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D A I LY E M E R A L D . C O M

EMERALD

WEEK OF DEC. 2

PG 4 WHO’S RELEASING NEW MUSIC IN DECEMBER?

PG 11 DUCKS PULL OFF WIN IN 123RD CIVIL WAR

A LOOK

BACK FROM BUILDINGS TO BELLS, HERE’S A LOOK BACK AT THE TOP NEWS STORIES OF THE TERM.


PRE- GAME. PRE- ROLL. PREPARE.

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DUCKS HOUSING the simple search for UO students

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EMPLOYERS JOBS, INTERNSHIPS, AND VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

career.uoregon.edu/events

Networking Nights

November 13, February 19, April 15

Career Fairs

November 14, February 20, April 16

Career Fair Interview Days

November 15, February 21, April 17

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NEWS

VOL. 121, ISSUE NO. 17

GET IN TOUCH

EMERALD MEDIA GROUP 1395 UNIVERSITY ST., #302 EUGENE, OR 97403 541.346.5511

NEWSROOM EDITOR IN CHIEF

Michael Tobin MANAGING EDITOR

Donny Morrison

WHO IS RUTH YI OF COTTAGE MARKET?

ART DIRECTOR

Devin Roux ENGAGEMENT EDITOR

BY ARDESHIR TABRIZIAN

Jordan McMinn

OUTREACH DIRECTOR

Ashlyn Darnell

Ruth Yi of Cottage Market takes an Emergen-C every day for good measure to avoid getting sick. (Sarah Northrop/Emerald)

NEWS EDITORS

Hannah Kanik Gina Scalpone Zack Demars A&C EDITORS

Sydney Dauphinais Illana Slavit OPINION EDITORS

Joanna Mann Lizzy Palmquist SPORTS EDITORS

Gabriel Ornelas Shane Hoffmann Brady Lim PODCAST EDITOR

Danny Latoni PHOTO EDITOR

Sarah Northrop DESIGN EDITOR

Morgan Darby DESIGNERS

Katalena Sanchez Kira Chan Natalie Dulansky VIDEO EDITOR

Melanie Henshaw COPY CHIEF

Tanner Shipley

BUSINESS PUBLISHER & PRESIDENT

Bill Kunerth X317

bkunerth@dailyemerald.com

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Kathy Carbone X302 kcarbone@dailyemerald.com DIRECTOR OF SALES & DIGITAL MARKETING

Jamie Lanz X303 jlanz@dailyemerald.com CREATIVE & TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

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creative@dailyemerald.com

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Matty Leech Jordenne DeGraw Emma Swanson Noah Mayers Sam Lax Paige Vizza Fritz Hergenhan Patrick McCumber

THE DAILY EMERALD

The Daily Emerald is published by Emerald Media Group, Inc., the independent nonprofit media company at the University of Oregon. Formerly the Oregon Daily Emerald, the news organization was founded in 1900.

ON THE COVER

Illustrations by Billy Lawson.

verything you need to know

VERYTHING UO

Ruth Yi takes it one day at a time, just as she always has. While she has only been running Cottage Market on 16th Avenue and Hilyard Street for about three years, her fiercely loyal customers and overwhelming popularity in Eugene may lead one to believe she has been there for decades. Yi said she has “led a very simple life,” but that is only because she has lived a life of transition that has forced her to appreciate the simple things. Born in South Korea in 1945, Yi’s family lived comfortably until they returned home one day to find their house razed to ashes. Though the Korean War brought a great deal of instability for them, it did not mar Yi’s childhood entirely and, in a way, changed her perspective for the better. “At that time, Korea was a fairly poor country,” Yi said. “But we didn’t feel much of that. We were fed well, we were happy in the church and going to school, getting good grades — what else do you need when you’re young?” Yi attended the University of Guelph in Canada because her husband had a connection there, and the classes she took helped her learn English, which would go on to fare well for her when she moved to California in 1968. She arrived a month before her husband, so she said she sent him a postcard with a picture of Palisades Park in Santa Monica and a Pacific Ocean backdrop, which she described as “the most spectacular scene in L.A.” Five years later, she and her husband bought a cafeteria on the second floor of General Telephone Electric, where their window overlooked the exact same visual from the postcard. “Isn’t that amazing?” she said. “I say this story to everybody [who] comes to our house for dinner.” Despite starting with zero cooking experience, Yi and her husband operated the cafeteria for 13 years. Her customers, employees of the telephone company,

