Issuu on Google+

E

Vol. 114, Issue 7

Wednesday 6:27:2012 Special Coverage DAY

Oregon Daily Emerald online: dailyemerald.com mobile app: trials.dailyemerald.com twitter: @odesports

OLYMPIC TRIALS

6

forecast TODAY High: 76 Low: 50 Mostly sunny

RUNNING FOR HIS LIFE

From childhood military hostage to Olympic hopeful, Lopez Lomong is in the finals for the men’s 5,000 meters mia schauffler multimedia reporter

Lopez Lomong has been running since he was 6 years old. In 2008, he ran with the American flag in the Beijing Olympics. In April, he set a 2012 world-best time in the men’s 5,000-meter race. Earlier this month, he ran in the Prefontaine Classic here in Eugene, finishing fifteenth in the Bowerman Mile, with a time of 3:55.14. But when he began running at the age of 6, it was not for competition or joy — he was escaping from a rebel militant group in South Sudan that had kidnapped him. “We didn’t have much, but we always had food and dancing and singing,” Lomong recalls of his childhood. “One morning when we went to church, a troop of soldiers came in and ordered everyone to lay down.” He says that in Sudan everybody lived a mile or two away from each other, and church was a guaranteed place to find a large group of children together. “They took all the kids, including myself, into a truck that was covered with canvas so we couldn’t see where we were going,” he says. “We drove blindfolded for three or four hours, and when we got there, there were only boys. We didn’t know what happened to the girls.” Conditions at the camp were terrible. “The grain they gave us to eat was mixed 50 percent with sand,” he says. “If you ate it all together, your stomach wouldn’t digest it, and you would die. When you’re hungry, you eat everything you can. Children were dying every day.” The rebel soldiers who kidnapped Lomong wanted to turn him into a child soldier. “An AK-47 became my toy,” he says. “It’s harder to train 18-20 year olds. It’s easier to train young kids and brainwash them.” In the camp, he had three friends who also were taken from his village. After noticing a hole in the fence, they woke him up in the middle of the night and told him he was going to see his family again. “We ran for three days and three nights,” Lomong says. “And we thought we were going to our village, but we ended up in Kenya, which turned out to be our home for a decade.” He and his friends arrived at the refugee camp in Kenya funded by the United Nations. The U.N. issued Lomong a tarp, cooking oil, salt, sugar, as well as flour and advised him to go find other kids to live with. He found a group of kids, and they all consolidated their food to eat one meal a day. “Tuesday was the garbage day from the U.N. compound,” he says. “They would bring the garbage into the refugee camp to be burned. But we ate the garbage. The spoiled food from the compound was our delicacy. They never had to burn the garbage.” Lomong lived in the camp for ten years. In 2000, a U.S. government program offered refugee status for those dubbed “The Lost Boys of Sudan” and provided him with a way out of the refugee camp. “We always had optimism that God would hear our cries,” he says. “One day, people at the church in the refugee camp told us ‘If you guys want to go to America, write your life story and maybe you’ll go to America.’ I came back and wrote my life story in Swahili and brought it back to church, which had become the post office of the camp. They collected and mailed them because we didn’t have money to send it to the American embassy.” Lomong was interviewed and selected to come to America. He flew to Syracuse, N.Y., and was adopted by an American family. “I kept pinching myself to wake up,” he says. “Being rich in Africa means you have your own soccer ball and bike. My parents had three cars, a bike, a basketball and a soccer ball. I didn’t think I was going to stay there long. I’d thought I’d have to go back to work, but they gave me my childhood back. They loved me unconditionally like their own kid. I was just so thankful to be able to call someone mom and dad that would take care of me.” He started high school and says learning English and the culture was very difficult. He also began running cross-country. “Running is part of life in Africa,” he says. “If you want to get somewhere faster, you have to run — that is part of life. There are no cars. “In cross-country, I got to learn English and make friends. I couldn’t speak Swahili when others were speaking English.

jeff matarrese PHOTOGRAPHER Oregon Track Club Elite runner Lopez Lomong competes in the prelims of the men’s 5,000 meters. Lomong was adopted from a refuge camp in Kenya and is in the running to represent the U.S. in London this summer.

