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Saturday 6:24:2012 Special Coverage DAY

Oregon Daily Emerald

Vol. 114, Issue 4

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OLYMPIC TRIALS

BEST EVER

ASHTON EATON BREAKS THE DECATHLON WORLD RECORD

tess freeman PHOTOGRAPHER Ashton Eaton celebrates after he broke the world record in the decathlon event. He earned a total of 9,039 points and broke two single-event world records during his competition.

Becky Metrick News editor

With 800 meters separating him from the finish line, Ashton Eaton is at 2 minutes flat. Sitting in third, he is right on pace to break the world record. The crowd rises, screaming as they watch him fight for his time. He makes his move, charging in front of second. Recognizing the occasion, Curtis Beach from Duke turns around, slowing and motioning Eaton to pass by. That was it. Ashton Eaton broke the decathlon world record, with a time of 4:14.48 in the 1500 meters.

*** “With 600 meters to go, I became a firm believer that the Hayward magic does exist,” Eaton said. “I felt it for 600 meters … I knew there was no way I was not going to get the world record.” He was excited by the amount of “decathlon love” in the air, and even though he told his rivals to run their own race, he was thankful for all their support. “I feel very fortunate to be in this position,” Eaton said. “It’s just in large part because of the guys you’re competing with next to you.”

*** After a record-breaking first day, Eaton shined in his first event of day two. However, winning the 110-meter hurdles was just another

step toward his ultimate goal. He still had four events remaining. Discus was far from promising. After taking eighth place in the event, it seemed like the field might catch Oregon’s star. More than that, with a mark of 42.81 meters, he was nearly 4.55 meters off of his own personal best. It was his pole vault that reset the tone of the competition. Eaton’s graceful. Easily taking heights that others appeared to struggle with, he floated inches above his marker, arms outstretched as he hit the mats beneath. By his fifth vault, he had surpassed all his competitors. Still, he wasn’t finished. It wasn’t until on his third attempt, where Eaton vaulted 5.30 meters — achieving a lifetime best — that he was finished. By the time his flight of the javelin competition came up, at 7,468 points, Eaton was less than 1,500 away from the American record and an attainable 1,558 points away from beating the world record. His first throw of 58.87m set him up for fourth place; a decent score, good enough to keep him within reach of the world record. But it wasn’t good enough, and he would try again. His frustrated scream echoed throughout Hayward as his second attempt soared through the air, landing just short of his previous throw at 57.98 meters. Once again, it was not enough. The final throw, his last chance to give himself an advantage, fell short once again. 58.13 meters meant that his first score would be used. Just 837 points short of the world record,

Eaton faced his final event: the 1,500 meters. He would need a time of 4:16.23 to achieve his goal. His personal best was 4:18.94. An early supportive chant rang out as they began setting up for the 1,500 meters. The competitors were called to their spots as Hayward’s video screen reviewed the day that tried him and broke others. The PA announced that Eaton had a chance of breaking the world record. The gunshot pierced the air, and history was made.

*** Raised in Bend, Ore., Eaton has been Oregon-oriented his entire life. While competing with University of Oregon during his college years, he won the NCAA decathlon title three times between 2008 and 2010 and claimed the Bowerman award his senior year. “From the very first one that I did, I loved the event,” he said. “I didn’t really know why, still don’t know why.” During the 2008 Olympic Trials, the thensophomore placed fifth overall — just missing out on making the Olympic team. In 2009, he placed second at the USA Track and Field Championships behind current compatriot Trey Hardee who finished these Trials in second. It was then that he made his first international appearance, at the 2009 World Championships. He managed an 18th-place finish. The result was good, but not great by any standard. In 2011, Eaton broke through with a silver medal at the World Championships, but once

again finished second to Hardee. Saturday was the first time it became clear that Eaton would come out on top. And not only to his teammate Hardee, but to decathletes around the world. For him to do it on his home turf became a special part of the experience. “For my decathlon career and maybe just my athletic career, Hayward Field is where it all started for me,” he said. “The support, the crowd loves me, I love them. I love this field. It just means a lot because, it’s not like I’m finished but it’s special for it to happen here. It’s a very special place.” It was only the qualifiers for the legendary world meet, but Eaton refused to back down.