taught her recipes. “It was a family, they were so good to us,” Yi said. “They would come and tell me, ‘Ruth, did you know Californians like Mexican food?’ And they would tell me, ‘Let’s do the taco salad this week,’ and they would tell me the recipe.” “Relationship is always tradeoff,” Yi said. “You’re nice to them, they will be nice to you, right? I think it’s most crucial thing in any workplace.” Yi carried this sentiment with her after she lost her business and moved to Eugene in 1986. For 18 years, she worked at a dry cleaners, which she said she largely looks back on fondly. What came next, though, still baffles her to this day. Four years ago, Cottage Market, now known informally among students as “Ruth’s,” was nothing but a garage attached to a fixer-upper. A friend offered Yi and her husband the house to rent out for profit, but once the competitive market began to hinder their business, the city allowed them to operate a store out of the garage. Yi considered the opportunity a gift from the city, so she agreed to open the market. Now, she said she views the fact that she has one of the busiest stores near campus as a gift from God. “It’s unbelievable how kids support me. I’m not the only store here,” Yi said. Many of Yi’s customers are UO students, and they adore her. “She’s pretty much the sweetest woman around,” said one of her customers, Jake MacVicar. “Everybody has no choice but to love her. I feel like everybody does in this city, especially all the students. One regular, Jamie Peterson, described Yi as “one of the nicest people in Eugene.” “She’s an amazing person,” Peterson said. “She knows my major. She knows the fact that I’m going to be a teacher. She literally just asked me if it was my last term, if I was gonna graduate soon. She asked me if I was staying here.” Michelle Villa said Yi sang “Happy Birthday” to her when she visited the market on her birthday. “It was pretty

great,” she said. “She’s always been very sweet.” Some have even taken to social media to declare their appreciation for Yi. She struggles to make sense of the outpouring of support from her customers, and the only explanation she can think of is “God’s grace.” “I’m not the sweetest person in America,” she said. “I’m just old lady with my accent. But when I see them, I feel like they’re my grandkids, you know? They’re so sweet.” “I brag to everybody: I’ve never seen one rude person here,” she said. “They make my day, so they make my job.” Like all her previous jobs, Yi takes the time to get to know her customers on a personal level. Some students even bring their parents to the store when they are in town so they can meet her. Yi recalled one student who felt comfortable enough to discuss a tough breakup he was dealing with. “We had relationship already, he was not stranger,” Yi said, “and I liked them coming in together. So I used to talk with them, chat with them. That openness — we had the feeling already.” It has become increasingly difficult for Yi to take care of the store with her husband not being able to contribute as much at his age, she said. Still, her “attitude of gratitude” has not wavered, and she credits her customers for helping her stay motivated. “It’s my customers who bring all the joy,” she said. “They are amazing, I’m very thankful about that.” Yi may say she has lived a simple life, but simplicity has proven to be a successful recipe for her. She takes an Emergen-C every day for good measure to avoid getting sick, and if she sees a customer cough, she offers them one free of charge. “Once in a while, they just pay the money, but if you pay, you ruin my fun,” she said with a laugh. “Happiness is doing a little extra than you’re supposed to, like giving a little Emergen-C.”

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A&C

ANTICIPATED ALBUM RELEASES OF DECEMBER BY FRANKIE KERNER Illustration of Camila Cabello by Christina Staprans.

As the end of the year and the decade comes to a close, many are looking back at the best albums of the past 10 years. With only one month left of the 2010s, the Emerald took a look forward into some of the most anticipated albums of this December. The Free Nationals - The Free Nationals Many know The Free Nationals only as the backing band of Anderson .Paak. You may have seen them performing alongside him in his Tiny Desk Concert for NPR, or perhaps at a live show. Now the time has come for their own album. Including the single, “Shibuya,” which features The Internet’s Syd, the project is sure to be packed with funky, soulful music and a modern twist. According to Consequence of Sound, the record is packed with

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other guest features: Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Daniel Caesar, Kali Uchis, JID and more. Their self-titled debut album will be out on Dec. 13. Camila Cabello - Romance Camila Cabello first started out in Fifth Harmony, the female pop ensemble that ran strong until 2016, when Cabello left the group to start her solo career. In 2018, the singer released her debut album, “Camila.” Since then, she’s gained more traction in the pop world, especially this year with the release of her song “Señorita,” a collaboration with Shawn Mendes. The two artists have gained popularity since then, earning a Grammy nomination for the duet. Next month, Cabello is set to release her sophomore album, “Romance,” a record diving deep into her personal love life over the past few years.

Romance comes out on Dec. 6.

Kanye West - Jesus is Born

Harry Styles - Fine Line

We’ve seen Kanye West’s journey from a shutter shades-wearing, A Tribe Called Quest-loving, early-2000s hip-hop staple to a born-again Christian, premarital sex-denouncing, cultural phenomenon in 2019. Over this past decade, Kanye has had quite the transformation both sonically and personally. This past decade, he’s released seven albums, all with different sounds and impacts. His latest album, “Jesus is King,” was released in October and he’s already back in December with another Jesus-centric project, a gospel album titled “Jesus is Born.” This album was made with the Sunday Service, a gospel group he started that has been traveling together for almost a year. Jesus is Born is set to come out on Dec. 25.

