 Commotion 49 The Home ___ 51 Some “giants” in “Honey, I Shrunk the Kids” 54 Unlock, to a bard 55 1990s Indian P.M. 56 Little handful 58 Like Arctic waters

SOLUTION

Voted Best Shoe Store 2012-2014

957 WILLAMETTE

541-687-0898 shoeaholic.biz

Mon-Fri 10:30 am-7 pm Sat 10:30 am-6 pm Sun 12-5 pm

Regular priced items only. Offer valid through 1/31/17.

Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

A simple way for UO students

TO SEARCH FOR

herbivore. Carnivore. Locavore.

tacovorepnw.com 541.735.3518 11am-10pm daily 530 Blair Blvd. Eugene OR 97401

HOUSING DucksHousing.com

J A R A B E B A R L O P O U A N T W E E

21 24

36

12

18

23

33

11

15

20

30

10

R O M A O B A N D E N S L A W B I T E O S E R L K E S S T D E O R S S

19

9

I C Y

17

8

D I P L O M A

16

7

O R I E N T S

14

6

T A S G R K G A R A B S G N S A G P Z W I E T A G L O X L O S E L D T E A R I P S A M O I O P T S

13

5

S C O H O T R O C S E R N D S I I S M P T A P R I C E Y S T E S S F I A U F O N S T P T S E S

4

B E T A C A M

3

B R A V A D O

2

A C R O B A T

1

Looking for the solutions? Download the Emerald Mobile app today. It’s available on both the iTunes and Google Play stores.


Mckenzie River Music is a guitar shop that has been in business for over 30 years in Eugene, Oregon. (Samuel Marshall)

time between Light’s Music in Springfield and McKenzie River Music, where he has worked full time since 1990. “Everything I do is just like what a mechanic does, it’s just a different machine,” Longstreth said. “It doesn’t matter how good a car it is, sooner or later you have to throw some money at it.” Longstreth rents the upstairs office at McKenzie River Music for his repair shop, but the two businesses have always complemented one another. “Our customers are sort of the same people, there’s kind of a symbiosis,” said Longstreth. “It has to work that way. I couldn’t have the shop be in a store if we were butting heads ... We’d kind of have to see eye-to-eye and be able to work things out if stuff comes up.” On May, 21, 2012, Bob November lost a battle with cancer. !e first guitar he owned still hangs above the shop’s case of trophy guitars, memorializing the way McKenzie River Music is meant to operate. “He [November] was well-respected and wellknown across the country as a knowledge base,” said Mark Schneider, shop employee. “People called him about vintage Martins, Gibsons or Fenders because he was one of the go-to guys and had experience and bought and sold enough of them to really know what he was talking about.” Schneider was a McKenzie River Music customer when the store opened in 1981, and he has worked at the vintage music store for the last two years. He specializes in accessories and bass guitars. Although Schneider never worked with November directly, he said the store continues to provide customers with carefully selected instruments and a high level of knowledge.

“A very important part of the store’s philosophy is finding the right guitar for a person — a good fit,” Schneider said. “And Artie [Leider] is the king of the hill when it comes to that sort of stuff.” As the resident guitar matchmaker and current owner of McKenzie River Music, Artie Leider has had ample practice finding the right guitar tailored to each individual’s needs. “When you get a guitar you love, you play it until your hands bleed,” Leider said. “It feels right and it plays right. !at’s what you want to do: play it.” When Leider was 11, his older brother brought home a Fender Stratocaster. It was the first instrument that caught his attention and he quickly became fascinated with taking apart and rebuilding the guitar. Leider began scouring New York pawn shops for guitars that he could collect or sell to his friends. At 18, Leider moved to Berkeley, California, and started working full time at a guitar repair shop. During this time, he would occasionally embark upon cross-country road trips buying and selling guitars across the country. In the early 1980s, Leider said the vintage guitar business hit a lull, so he took a break to go to culinary school. He paid for school by selling a 1952 Fender Telecaster. “I had a bit of a dichotomy going on between the two things because I was a better chef than a guitar player,” Leider said. But even while in culinary school, he never stopped buying and selling guitars. In 2004, Leider moved to Eugene and met Bob November through mutual friends. !eir shared interests of guitar and golf spawned a friendship, and in 2006 Leider began working at McKenzie River Music as a guitar buyer and seller.