*** After crossing the finish line and slowing down, the realization hit him. His face contorted into a look of sheer happiness and utter disbelief. “There was no conversation,” `he said. “There was just mutual laughter, emotions, words.” After being handed an American flag, Eaton waved while soaking in his new record. For a moment, he let the flag fall over his face as his head fell back, still unbelieving of his accomplishment. “Maybe it’s not even about that much to the rest of the world, but to me it’s my whole world,” Eaton said. “To do the best that I possibly could in my world makes me pretty happy.” bmetrick @ dailyemerald . com


2 Oregon Daily Emerald Sunday, June 24, 2012

TRIALS

HEAT SHEET

nate barrett photographer Sprinter Justin Gatlin runs the 100 meters on Saturday. Gatlin topped off his heat in this race with a time of 9.90 seconds to prevent Tyson Gay from easily taking first among U.S. competitors.

WOMEN’S POLE VAULT (FINAL) 1:00 PM

4 Charles Silmon

TCU

9 George Fields Jr.

Shore A C

10 Jacob Thormaehlen

Texas

5 Justin Gatlin

Unattached

10 JaRod Tobler

Unattached

11 Blake Eaton

Unattached

6 Ryan Bailey

Nike

11 Michael Hartfield

Ohio State

12 Jordan Clarke

Arizona State

1 Samantha Sonnenburg

Unattached

7 Darvis Patton

Nike

12 Reindell Cole

Unattached

2 Morgann Leleux

Georgia

8 Rae Edwards

Unattached

3 Kylie Hutson

Nike

4 Angela Rummans

Unattached

5 Vera Neuenswander

Unattached

2 Keenan Brock

Auburn

6 Lacy Janson

Nike

3 Cordero Gray

Unattached

7 Melissa Gergel

Unattached

4 Philippe Derosier

Unattached

8 Allison Stokke

Unattached

5 Marcus Rowland

Auburn

9 Megan Jamerson

Unattached

6 Tyson Gay

adidas

10 Janice Keppler

Unattached

7 Trell Kimmons

adidas

11 Jennifer Suhr

adidas

8 Ahmad Rashad

Nike

12 Becky Holliday

Unattached

13 Mary Saxer

NYAC

14 Logan Miller

Washington

15 Katherine Viuf

Unattached

16 Melinda Owen

Unattached

17 Bethany Buell

South Dakota

18 Leslie Brost

North Dakota State

19 Alexander Acker

Oklahoma

20 Katie Stripling

Unattached

21 April Kubishta

Unattached

22 Kathleen Majester

Unattached

23 Brysun Stately

Unattached

24 April Bennett

Asics

Heat 3

WOMEN’S DISCUS THROW (FINAL) 3:05 PM

2 Jeremy Wariner

adidas

1 Baillie Gibson

Arizona

3 Manteo Mitchell

Unattached

2 Mary Angell

Unattached

4 Josh Mance

Unattached

3 Summer Pierson

Unattached

5 Tony McQuay

Florida

4 Elizabeth Podominick

Unattached

6 LaShawn Merritt

Nike

5 Anna Jelmini

Arizona State

7 Bryshon Nellum

USC

8 Brady Gehret

Penn State

6 Shelbi Vaughan Mansfield High School

2 Travis Padgett

adidas

7 Suzy Powell-Roos

Asics

3 Justin Murdock

Clemson

8 Jere Summers

Unattached

4 Maurice Mitchell

Florida State

9 Aretha Thurmond

Nike

5 Michael Rodgers

Unattached

10 Stephanie Brown Trafton

Nike

6 Walter Dix

Nike

11 Gia Lewis-Smallwood

Unattached

7 Jeff Demps

Florida

12 Beth Rohl

Michigan State

8 Ivory Williams

Nike

Men’s Long Jump (FINAL) 3:00 PM

1 David Verburg George Mason University

MEN’S SHOT PUT (FINAL) 3:30 PM 1 Kevin Bookout

Unattached

1 Joseph Allen

Unattached

2 Rob Golabek

S U N Y Buffalo

2 William Claye

Nike

3 Cory Martin

Nike

3 Christian Taylor

Li-Ning

4 Kurtis Roberts

Unattached

4 George Kitchens Jr.

Unattached

5 Ryan Whiting

Nike

5 Marquis Dendy

Florida

6 Eric Werskey

ConnQuest

WOMEN’S 400 METER DASH (FINAL) 4:35 PM 1 Keshia Baker

Saucony

2 Jessica Beard

adidas

3 Natasha Hastings

Under Armour

4 Debbie Dunn

Nike

5 Sanya Richard-Ross

Nike

6 Francena McCorory

adidas

7 Dee Dee Trotter

Saucony

8 Diamond Dixon

Kansas

6 Norris Frederick II

Unattached

7 Reese Hoffa

Nike/NYAC

2 Mickey Grimes

Unattached

7 Marquise Goodwin

Texas

8 Joseph Kovacs

Penn State

MEN’S 100 METER DASH (FINAL) 4:48 PM

3 Calesio Newman

Unattached

8 Ronald Taylor

Hastings College

9 Christian Cantwell

Nike

TBA

Heat 1

Oregon Daily Emerald 1222 E 13th Ave., #300, Eugene, OR 97403 541.346.5511 The Oregon Daily Emerald is published by the Oregon Daily Emerald Publishing Co., Inc. at the University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. The Emerald operates independently of the University with offices in Suite 300 of the Erb Memorial Union. The Emerald is private property. © 2012