Once one of the five members of the British boy band One Direction, Harry Styles is paving the way for his solo music career. After releasing his self-titled debut album in 2017, he continues to expand his repertoire. Following his Saturday Night Live debut a few weeks ago, where he performed both as the host and musical guest, fans of all ages have the singer on their minds. He has proven that he’s more than his boy band past, and while his music is still pop-heavy, he’s separating himself from how fans used to know him. The sultry music video released last month for his song “Lights Up” shows that he’s grown past his boy band days. “Fine Line” comes out Dec. 13.


The Flats at Chase

Offering modern and luxury student living at an affordable price. For many students, finding an off-campus apartment can be challenging. With so many options for apartments available in the Eugene area, students can struggle to find the perfect place to reside that meets all of their needs. Luckily, Horizon’s brand new apartment community, The Flats at Chase, is ready to show students just how easy their decision can be.

DECEMBER 5, 11 -3pm

FREE PHOTOS WITH SANTA! EMU historical lobby FIND YOUR PHOTOS ON FACEBOOk! @emgphotobooth

Located right next to Autzen Stadium, the community is centered in the perfect location for both students and young adults alike. These apartments not only offer a convenient location but also provide a living experience like no other. The Flats at Chase offer affordable and fully furnished studio, two, three and four-bedroom homes where brand new kitchen countertops and cabinets meet 10-foot ceilings, and top-of-the-line appliances that face large broad windows allowing for the warm Eugene sunlight flood in. The apartments themselves offer the perfect mix of community and privacy with comfy, spacious living areas and individual bedrooms and bathrooms. Unwind on the sun deck, meet new people in the residential clubhouse, be inspired in the study lounge and watch the sunset behind the mountains on the rooftop terrace. On top of its exceptional features and state-of-the-art living spaces, The Flats at Chase also offer a superior and reliable management team. At Horizon Realty Advisors, customer satisfaction is a top priority. Horizon takes pride in managing its communities properly and productively with its main goal in mind: to make every customer experience a fantastic one. The level of care and effort Horizon puts into managing its communities is what sets Horizon apart from others. Don’t miss out on the grand opening from Dec. 3rd through 6th at 3282 Kinsrow Ave. Eugene, OR 97401. Special deals and prizes will be offered to anyone who signs a lease for an apartment home that week! If you find yourself looking for an apartment, consider The Flats at Chase — modern and luxury student living at an affordable price.

GRAND OPENING

DEC. 3-6

TheFlatsAtChase.com 541.255.4408 3282 Kinsrow Avenue Eugene, OR 97401 M O N D AY, D E C E M B E R 2 , 2 0 1 9

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COVER

TOP NEWS STORIES OF FALL 2019 Protests, new buildings and the EMU bells. Fall term 2019 at the University of Oregon was nothing short of interesting. We saw the Graduate Teaching Fellowship Federation protest for a new contract, the opening of the Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Culture Center and Tykeson Hall and we said goodbye to Smith Family Bookstore’s 13th Avenue location. Here’s a look back at the top stories of the term.

GTFF SETTLED A NEW CONTRACT WITH THE UNIVERSITY BY RYAN NGUYEN After nearly a year of bargaining, the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation and the UO settled on a new three-year contract for its graduate employees. The contract, which includes six weeks of paid parental leave, a bump in salaries for many workers and no increases to health care costs, came after the labor union threatened to strike at the start of week 6 if it and the university could not come to a deal. “I am incredibly proud of what we were able to build over the year of negotiations,” GTFF President Ellen

The “bell” that can be heard from the EMU actually comes from speakers that are mounted on the roof of the building. (Marissa Willke/Emerald)

Gillooly-Kress said to the Emerald when the union announced the results. “I am also very excited to see what we can do next as we have built up an incredible network of people who are now engaged in the union in a way I have never seen in my six years of being involved.” The union represents UO’s 1,400-some graduate employees, graduate students who teach, research and work in university administration in exchange for tuition and fee waivers.

Kayleigh Petermanbtalks to passersby about the GTFF’s bargaining with UO. (Sarah Northrop/Emerald)

EMU BELLS ARE BACK IN TOWN BY CARRINGTON POWELL

An electric bell system, known as the “Carillon Chimes,” sits on top of the EMU. It has existed in some form since the 1950s and rings on the quarter of the hour, every hour, from dawn until dusk. It can play anything from music to an emergency alert system. But after a survey was posted on the UO subreddit, it was revealed that many people aren’t fans of how frequently the bell rings. Nearly half of

students said it distracts them from their work. The bells are especially disruptive in the LLC residence hall, where one student said that he could hear the chimes through his headphones when he had music on. However, most of the students in the survey still wanted the bell around. All they wanted was for it to ring less than four times an hour, every hour, every day. Workers prepare to strike. (Courtesy of SEIU local 503)

SEIU CAME CLOSE TO STRIKING BY RYAN NGUYEN AND GINA SCALPONE In September, classified employees at Oregon’s seven public universities also came close to striking. Negotiations had stalled for months between the schools and the labor union representing their classified employees, Service Employees International Union Local 503. The 4,500-member union planned to begin striking Sept. 30, the day before classes began at UO and some other Oregon colleges.

