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D A I LY E M E R A L D . C O M

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BACK MOVING FORWARD THIS WAS A YEAR FULL OF CHANGES,

loss and growth, and the Emerald covered it all.

UO WOMEN PLACE SEVENTH AT NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS SPORTS PG 7

JSMA HOSTS PIECES BY GLENN BROWN THIS SUMMER A&C PG 15

UO INSTITUTES NEW PLASTIC RECYCLING RULES NEWS PG 6


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NEWS

UO senior Rachel Alm founded Define American UO. (Emily Goodykoontz)

NEW CLUB EXPLORES WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AMERICAN BY EMILY GOODYKOONTZ • TWITTER @SHARKASAURUSX

UO senior Rachel Alm doesn’t know what it means to be American, but she’s starting a campus-wide conversation seeking an answer to the question. Alm’s family emigrated from Japan to Hawaii five generations ago. Growing up in her Hawaiian community, Alm was considered to be Hapa — a Hawaiian word identifying people of mixedrace heritage, particularly of Asian or Pacific Islander descent. It was a comfortable term for a young woman straddling the identities of her Japanese and Scandinavian descent while growing up as an American and a Hawaiian resident, she said. But when Alm moved to Eugene, a much more homogenous white community than her last, she found that her Japanese heritage became the quality identifying her to many people. “When I came to Oregon, I was like ‘Wow, I am suddenly this Asian girl,’ and that was really weird for me because growing up, I was mixed-race — a Hapa kid in Hawaii,” said Alm. Her complex and rich heritage and identity was reduced by strangers— and it wasn’t even an accurate depiction, she said. “When I came here, I realized I didn’t feel like I fit in and I didn’t know that much about American continental culture,” said Alm. “I felt very privileged to have been raised in Hawaii but then was struggling to figure out what it means to be American.” She realizes this might be a common experience for U.S. immigrants and their descendants. “How do I understand where I fit into American as a mixed-race kid? ere’s going be plenty more people like me, so we need to figure this out,” she said. Alm founded Define American UO last fall, a local chapter of a national nonprofit founded by Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and undocumented immigrant Jose Antonio Vargas. Define American explores how cultural narratives and storytelling influence ideas about immigration and identity. As

e Emerald is published by Emerald Media Group, Inc., the independent nonprofit media company at the University of Oregon. Formerly the Oregon Daily Emerald, the news organization was founded in 1900. VO L . 1 1 9 , I S S U E N O. 5 5

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coordinator of a hyper-local campus chapter, Alm is laying the foundation for a conversation to unfold. Vargas visited campus fall term as the UO Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics Chair; the organization’s current theme of inquiry is “borders, migration and belonging.” When Alm met Vargas during a lunch meeting with Wayne Morse scholars, he suggested that she could bring a locally-focused chapter of Define American to UO. “I think we have to figure out a sense of collective identity beyond just our segmented groups. at’s what I’m kind of hoping we can do, is be a place for these difficult conversations that are coming up because we are becoming more diverse,” said Alm. “I think that diversity will be beautiful once we know how to work through differences and what happens when a homogenous community breaks down and is suddenly interacting with people that it never had to before.” Alm said that Define American UO doesn’t have any political affiliation; It welcomes all students interested in participating in conversations about American identity and immigration. e group is working to challenge negative stereotypes about immigration in partnership with other similar organizations like No Lost Generation UO, a student group that advocates for refugees. Momo Wilms-Crowe, director of No Lost Generation UO and a Define American UO member, said that while UO can be an open community, she does see ideas and stereotypes harmful to local immigrant communities. “It’s not something that’s just unique to our campus; it’s a national conversation and I think the university is a microcosm for that,” said Wilms-Crowe. She said Define American is looking for ways to uplift and support immigrant voices while challenging harmful ideas about the “good immigrant and bad immigrant dichotomy.” “e biggest way that these harmful narratives get spread is just by people who don’t have that

NEWS EDITORS FRANKIE BENITEZ BRAEDON KWIECIEN ERIN CAREY A&C EDITORS ZACH PRICE SARAROSA DAVIES DANA ALSTON OPINION EDITORS BILLY MANGGALA JADYN MARKS SPORTS EDITORS JACK BUTLER SHAWN MEDOW MAGGIE VANONI PODCAST EDITOR ALEC COWAN

personal connection. With refugees, there’s just so much misconception,” said Wilms-Crowe. Alm and Wilms-Crowe hope to reframe how people talk about immigrants in a way that is accurate and recognizes how they benefit American communities. “I hope that in the future Define American can find a way to really incorporate the voices of immigrants themselves,” said Wilms-Crowe. Vargas’ visit inspired more than one student; Mariko Plescia, a graduate employee in Romance Languages, taught a class with Vargas fall term that focused on empowering immigrants, listening to their experiences and challenging narratives around how they are portrayed in the media. Plescia said that immigrants are underrepresented in media and are often portrayed as criminals. “is change has to come out of listening, and out of listening in particular to people who have gone through the experience of immigration,” she said. On June 12, Define American UO will hold its second showing of Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei’s film “Human Flow,” which documents current mass migrations around the globe. e screening will take place in the Knight Law Center, room 184 at 6:30 p.m. A first screening was held at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art last ursday. e screenings are the first public events held by Define American UO and are funded in partnership with the Wayne Morse Center, said Plescia. After the screening, Plescia will host a community discussion. She said the film is a good starting point to build common ground and frame a conversation about migration that includes a wide variety of perspectives. Define American UO is just beginning to build a presence on campus. Alm said she hopes the screenings will draw interest for student participation in the fall. “We’re here to learn. We don’t know the right answers,” said Alm. “at’s why we want to keep talking — we think we’ll maybe find some answers along the way.”

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A graduate walks up the steps of Johnson Hall. Photograph by Sarah Northrop

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A NEWS

We bring the camera, lights, props and staff.

UO STUDENTS TO PROTEST PIPELINE IN SALEM, GOVERNOR TO ATTEND BY DONNY MORRISON • TWITTER @DONNYMORRISON26

YOU BRING YOUR FABULOUS SELF.