“Bob built this from the ground up and became a very well-known vintage guitar dealer and specialized in vintage Martin guitars and Fender and Gibsons — really classic vintage guitars,” Leider said. Next month, a stage will be constructed in the corner of the store where Leider plans to regularly host bands to perform. Likely, many University of Oregon jazz combos will be invited. “McKenzie River Music has been a part of the musical community of Eugene since 1981, and I believe it has really contributed and supported, and I’d like to see it contribute and support more for a long time to come,” Leider said. Part of the reason Leider feels music is important is because he views guitars as more than an instrument, but rather, a communication tool. “If you put two people who are supposed to be mortal enemies in a room with instruments, they wouldn’t be mortal enemies anymore,” Leider said. “!ey wouldn’t fight. !ey would communicate.” Leider said that although many of the guitars in the store are high-priced vintage items, he is always on the lookout for affordable, well-made guitars. But once he has them in stock, they tend to be purchased in a matter of days. Still, he and the McKenzie River Music staff say it’s important to offer an affordable instrument selection alongside the vintage collector’s guitars that the store is recognized for. “I’m way more interested in helping somebody to go find their first instrument so they can play their first chord than selling somebody their tenth fantastic, expensive guitar that’s just another one in their collection,” Leider said. “!at part of nurturing people starting out, especially kids, is super important. !at’s what we’re here for.”

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

|

EMERALD

|

PA G E 9


% SPORTS

OF

CAMPUS 2 0 1 7

E D I T I O N

Oregon forward Ruthy Hebard (24) looks around for an open teammate. (Amanda Shigeoka)

Kick-Off the Vote! Join us for prizes and refreshments while we kick off our Best of Campus contest

BEST RT O F M O C FOOD B

EST DATE NIGHT SPO T

BEST E COFFE

OTS L D N A MORE!

January 31st • 11am - 4pm EMU - Crater Lake Room PA G E 1 0

|

EMERALD

|

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

Oregon freshman Ruthy Hebard on pace for a record-setting season # S H AW N

M E D O W, @ S H AW N M E D O W

Ruthy Hebard is having a breakout year. It may very well be a recordbreaking one, too. Hebard, a freshman at the University of Oregon, is shooting 69.8 percent from the field four games into Pac-12 play. Her numbers trounce those of past shooting percentage leaders, not only at Oregon but also across the conference. !e Fairbanks, Alaska, native is taking Matthew Knight Arena and the Pac-12 by storm. She’s also drawn comparisons to the Pac-12’s reigning co-player of the year, Jillian Alleyne. “She has so much growth potential,” head coach Kelly Graves said of Hebard following Oregon’s win over Portland. “She’s not getting Jill-type numbers yet, but if she was getting Jill-type minutes, it would probably be about the same.” Hebard shot 8-9 shooting against the Pilots, putting up 19 points while bringing down 11 rebounds in the 8141 win on Dec. 9. She had a dream start to her collegiate career after her breakout game against CSU Bakersfield. Against the Roadrunners, Hebard posted a double-double with 23 points and 10 rebounds. !e freshman is part of Oregon’s No. 3-ranked recruiting class by espnW HoopGurlz. “We have six posts, so when we get in, we have to go as hard as we can because we definitely have depth,” Hebard said. Hebard kept the dominance going with another stellar performance against then-ranked No. 22 Michigan State where she notched another double-double with 15 points and 10 rebounds. She has five double-doubles this season, which is not yet at the

dominant levels of Alleyne, who is arguably Oregon’s best player ever. “I feel like I’m getting my rhythm down,” Hebard said after the Portland game. “I’m getting calmer each game and not as nervous.” Alleyne dominated Oregon’s inside game during her career in Eugene. In her senior year, she led the Ducks with a 58.5 percent shooting percentage, which also led the Pac-12. !e only rivalling numbers in Pac12 over the past six seasons come from Stanford’s Chiney Ogwumike, who shot at 60.1 percent in the 2013-14 season, leading the Pac-12 that year and the prior season at 58.6 percent. Hebard earned Pac-12 freshman of the week honors in mid December and is not just impressing fans and the media, she is also surprising her teammates. “It’s hard. It’s hard because you play against some of the biggest girls in the nation,” fellow freshman Mallory McGwire said. “She’s doing really well against them.” Hebard put up a season high of 28 points against Portland State and scored 25 points in the Ducks’ Pac-12 opener against then-ranked No. 9 Washington. !e 6-foot-4 freshman went 6-of-10, tallying 13 points and 10 rebounds in Oregon’s dramatic win over Cal on Sunday to help the Ducks win their first game of conference play. She blocked an inbound pass and found an open Maite Cazorla for the game-tying lay-in. “She’s been awesome. She’s getting good shots,” Graves said. “It’s incredible. She’s taking the double teams and stuff now. For her to be doing what she’s doing is a real credit to her.”