The new building Tykeson Hall. (D.L. Young/Emerald)

But the strike was averted days before its potential start when SEIU and the universities were able to come to an agreement. Classified employees include workers in food preparation, maintenance, custodial services and information technology, among other areas. The new contract includes increases to salaries and paid leave due to weather-related closures.

TYKESON HALL OPENS BY BRUNO CROLLA Tykeson Hall opened at the beginning of the fall term. The newest College of Arts and Sciences advising building on campus introduced an experimental style of advising using “flight paths.” These paths act as a way to consolidate similar majors in an attempt to help students who are not settled on one major yet. This building has been in the making since 2014 when Willie and Donald Tykeson made a $10 million donation to UO. They eventually held a ceremonial groundbreaking in fall 2017. According to the Tykeson website, the academic structure of Tykeson (its classrooms, advising models and career center) is the first of its kind in the country.

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“One of the new things that’s very innovative for CAS students is this integrative model where you have academic advising happening while career advising is threaded through it. So when you’re thinking about these majors and programs, students are able to talk about careers and leading them to what those experiences are and advising,” Kimberly Johnson, vice provost of advising said of Tykeson Hall. Students seeking to explore career options, integrated academic and career advising, or who are just looking for guidance toward the right major can now find all of this in Tykeson Hall.


A Smith Family Bookstore employee stands between two bookshelves. (Connor Cox/Emerald)

SMITH FAMILY BOOKSTORE CLOSES BY DONNY MORRISON In October, the Smith Family Bookstore announced that it would be closing the doors on its UO campus location after 45 years in business. It was the laststanding used bookstore near campus. For a long time, Smith Family was the closest and cheapest option for used textbooks. However, with textbook sales

Lyllye Reynolds-Parker, President Michael Schill, and members of the UO Black Student Task Force cut the ribbon to open the Black Cultural Center. (Marissa Wilke/Emerald)

moving online and a renovation happening at their second location on Willamette, it was time for Smith Family to close up shop near UO. We heard from second-generational owner Evon Smith about what the bookstore meant to campus in the ‘80s and what to expect from the expansion on Willamette street.

LYLLYE REYNOLDS-PARKER BLACK CULTURAL CENTER OPENS BY C. FRANCIS O’LEARY UO held a grand opening for the Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center on Oct. 12. Speeches by ReynoldsParker, a former advisor at UO and the first Black person born at Eugene’s Sacred Heart Hospital, UO VP of Equity and Inclusion Professor Alex-Assensoh and members of the Black Student Task Force who initially demanded the construction of a Black Cultural Center on campus marked the event. The BSTF issued a list of demands to UO administration in 2015 in order to foster a more welcoming environment for Black students. UO President Michael Schill announced the construction of the building in 2017 and broke ground on the project in 2018. After considering more than 20 people for the honor,

a committee of students, faculty and staff chose Lyllye Reynolds-Parker as the namesake of the cultural center. The BCC is the first building on campus named for a Black woman, and Reynolds-Parker was chosen for her 17 years of work at UO and continued commitment to the Eugene community today. The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center is now home to a resource library where students can watch movies and check out books by Black authors and about Black culture; an art gallery; a conference room for student organizations and office space. In her speech during the BCC opening, Reynolds-Parker quoted her father: “‘Give people their flowers while they’re alive.’ Well, I’m smelling my roses today!” Colorful Nike shoes greet guests at the front desk of the Graduate Eugene. (Marissa Willke/Emerald)

GRADUATE HOTEL COMES TO EUGENE BY CARRINGTON POWELL The Graduate Eugene hotel opened up over the summer. The Graduate line of hotels brand themselves on being decorated completely in the style of the college and town that they set up in. Eugene’s Graduate Hotel is no different. The first thing seen when walking into the hotel is a custom-made Oregon Duck toy on wheels. The reception desk is a

glass case filled with vintage Nike shoes. Art from local artists decorates the hallways. Every small decoration in the room has meaning. The lamps are formed into statues of the goddess Nike, there are pictures of Otis Day on the wall and ducks on the bathroom wallpaper. It’s a micro version of Eugene that sits in the center of the city.