On Tuesday, June 12, University of Oregon students will rally outside a State Land Board meeting in Salem to protest the creation of the Pacific Connector pipeline, as well as the Jordan Cove Liquified Natural Gas facility. Carpools leaving from the university the morning of the 12th are available to all students looking to participate. e rally and carpool are being The PhotoBooth is a customized backdropped photo set-up that allows guests organized by No LNG coalition t your events to capture moments in time. The PhotoBooth has been a staple of members, in connection Cascadia Wildlands and he Emerald Media Group for 3 years and has continued to grow in popularity with 350EUG, which is the Eugene with the community. We can help you set up anywhere and give your guests an chapter of a global organization mazing experience and honestly quite a fun one too. We create custom props dedicated to raising awareness about climate change. nd print all photos onto special film strips, just like we used to get as kids. e proposed 230-mile Pacific Connector pipeline would cross through four counties in total to reach Coos Bay, where the gas would then ustomized backdropped photo set-up that allows guests be exported overseas by the re moments in time. The PhotoBooth has been a staple of Jordan Cove facility. Since 1859, the State Land up for 3 years and has continued to grow in popularity Board has consisted of the $550 and give 1 Hour $300governor, secretary of state edent canGroups help you set up anywhere your guests an and state treasurer, with an honestly quite a fun one$650 too. We create custom props n-Profit $500aim to help manage state 2 Hours land in a way that will benefit to special film strips, just like we used to get as kids. Oregonians. e board was Departments $650 made with an emphasis on conservation and sound land

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management. According to the State Land Board website, the June 12 meeting will discuss a number of topics, including the State Land’s budget for the next three years. According to Dylan Plummer, event coordinator for Climate Justice League and intern at Cascadia Wildlands, the proposed pipeline and export facility threaten Oregon wildlife. “We strongly believe that this project is ecologically and socially reprehensible, as it would pose a threat to Oregon’s clean water and endangered species, including the northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet and a variety of different salmon species,” Plummer said. In a town hall discussion in 2013, Democratic Senator Ron Wyden admitted he was unsure whether the project would have negative environmental impacts but also said it could bring economic benefits to coastal cities in Oregon. e project being discussed was first proposed in 2004 but has been denied twice by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for various reasons.

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e Department of State Lands in Salem, Oregon. (Creative Commons)

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A NEWS UNDERGRADUATE LEGAL STUDIES PROGRAM FINDS SUCCESS IN FIRST YEAR BY JADYN MARKS

Noah Glusman, manager of the Legal Studies program at the University of Oregon. (Adam Eberhardt)

Approximately 40 of this year’s graduating seniors will be receiving the legal studies minor, a program offered through the University of Oregon Law School for the first time this year. Although the minor itself is new, undergraduate law course offerings are not. According to Noah Glusman, the program’s manager, the law school has been offering between three and five undergraduate law courses a term for the past four years. However, it’s only this year that students have been able to declare a minor in legal studies. About the program e legal studies minor requires 24 credits from three categories. Students must take two out of four core classes: Introduction to American Law, Introduction to Criminal Law, Public International Law and Introduction to Conflict Resolution. e second category includes law and conflict resolution electives, of which students must take eight credits. e program divides electives into two subheadings — American society courses and global society courses — although students are not required to take classes from both. In the past, these electives have included courses on government secrets, youth movements and law, how to engage in a dialogue and the IsraelPalestine conflict. e third category consists of campus partner electives, in which students must have at least eight credits. For many students, campus partner electives are already counted toward their major. ere are classes from several departments, including political science, journalism, philosophy and sociology. e law school and campus partners now offer eight to nine courses in total per term, ideally including two core classes, Glusman said. Why legal studies? Students who are taking the legal studies minor come from a wide variety of departments, including 24 majors. ese range from political science to Spanish to general music, to name a few. Glusman said the program is made up of three types of students. e first type are students who are interested in or are exploring legal topics. e second type is students who have found a strong interest in the topic and have found that it pairs well with their major. e third type includes students planning to

go to law school; however, both Glusman and program faculty director Michael Musheno emphasize that the legal studies minor is not a pre-law program. “One of the greatest things about the legal studies minor is that it pairs well with any major on campus,” Glusan said. “I think it’s really important for anyone to have some basic knowledge of how society and laws interact. … You deal with laws on a daily basis. Whether you’re going into education, business, or nonprofits, you’re going to have to know some basic things about the law.” Even though the program was not designed to prepare students for law school, it can help students during their first year of law school, which is particularly difficult, according to Glusman. is is something that junior Audrey Miller, planning to go to law school, considered when she declared the legal studies minor. “While the minor won’t necessarily prepare me for entering into the field of law, it does allow me to dip my feet into the subject and explore multiple areas of law,” Miller said. Program history e program has been in the works for two years. In 2015, Musheno was recruited by UO to help build an undergraduate program in the law school. When he arrived, these plans included the development of a major in legal studies. “I realized very soon that there were a number of programs and departments that had a commitment to educating undergrads in law, and that they were rightfully nervous about the law school getting into the undergraduate business,” Musheno said. e main concern many departments had was how a major in legal studies would affect their own departments. According to Musheno, budgets for departments were partially determined by the number of undergraduate students in them. Musheno conducted meetings with several departments, including political science, philosophy, ethnic studies, and international studies, and soon realized that it would make more sense to partner with these departments. is put other departments’ concerns aside and gave the departments involved a sense of collaboration, according to Musheno. “e cooperation has been phenomenal,” he said.