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MEN’S 100 METER DASH (SEMI-FINAL) 2:30 PM

Heat 2

MEN’S 400 METER DASH (FINAL) 4:20 PM


SCENE tess freeman photographer A Eugenian enjoys one of the nicer days of spring on a trail in Eugene. The area has several good hiking trails with a handful of well-worn paths — including the historic Pre’s Trail — from the many distance runner enthusiasts in town.

Hitting the trails A local’s guide to the five big hiking hotspots in and around the city of Eugene kate burke special sections reporter

Everyone who lives in Eugene, or who has been lucky enough to experience it on one of its drier days, knows that the city can be an outdoor-lover’s playground. Hiking is a regular activity for locals, as there are quite a few trails that are accessible, open for all skill-levels and ages, and offer a beautiful view of Oregon’s native trees and wildlife. Here are five favorites within just 10 miles of the University of Oregon campus. Seven miles away is Mt. Pigsah, a notable hiker’s spot that rises above an arboretum. The trail is easy and 3.5 miles long, so hikers should expect to spend anywhere from one to three hours on the trail — and the time is worth it. At an elevation just under 700 feet, the peak offers an extensive view of the Southern Willamette Valley and the 209-acre arboretum. Experienced hikers say to choose the left trail for the

Keep in mind that hikers should always carry food and water and be cautious of poison oak, which is found near many of these trails. No matter what mountain, butte or park you choose, you are guaranteed beautiful scenery, some good exercise and a great time. best view. One of Eugene’s most popular trails, Spencer Butte, offers a wide range of trails and an all-seeing view from downtown Eugene to the Willamette Valley at just over 2,000 feet. This park is perfect for both beginners and experts, but can get fairly busy in the summertime. Hikers love this trail for its diversity and easily earned views. The Thurston Hills are another great option for those looking for a moderate, short trail. The hills are 5.5 miles away and offer a view of Jasper Valley and Thurston. The larger of the two hills is considered to be the best for hikers,

as the scenery is better and a madrone grove greets hikers at the top. The trails, however, are more faint than other hiking spots, and it is recommended that hikers look online for a guide first. A good resource for advice or maps is www.everytrail.com. Skinner Butte, a close 2.5 miles from the University, is located on the north edge of downtown Eugene. This is an easy hike, requiring about 30 minutes to an hour, that offers a beautiful view of downtown Eugene. Locals suggest hiking Skinner Butte at sunset to enjoy the view of city lights below the giant trees. There is also a paved path for those who are

unable to hike or prefer to drive, but the hikers can find the trailhead on Third Street, a little east of Lincoln Street. Last but not least is Hendricks Park, an outdoor gem just blocks from campus. Known well by locals as one of Eugene’s oldest and most well-kept city parks, Hendricks Park is almost 80 acres of mature forest and native plants, including Douglas-firs up to 200 years old and about 6,000 varieties of rhododendrons. More of a walk in the park than a hike, the four trails this park has to offer are ideal for bikers, runners, dog-walkers, and nature-lovers. For more information or trail maps, visit www.eugene-or.gov. Keep in mind that hikers should always carry food and water and be cautious of poison oak, which is found near many of these trails. No matter what mountain, butte or park you choose, you are guaranteed beautiful scenery, some good exercise and a great time. specialsections @ dailyemerald . com


4 Oregon Daily Emerald Sunday, June 24, 2012

SCENE EATS

Studio One Cafe’s the place for Eggs Benedict & more The cafe also serves up burgers, wraps and scrambles all afternoon angela allison special sections reporter