ULTRA-HIGH-SPEED RAILWAY TO COME TO OREGON BY JACK FORREST Leaders in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia, Canada are planning to connect the Pacific Northwest megaregion “Cascadia” using an ultra-high-speed railway. The new mode of transportation is currently planned to run from Portland, Oregon; to Seattle, Washington; to Vancouver, British Columbia, with each stretch taking around an hour. Eugene was originally part of the railway plan and would have acted as the southernmost station for the Cascadia high-speed railway. The proposed route for the train would have placed tracks following or crossing over Interstate 5,

according to Cascadia High-Speed Rail LLC. According to a business case published in July 2019 by the Washington State Department of Transportation, the project would generate an increase in gross domestic product 12 times that of the construction costs for the project. The railway initiative would also stimulate job growth with as many as 160,000 jobs being created by connecting the megaregion and another 30,000 directly from the construction of the project. These data sets are only for Washington and similar growth is expected in Oregon.

(Michael M. Stokes/Flikr) M O N D AY, D E C E M B E R 2 , 2 0 1 9

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DAILY EMERALD

December 2nd-8th, 2019

FIND OUR FULL LIST OF EVENTS AT: DAILYEMERALD.COM/CALENDAR

DECEMBER 2,

COPING WITH ANXIETY This workshop will help students develop skills for coping with and overcoming symptoms of anxiety, such as excessive worry, feeling overwhelmed, insomnia, perfectionism, and excessive self-criticism. 3-3:50 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 3 pm University Health & Counseling Center, University Counseling Center (2nd floor), University of Oregon.

GEO STUDY ABROAD DROP-IN ADVISING

Are you interested in studying abroad?Want to find out how to fit it in your academic plan?Not sure how to get started?Come speak to a GEO Study Abroad expert on steps to make it a reality! 1:30-3:30 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 1:30 pm Oregon Hall, 300W, University of Oregon.

LET’S TALK

Let’s Talk is a free and confidential service where UO students can stop by for support from a mental health professional in locations across campus. 2-4 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 2 pm Oregon Hall, Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence (CMAE, OH 131), University of Oregon.

TUTORS FOR ADULTS

Adults: drop in for help with English language skills. 4-5:45 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 4 pm Downtown Library, 100 W 10th Ave.

TUESDAY DECEMBER 3, LET’S TALK

Let’s Talk is a free and confidential service where UO students can stop by for support from a mental health professional in locations across campus. 2-4 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 2 pm Erb Memorial Union

Racing to Change chronicles the civil rights movement in Eugene, Oregon, during the 1960s and 1970s—a time of great upheaval, conflict, and celebration as new voices clashed with traditional organizations of power. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 11 am Museum of Natural and Cultural History

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 4,

CONNECT THE DUCKS PRESENTS: BINGO AND TRIVIA NIGHTS!

Connect The Ducks hosts Bingo and Trivia nights each Wednesday from 6:00 to 7:00pm at the EMU O Desk stairs! Come by to have some fun, meet cool people, and win campus cash! 6-7 p.m. Erb Memorial Union, 1395 University St.

COPING WITH DEPRESSION

This workshop will help students gain understanding about where their depression may be coming from. The primary focus will be learning psychological and emotional skills for coping with and overcoming depression. 2-2:50 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 2 pm University Health & Counseling Center, University Counseling Center (2nd floor), University of Oregon.

GEO ASK ME ANYTHING: PEER ADVISING

Thinking about a creative way to finance study abroad and want to learn how others did so?Want to learn how to live like a local student while abroad?Find out how GEO study abroad alum made it happen, and what they wish they’d known beforehand! 12-1 p.m. Oregon Hall, 300W, University of Oregon.

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HAPPINESS HOUR

Come hang out at our Happiness Hour. We’ll keep it all natural breathing and meditation. 4-5 p.m. Prince Lucien Campbell Hall (PLC), Room 361, University of Oregon.

IDEAS ON TAP: REPRESENTATION IN STORYTELLING

Quench your thirst— for knowledge and for beer—at Ideas on Tap, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History’s monthly pub talk. 6-7 p.m. Viking Braggot Co. Southtowne Plaza, University of Oregon.

JOURNEY TO THE THIRD DEMENSION: TOM CRAMER DRAWINGS AND PAINTINGS 19772019 Tom Cramer (American, b. 1960) is widely known for his intricate relief paintings, which celebrate the lushness of nature and the mysteries of the cosmos. This exhibition explores his parallel practice in drawing. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 11 am Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA), University of Oregon.

NAEEMEH NAEEMAEI: DREAMS OF EXTINCTION AND UNDER THE EARTH, OVER THE MOON

Dissolving the artificial boundary between human society and wild nature is the goal of this special exhibition, featuring work from two of the artist’s recent series, “Dreams Before Extinction” and “Under the Earth, Over the Moon.” 11 a.m.-8 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 11 am Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA), University of Oregon.

THURSDAY DECEMBER 5,

3RD ANNUAL CIDERGARDEN COMING TO BEERGARDEN THIS DECEMBER! We’re doing it again! MOST of our taps will be taken over by Cider

for the first weekend in December. Don’t worrywe’ll keep some beer on tap for you hop heads! Beergarden, 777 West 6th Avenue.