The program’s first year In the program’s first year, it has achieved an unexpected level of success, especially considering the program’s team hasn’t done much marketing. “We are all just pleasantly surprised — or shocked — at how popular this program is,” Glusman said. “We expected 30 to 40 [students] by the end of the year and we’re at 250 minors.” “We went from, ‘Wow, how many students are actually going to take this minor with all the minors that are out there?’ to ‘Oh my god, how are we going to accommodate all these students?’” Musheno said. Musheno also appreciates the level of diversity and inclusion the program has brought to the law school. It has brought a wider range of interests, disciplines and diversity in race, ethnicity and gender. “[It’s] a really rich environment of inclusion that greatly enhances the law school environment,” Musheno said. “So I feel pretty good about that.” Hopes for the future Both Musheno and Glusman have many ideas on how they can add to the program in the coming years. Glusman hopes to put together some career development materials, including information on internships and summer jobs. He also wants to send out a monthly newsletter. Both Musheno and Glusman emphasized extracurricular programming for legal studies minors. Glusman would like to help develop the Undergraduate Law Society, a newer student group that meets weekly. Musheno wants to survey and interview current students and those on their way out about what would have enhanced their experience as legal studies minors. He would like to provide extracurricular opportunities for students to come together and collaborate outside of the classroom. Another one of Musheno’s goals is to make the undergraduate students realize the law school is theirs. “e undergraduate program is part of what the law school is all about,” he said. “I’d like to think that students who come as minors feel that the library, all the nooks and crannies, and all the programming, all the speakers that take place here are available to them.” M O N D AY, J U N E 1 1 , 2 0 1 8

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A NEWS

ZERO WASTE MAKES CHANGES TO RECYCLING RULES e UO Campus Zero Waste Program truck drives to the Campus Planning and Facilities Management complex, which houses the Office of Sustainability. (Sarah Northrop)

Zero waste has changed its recycling rules to restrict recycling anything but bottles (any plastic container in which the mouth opening at the top is smaller than its base) and jugs (any plastic containers with handles). (Sarah Northrop)

Zero Waste sorts different recyclable materials into appropriate bins. Certain items are moved in and out faster than others. Bottles move through the facility most days, but items like CDs linger around for much longer. (Sarah Northrop) PA G E 6

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BY BECCA ROBBINS • TWITTER @BROBBINSUO

e City of Eugene has changed its recycling rules and the University of Oregon’s Zero Waste Program is asking students to throw all plastics away except for bottles and jugs. Cimmeron Gillespie, Zero Waste Program’s marketing and education coordinator, defined accepted bottles as any plastic container that has a mouth smaller than its base — common types are water bottles and juice bottles, and jugs are considered containers with handles. ey also consider things like jars to be bottles if they fit the shape requirement. “We identify what materials there are markets for so that we can take materials that are able to be recycled,” said Gillespie. “We only want to take materials that we know we can handle and that we know that there’s a market for and we can send.” Gillespie said the most common mistake they see when sorting the waste is people recycling cups, straws and utensils. Another thing that confuses people is the recycling symbol. “ere’s a common

misconception that the recycling mobius, the triangle with the number inside, indicates that item is recyclable,” said Gillespie. “Here we don’t use the mobius to determine what’s recyclable — we use the shape. ere are other areas where that system is different and every system across the United States is going to be different.” Although it can be difficult to remember what goes where, Gillespie said the program tries to make their needs as clear as possible with visual aids on tables and trash cans with colors and pictures. According to Gillespie, UO’s waste recovery percentage is about 55 percent, meaning that amount of materials went somewhere other than a landfill. “at means there’s still room to improve, but we’re excited that the majority of materials are not being thrown away,” said Gillespie. Gillespie encouraged those with any other questions to visit the Zero Waste Program’s website where they can find the program’s email.


SPORTS

Oregon Ducks runner Jessica Hull crosses the finish line to win the 1500m. (Ben Green)

WOMEN PLACE SEVENTH AT NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS,

JESSICA HULL WINS 1,500 BY SIERRA WEBSTER • TWITTER @WEBSTERSIERRAE

In the final day of the 2018 NCAA Track and Field Outdoor Championships, the Oregon women’s team, with nine athletes and two relay teams, scored 39 points for a seventh-place finish, unable to defend last year’s title that capped off the Triple Crown. e Ducks started the day off hot with a secondplace finish in the 4×100-meter relay and a firstplace finish by sophomore Jessica Hull in the 1,500 meters, taking Oregon from unranked with no points to a second-place ranking with 18. Following the 4×100, freshmen Jasmin Reed and Lauren Rain Williams cheered for Hull in the 1,500 before stepping into the media tent. “We kinda just had to stay calm and use [the high emotion] as a positive aspect, instead of letting the moment become too big and making sure we use the energy to get the baton around the track,” Reed said. She joked that she wasn’t sure how the team was doing during her leg, the third. “I didn’t really see anything, honestly, because I have a lot of trouble with the tape aspect of the relay, so I was kinda just really focused in on being patient and watching my tape and making sure I took off at the right time.” But things quickly turned sour for the Ducks

in the 100-meter hurdles and 100-meter dash for 4×100 relay runners and juniors Alaysha Johnson and Ariana Washington. As rain began to dump onto Hayward Field, Johnson took the line for the hurdles. Two false starts and an adjustment to her starting blocks later, Johnson crossed the line in 13.22 seconds with a seventh-place finish. In the 100, Johnson finished last with a time of 11.50. “I don’t think I’ve seen rain like this in a really long time out here,” Johnson said. “Right before the race started, it started to pour and I was just like, ‘Crap!’ I just tried to keep my head straight and my mind clear, and things just didn’t work out for me.” In the 400 meters, junior Briyahna DesRosiers and sophomore Makenzie Dunmore represented Oregon. Hopes of team title contention riding on DesRosiers and Dunmore were dashed as the two brought in a collective four points for the Ducks. DesRosiers finished sixth with a time of 52.10 seconds, while Dunmore went down in the final stretch about 50 meters from the finish. She stayed down for about a minute before crossing the finish with an official time of 1:49.13, almost a whole minute behind seventh-place finisher Rachel Misher of LSU.

Dunmore ran the anchor leg in the semifinal of the 4×400 on ursday, but did not appear in Saturday’s final. DesRosiers, Shae Anderson, Venessa D’Arpino and Hannah Waller represented Oregon, with D’Arpino replacing Dunmore. e Oregon relay team finished third after an exciting comeback by USC in the final 100 meters to win the title. e Trojans finished first, just 0.05 seconds before second-place finisher Purdue. In the 800 meters, senior Sabrina Southerland, who was the first-place finisher in her heat of ursday’s preliminary race and fourth overall, took seventh place with a time of 2:06.99. In the 5,000 meters, junior Lilli Burdon took third with a time of 15:43.22 and senior Samantha Nadel finished 17th in 16:01.14. On the field, Chaquinn Cook took 10th in the triple jump with a jump of 43 feet, 4¼ inches. Hull’s first-place 1,500-meter finish, the only first-place finish for Oregon, was a personal best of 4:08.75 and a bright spot in a mostly rainy and generally disappointing day for Oregon. “It was kinda nice to feel like I was doing it right,” Hull said. “I think that 10 meters to go I was like ‘I’m gonna take this,’ and I was shocked and so excited and then I crossed the line. To have it actually come true, I was blown away — very special moment.”