Studio One Cafe is a homey and eclectic breakfast and lunch spot. It’s open every day from 7 a.m. – 4 p.m., and it has a large outdoor eating area that allows you to enjoy your morning breakfast and coffee in the Eugene sun. If you like Eggs Benedict, this is the place to be. And if you’ve never tried Eggs Benedict, this is the place to try it. And if you don’t fit into either of those categories, you can chose from a massive selection of French toast, omelets or salmon breakfast specialties. If it’s lunchtime, Studio One has a substantial lunch menu with burgers, wraps

and sandwiches. We recommend the Animal House Benedict with fresh spinach, tomato, ham, poached eggs, and hollandaise sauce all over an English muffin. Another specialty to try is Zorba the Greek, a scramble with fresh tomato, onion, spinach, pesto, Kalamata olives and Feta cheese. As for lunch fare, the Avocado and Turkey wrap is particularly scrumptious. Try it with the sweet potato fries or a salad. The Big Chili burger is also a nice treat and is basically a classic cheeseburger dripping with chili. Studio One Cafe is located only two blocks from Hayward Field at 1473 East 19th Street. For more information, visit www.studioonecafe.com or call (541) 342-8596. news @ dailyemerald . com

jeff matarrese photo editor Studio One Cafe, just four blocks from Hayward Field, provides a good variety of breakfast and lunch food. From expected fare to less traditional options, Studio One is sure to have something up your alley.

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Snap a p with In hoto stag at the t ram rials and wa tc appear h it in the “fan P hotos section ”


Sunday, June 24, 2012 Oregon Daily Emerald 5

SCENE SCIENCE

Science museum helps kids explore lauren prater special sections reporter

Right next to Autzen Stadium and Alton Baker Park is a children’s paradise. The Science Factory Children’s Museum & Exploration Dome was once merely a seed of hope for a Eugene children’s science museum in 2002. Since then, more than 30,000 visitors have experienced what is now a successful and growing nonprofit, supported by local residents, businesses and foundations. Thanks to the Exhibit Hall, Exploration Dome, and the special events offered, The Science Factory inspires in children a love of science and learning. The Exhibit Hall has an ongoing iguana and

lizard terrarium wherein lizards, plants and frogs from regions all over the world interact with one another while Renegade, the resident iguana, bids visitors a peek into his nearby home.

In fact, the term “uninteresting” doesn’t describe anything in the Science Factory. With the help of the community, The Science Factory remains (and always will remain) a paradise ...

The Tot Spot is another ongoing exhibit. It’s designed for children under the age of 5 and is complete with underwater murals of ocean animals, a giant play boat and a make-believe tide pool touch tank.

showcases award-winning microscopic life images.

The Exhibit Hall’s most popular attractions, however, are the ones sponsored to be seasonal. “Attack of the Bloodsuckers!” examines the anatomies, behaviors, and life cycles of parasites, “Energyville” visitors pedal bicycles hard and fast enough to propel a model train, and the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition

Visitors can also enter the Exploration Dome, a dome-shaped theater providing nothing to look at besides an encompassing screen. Whether the topic is the Hubble Space Telescope, black holes, prehistoric sea monsters, dinosaurs, rainforest bugs, or the Seven Wonders of the World, no show is a small affair and no show is uninteresting. In fact, the term “uninteresting” doesn’t describe anything in the Science Factory. With the help of the community, The Science Factory

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remains (and always will remain) a paradise, turning the hearts of Eugene youth to science upon every visit.

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There’s strong. Then there’s Army Strong. Enroll in Army ROTC at University of Oregon to complement  your education with the training, experience and skills needed to make you a leader. Army ROTC also may offer up to a full-tuition scholarships and a monthly stipend to help pay for your education. And when you graduate, you will have an edge in life as an Army Officer and a leader. All it takes is enrolling in MSL101. To get started, visit www.goarmy.com/rotc/uo. 

ARMY ROTC provides those LEADERSHIP SKILLS, DISCIPLINE and CONFIDENCE to succeed in college and life.  During your visit, please stop by our office right across from the East Gate of Hayward Field or contact Darren McMahon at 541-346-7682/ mcmahond@uoregon.edu. ©2008. Paid for by the United states army. all rights reserved.