I learned to communicate, but it was very hard; English is really hard to learn. I learned about community and taking care of your friends — it reminded me of how you take care of your friends in the camp.” After high school, Lomong ran track and cross-country on full scholarship at Northern Arizona University. He won two national titles and got the attention of Nike. During this time, he also learned his biological mother was still alive. “I got reconnected with my family from a phone call in 2003,” he

says. “My mom was looking for me in the refugee camp and heard about me coming to America. I signed with Nike to go professional to help my family as much as I can.” Four years later in 2007, HBO sponsored him to go see his family for the first time since he was 6 years old. “We had a great celebration, and I brought my younger brothers

LOMONG

continued on page 2

GET CAUGHT UP

OREGON BACH FESTIVAL

FESTIVAL PHOTOS

TRIALS INSTAGRAM PHOTOS

Go to our website for full-day recaps, longer profiles of Trials’ people — both behind-thescenes and starring on it — and other features.

While you’re in town for the Trials, don’t miss Oregon Bach Festival events scheduled to happen in Eugene.

Take a look at the fun that’s been going on just outside of Hayward Field in conglomeration with the Trials.

A running list of photos taken near Hayward Field is still on our website. upload yours or see what others are doing.

dailyemerald.com

PAGE 3

PAGE 7

dailyemerald.com


2 Oregon Daily Emerald Wednesday, June 27, 2012

NEWS 2012 OLYMPIC TRIALS

Wilma Rudolph to be honored Saturday ‘60s sprint legend was told early on she would never walk

Nude Hours

12pm - 2:15am Daily nO COveR

Preston Hiefield freelance reporter

Lottery•Champagne Room Outside Smoking and Drinking Patio 1836 South ‘A’ St., Spfld 541.762.1503

32297

Only 5 minutes from campus! Franklin Blvd. turns into South A. St., Spfld

Both in sports and in life, some say it is human instinct to root for the underdog. When a person or team overcomes what may seem like insurmountable odds, a success story is produced and the these fans win. There may not be a bigger underdog story in the history of track than that of Wilma Rudolph. Rudolph battled a number

Department of Planning, Public Policy and Management

Complete your

Master of Nonprofit Management at the University of Oregon • This two-year degree strongly focuses on skills for leadership of ground-breaking, fearless nonprofit and philanthropic endeavor. • Curriculum is intensely practical, requiring students to practice administrative skills throughout the degree program. • Particular strengths at the UO include environmental studies, arts management, community development, and philanthropy. Many concurrent degree options are available.

Admission is limited; apply by February 1, 2013 (GRE scores required) PLEASE VISIT US AT PPPM.UOREGON.EDU

Contact Associate Professor and Director Renee Irvin, rirvin@uoregon.edu Department of Planning, Public Policy and Management 119 Hendricks Hall 1209 University of Oregon Eugene OR 97403-1209 541-346-3635

EO/AA/ADA institution committed to cultural diversity.

physical disability possible on her way to becoming one of the best athletes of her generation. She was born prematurely on June 23, 1940, weighing just 4.5 lbs. At age four, she was diagnosed with infantile paralysis. This required her to wear a brace on her entire left leg for five years. As a result, her foot became twisted and her mobility limited. When Wilma’s mother brought her into the doctor’s office to seek a cure, the doctor told them that Wilma would never be able to walk again. Mrs. Rudolph would not give up. She discovered a medical college in Nashville, Tenn., roughly 50 miles from their home in Clarksville, where Wilma could be treated. The two made the trip to Nashville twice a week for two years to go through physical therapy and reconstruction. In order for her left foot to regain proper form, Rudolph was forced to wear an orthopedic shoe during this time. She was famously remembered as saying, “My doctor told me I would never walk again. My mother told me I would. I believed my mother.” By the time she was 12, she had fully recovered. In addition to overcoming the odds of being able to walk, she had also battled a variety of severe diseases including measles, chicken pox, scarlet fever, double pneumonia and the whooping cough. As an African-American living in a racially segregated environment, she was unable to obtain proper treatment from doctors. Instead, her mother had to nurse her through these illnesses. With her physical health back to full strength and her athletic career set to take off, she joined her high school’s basketball team. Almost instantly, she was the best athlete on the team, leading the State of Tennessee in scoring and bringing Burt High School a state championship. She participated in track

lomong

continued from page 1

tour tod lease ay! for 2012

over here,” he says. Lomong came back and then ran in the 2008 Beijing Olympics. “That was my biggest dream — to run for this country,” he says. “I was given the opportunity to be the flag bearer; it was so incredible to have that opportunity to meet the president. For those kids who never had the opportunity for anything, who didn’t have a country to run for, when I carried the American flag, it was like my dream had come true. “It was amazing to have the