Convenient Medical Care on Campus PRIMARY CARE Acupuncture Allergy/Asthma Birth Control Colds/Flu CPR/First Aid Classes Dental Diabetes Management Energy Healing Health Insurance Immunizations Massage Therapy Medical Lab Tests

Meditation Mental Health Nutrition Pharmacy Physical Therapy Sexual Health Sports Medicine STI Screening Clinic Stress Management Suicide Prevention Tobacco Cessation Travel Clinic X-ray

University Health Center healthcenter.uoregon.edu EO/AA/ADA institution committed to cultural diversity.

Welcome to the University of Oregon History Department. We offer courses on the history of classical antiquity, Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, colonial North America and the United States, and the world as a whole. Have you ever been curious about how and why people acted or believed the way they did in the past? Have you ever wondered why there are inequalities, imbalances, and conflicts within and between groups, societies, organizations, and states across the world? Are you interested in the diversity of world cultures and how cultures have changed? The study of history will give you the knowledge and perspective to understand these and other issues. History majors learn about the variety of human experience over time, gaining a breadth of understanding over numerous historical geographic, chronological, and cultural themes and dynamics. In the process, they acquire analytical, research, and writing skills that will prepare them for success all walks of life.

Department of

HISTORY

HIST

Department of History

541-346-4802 275 McKenzie Hall

The B.A. or B.S. in History is a versatile degree. Besides paving the way to careers in government, law, journalism, business, education, writing, editing, curating, and communication, the study of history cultivates critical skills useful in all walks of life. Among these are the abilities to communicate verbally and in writing, to conduct research on virtually any topic, and to analyze, interpret, and synthesize large quantities of information. Try out one of our courses and see if our program is for you!

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

|

EMERALD

|

PA G E 1 1


Identifying Discrimination Part IV:

Privilege & Support # BRAEDON

KWIECIEN, @BRAEDONJAMES

In an effort to better understand the challenges facing some minority students at University of Oregon, the Emerald interviewed students of color and faculty who have devoted their careers to addressing diversity and inclusion. Some students have used their experiences to reflect on their own biases and have taken steps to change their own behavior. This is the fourth part of a series coming out this week examining the role of discrimination at UO. The last installment highlighted the way students celebrate their identities, but this article focuses on the discrpency of privelege on campus as well as advice from minority students to alleviate discrimination. Death by 1,000 cuts. !at’s what some refer to as the experience of feeling insecure, unprotected, offended or unwelcomed in a community that seems to resent the culture they represent. “You wake up, you go to class, the person next to you asks if you’re at UO because you’re an athlete, then the next class you walk in, you’re in a room of 150 white people,” University of Oregon student Aleiya Evison said. “When they talk about slavery or police brutality, everyone stares at you and you might be asked to represent all black people — or all asian people — and then you go home and watch the news, and another person of color was killed. !at is an average day for a student of color — on top of their responsibilities of being a student.” Evison’s experience is something students who come from a background of privilege may not understand. Privilege for students of the majority is not financial support or positions of authority, but a life unprovoked by the consistent misrepresentation, insensitive comments and discrimination many minority students can face. !e day-to-day struggle for some minority students in communities where they are misunderstood or disregarded is oftentimes unnoticed. President of UO’s Multi-ethnic Student Alliance Vickie Gimm says, “What students need to do on campus is believe

PA G E 1 2

|

EMERALD

|

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

everybody’s individual experiences. A lot of times, we dismiss it because we don’t believe it’s true and that contributes to a lot more marginalization.” Minority students like Evison and Gimm who are inspired to pursue higher educations, feel restrained by the lack of diversity and cultural understanding on campus, she said, but some students believe this can be changed. Evison said that, “One way to be an activist is to build community, and that’s something I’ve started to do here. [I] surround myself with other women of color and approach activism from a place of strength by taking up more space on this campus and engaging in issues of race and identity.” When Evison talks about women of color, she doesn’t only talk about Black students like herself, but of all minority students who are underrepresented. “I have met so many brilliant students of color on this campus that are working tirelessly to make our school a more inclusive environment,” Evison said. One place on campus where people work to create community is the Holden Center, on the ground floor of the Erb Memorial Union. Part of the center’s mission is to promote positive change in the UO community. Chris Esparza, the associate director of the Holden Center, said the path to alleviating the pains of discrimination starts with individuals.