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Q SPORTS MEN FINISH 35TH IN NCAA OUTDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS

Oregon middle distance runner Sam Prakel runs in the final lap of the men’s 1500m. (Kiara Green)

BY SHAWN MEDOW • TWITTER @SHAWNMEDOW As the rain began to come down with force on the final day of the men’s meet at the NCAA outdoor track and field championships, Oregon middle distance runners redshirt senior Sam Prakel and redshirt sophomore Mick Stanovsek were Oregon’s best chances of glory as the two ran in the 1,500 meters. Stanovsek ran into trouble early on as the physical race took its toll on the walk-on. Prakel was still in it, though. He was forced inside and his battle to get to the outside and into the front fell short, finishing sixth in 3 minutes, 45.73 seconds to earn the Ducks’ first points of the championships. “Definitely lost some momentum on the last lap, had to slow down a bit,” Prakel said. “At some point I slowed down a little bit to get to the outside but that’s something that you never want to do.” Oregon men’s track and field ended the day with just eight points total from Prakel and sprinter Cravon Gillespie, as the team came 35th overall in the team event. e Ducks’ struggle to perform on the big stage for the final time at Historic Hayward Field left a sour taste in the

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mouth of head coach Robert Johnson. “Not what we’re accustomed to,” Johnson said. “One of those things where we have to go sit and evaluate how we can do better. is is the crown jewel of our season and for us not to perform is disheartening.” Prakel said he was too focused on favorite Josh Kerr, who finished third, and ignored the top two finishers: Wisconsin’s Oliver Hoare and Virginia Tech’s Vincent Ciattei. “Something I can learn from and a race like this keeps me hungry and I’ll be back for sure,” said Prakel, who now moves on to the U.S. championships in two weeks. For Stanovsek, focus shifts to next season. “It’s kind of hard not to lose your patience with these championship races but that’s the name of the game,” Stanovsek said. “So come back next year and have this experience under my belt to use as an advantage I guess.” Junior Ben Milligan failed to get beyond the second height in the high jump, but the scoring continued for Oregon with Gillespie flying into a fourth place finish in the

100-meter dash in 10.27 seconds. “Disappointed with my finish,” Gillespie said. “I didn’t have the start I had on Wednesday. Still missed a few things throughout the race. is doesn’t define who I am.” Gillespie had dreamt of competing in an NCAA championships meet, saying he’d watched it on television. Having the opportunity to run at home at Hayward Field made it much easier on the redshirt junior. But Gillespie was not satisfied with his fourth place finish — he wanted to be on top. “[I was] feeling good in warm ups, had great starts,” he said. “Went out there and kind of got out of character a bit.” Freshman Cooper Teare, the Pac-12 cross country freshman of the year, was Oregon’s final men’s athlete of the meet in the penultimate race of the day in the 5,000 meters. Teare, who finished sixth in the Pac-12 championships and 12th in the NCAA West Regionals, crossed the line in 17th in 14:08.18. “It’s a surreal experience,” Teare said. “It was an amazing race, amazing atmosphere. Just the support here is crazy.”


Q SPORTS

USC WINS WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD TITLE IN SIMILAR FASHION AS OREGON IN 2017 BY MAVERICK PALLACK • TWITTER @MAVPALLACK ere have been some memorable moments on the final day of the NCAA Track and Field Championships. Last year, Oregon came out on top after winning the final race, the 4X400 relay, in dramatic fashion. is year, seemingly insurmountable expectations of excitement were placed on the meet, which was the last at current Hayward Field. USC positioned itself well, putting its title hopes all on that same last race. e Trojans came out victorious thanks to an incredible final kick in the 4X400 by senior anchor Kendall Ellis, who beat Purdue’s anchor, Jahneya Mitchell, to the line by just 0.07 seconds. Hail and rain covered participants throughout the day. Two champions, Missouri’s Karissa Schweizer in the 5,000-meter and Boise State’s Allie Ostrander in the 3,000-meter steeplechase, repeated their wins from last year, and a Pac-12 team clinched the team title in the final race, but this time it was USC instead of Oregon. e Trojans went into the final race trailing Georgia by nine points. Since Georgia was without a team in the race, the four Trojans,

Kyra Constantine, Anna Cockrell, Deanna Hill and Ellis, knew that if they won, they would win the championship. “I’m just so glad,” head coach Caryl Smith Gilbert said. “I didn’t know what time would come up on that board first, but man it was good to see that shield.” Ellis said she knew they would win the race “the second she got the baton.” “[Assistant sprints] Coach [Quincy] Watts told me before we even did the race, ‘If there is a 10-meter gap, you can close it.’” Ellis said. “Even if it’d been 20-meters, it doesn’t matter. My goal in my mind was to get our team the win.” Although it ended in stellar fashion, the race was not perfect. Hill’s handoff to Ellis took multiple tries due to a collision with Florida’s Nikki Stephens and Taylor Sharpe. ere was even controversy on whether USC should be disqualified. “I passed it off to her and she didn’t take it the first time and the second time she put her hand out and I got it in there,” Hill said. “Two times and we got it.”

Ellis indeed got it and made up over 10-meters of spacing between the leader, earning the title for her team. “I wanted it for the team,” Ellis said. “We wanted it so bad all season. We wanted to be national champions.” USC did need some help, however. If Stanford’s Vanessa Fraser won the 5,000-meter, the Cardinal would have won the title. Instead, Schweizer, Furman’s Allie Buchalski and Oregon’s Lilli Burdon passed her, giving USC a shot at the title. e Trojans were forced to play spectator as this race was completely out of their hands. “I was a wreck,” Smith Gilbert said. “I said, ‘All we can do is get as many points as we can where we can get them, but we have to win the mile relay.’” With it being the final race at Hayward Field in its current state, the win had a special feeling to it. “ese two days have been a real statement for USC track and field,” Ellis said. “ese last two days at Hayward, at this version, I think it was all about the Trojans. at’s what we wanted to do.”