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The Science Factory, open since 2002, turns Eugene youth to science


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UO Annex

PeaceHealth University District

Duck Store

Chiles Peterson

Condon

KINCA ID ST

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knight Library On The Quad Off E. 13th Ave.

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On The Quad off E. 13th

• Award-winning research active faculty • 700 high achieving students • Educating tomorrow’s global citizens

honors.uoregon.edu

SUPER COOL

SCIENCE STUFF! Willamette Hall Atrium 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. (June 22-25, June 30, July 1)

Sprint over to see interactive science exhibits — from the nanoscale to the macroscale.

PLUS

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AWE-INSPIRING SCIENCE DEMONSTRATIONS @ noon, 1 and 2 p.m. brought to you by the UO Departments of Chemistry and Physics

Gerlinger Annex

Knight Library

StuDent rec center Off E. 15th Ave. Inside Super Block

Esslinger U N IV E R S IT Y S T

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Education HEDCO Annex Education Beall Concert

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Schnitzer Museum of Art Susan JorDan Schnitzer Campbell Hendricks muSeum oF art

Clinical Services

Founded in 1960 as a small liberal arts college nested within the larger research university.

Johnson

Lokey Education

Your membership makes the UO stronger.

Robert Donald Clark Honors College

oregon DaiLy emeraLD and erb memoriaL union E. 13th Ave. and University

robert D. cLark honorS coLLege House Chapman Hall OnJOHNSON E. 13th Ave. LA NE

Alder

Join today at http://uoalumni.com/join

Friendly Columbia

Fenton

Chapman

Prince Lucien Campbell (PLC)

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(restricted access)

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Visit the UO Alumni Association and Student Ambassadors at the Ford Alumni Center.

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inFo graPhicS Lab E. 13th Ave. and Kincaid Condon Hall Basement

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Eugene Police Department

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University Health, Counseling, and Testing

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East Campus Graduate Village

Visit orientation.uoregon.edu for more information on the Ambassador program or to schedule a special tour. Stop by and see us during the trials at the Ford alumni center.

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Museum of Natural and Cultural History

LERC Military Science

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Tuesday – Sunday Wednesday

Visit jsma.uoregon.edu for more information

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MuseuM of Natural aNd Cultural History

Visit

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Opening June 30 Tough by Nature: Portraits of Cowgirls and Ranch Women of the American West

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Agate

11 a.m. – 5 p.m. 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Provenance: In Honor of Arlene Schnitzer

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HEP

Artificial Turf Field

Agate Apartments

1430 Johnson Lane on the Memorial Quad

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ON VIEW Russel Wong: The Big Picture

Olum Child Center

Hammer Field

Artificial Turf Field

Global Scholars Hall

Many Nations Longhouse

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muSeum oF naturaL DeBusk Caswell Bean anD cuLturaL hiStory Bean Bean East 1688 E. 15th Ave. West Parsons Moore Outside Super Block

Bowerman Family

Covered Tennis Courts

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Ford Alumni Center

Inside Super Block

Artificial Turf Field

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today and check out a little Olympic history! located one block east of hayward Field.

see the world’s oldest shoes! Get your stamp!

Open daily 11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. · 1680 e. 15th avenue

visiT

The Fishbowl on the main floor, west side, of the Erb Memorial Union.

Play our bean-bag toss, win prizes and check out photos from the 2008 Olympic Trials. Sponsored by the EMU and the Oregon Daily Emerald

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8 Oregon Daily Emerald Sunday, June 24, 2012

TRIALS 2012 OLYMPIC TRIALS

Day 2 rundown of the events that highlighted the Trials Did you miss the biggest moments of the day? We summarize them for you Nicole Ginley-Hidinger freelance reporter

The sun started to peak out from behind the clouds as Day 2 of the Olympic Trials came to a close with the finals of the women’s 100-meter dash and 100-meter hurdles. Carmelita Jeter and Tianna Madison will be on the U.S. women’s 100-meter team in London. Jeter won the race, running a 10.92. “When the gun clicked, all I could hear was my coach John Smith telling me ‘Stay patient, stay patient, let the finish line come to you,’” Jeter said. “That’s exactly what I did.” Madison came in second with a time of 10.96. The race for third between Jeneba Tarmoh and Allyson Felix was determined to be a dead heat. “In today’s race, the outside camera was inconclusive due to some obscured torsos, and it is the torso that determines both time and place,” a USA Track & Field representative announced. Returning Olympic Gold Medalist Dawn Harper was the clear leader along with Kellie Wells in the 100-meter hurdles after the third barrier and ended up finishing first and second, respectively. “I know that I’m racing the best in the world,” Harper said. “I had that pressure of ‘Can she do it again?’ when I went to the line

jeff matarrese photo editor In typical Hayward fashion, the crowd endures torrential downpours to watch Ashton Eaton set world records and see the womens’ 100-meter hurdles and 100-meter dash competitors.