E AV $S

$

“The feeling of accomplishment welled up inside of me ... I knew that was something that nobody could ever take away from me, ever.” WILMA RUDOLPH THREE-TIME GOLD MEDALIST during the off-season to stay in shape, but it was more of an afterthought rather than a focal point — at least until she met the man that changed her life: Ed Temple. Temple was the track and field coach at Tennessee State University and first discovered Rudolph while watching her play in a high school basketball game. He recognized her natural athleticism and persuaded her to take part in his summer track program at the university. By age 16, she qualified to race for the U.S. Olympic Track and Field team in the 1956 Melbourne Games. She returned home from Australia with a bronze medal in the 4×100-meter relay, but that accolade would be an appetizer in comparison to what she would do in the next Olympic Games. Four years later, at the Summer Olympics in Rome, she turned in one legendary performance after another. She became the first American woman in history to win three gold medals in a single Olympic Games. She won the 100 meters with a time of exactly 11 seconds. This was a world record at the time but was not credited as such because the race was determined to be windaided. Additionally, she set an Olympic record in the 200 meters with a time of 23.2. Finally, she brought home her third gold medal as she anchored the 4×100-meter relay to a world-record finish of 44.5. This victory was perhaps extra sweet because it not only clinched her a spot in the history books

as the first woman to bring home three golds in a single Olympics, but also her three teammates in the race were all friends and teammates of hers at Tennessee State: Martha Hudson, Lucinda Williams and Barbara Jones. “The feeling of accomplishment welled up inside of me, three Olympic gold medals,” she said after the Games. “I knew that was something that nobody could ever take away from me, ever.” Just two years later, at age 22, Rudolph retired from professional track and field competition. She raised a family of four children with her high school sweetheart Robert Eldridge. She graduated f r o m Te n n e s s e e S t a t e University and would later become a teacher, track coach and sports commentator. Rudolph passed away from brain cancer on November 12, 1994, at age 54. The Woman’s Sports Foundation Wilma Rudolph Courage Award was created in her honor, among numerous other awards, statues and foundations named after her. This award is given to a “female athlete who exhibits extraordinary courage in her athletic performance, demonstrates the ability to overcome adversity, makes significant contributions to sports and serves as an inspiration and role model to those who face challenges, overcomes them and strives for success at all levels.” Wilma Rudolph will be honored this Saturday, June 30, at Hayward Field prior to the women’s 200-meter final.

people who supported me, who didn’t see me as a refugee kid but as a fellow American. It was a chance to say thank you to this country.” Since then, Lomong has started the Lopez Lomong Foundation, which partnered with World Vision to establish 4 South Sudan, The partnership aims to “meet the needs of South Sudanese people through water, healthcare, education, and nutrition.” The foundation has already raised $100,000 for clean water and started drilling wells; the next target on his agenda is education. “Every time I go to Africa,

very horrible things are happening,” he says. “Children and girls are not going to school. It’s hard to fathom how other people are being denied education. I’m learning how to help South Sudan, newest country on earth.” As for the present, he is back in Eugene right now for the Olympic Trials — “And then to England to run for the gold medal for the U.S.,” Lomong says. “Because I owe this country so much.” Lomong took first in his heat in the men’s 5,000 meters and is slated to run the final on Thursday evening.

news @ dailyemerald . com

mschauffler@dailyemerald.com

24/7 Eugene Airport Shuttle

Fly

EU

G

For reservations:

888.450.9281

28146

livearenadistrict.com

Fly

www.omnishuttle.com

EU

G

541-461-7959 1-800-741-5097

E$

AV $S


ScEnE nate barrett The Pacific International Children’s Choir at the opening ceremonies of the 2012 U.S. Olympic Team Trials at Hayward Field. The choir will kick off the Oregon Bach Festival on Friday June 29 at 6:45 PM.