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THE EMERALD’S YEAR IN REVIEW This year was full of change for the University of Oregon. It’s impossible to sum up a whole year, but here’s a look back on some of the biggest stories that impacted the campus community.

STRING OF ROBBERIES BY FRANKIE BENITEZ • TWITTER @FNBENITEZ In March, a string of armed robberies and muggings shocked campus. Robbers targeted two different Subway restaurants, Tom’s Market on 19th and Agate, Home on Hilyard on East 24th Ave. and Dutch Bros on West 11th. Between March 15 and 19, there were four incidents that involved students. e robbers stole whatever the students had in their pockets, and in one case three assailants pushed a student up against a car and tried to cut the straps off the

student’s backpack, according to a UOPD alert. Some students were threatened with a gun, while some were physically assaulted. UOPD has not alerted the community of any more incidents. As a result of the robberies, UOPD held free, 90 minute self-defense classes in the first two weeks of April and added two routes to its campus shuttle program. UOPD also advised students not to walk alone and to avoid dark areas.

e University of Oregon Police Station. (Adam Eberhardt)

RED WAGON CREAMERY CLOSES BY JACK PITCHER • TWITTER @JACKPITCHER20

Red Wagon Creamery owner Stuart Phillips, pictured with UO president Michael Schill and Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum. (Courtesy of Red Wagon Instagram)

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When students returned from winter break and walked through the EMU, something was missing. Red Wagon Creamery, the Eugene start-up ice cream shop which had received national media coverage for its creative flavors, was no longer in the EMU. e Emerald learned from UO that Red Wagon’s lease had been terminated due to a sale and failure to pay rent on time. But it quickly became apparent that there was more to the story. rough interviews with employees and analysis of public records, the Emerald learned that Red Wagon, a darling of Eugene’s up-and-coming food scene, was a business in disarray. Red Wagon was being sued by creditors, former-employees complained of unpaid wages, the owners owed back taxes, and multiple women, all employees of Red Wagon, accused owner Stuart Phillips of sexual harassment. At the time the Emerald story

ran, Red Wagon’s downtown location was still operating. It has since closed. e Emerald found records of lawsuits against the owners, wage and hour complaints filed with the Bureau of Labor and Industries, and an internal sexual harassment complaint. e complaint was filed by a then19-year-old employee who said that owner Stuart Phillips told her she had “nice, big tits,” and that they should make a porno of her bathing in ice cream. In an interview with the Emerald, Phillips admitted to making an “inappropriate comment,” but denied other sexual harassment allegations. is story was awarded first place for “best news story” by the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association Awards in May 2018. If you missed the story and want to read the full investigation and follow-up coverage, visit dailyemerald.com


TUITION INCREASE AND DIFFERENTIAL TUITION

CAMPUS UPDATES:

BY HANNAH KANIK • TWITTER @HANNAH_KANIK is year, the Board of Trustees voted to increase tuition, support differential tuition for the Lindquist College of Business and reduce differential tuition for the Clark Honors College at its meeting last March. Students were faced with increases in tuition totaling to $270 annually for residents and $810 annually for non residents. e estimated revenue from the increase is approximately $1.4 million annually. President Michael Schill plans to allocate 20 percent of that, or $280,000, towards need-based financial aid. ese increases were met with some opposition from students who shared their testimonials at the meeting last March. University of Oregon administration said these increases come after a $16.7 million budget deficit. Campus is forecasted to grow by

3000 students over the course of eight years to make up for the budget deficit, along with lobbying for state funding and further budget cuts. You can read more about that here. e Board also reduced differential tuition for the Clark Honors College by 35.6 percent from $4,194 per year to $2,700 per year. e Board implemented differential tuition for the Lindquist College of Business adding $20 per credit hour. Of the increased tuition, 20 percent will be allocated to financial aid within the school. Former ASUO president Amy Schenk passed a resolution through the senate to create a task force focused on evaluating how the university grants differential tuition. Schenk said the task force will discuss differential tuition and the “moral questions” surrounding it. e task force will make recommendations to President Schill by Nov 15.

TUITION INCREASE FOR 2018-19:

$270 $810 RESIDENTS

CONSTRUCTION AND CLOSINGS the Tykeson Hall College and Career Building between Johnson hall and Chapman hall last December. e residence hall, Kalapuya Ilihi held its first class of first year students this year. e restaurant Papa’s Soul Food closed its doors last October after 15 years in the Eugene community. Standing on benches and singing “Sweet Caroline” by Neil Diamond at 2 a.m., a tradition commonly known as “Closing Max’s,” will no longer be the same. e popular campus bar banned standing on the benches in February following an incident in which a patron

Knight Campus, Black Cultural Center, loss of Papa’s Soul Food. is year, construction workers, bulldozers and a massive crane crowded campus to construct new buildings. Construction began on the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact March 2 on Franklin Blvd. behind the Lokey Science complex. e campus project was announced October 2016 and is scheduled to open in 2020. e University will gain a 3,200 square foot Black Cultural Center by fall 2019 located on East 15 Ave and Villard Street. Construction began on

ASUO ELECTION After a lively election race between Ducks Together and United UO, Ducks Together won by a landslide. Maria Gallegos

will be the 2018/19 ASUO President. e Ducks Together slate is a slate comprised entirely of queer and people of color.

NON RESIDENTS

DEATHS IN THE COMMUNITY PRESIDENT SCHILL WANTS TO ALLOCATE 20% OF THAT TOWARDS NEED-BASED FINANCIAL AID

($280,000)

e Emerald mourned the loss of four UO community members this year, including School of Journalism and Communication Professor Tom Wheeler in February. Matt Carroll, a junior economics who was studying economics and a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity

died in February. Nicole Panet-Raymond, a sophomore studying at the Robert D. Clark Honors college died after falling into a tree well at Mt. Bachelor in March. Dylan Pietrs, a 21-yearold studying business administration, died at Shasta Lake and the cause of his death is still under investigation.