and I told myself ‘You are ready — do not psych yourself out.’” In the men’s 100-meter prelims, Justin Gatlin qualified first with a time of 9.90 — the only racer to break 10 seconds today. “I just want to establish dominance out here every round

and just have a clean race and work on certain techniques and make it to the finals and hopefully get on that team,” Gatlin said. In the triple jump, Lauryn Newson, the Pac-12 champion from Oregon, qualified in third place with a personal best of

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44 feet 4 1/4 inches. She tied Andrea Geubelle. Elijah Greer from Oregon kicked with 200 meters left in the 800 meter semi-final, putting him in third place in his heat and qualifying him for the final on Monday.

“I need to run my heart out if I’m going to have any shot,” Greer said. Oregon runner Laura Roesler was two out from qualifying for the 800 finals. In the same heat, Alysia Montano took an early lead and kept it. She qualified first for

the finals with a time of 2:00.25. In the javelin, Tim Glover placed first in the qualifying round. Oregon’s Sam Crouser and Cyrus Hostetler, an Oregon alumnus, also qualified for the finals on Monday. sports @ dailyemerald . com


Sunday, June 24, 2012 Oregon Daily Emerald 9

TRIALS 2012 OLYMPIC TRIALS

Bryan Clay suffers miscues Saturday, finishes the decathlon Reigning Olympic gold medalist falls far short of qualifying for Games isaac rosenthal sports reporter

Facing a stacked field that included two-time World Champion Trey Hardee and local favorite Ashton Eaton, Bryan Clay’s quest to repeat as Olympic decathlon champion wasn’t going to be easy — but it wasn’t supposed to be this hard. Clay posted good scores on Friday, placing second in the shot put and 100 meters. He finished the first half of the competition in third place with 4,252 points. He was in strong position considering he previously owned a world record in

the decathlon discus, one of two throwing events to start competition on Saturday. From the start, however, it was clear Clay’s day wasn’t going according to plan in any way, shape or form. It also quickly became clear he wasn’t going to lie down — even if he needed a little encouragement from his coaches. “I didn’t want to finish,” Clay said. “My coaches made me, and I had to for my family. As much as I didn’t want to, there was no other option. I want to be the best role model, and the worst thing you can do as a role model is quit.” A false start in the 110-meter hurdles turned out to be just the beginning of his troubles. When the race finally began, he tripped on the final two hurdles

and limped across the finish line. He was initially disqualified for touching a hurdle before having his time reinstated. Either way, the race all but ended his Olympic dream with four events still left on the docket. He took the field for the discus to supportive applause from the knowledgeable crowd at Hayward Field but sent his first attempt into the cage. He got another attempt at his firstround throw after officials determined there were issues with the cage, but he still didn’t manage a scoring throw on either of his first two attempts. On his third attempt, he was finally able to get a disc into the sector, but what looked like the best throw of the day was negated due to a foot fault. That error gave Clay zero points for the

“I didn’t want to finish. ... As much as I didn’t want to, there was no other option. I want to be the best role model, and the worst thing you can do as a role model is quit.” BRYAN CLAY 2008 decathlon gold medalist event, rendering the eventual reversal of his DQ in the 110-meter hurdles irrelevant. Clay continued to compete in the pole vault, passing on early height attempts before then easily soaring over the bar at 4.80 meters to keep pace with the leader. He was unable to clear the bar at 4.90, but his mark of 4.80 meters was good enough for seventh place and earned

him 849 points. Regardless, Clay remained in last place among those still competing, due to his non-score in the discus. After a significant rain delay, he put on a clinic in the javelin, throwing over 60 meters on each of his three attempts to place second in the event with a mark of 66.80. At the end, he labored to make it through the final event

2012 OLYMPIC TRIALS

sports editor

3:30 p.m., Men’s shot put final This event will pit Georgia native Reese Hoffa against Christian Cantwell (a silver medalist in Beijing in 2008) and Ryan Whiting (who claimed first place at the 2012 World Indoor Championships). Cantwell had the best throw of any competitor in the preliminaries (21.22m) but will surely be challenged by Cantwell and Whiting. Cantwell’s personal best is 22.54 meters, while Whiting’s career-best effort is 21.97.