photographer

Classically Oregon Starting June 29 and going until July 15, Eugene will be hosting events with the annual Oregon Bach Festival angela allison special sections reporter

The Oregon Bach Festival is an incredible annual event in Oregon. The international music festival runs from June 29 — July 15 and takes place in Eugene, Portland and surrounding cities. It is a world-class celebration of Johann Sebastian Bach and his musical descendents. The festival packs nearly 60 events into 18 days, with musicians from around the world and audiences across the country. The OBF is a program connected to the University of Oregon and especially emphasizes learning and teaching. There are many musical opportunities at every level throughout the two weeks. The focal point is, of course, the performances. There are also numerous concerts at various venues in Eugene and Portland. The festival also generates individual concerts in Ashland, Astoria, Bend, Corvallis and Lincoln City. In Eugene, most of the events are at the Hult Center or the University of Oregon’s School of Music and Dance. The OBF’s founding conductor, Helmuth Rilling, will be retiring after next year’s festival, so it is one of your last chances to see this conducting legend. Rilling, one of the world’s foremost Bach interpreters, is from Stuttgart, Germany, and has been with the Bach festival

since its inception in 1970. Opening night — taking place on June 29 in Eugene and June 30 in Portland — will feature rockstar violinist Joshua Bell and founding conductor Rilling. They will be performing Felix Mendelssohn’s elegant music, which is truly accessible for all ears. The festival is a mix of musicians, students and community members, all coming together for their love of music and Bach. The festival seamlessly incorporates Bach’s work with other classical music as well as modern music. There is truly something for everyone. The OBF Director of Communications George Evano has been working with the festival for 20 years. He has seen it grow and change over the years, but ultimately, the festival’s powerful sentiment remains unchanged. “The music, the friendliness, the joy seems to take over the town, and I think it’s a wonderful thing,” Evano said. For the first time, the OBF is taking over Cuthbert Amphitheater, a massive outdoor stage in Eugene’s popular Alton Baker Park. Pink Martini will be performing with guest vocalist Storm Large on July 1. Another powerful performance that is not to be missed is “A Child of Our Time.” This moving concert combines a joyous mass by J.S. Bach, written in the

“The music, the friendliness, the joy seems to take over the town, and I think it’s a wonderful thing,” GEORGE EVANO bach festival communications director

early 1700s, and a choral work composed by Michael Tippett at the start of World War II. It integrates wonderful orchestrated spirituals in its statement against the war. If you’re on a budget, there are free opportunities at the festival. On July 2 at 4:30 p.m., nearly 100 singers from the Stangeland Family Youth Choral Academy will perform a free public concert at the Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. That same day at noon, Central Lutheran Church presents a free concert performed on its Brombaugh organ. Student tickets are available at the low price of $10 for nearly every concert. Tickets for adults, seniors and community members range from $10 – $67.

To learn more, visit www.oregonbachfestival.com. specialsections @ dailyemerald . com


A

B

C

D

E

F

G

4 Oregon Daily Emerald Wednesday, June 27, 2012

U n i v e r s i t y

11

E

Ducks Serving Ducks —Since 1920.

U

G

o f

O r e g o n

E

N

E

Campus O

Play the gold medal game!

10

The original university store.

Mi l l

FR A

EA ST 11TH AVE

N

North

0

visit gold medal game Robinson participants McKenzie Theatre Villard MILLER THEATRE COMPLEX 400 Feet not located inside Hope Theatre the event gates.

8

UO Annex

PeaceHealth University District

Duck Store

Chiles Peterson

Condon

KINCA ID ST

AL D ER S T

knight Library On The Quad Off E. 13th Ave.

Alder

32360

Chapman

Prince Lucien Campbell (PLC)

Founded in 1960 as a small liberal arts college nested within the larger research university. • Award-winning research active faculty • 700 high achieving students • Educating tomorrow’s global citizens

honors.uoregon.edu

SUPER COOL

SCIENCE STUFF! Willamette Hall Atrium 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. (June 22-25, June 30, July 1)

Sprint over to see interactive science exhibits — from the nanoscale to the macroscale.