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OPINION (Illustration by Michael Koval)

FAREWELL, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON BY JADYN MARKS Dear University of Oregon, From the time I first started taking classes here as a senior in high school to my college graduation three years later, my life has changed dramatically. I dropped out of another school, transferred here, founded and let fade away an a cappella group, joined a journalism community, withdrew from a term, changed majors twice, lost a family member, and now, here I am: about to cross the finish line. For many students, college graduation represents the start of a new phase of life — one in which they become part of “the real world.” is is where their lives start. I used to think that way, but I don’t anymore. My life has already started and will continue throughout the next year I take off school before I move out of state to go to law school. For me, graduation does not represent a major change in my life. Instead, this major change has occurred over the two years I’ve spent here. e University of Oregon has been instrumental in me becoming the person I am PA G E 1 2

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today. When I first got here, I had transferred from another school and was still planning to major in chemistry; however, I struggled in more advanced chemistry classes, and as a result, found myself without a major. e next term, I took a political science class and fell in love with the topic, declaring the major a term later. I also auditioned for two a cappella groups when I first arrived, and I’m actually grateful I didn’t get in — the setback inspired me to create my own. My LGBTQ+ group was short-lived, but the experience allowed me to work on my leadership skills and work on music with people in my community. Finally, I sought out the Emerald, hoping to find a place to work on my writing skills. I originally applied for the news desk but was placed on opinion. e placement was wellmade, and I flourished with the opportunity to write about issues that were important to me. e Emerald also provided a variety of opportunities, giving me work experience as an

editor, news writer and copy editor. When I first started, I didn’t realize writing was a skill, and now it’s one I’ll never take for granted. Although I’m happy to be getting my undergraduate degree and preparing to leave Eugene behind, the University of Oregon helped me get back on my feet. e instructors I’ve learned from, the peers I’ve met and the friends I’ve made have influenced me immeasurably. e person I have become today would not be possible without the wide expanse of opportunities UO gave me. To current students, enjoy the time you have here. Take this opportunity to learn seriously, but make sure you have some fun as well. Build relationships with fellow students and professors alike — you never know which connections might help you along later in life. Finally, acknowledge that you’ll probably leave this place a completely different person than when you started. I certainly did. So, thank you, UO. For the good times and bad.


deliver ikes and b o g r a er c ride Newspap

9 OPINION

The Eme

BREAKING UP THE BOYS CLUB BY MILES TRINIDAD Greek Life is almost ubiquitous with college life and is often held up as an institution that instills senses of community, character, friendship, leadership and charity among its members. But this is a romanticized version of Greek Life that hides what it truly is: an antiquated relic that perpetuates privilege for those admitted into the Boys Club of fraternities — mostly upper-class, white, straight, Christian men — and makes its values and beliefs the norm for college social life and beyond. In the process of rushing, implicit biases regarding race, religion, sexuality, and other forms of identity have always influenced whether or not a prospective member “fits in” with the Boys Club. Rather than fostering community and friendship, the need to conform to participate in Greek Life creates an exclusionary clique of people who are exactly the same and think exactly the same. And this sameness can be dangerous. e recent report regarding a derogatory document attributed to Phi Kappa Psi — which included anti-gay slurs, objectification of women, rape jokes, anti-Semitic references and ableist language — exemplifies how the culture of these boys clubs promotes an environment that segregates people into tribes with a homogeneous set of values that perpetuates what is or is not acceptable within groups of men. Perhaps Phi Kappa Psi’s actions can be dismissed as “locker room talk,” but when people are caught in an act when they thought no one was looking, it is always indicative of their true character. But this problematic culture is not just isolated to higher education. ese mostly white boys clubs extend to the business world, Wall Street and the White House through a “fraternity pipeline” where they receive special treatment in already male-dominated fields and keep the toxic culture alive outside of college. is further exacerbates the opportunity gap that minority and marginalized communities have compared to white students to succeed in the professional world. In a university environment where we strive for the discourse of diverse ideas and a celebration of individuality, Greek Life stands

opposed to this premise. Instead, Greek Life provides a safe haven for students to retreat to where everyone looks and thinks alike to avoid different perspectives and reinforce preexisting ones. is is why the University of Oregon should move to promote inclusivity and integration within Greek Life to change the culture both on and off campus. One way to accomplish this is to encourage fraternities and sororities to become co-ed. is would not be the first time single-gender groups integrated. Princeton’s all-male eating clubs went co-ed in the 1990s, and Harvard’s final clubs in 2016. Greek Life should also provide financial aid for members to include those who are not just among the richest 25 percent of the population. Many low-income students are unlikely to pay the dues necessary to participate in Greek Life, which produces a socioeconomic and racial disparity that further contributes privilege to members that have historically been white. Despite the critiques of Greek Life, there are benefits. Many who defend it discuss how it creates a sense of belonging in a period of a person’s life where they are likely away from home for the first time and unsure what to do next. People can forge life-long friendships and find spouses, and it can also provide career opportunities through networking. But why should these opportunities be based solely around gender and reserved for those who have historically participated in it? By breaking apart the homogeneity of Greek Life, we can transform this culture that has defined higher education and beyond. Changing an institution so ingrained in the culture of higher education will not be easy, especially since Greek Life alumni are some of the largest donors for their alma mater, but this change is more than just helping fraternities and sororities become more diverse and inclusive. It is about holding them accountable for the common values and missions they continually say they strive for. If fraternities and sororities are serious about the values they say they uphold, they should be the ones leading this reform.

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H MUSIC

EMERALD RECOMMENDS: THE BEST RELEASES OF THE YEAR SO FAR

We’ve made it. Well, almost. To celebrate the end of the school year, Emerald Arts and Culture writers compiled their favorite releases from the last few months. Celebrate summer and look back on the last year with some of the Emerald’s favorite albums and tracks.