HOLIDAY NIGHTS AT THE MUSEUM

Come warm your spirits with holiday fun throughout the museum and deep December discounts at the museum store! 5-8 p.m. Museum of Natural and Cultural History

LEADERSHIP LOUNGE - HOLIDAYS AND CONSUMERISN

A conversation group for students who want to hear and be heard. This week we will talk through holidays and consumerism while sipping on free tea. 2-3 p.m. Erb Memorial Union, 1395 University St.

EMU PAC-12 FOOTBALL WATCH PARTY Come cheer on your Duck! football team in the Pac-12 with the Pit Crew and fellow students in the EMU O Lounge! Pregame and halftime commentary provided by UO’s KWVA announcers. Erb Memorial Union, 1395 University St.

FREE FIRST FRIDAY AT THE MUSEUM

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers free admission on the first Friday of the month. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Museum of Natural and Cultural History

FRIDAYS ON 5TH | FEAT. TONEWOOD TRIO Celebrate the beginning of the weekend with us at Sweet Cheeks on 5th, located upstairs at The Fifth Street Public Market in Downtown Eugene. We feature a local musician each Friday night from 6:00 - 8:00pm. 6-9 p.m. Sweet Cheeks Winery & Vineyard, 27007 Briggs Hill Rd.

GLOBAL SCHOLARS HALL RECITAL SERIES

FRIDAY

DECEMBER 6, BEAR GRILLZ

|ON SALE AT THE UO TICKET OFFICE IN THE EMU| Demon Deluxe Tour with Lucii, Somnium Sound, OG Nixin 7-8 p.m. McDonald Theatre, 1010 Willamette Street.

CULTIVATING SELFCOMPASSION

Let’s end your week learning skills to turn your biggest critic into your greatest ally. This workshop focuses on practicing therapeutic exercises that enhance self-compassion, selfacceptance, and self-love. 11-11:50 a.m. University Health & Counseling Center, University Counseling Center (2nd floor), University of Oregon.

Performer TBA This free recital series is held at noon every Friday of spring term at the Global Scholars Hall, Room 123, and audience members are encouraged to bring their lunch and enjoy the music. 12:15-1:15 p.m. Global Scholars Hall, Great Room, University of Oregon.

RETURNING TO THE NEST

Returning home during school breaks can involve unexpected challenges for students, including shifts in expectations, responsibilities, and relationships, among others. 2-2:50 p.m. Erb Memorial Union

SHE LOVES ME

Considered by many to be the most charming musical ever written, She Loves Me is a warm romantic comedy with an endearing innocence and a touch of old world elegance.

7:30 p.m. The John G. Shedd Institute, 868 High Street.

WEEKEND EVENTS

OREGON’S CIVIL RIGHTS YEARS—THE EUGENE STORY

MONDAY


SATURDAY DECEMBER 7,

CASCADIA QUEST’S 5TH ANNUAL SEASON OF LIGHT GATHERING: AN EVENING ON THE WILD PATH: MEDICINE STORIES FOR OUR TIME Cascadia Quest’s 5th Annual Season of Light Gathering: An Evening on The Wild Path: Medicine Stories for Our Time will be held at the WOW Hall on Saturday, December 7, from 7:00 - 9:00 pm. 6:30 p.m. WOW Hall Community Center for the Performing Arts, 291 West 8th Avenue.

DJ QUIK LIVE! (EUGENE 12/7)

ChochyCity Ent. Presents DJ Quik live! Whirled Pies 199 W.8th Ave Eugene, Or 12/7 Doors @ 8pm 21+ $27 advance $32 day of show NO REFUNDS * ALL SALES ARE FINAL* 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Whirled Pies, 199 W. 8th.

FREE THE FOREST

The Hendricks Park forest has a goal of being ivy free. Help reach that goal by joining 20 years of dedicated volunteer efforts to freethe forest of the invasive English ivy. This is a family-friendly event – no experience necessary. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Hendricks Park, Summit Ave. and Skyline Blvd.

MODEST MOUSE

|ON SALE AT THE UO TICKET OFFICE IN THE EMU 8-9 p.m. McDonald Theatre, 1010 Willamette Street.

NATIVE AMERICAN CRAFTS FAIR, ALL AGES

A gathering of Northwest artists and crafters dedicated to preserving native arts and cultures host the winter Native American Arts andCrafts Fair. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (Monday - Friday) 11 am Amazon Community Center, 2700 Hilyard St.

OREGON DUCKS MEN’S BASKETBALL VS. HAWAII WARRIORS MENS BASKETBALL

4 p.m. Matthew Knight Arena, 1776 E. 13th Ave.