PLUS

32155

AWE-INSPIRING SCIENCE DEMONSTRATIONS @ noon, 1 and 2 p.m. brought to you by the UO Departments of Chemistry and Physics

Johnson

On The Quad off E. 13th

Gerlinger Annex

Knight Library

StuDent rec center Off E. 15th Ave. Inside Super Block

Esslinger U N IV E R S IT Y S T

Pioneer Cemetery

Education HEDCO Annex Education Beall Concert

EA ST 17TH AVE

St Rec

C

C McArthur Court

Stu Te

Construction zones

Frohnmayer Music

2

St

De Pu Sa

Gerlinger

EA ST 16TH AVE

3

Erb Memorial Union (EMU)

Collier

Schnitzer Museum of Art Susan JorDan Schnitzer Campbell Hendricks muSeum oF art

Clinical Services

Robert Donald Clark Honors College

oregon DaiLy emeraLD and erb memoriaL union E. 13th Ave. and University

Lokey Education

Your membership makes the UO stronger. Join today at http://uoalumni.com/join

Friendly Columbia

Fenton

robert D. cLark honorS coLLege House Chapman Hall OnJOHNSON E. 13th Ave. LA NE

EA ST 14TH AVE

S

LOKEY

(restricted access)

EA ST 15TH AVE

Visit the UO Alumni Association and Student Ambassadors at the Ford Alumni Center.

Anstett

EA ST 13TH AVE

inFo graPhicS Lab E. 13th Ave. and Kincaid Condon Hall Basement

4

Allen

Computing

ON Y X S T

Duck Store E. 13th Ave. & Kincaid

HILYARD ST

5

Cascade Annex chemiStry Ph Onyx&Brid Willamette Hall Sci Atr Pacific On E.Cascade 13th Ave. Lib

Lillis LILLIS BUSINESS COMPLEX

Eugene Police Department

6

Lawrence

Deady

EA ST 12TH AVE

7

IN B LV D

Volcanology

PeaceHealth 895 E 13th Ave • UODuckStore.com

CMER

NKL

ra c e

FERRY ST

9

HIG H ST

EAST 11TH AVE

Central Power Station

0

400 Feet

Howe Field

N

© 2012 University of Oregon InfoGraphics Lab Department of Geography online at map.uoregon.edu

1

Outdoor Program Barn

EA ST 18TH AVE

A

B

C

D

E

F

G


G

H

I

J

K

L

M Wednesday, June 27, 2012 Oregon Daily Emerald 5

W ZIRC

RIVERF RONT PKW Y

MO S

Information Kiosk

University Health, Counseling, and Testing

Hamilton

Henderson

Hayward Field

Knight Law

East Campus Graduate Village

Visit orientation.uoregon.edu for more information on the Ambassador program or to schedule a special tour. Stop by and see us during the trials at the Ford alumni center.

5

Ganoe

Museum of Natural and Cultural History

LERC Military Science

I

Tuesday – Sunday Wednesday

Visit jsma.uoregon.edu for more information

2

MuseuM of Natural aNd Cultural History

Visit

1

Agate House

J

Opening June 30 Tough by Nature: Portraits of Cowgirls and Ranch Women of the American West

EA ST 17TH AVE

CO L U MB I A S T

Agate

11 a.m. – 5 p.m. 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Provenance: In Honor of Arlene Schnitzer

3

Moss Street Children's Center

HEP

Artificial Turf Field

Agate Apartments

1430 Johnson Lane on the Memorial Quad

4

ON VIEW Russel Wong: The Big Picture

Olum Child Center

Hammer Field

Artificial Turf Field

Global Scholars Hall

Many Nations Longhouse

A G AT E S T

East Grandstand

West Grandstand

6

EA ST 15TH AVE

Eugene Fire Department

H

ForD aLumni center camPuS tourS E. 13th Ave. Next to Knight Arena Thornton Willcox

Smith

Artificial Turf Field

Outdoor Tennis Courts

Matthew Knight Arena

muSeum oF naturaL DeBusk Caswell Bean anD cuLturaL hiStory Bean Bean East 1688 E. 15th Ave. West Parsons Moore Outside Super Block

Bowerman Family

Covered Tennis Courts

udent ennis

Ford Alumni Center

Inside Super Block

Artificial Turf Field

D

K

L

M

today and check out a little Olympic history! located one block east of hayward Field.

see the world’s oldest shoes! Get your stamp!