Vickie Gimm, President of UO’s Multiethnic Student Allianc, says people need to acknowledge indivual experiences. (Aaron Nelson)

UO student Aeiya Evison tries to build community on campus. (Aaron Nelson)


“!e solution is as simple, yet as complex as changing the way we form relationships,” he said. In his own experience, Esparza has struggled with talking to his dad about racial sensitivity, although he decided the conflict is worth the effort. His dad sent him an email years ago containing jokes about negative stereotypes of Chinese-Americans. Esparza felt that jokes like this were inconsiderate, but he wanted to make sure his dad knew too. In a moment of courage, he sent an email detailing why those jokes were insensitive and why he felt they were unacceptable to tell. Esparza said telling a friend or family member that the way they’re acting is intolerant is very challenging but can be necessary to push people to care for each other, not marginalize. Marginalization is part of what Vickie Gimm refers to as “othering.” As a first generation Asian-American, Gimm notices when students assume she is an international student or assume she doesn’t speak English because of the way she looks. She recalled others speaking random Chinese words to her assuming she is fluent. When Gimm experiences these microaggressions, she said they usually occur unintentionally, despite the offense she feels. “It’s normalized, accepted behavior and then they go about performing the microaggression without realizing the impact,” Gimm said. !e way someone asks a question or makes a joke can be offensive regardless of whether they meant it, and although it’s an accident, those affected by the comments have to find ways of coping. UO senior Seela Sankey has begun to have a sense of humor with comments about her skin color. As an international student from Kenya, she came to UO with a dark tan, but in the winter, she said her skin tone lightens and she

tans orange. As she recalled from her freshman year, this can lead to uncomfortable conversations. Once a student ran up to her in the rain and asked her which tanning salon she went to. “I didn’t want to be rude and I was like ‘I don’t remember the shop, but give me your number. I’ll text you the name of the shop’ because I didn’t know how to react to it,” Sankey said. Rather than ask if that was her natural skin tone, the student assumed she must go to to a tanning salon. Sankey dealt with the comment with a sense of humor, but she also recommends students think before they assume. “Let’s say I’m running to class. If you want to talk to me, be like ‘I know you’re in a hurry, but I was really attracted to your skin tone.’ And then I would explain it to you.” Taking the time to ask someone about their culture and understand their background is what some people at UO call cultural humility. Abigail Leeder, the director of Experiential Education and Prevention Initiatives, defines cultural humility as being willing to admit your ignorance about someone’s culture and being open minded about their values. She said that discrimination can be diminished by listening to each other and asking questions. As Leeder puts it, “[by] being curious about other people and being more open minded to hearing different people’s perspectives, a level of connection or empathy begins and then people want to be supportive.” Many of these students feel that it only takes small measures to ease a feeling of discrimination on campus, but Leeder said we especially need to focus on the desire to learn more about each other. “I think we’re losing that as a culture,” Leeder said. “And I think that is pretty much the only way to move forward: to listen.” Anna Lieberman contributed to the reporting of this article.

“THE SOLUTION IS AS SIMPLE, YET AS COMPLEX AS CHANGING THE WAY WE FORM RELATIONSHIPS.” -CHRIS ESPARZA Associate director of the Holden Center

REAL. FAST. FOOD.

An awesome salad bar, grab and go sandwiches, snacks and coffee, a hidden gem smack dab in the heart of campus! 8:30-4 MON-FRI • 11-4 WEEKENDS

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

|

EMERALD

|

PA G E 1 3


Study PLANNING, PUBLIC POLICY and NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT AT UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

Priority Deadline for Fall 2017 Applications is February 1, 2017.