ARCTIC MONKEYS, KANYE WEST AND MORE: NEW MUSIC, OLD FRIENDS BY ZACH PRICE • TWITTER @ZACH_PRICE24 e first half of 2018 has seen numerous artists release new music, which isn’t out of the norm. But there is an interesting trend emerging through the music released this year: Many popular artists who haven’t released music in years are suddenly back. And they’re owning the scene, too. For the first time in a long time, the Arctic Monkeys, A$AP Rocky, J. Cole, Kanye West, Kid Cudi and Pusha T have new records. Each one of those artists dominated popular music in the late 2000s and early 2010s but have since been surprisingly quiet — excluding Kanye West, of course. What isn’t surprising, however, is that these music stars are back like they never left. While their music will never be like it once was, there is no significant dip in quality or creativity from each artist’s music. It’s always fun to discover new artists and music, but it’s always nice to hear from old friends again, too.

“THE OOZ” — KING KRULE BY JORDAN MONTERO • TWITTER @MONTERO_JOR Archy Marshall’s third album, “e Ooz,” occupied the darkest, most sensitive spaces between indie rock and acid jazz in the last year. Released in early October, “e Ooz” offered an immersive album that guided listeners through the sadness and melancholy of grey skies and wet asphalt. “e Ooz,” regarded by Pitchfork as one of the best records of the year, also fixed King Krule as a world-class musician. Compounding off the success of his first two albums, Krule’s 2017 release was the climax of a visionary talent finding his truest sound. When Oregon’s gloominess inevitably comes back around, “e Ooz” will be waiting.

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“NO ONE EVER REALLY DIES” — N.E.R.D BY AMIRA BORDERS • TWITTER @ MIRRAAAAAAAA is album is a hidden gem. “Lemon,” featuring Rihanna, is the most wellknown single, but this album has much more to offer. If you enjoy the sounds of rap blended with upbeat tempos, this is the project you should listen to while ending the school year. In just 11 songs, it manages to give you a variety of choices: You might just find your next favorite head bopper.

“KOD” — J COLE BY AMIRA BORDERS • TWITTER @MIRRAAAAAAAA If you are someone who’s looking for a message in your playlists, then J. Cole’s “KOD” is the right pick. J. Cole shows his growth as a successful rapper dealing with fame, money and other temptations. He makes sure the music is digestible and not too overbearing, like a long lecture. Cole arguably released the most top-tier rap album of the year so far.

“INVASION OF PRIVACY” - CARDI B BY AMIRA BORDERS • TWITTER @MIRRAAAAAAAA Summer is coming soon, and with that, students will need plenty of anthems to sing out loud in the car, on the beach or at home. Cardi B’s “Invasion of Privacy” is full of tracks for every mood a person could possibly have this summer. Whether dancing at a bar to “Bickenhead” or “I Like It,” this album will hype everyone up.

“NOW ONLY” — MOUNT EERIE BY NIC CASTILLON On “Now Only,” songwriter Phil Elverum — who records these days under the moniker Mount Eerie — continued to reflect on the recent passing of his wife, Geneviève Castrée. e album pushed past the minimalism of its 2017 counterpart, “A Crow Looked At Me,” with both defeated pop songs and long, meditative narratives. It may be difficult to subject the record to any type of criticism given its intensely personal nature, but at the same time it’s hard not to recognize “Now Only” as yet another Mount Eerie masterstroke. His honest lyricism, subtle guitar arrangements and expert self-production help to effectively translate his personal suffering into an emotional work of art.


H MUSIC

GLENN BROWN EXHIBIT AT THE JSMA FEATURES ACCESSIBLE, CAPTIVATING WORKS OF ART BY MAX EGENER

is summer, people walking past the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art will see a banner with a striking image of a painting that is on display. It depicts a girl, no more than six years old, with haunting blue eyes gazing out of the frame. Her tilted face, the curls in her hair and her preindustrial era clothes appear fluid, or melting, as she drifts into a trance. British artist Glenn Brown’s “Daydream Nation” is a stunning sight. “Transmutations/Glenn Brown: What’s Old is New Again” is on display at the JSMA until August 19. e exhibit marks the first time the JSMA’s Masterworks on Loan program has collaborated with multiple private collectors to display a variety of an artist’s work. It contains five drawings, two paintings and one sculpture by Brown. Both longtime art aficionados and people who have never set foot in an art museum can appreciate his work for its sheer beauty. e drawings and paintings capture Brown’s mesmerizing use of color and brush work. e sculpture speaks to Brown’s capability in other mediums. In 2014, the Masterworks on Loan program at the JSMA appeared on the cover of e New York Times. e story revealed how art collectors avoid millions of dollars in “use taxes” by donating recently-purchased artworks to museums in states without the tax before they ship the pieces home. Due to the program, the JSMA currently

Day dream Nation by Glenn Brown. (Courtesy of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art)

displays works by world-renowned artists such as Henri Matisse, Joan Miró and JeanMichel Basquiat. “is is a rare opportunity for Eugene in particular,” Emily Shinn, a University of Oregon graduate student of art history, said. Shinn wrote an essay discussing the artwork for a hardcover catalog that accompanies the exhibit. “He’s very very famous in Great Britain. All of these works have been shown in galleries across Europe so it’s a big deal to have them here all at once,” Shinn said. Brown’s unique style allows him to create pieces unlike any people have ever seen, according to Shinn. He blends artistic techniques and concepts that are apparent in the works of multiple artists into his own individual pieces — a style called “appropriation.” He looks for inspiration in the work of artists particularly from the Renaissance period such as Rembrandt. Brown’s art becomes entirely new, but eerily reminiscent of the pieces that initially inspired him. ey are modern transformations, or mutations, of classic artworks from bygone eras. Brown’s painting “is Island Earth” at the JSMA represents how his work can appeal to both people with no knowledge of art history and art scholars such as Shinn. e nearly nine foot tall black and white

is Island Earth by Glenn Brown. (Courtesy of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art)

painting looks like a Renaissance masterpiece from the underworld. Long, flowing brush strokes depict ghostly figures surrounding a saint-like entity holding a baby. ey don’t have any discernible facial features. ey look tormented. e longer people look at the painting, the more distorted, disembodied faces appear around the subjects. “It’s fascinating because I want to read religious symbolism in it, but there’s nothing overly religious about it at all,” Shinn said. One of the donors of the exhibit told Shinn that her daughter saw the painting and said it reminded her of the dementors from the Harry Potter series. “It totally could have been an influence for him — who knows,” Shinn said, enjoying the thought that Brown could have taken an idea from Harry Potter. at’s what makes Brown’s use of appropriation intriguing to Shinn. It embraces how artists can be influenced by a Renaissance painting and contemporary novels like Harry Potter at the same time. It makes art accessible to people who may occupy completely different worlds. In Shinn’s essay in the exhibit’s catalog, she features a quote from Brown that encapsulates how he views his style: “All of the knowledge of all of the art we’ve ever seen is with us when we paint, when I paint.”