Open daily 11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. · 1680 e. 15th avenue

visiT

The Fishbowl on the main floor, west side, of the Erb Memorial Union.

Play our bean-bag toss and look at photos from the 2008 Olympic Track Trials. Sponsored by the EMU and the Oregon Daily Emerald

32380

Clark South UO Booth

B LV

Regular & special campUS tOUrS 7 lead by current UO students.

VI L L AR D S T

Stafford

Young

tudent creation

G

Dunn

Robb lain ins McC Tingle Spiller

Living Walton traub Earl Sweetser Adams Learning Sheldon Center ept of Free Souvenir Photo Douglass

ublic afety

KLIN

Watson Burgess Boyn er to n Colli

Schafer

DeCou

UO Student Orientation

EA ST 13TH AVE

Dyment McAlister Hawthorne

North

r

N AV E

knight arena tour Use West Entrance Franklin and E. 13th Ave. Next to Ford Alumni Center FR A N

Jaqua Academic Center

Cloran

McClure MRI Morton

ve

8

MO S S S T

Carson

GA R D E

Jacqua acaDemic center E. 13th Ave. & Agate St.

CO L U MB I A S T

Deschutes

(limited vehicle access)

Ri

9

Oregon

Lokey Laboratories

te

Millrace

COMPLEX

B EE C H S T

Willamette

et

10

Riverfront Innovation Center

Lewis Integrative Science

Huestis

m

MILLR ACE DR

hySicS dge Lab Streisinger rium ience

brary Klamath SCIENCE

11

32226

Fine Arts Wilkinson Studios House Millrace Studios Woodshop Urban Farm Office

la

S ST

Operations

il

EMU


6 Oregon Daily Emerald Wednesday, June 27, 2012

SCENE RECREATION

Eugene has several options for a fun afternoon of golf kate burke special sections reporter

Golfing is a fun day activity for the whole family to enjoy in Eugene’s usual summer sunshine at a fairly reasonable price. Whether you’re hoping to play a long game

or just hit it off at the driving range, there are a few places that can get you out there hitting in no time. Located on 2700 Columbia Street and just 1.5 miles away from the University of Oregon, Laurelwood Gold Course is the closest. Golfers

can play 18 holes for $25 or nine holes for $15 on a green lined with trees. Power-carts are available for rent as well as clubs and equipment. To book a tee time or check specials, check out their website at golflaurelwood.com. Oakway Golf, five miles

from the UO, is another course offering 18 holes at $24 and nine holes at $16 on weekends. Clubs can be rented for $7 and pull-carts for $3 — but you won’t find power carts here. No reservations are needed to golf, however, and there are

special rates for seniors. The furthest course from the UO, Fiddler’s Green, is 10 miles away but offers the lowest price. The green features a flat, 18-hole course, a lighted and covered driving range (perfect for those rainy Eugene days) and putting

as well as chipping greens. Summer rates vary from $8 to $15 depending on the number of holes, and golfers can also rent clubs for $3.50 and carts for $3. Go to fiddlersgreen.com/golfcourse. com for more information. news @ dailyemerald . com

EATS

Off the Waffle’s menu features more than just breakfast

The Orian brothers brought Belgian Liege waffles to Oregon diana higgins special sections reporter

If you are looking for a unique Eugene dining experience, Off the Waffle is sure

to deliver. On 25th Avenue and Willamette Street, the restaurant serves Belgian Liege waffles of all varieties. This waffle is yeast-based and contains imported Belgian-pearled sugar, which caramelizes within the waffle to give it its rich and sweet taste.