Open House: Master of Community and Regional Planning, Master of Public Administration, and Master of Nonprofit Management January 13 Friday Noon - 2:30, Hendricks Hall Room 119 1408 University St, Eugene, OR

131 E. 5th Ave. • 541-687-2805 BUFFALOEXCHANGE.COM •

Contact us: pppm@uoregon.edu • Visit us: 119A Hendricks Hall

free pool

TUES - SAT 4-9PM & Sun - MON All night!

Happy hour 4-9PM

voted #1 off campus bar!

115 W. Broadway • DOWNTOWN EUGENE • jamesonsbareugene.com • OPEN 4PM - 2:30am daily

Traditional Greek & Indian Food 992 Willamette Street Eugene, OR 97401 (541) 343-9661

PA G E 1 4

|

EMERALD

|

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7


EMERALD MEDIA GROUP

&

OPINION

Texas, under Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick, is following the legislative path that North Carolina took last year. (Gage Skidmore/Flikr)

MORE AT DAILYEMERALD.COM

New Texas Privacy Act fights an old war !e legislation that discriminates against transgender people was introduced Jan. 5. “It’s the right thing to do,” stated Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick at a press conference regarding the Texas Privacy Act. Patrick, a conservative Christian, considers it a priority and an investment in the privacy and safety of Texans. !e Texas Privacy Act states that people must use public restrooms and changing rooms that correspond with their assigned sex at birth. !is would be applied in schools and at businesses. Furthermore, the legislation prevents cities from passing their own ordinances against the Texas Privacy Act, meaning that they have no independence regarding the bill. !is is a poorly masked attack against the LGBTQIA+ community, despite some insistence that the legislation is an effort to prevent predatory attacks. It is psychologically and possibly physically harmful for transgender people to not be able to use the bathroom they feel most comfortable in, and this bill is clearly targeting those who don’t feel comfortable with the gender identity society has imposed upon them. !e use of a Martin Luther King, Jr. quote in Patrick’s press conference is astounding to me. Patrick began his speech at the conference by stating “Martin Luther King Jr. said, ‘Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.’” MLK, Jr. was part of the civil rights movement, and queer rights are a part of today’s civil rights. He likely would not have supported bathroom bills that target transgender people. Patrick continues to comment on how we can’t allow “men” in women’s restrooms simply because of how they feel. !is is a personal and targeted attack on transgender women. Transgender women are real women, not men dressed up in feminine clothing and makeup. !e chief executive of LGBTQIA+ rights group Equality Texas, Chuck Smith, was interviewed about the new legislation. He was clear in stating “Transgender people are not the predators. Transgender people are more likely to be the victims.” !is is an indication that transgender people are often the victims of attacks in bathrooms by cisgender people who

are uncomfortable. Furthermore, he remarked that the act closely resembled HB2, a similar bill passed in North Carolina that is now facing challenges in court and has caused the state to have a huge fall in its economy—millions of dollars lost and hundreds in jobs due to boycotts. !is is not unlike what the Texas Association of Business has predicted in a study. !ey’ve reported that the new bill could result in billions of dollars in losses for the state of Texas. Clearly, this makes Patrick’s decision a bad idea. Bathroom bills have become such an arbitrary thing to me. !ink about single-stall, gender neutral bathrooms. Does the genitalia of the person using the bathroom before or after you really matter? It’s just a bathroom. Transgender people certainly don’t want to be hassled for a necessary act, and shouldn’t have to feel afraid to enter or use public restrooms because of how others might react. Furthermore, they shouldn’t have to experience psychological harm, physical harm or trauma because they are attacked. !e fact that Texas could pass this bill so soon after HB2’s massive failure in North Carolina is a testament to the conservative Christians living in the South. America watched as the bill in North Carolina passed, caused social and economic destruction, and has now been brought to court for being discriminatory against the LGBTQIA+ community. Why would Texas follow so soon after such a disastrous result? It’s like talking to a brick wall. Ideally, the things that happened with HB2 will also happen with the Texas Privacy Act. One can only hope that people will be protective enough of the LGBTQIA+ community and our civil rights as Americans to protest against the legislation and boycott those who choose to follow it. Additionally, businesses should also refuse to enforce the bill. By taking action, change can be made.

BY LOGAN MARKS

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

|

EMERALD

|

PA G E 1 5


PA G E 1 6

|

EMERALD

|

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 2 , 2 0 1 7


01/12/17 Emerald Media - Thursday Edition