POTTERY STUDIO SALE & OPEN HOUSE

One of Amazon Community Center’s hidden gems is the ceramic studio. Come for a visit, find some holiday gifts and view upcoming classes. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Amazon Community Center, 2700 Hilyard St.

PROVISIONS MARKET HALL: BEAN TO BAR CHOCOLATE-MAKING CLASS

From the cacao bean to the delicious chocolate bar-the transformation is easier than you might think (and it makes your kitchen smell like heaven). 3-5 p.m. 5th Street Public Market, 296 East Fifth Ave..

SPRINGFIELD CHRISTMAS PARADE

The oldest and coldest Christmas parade is in its 67th year and will follow the same parade route as in the past - 21st St and Olympic St, down Mohawk Blvd to Main St.

SUNDAY DECEMBER 8,

CLIMATE REVOLUTIONS BY BIKE - OCTOBER WELCOMING THE RAIN RIDE Let’s welcome our early and glorious rain with

raincoats, action, and cheer! We ride year-round, right?! Let’s compare notes and learn from each other about how to be cozy and warm in all weather. 2-3:30 p.m. Monroe Park, 954 Monroe St..

GRANGER SMITH FEATURING EARL DIBBLES JR.

|ON SALE AT THE UO TICKET OFFICE IN THE EMU| Over the course of his groundbreaking career, Granger Smith has amassed a massive and rabid audience now known as “Yee Yee Nation” built through heavy touring and grassroots fan engagement. 8-9 p.m. McDonald Theatre, 1010 Willamette Street.

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girls?

GUSTAV HOLST

Gustav Holst Holiday Songs The eminently British composer Gustav Holst (1874-1934) is bestknown for his orchestral suite The Planets, but he led a busy life as a choirmaster and organist and composer/arranger of choral music. 7:30-8:15 p.m. The John G. Shedd Institute for the Arts, 868 High Street.

OREGON DUCKS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL VS. SOUTH DAKOTA STATE JACKRABBITS WOMENS BASKETBALL 12 p.m. Matthew Knight Arena, 1776 E. 13th Ave.

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OPINION

The University of Oregon celebrates its 142nd commencement with the traditional Thirteenth Avenue Duck Grad Parade on June 18, 2018. (Dana Sparks/Emerald)

GRADUATE SCHOOL ISN’T THE NEXT STEP FOR EVERYONE BY CAMRYN PRIVETTE

As seniors approach the end of their undergraduate careers, plans for the future are made. For some, that means moving back home, moving to a new city or starting a new job. For others, an undergraduate degree is just the beginning of their education journey with graduate school looming in the background. But how do you know that grad school is the right path for you? First, you need to ask yourself: Does your career require graduate school or is it a cushion between you and the real world? If you want to work in law, medicine or academia, obtaining an advanced degree is a crucial step in your career path. Going to graduate school makes sense for those individuals, but others

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often see graduate school as a resume booster or something to do after getting a bachelor’s degree. Graduate school isn’t a place to explore different areas of interest and switch programs until you find the right one. It’s expensive, costing upwards of $30-40K per year depending on the field, according to a June 2017 study done by the think tank the Urban Institute. The cost of graduate school varies depending on the university and the master’s program itself. But what’s the point in putting yourself in financial limbo for years to come if a graduate program isn’t a necessity? Compare how much money it costs to go back to school with how much you will profit in your field from this additional

degree. Investing too much money into your education could have more consequences than you think. Sometimes work experiences says more to future employers than the degrees you possess. Someone who has had real-life experiences in a specific career field could be more qualified for the job than someone who has just studied it. A graduate degree does not guarantee employment, and just like with any other application process, it is crucial to be a well-rounded applicant. Going to graduate school because you cannot find employment also isn’t a smart idea. We saw this happen during the Great Recession in 2008 when jobs were scarce and masses returned to education programs in

hopes of gaining future employment. For example, the New York Times reports that there was a 20% increase in the number of people taking the LSAT in October 2009 compared with October 2008. While it is impossible to tell, it makes you wonder how many people truly wanted to study law versus the people who saw law as a financially stable career path. While graduate school can add a lot to your resume, it isn’t for everyone. It’s for those who have a passion for their specific field and truly need it to advance in their career. It’s not for those who have anxiety about what to do post-graduation. Don’t use graduate school as a next step if you don’t have to, because sooner rather than later, it will catch up with you.