Sunday’s 400-meter final has several storylines that are sure to captivate. The favorite in the event is LaShawn Merritt, a grizzled veteran that earned gold in Beijing in 2008. Tony McQuay, a junior from the University of Florida that claimed an NCAA title in 2012, will challenge Merritt. Jeremy Wariner, a 28-year-old Texan and longtime rival to Merritt, has won four Olympic medals and also figures to be near the front of the pack.

4:35 p.m., Women’s 400m final Sanya Richards-Ross, who won bronze in Beijing and is the reigning 2012 World Indoor Champion, will be a clear favorite in the 400. RichardsRoss’ main adversary will be

track fans

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Francena McCorory, a former NCAA champion and American indoor record holder. Natasha Hastings also has an opportunity to push to the front and represent the US in London.

4:48 p.m., Men’s 100m final Before this weekend, American record holder Tyson Gay seemed destined to top the list of American sprinters headed to London. That was before Justin Gatlin ran a 9.90 to top his heat on Saturday. Gatlin won gold in the 100 in Athens in 2004, but was forced to miss the 2008 Olympics as a result of a failed drug test. Gay, whose personal best is 9.69, is almost a sure bet to finish in the top three. Can Gatlin surge past Walter Dix (an Olympic bronze medalist in 2008) or Michael Rodgers (2009 USA Outdoor Champion) to claim a spot on team USA? Only time will tell.

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Four events you must see in the third day of the Trials Here are the races you need to keep an eye on and shouldn’t miss

of the decathlon, the 1500 meters. He finished nearly a minute behind Eaton and the rest of the leaders but ahead of fellow competitors Jake Arnold and Ryan Harlan. During the decathletes’ victory lap, Clay was given a warm ovation from the fans at Hayward Field. He finished twelfth with 7,092 points despite failing to score in the discus and recording a last-place finish in the 110-meter hurdles.He still managed to place ahead of four athletes who scored in all 10 events. Though Clay will be 36 years old for the next Olympic Trials, he says his career isn’t done yet. “I don’t think I’ll hang it up,” he said. “There is always another team to be made.”

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10 Oregon Daily Emerald Sunday, June 24, 2012

TRIALS BEHIND THE SCENES

Olympic Trials coordinator job high-stress, high-reward position Dennis Olafson oversees the work of every athlete, official at Olympic Trials Keegan Clements-Housser news reporter

During any given day of the Olympic Trials, Trials coordinator Dennis Olafson is endlessly, frantically busy. He’s helping athletes and staff make sure they have the right paperwork, patching holes left by late or missing

officials, and ensuring that everyone wandering around the events are where they’re supposed to be. Lots of little things – “putting out fires,” he calls it – but they add up to make for a full schedule. “I couldn’t tell you what went on (Friday). I don’t see meets,” Olafson said, explaining that by the time he’s made his rounds, he generally only has a few minutes to spare before his next project. “(Friday) I got to see the last lap of the men’s 10K, and the last lap of the women’s 10K, and that

was it.” It’s for this very reason that he stepped down from both his previous track positions with the Oregon Track Club and the University of Oregon Track and Field Program. Previously the chairman for the former and an officials coordinator for the latter, he left the positions to focus more on what originally turned him from a student high jump athlete to an athletic official: officiating events. Nevertheless, when asked to coordinate for the 2012 Olympic Trials, Prefontaine Classic,

“It’s a lot of work, but it’s very rewarding. It’s the probably the camaraderie that I picked up on the most, even with the athletes … I get to work with a lot of enjoyable, easy to get along with people. It makes it all worth it.” DENNIS OLAFSON olympic trials coordinator and Pac-12 Championships, the Portland-based track veteran of 40 years stepped back up to the plate. After all, he pointed out, not many other people are on a familiar, even friendly, basis with nearly as many of the visit-

ing officials he is after four decades. Besides, even though he doesn’t get to see many of the events, he still enjoys his job. “It’s a lot of work, but it’s very rewarding,” said Olafson. “It’s the probably the cama-

raderie that I picked up on the most, even with the athletes … I get to work with a lot of enjoyable, easy to get along with people. It makes it all worth it.” kchouser@dailyemerald . com