Owners and brothers Omer and Dave Orian always enjoyed these Liege waffles from the street vendors near their home in Belgium. The brothers’ business is recognizable for its logo, “The waffle guy” with long, bright orange hair, which resembles the

brothers themselves. The pair decided to bring these type of waffles to Eugene in a variety of both savory and sweet options. You can get your waffle topped with bacon, basil, havarti cheese and maple syrup Alyssa 6.1 for a savory and delicious meal or ice cream, banana,

whipped cream, almonds and chocolate sauce if you are in the mood for something sweeter. These are just two of the 16 different signature waffles that Off the Waffle offers. If none of the signature flavors suit you, you can get creative and even make a custom

waffle with your choice of the many toppings. The restaurant has great food that is filling and affordable, with options other than waffles for the less adventurous restaurant-goer. specialsections @dailyemerald . com

reliable, safe, dependable, Cdl liCensed

MuseuM of Natural and Cultural H i s t o ry

Eugene • Salem • Albany • PDX

“reservations required”

541-758-8001 32309

www.city2cityshuttle.com

1,000 Meter*

See Olympic History!

Jim Thorpe, one of the greatest athletes of all time, is the only competitor ever to win both the Olympic pentathlon and decathlon. Come see his gold medals from the 1912 Olympic trials and learn about his lifelong contributions to sports by visiting the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. We’re located less than two blocks east of Hayward Field. And while you’re here, be sure to see the world’s oldest shoes! 1680 E. 15th Avenue · 541-346-3024 · natural-history.uoregon.edu Open daily 11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Dash for

Deals

DaY 4

DaY 5

25

$

20

$

track town tee

10 Days. 1 deal each day of the olympic trials.

20

$

15

$

go Pre tee

DaY 6

tracktownbook

Exclusively at Your campus Duck Store. Visit UODuckStore.com/DashForDeals to learn more.

Oregon Daily Emerald 1222 E 13th Ave., #300, Eugene, OR 97403 541.346.5511 The Oregon Daily Emerald is published by the Oregon Daily Emerald Publishing Co., Inc. at the University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. The Emerald operates independently of the University with offices in Suite 300 of the Erb Memorial Union. The Emerald is private property. © 2012

NEWSROOM Editor-in-chief x325 Tyree Harris Reporters Branden Andersen Ian Campbell Keegan Clements-Housser Nicole Ginley-Hidinger Preston Hiefield Jeff Lalor Turner Maxwell Becky Metrick Dash Paulson Megan Sanderson Sam Stites Kyle Webb Copy chiefs x323 Franklin Bains Jonathan Bowers

Sports editor x322 David Lieberman Sports reporters Isaac Rosenthal Photographers Nate Barrett Dan Freimark Tess Freeman Eugene Johnson Jeff Matarrese Rockne Andrew Rolll Designer editor Griffin Funk Designers Felecia Rollins Jacob West

BUSINESS Publisher x317 Ryan M. Frank Digital Media Developer Ivar Vong Mobile & web designer Gaston Figueroa Manager x302 Kathy Carbone Delivery Nicholas Baker Zach Kezer Logan Kostur Jeff Kresse Jeff Leanse Thomas Weaver

ADVERTISING Director x303 Brittney Reynolds Representatives Alyssa Adkisson Cally Adkisson Jamie Barclift Kawika Bernal Daniel Bonner Mary Duke Kat Koury Sydney Madge Conor Stott Sam Uyeki Creative services Michele Ross Tara Sloan

3995

$

30

$

Corner of 13th & Kincaid • UODuckStore.com/DashForDeals * Approximate distance between Hayward Field and The Duck Store.


Wednesday, June 27, 2012 Oregon Daily Emerald 7

SCENE

FESTIVAL PHOTOS

1

2

4

3

5

6

photos by turner maxwell photographer 1 Track fans can take a seat on the turf and watch the Olympic Trials on two large TV screens set up in the TrackTown12 festival area. 2 A young track fan poses while he clean and jerked a fake olympic bar and weights at the Otterbox booth on Sunday. 3 Fans get the chance to catch a picture and signature with the new decathlon world record holder Ashton Eaton in the festival area on Sunday. 4 Young fans interact and learn more about track and field at the Starting Block in TrackTown12’s festival area on Sunday. 5 Track fans experience Nike’s Speed Tunnel near Hayward Field on Sunday. 6 Track fans get to try on Nike’s new LunarGlide+ 4 and Flyknit trainers at the Nike Camp Victory in the festival area near Hayward Field.


8 Oregon Daily Emerald Wednesday, June 27, 2012


2012 Olympic Trials Day 6