Trivial Pursuit by Glenn Brown. (Courtesy of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art) M O N D AY, J U N E 1 1 , 2 0 1 8

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8 JUNE 11-17 CALENDAR

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8 JUNE 11-17 CALENDAR

THIS WEEK IN

EUGENE TUES

TUES

12

EUGENE YOUNG PROFESSIONALS SUMMIT HILTON-EUGENE (66 E 6TH AVE.), 8:30 A.M. TO 6:30 P.M., MAIN EVENT REGISTRATION IS CLOSED BUT AFTER-PARTY REGISTRATION IS STILL OPEN

e Eugene Young Professionals Summit seeks to empower aspiring entrepreneurs through a series of workshops and lectures. Sponsored by the Lundquist College of Business, the event features local business and nonprofit leaders sharing personal journeys and tips for success.

Several speakers are UO alumni, including Ninkasi Brewing Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Cheryl Collins. ose who have already registered for the program can check in at 7:30 a.m. at the Hilton-Eugene. For those who missed registration, the after party registration is still open.

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GREG JOHNSON BLUER BAND THE JAZZ STATION (124 W BROADWAY), 7:30 P.M., $11

Greg Johnson is bringing his funky, organ-based jazz quartet to e Jazz Station this Friday in anticipation of his band’s forthcoming release, “A Liar’s Promise.” Johnson will be playing the saxophone, Michael Dougherty will be on the electric bass, Carey Frank will be on the organ and keyboard and Grammy-nominated Aaron Serfaty

will provide percussion. Johnson has been gaining popularity in the jazz world for his unique style that incorporates tinges of classical and pop music in his jazz stylings. With the Bluer Band, Johnson entertains funkier, more up-beat compositions. ey’ll be playing cuts from “A Liar’s Promise,” which is set to release in July.

Director Ai Weiwei. (Creative Commons)

SCREENING OF DOCUMENTARY ‘HUMAN FLOW’ WILLIAM W. KNIGHT LAW CENTER 184, FREE, BEGINS AT 6:30 P.M. William W. Knight Law Center 184, this free event begins at 6:30 p.m. Sixty-five million people across the globe have been forced to leave their homes in the last few years due to wars, climate change and famine. It has become the largest global refugee crisis since the end of World War II. “Human Flow” is a film produced and directed by Ai Weiwei that documents the ongoing refugee crisis around the world. Viewers are taken to over 20 countries such as Iraq, Greece and Germany to see how individuals are affected by the crisis and how policy

makers are addressing issues that stem from it. e film uses standard video cameras as well as drone and iPhone footage to tell the story. Following the screening, a discussion will be led by Mariko Plescia, a member of the immigrants advocacy group, Define American. e event has been organized by several organizations such as the University of Oregon chapter of Define American, Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Oregon Humanities Center, and e Department of Romance Languages.

WED

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MORE EVENTS:

Paul Hawken Sustainable Oregon 2018 Keynote Address at the McDonald Theatre, 7 p.m., $25

SAT

16

J. SCOTT CELLARS’ GRADUATION

J. SCOTT CELLARS’ URBAN WAREHOUSE (520 COMMERCIAL ST, UNIT G), 5:30 TO 8:30 P.M, FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

Graduation ceremonies are approaching and with that, after party plans are needed. Look no further, J. Scott Cellars’ urban warehouse is hosting the ultimate graduation celebration weekend. From 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, friends and family can enjoy live music, treats from

WED

13 Open mic comedy at Falling Sky Pizzeria in the EMU, 9 p.m.

food trucks and tasty wine. e musical talent for this entertaining weekend will be Mexamericana and Emily Sangder. is weekend event is the perfect place to go if you still are not sure of graduation plans or you just feel like supporting your fellow members of the 2018 class.

FRI

15 Slim 400 ‘Hol’Upppp” Tour’ at WOW Hall, 8 p.m., tickets $13 in advance, $16 at the door M O N D AY, J U N E 1 1 , 2 0 1 8

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8 JUNE 11-17 CALENDAR

LIVE. LEARN. EAT. PLAY.

AUGUST 2017

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1 ___ Sea (inland body with high salinity) 5 With 67-Across, song by 56-Across 9 Sword part 13 Radius, e.g. 14 Comic strip dog with a long tongue 15 Spine-tingling 16 Lash 17 Ike’s partner in 1960s-’70s music 18 Bicycle shorts material 19 With 32-Across, song by 56-Across 22 Half a school year: Abbr. 23 Chaos 24 Splinter group 26 Rat-___ 28 Conveyance in an Ellington song 32 See 19-Across 37 Pres. Carter’s alma mater 38 Having throbbing temples, maybe 39 Fourth notes 40 Expensive

41 Actress Taylor of “Six Feet Under” 42 Song by 56-Across 44 City SSW of Seattle 46 Peacekeeping grp. 47 Afternoon refreshers 49 Long rant 53 London-based record label 56 Musician born 11/27/42 59 “Deliverance” instrument 61 Panache 62 Lickety-split, in a memo 63 Passion 64 Pete and Julie’s “Mod Squad” partner 65 Job for an actor 66 Where to buy GM and GE 67 See 5-Across 68 Compound with a double-bonded carbon atom

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My wife has a problem with clowns. Other than that, let’s party.

M O N D AY, J U N E 1 1 , 2 0 1 8

herbivore. Carnivore. Locavore.

06/11/18 Emerald Media - Monday Edition  
06/11/18 Emerald Media - Monday Edition