VOLUNTEERS

Married couple finds joy in helping make the Trials run Joseph and Catherine Calbreath have long history as track volunteers megan sanderson news reporter

Among the 1,800 volunteers at the Olympic Trials, Joseph Calbreath and his wife Catherine are a couple of veterans. The Calbreaths have been volunteering their time for the Olympic Trials since 2008, but have volunteered at other track events for the past 20 years. They first got their start when their son was in junior

high. The Calbreaths volunteered at anything their children participated in, but it was track that the two continued to do after their children were out of school. “We liked track, so we just kept doing track,” Calbreath said. The Calbreaths’ favorite track events are the distance runs. As long as it’s over a mile, they two love to watch the different races. They find that the sprints are over too quickly. “You don’t get to appreciate the race,” Calbreath said. Calbreath

became

certified to officiate track

behind the scenes.”

Despite any problems or difficulties that the Calbreaths encountered, basket running remains to be their favorite volunteer job. meets in 1996. In 2007, both Calbreath and his wife became members of USATF, specifically for the Olympic Trials. Although it is not a requirement, it is preferred if you are a member of the USATF to volunteer at the Olympic Trials. The two decided to volunteer

MuseuM of Natural and Cultural H i s t o ry

for the Olympic Trials because of their love for the sport. “It looked like Calbreath’s wife said.

fun,”

Calbreath said that they also figured out that there were extra benefits to volunteering. “You get in free,” Calbreath said. “And you get to see

It was Calbreath’s wife that got them into the basket running. Basket runners make sure that the athletes personal belongings are taken from the starting line to the finish line for the athletes. Calbreath’s wife thought she would like that job because it allowed for her to keep moving instead of staying in one spot. The couple first started basket running in the Butte to Butte run in Eugene and just kind of fell into a niche. When they decided to volunteer for the 2008 Olympic Trials, the Calbreaths decided to continue on with basket

running. After asking an old friend of theirs if they could be a part of his crew, the two were accepted. After the 2008 Trials, the leader of the basket crew quit, leaving the Calbreaths in charge. The Calbreaths, never being in charge before, had to figure a lot of it out on their own. Calbreath said that they had a steep learning curve. Despite any problems or difficulties that the Calbreaths encountered, basket running remains to be their favorite volunteer job. “We get to be at the start of every race,” Calbreath said. “We get to see the athletes.” msanderson@dailyemerald.com

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Jim Thorpe, one of the greatest athletes of all time, is the only competitor ever to win both the Olympic pentathlon and decathlon. Come see his gold medals from the 1912 Olympic trials and learn about his lifelong contributions to sports by visiting the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. We’re located less than two blocks east of Hayward Field. And while you’re here, be sure to see the world’s oldest shoes! 1680 E. 15th Avenue · 541-346-3024 · natural-history.uoregon.edu Open daily 11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

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Sunday, June 24, 2012 Oregon Daily Emerald 11

TRIALS

photos

1

2

3

6

4

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1 tess freeman photographer Decathlon competitor Bryan Clay soars over the bar in the pole vault. Clay, a 2008 gold medalist, did not qualify for the 2012 Olympics. 2 eugene johnson photographer The women’s 100-meter hurdles competitors break out of the starting block in a semi-final heat. 3 tess freeman photographer Lolo Jones (right) and Christina Manning cross the finish line in the finals of women’s 100-meter hurdles. Jones finished third with a time of 12.86 and will compete on the U.S. Olympic team. 4 nate barrett photographer University of Oregon’s English Gardner races in the finals of the 100-meter dash at the Trials. However, she did not qualify for London. 5 jeff matarrese photo editor Kellie Wells celebrates her second-place finish in the women’s 100-meter hurdles. She is a favorite to lead the team in London. 6 tess freeman photographer Dawn Harper finished first in the 100-meter hurdles with a time of 12.73 seconds. 7 eugene johnson photographer Trey Hardee participates in the discus throw of the decathlon on Saturday. Hardee, recovered from elbow surgery seven months ago, placed second. 5

FAN PHOTOS

snap a photo with instagram at the trials and watch it appear in the “fan photos” section of trials.dailyemerald.com


12 Oregon Daily Emerald Sunday, June 24, 2012


Olympic Trials Day 3  

Volume 114 Issue 4

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