SPORTS

DUCKS GRINDS OUT

A CIVIL WAR WIN

Ducks running back Cyrus Habibi-Likio (33) celebrates his fourth quarter touchdown with a teammate. (DL Young/Emerald)

BY OSCAR DUYCK The Ducks won the 123rd edition of the Civil War 24-10 on a frigid Saturday afternoon this weekend. Far from pretty, Oregon relied on its defense and special teams to carry it to its 10th win of the season. This year’s Civil War had a lot on the line — Oregon State needed just one more win to earn its first bowl game spot since 2013. “They just talk so much trash,” defensive back Jevon Holland said. “I don’t like how they talk so much trash and then lose.” After three quiet quarters, a series of wild plays in the fourth woke up Autzen Stadium. A fourth-quarter drive by the Beavers led to a powerful 19-yard touchdown run by Jermar Jefferson to cut the Ducks’ lead to seven. Later in the fourth, a Jaylon Redd touchdown was overturned because he lost control of the ball in the end zone, resulting in a turnover. The call elicited a chorus of boos from the Autzen faithful, but Redd had dropped the ball long before it hit the pylon. The Beavers got the ball with the momentum in their favor; however, their chance to tie the game was upended when Thomas Graham Jr. made a critical tackle on fourth and 5. Graham came up clutch again in the last minutes of the fourth quarter, when a streaking Jermar Jefferson

tried to hurdle Graham, only to lose the ball. It was scooped up Brady Breeze, all but icing the game. “It just felt amazing,” Graham said. “The best feeling was just how close I am to most of the seniors.” Oregon’s offense sputtered all game. Herbert overthrew open receivers and the Ducks were 3-14 on third down. The Ducks were held virtually scoreless for the entire second half, with the exception of a late touchdown run by Cyrus Habibi-Likio with a minute remaining when the game was all but decided. “Not up to our standard,” head coach Mario Cristobal said. “We got to get back to work and get better.” Special teams were a bright spot for the Ducks. With the exception of a missed field goal by Camden Lewis, Oregon’s kicking game pinned the Beavers deep in their own territory on numerous occasions. The highlight play of the game was Mykael Wright’s 98-yard kickoff return for a touchdown. Wright torched the Beavers, earning his second kickoff return touchdown of the season. His score was especially important, considering how much trouble Oregon had scoring the ball. His electrifying returns brought back memories of one of the great Oregon return men of all time, De’Anthony Thomas. “I loved De’Anthony Thomas and this is what he

did,” Wright said. “Being able to do this is really a blessing.” Saturday was also the final game for the senior class. Justin Herbert and Troy Dye are some of the most notable departures from the program. They struggled in their first season together, finishing 4-8 and losing the Civil War. But now as seniors, they’re 10-2 and poised for a trip to the Rose Bowl with a win on Friday. The Ducks now face the toughest test ahead of them this season when they take on the winner of the Pac-12 South next week in the conference championship game. “They have a 10-win season, won the North and now they have a chance to play a great team in the Pac-12 Champioship,” Cristobal said. “That’s what your goal is when you go to a program.”

OREGON VS OSU WHEN: NOVEMBER 30 WHERE: OREGON FINAL SCORE: 10-24 MVP: MYKAEL WRIGHT M O N D AY, D E C E M B E R 2 , 2 0 1 9

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53 Pull together 56 Slaughter in baseball 59 Some highlight reel features, for short 60 Summer hrs. 61 Parisian’s possessive 62 Ore suffix 63 Affectionate sign-off

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8 Sonnet part 9 Xenophobes’ fear 10 Muesli morsel 11 Mrs. Robinson’s movie 12 “Fine with me” 13 Classic quintet 18 Response to “Who, me?” 19 Marked, in a way 23 Menu general 24 Gumbo thickener 25 “Wow!” 26 Actress Harper of “No Country for Old Men” 28 Savvy about 31 Until now 34 Cause of a boom and bust? 35 Young newt 37 Smidge 38 “Take ___ a sign” 39 Subject of a cap, in sports 40 Didn’t go by foot 44 “Dropped” drug 45 Compound in Agent Orange 46 Venerate 47 More Scroogelike 48 Tee off 49 Equilibrium 51 Battlefield fare: Abbr.

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1 Goose egg 6 “Major” beast 10 Porter’s regretful Miss 14 From Basra, say 15 Time to stuff stockings 16 [sigh] 17 Start of an algebra problem 20 Toby filler 21 To ___ (perfectly) 22 Heating option 23 Least fresh 27 Throw one’s support behind 29 “___ nerve!” 30 Poet with a “fanatic’s heart” 32 Passage preventers, often 33 Québec assent 34 Jettison 35 Outgoing flight stat 36 The rest of the algebra problem 41 Kitty 42 “L’___ c’est moi” 43 Alternative to Yahoo!

45 It has feathers and flies 47 Black Sabbath’s genre 49 Benchmarks: Abbr. 50 Think tank types 52 Like stir-fry 54 Meditation sounds 55 One-in-a-million 57 Messenger ___ 58 Answer to the algebra problem 64 Steaming 65 Causes of some celebrity clashes 66 Link with 67 Fictional Flanders and Devine 68 Kind of day for a competitive cyclist 69 Historic English county

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verything you need to know

VERYTHING UO

Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle.

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Emerald Monday December 2, 2019  

Emerald Monday December 2, 2019