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contributors

moving forward the summer zine The Moving Forward Summer Zine is a collaboration between the Moody College of Communication, Class of 2020 Agency, and ORANGE Magazine. All words and designs were produced by ORANGE magazine staff in conjunction with Moody College and Class of 2020 Agency. head writers and editors lydia wagner maya dandashi cruz rendon (co2020 agency) vanessa zielinski (co2020 agency) creative director meredith cambis designers isabel canales vildan karaca emma overholt isaac watson (co2020 agency) featured work from connor cleveland riley church leigh dougal quinto fernandez ariana pleasure mackenzie pratt joseph wallace sloane wick

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moving forward: the summer zine

A Letter from ORANGE Magazine Dear Reader, Whoever you are, we first want to offer you love and support during this tumultuous time. We hope our zine shows you the power in unexpected changes. We hope it shows you the power in creative catharsis. This zine — a collaboration between ORANGE magazine, the Moody College of Communication, and the Class of 2020 Agency — was an unexpected collaboration. At ORANGE, we value these unforeseen shifts. These major life upheavals that leave us reeling and needing to express ourselves are often opportunities in disguise. That was the major theme of our summer. All of our fantasized plotlines shifted dramatically when COVID-19 changed our world, and in-person classes halted. None of the current three executives at ORANGE knew we would even be working with the magazine again. We had all suffered the loss of other plans and predictions for the future and so had everyone around us. We watched the graduating class of 2020 persevere through their disappointment and their lack of closure. It was difficult but inspiring. They showed us how to rise above our circumstances and adapt to dramatic change. That is why the Class of 2020 Agency approached us with the idea for a zine. They wanted to give back to the incoming class and their peers. So as everyone in the world experienced a collective loss, we had the chance to flee straight to our creative outlets. In this zine, you’ll find; interviews, writing, design, illustration, photography and art by Moody students, detailing their unique experiences. We hope you see the honesty, emotion, and catharsis that went into the creation of this project. We have learned that some of the most moving work is born from hardship. And you, personally - whatever you have overcome this summer: we’re proud of you, and we hope you can be proud of your classmates’ accomplishments through this unprecedented time. This is the Moody Summer Zine: Moving Forward. Enjoy


creative submission

Breakfast with Myself

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moving forward: the summer zine

words by mackenzie pratt (communication studies ‘22) art by isabel canales The ghost of who I used to be sits across from me at the kitchen table. She looks like me. She sounds like me. She takes her coffee the same way I do. She asks me where I’ve been. When I will return. But I have no answer, because how can I be expected to step back into her shoes at the end of all this? I’ve been disconnected. Removed. Transported to another plane of existence. One far, far away from my life. My old life. Because that’s what she is. Old. The person I was before became a stranger in just four months. When the world shut down, so did mine. And suddenly I was living outside of my life, in a bubble. Time didn’t exist, or so I hoped. But when everything else came to a standstill, time did as time does. Continued. Continued without me. And thus, despite my best efforts of resistance, I changed. But not with my life. My life remained untouched, unscathed. She waited for me to return. She’s still waiting. Because how do I explain to her I’m not who I was? How do I return to the life I left behind when I’ve grown apart? The things back in my room, left undisturbed, aren’t mine. How could they be? They belong to someone else. To her. How am I supposed to sleep in a place that is now unrecognizable? In a room with old memories from a past life I hardly remember. It’s as if my world was put on pause but I continued onward. Alone. How I wish someone would press play again and yank me back into my daily routine, but that life is long gone. All that’s left is to move forward. To force myself back into a skin now a little too tight, but stretch it to fit the new me. Or maybe I can find a way to coexist with the ghost at the kitchen table. Maybe we can walk into the future together, hand in hand. Maybe we can become one again. I tell her this. She smiles. Maybe we aren’t as different as it seems.

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student interview

Starting a Cake Business with Julia Wachsman words by lydia wagner art by emma overholt Julia Wachsman, a 19-year-old advertising student, has a summer birthday. After moving home to Florida during quarantine, she wanted a gorgeous cake to make life interesting. “Obviously in quarantine, no one can have a birthday party, so it’s something to look forward to,” said Wachsman. After posting the five-layer explosion cake to her instagram story, Wachsman received an ecstatic reaction. One hundred custom cake orders and 1,100 followers later, Wachsman finds joy — and gives it — in her newfound business.

Pictured: A friend holding one of Julia’s cake creations.

“Obviously in quarantine, no one can have a birthday party, so it’s something to look forward to.”

“I gained a lot of confidence. I never knew I could start a business like this,” Wachsman said. “It makes me hopeful for the next business that I have, for my future.” Wachsman is happy to give back to her community and bring small moments of light to customers.

student: julia wachsman major: advertising class: 2023

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moving forward: the summer zine

Interning at Lang Stuttering Institute with Natalie Sfeir words by lydia wagner Natalie Sfeir had never worked with kids before this summer. The 23-year-old graduate student, studying speech-language pathology, worked for Camp Dream. Speak. Live. with the Michael & Tami Lang Stuttering Institute. “It’s usually in-person, but this summer, it went digital,” Sfeir said. “We started each day with a virtual dance party with a DJ who is also a person who stutters.”

student: natalie sfeir major: speech language pathology class: 2021

The kids loved it, and so did Sfeir. Virtual camp also allowed for kids from all across the United States to participate. Before the camp, Sfeir had only worked with adults in UT’s Speech and Hearing Center. She saw clients in-person regularly before the pandemic and then switched to virtual appointments. With both children and adults, Sfeir expressed that she saw amazing triumphs with clients online. “We saw great breakthroughs,” Sfeir said. “We have had to adapt to a lot of new things - loss of our routines, everything transitioning to online, not going to the places we love most or seeing the ones we love most. I have been genuinely surprised and pleased by the amount of resilience that we’ve seen in others.”

Working with Artificial Intelligence with Critica Srivastava words by maya dandashi Junior Critica Srivastava, a 20-year-old corporate communications major and computer science minor, began an internship with an artificial intelligence provider where she helped program AI that predicted financial distress within a company due to the implications of COVID-19. “We’re gathering a lot of information on companies through research to then feed the data into this machine learning program. Then, that program predicts a score (financial distress score) of the company to relay the information to investors on whether or not the company would be worth investing into or not,” Srivastava said. Although the company is based out of Kansas City, MO, Srivastava was able to work from her home in Texas due to coronavirus .

“Working from home was a huge change,” Srivastava said. “I didn’t have a set schedule or routine which made it difficult to do my best work. Once I set that schedule for myself, I started working better. It’s the uncertainty that gets to me, to everyone. Stressing out about how things are going to turn out in the future. I’ve gained a better perspective on all of it since the beginning of quarantine.”

student: critica srivastava major: corporate communications class: 2022

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creative submission

PHOTOGRAPHY photographyBY byCONNOR connor CLEVELAND cleveland

5 radio-television-film ‘22


moving forward: the summer zine

words by connor cleveland (radio-television-film ‘22) From the start of this summer, I could feel the environment changing around me. Even before the lockdown, I began to have this feeling of apprehension and hesitation of whether to keep making plans and going about life “normally”, or take a moment to understand the severity of the pandemic that was only brewing at the time. A way for me to self-reflect is to take photos of friends in a mutually-complementing environment. I love taking portraits of interesting characters with an equally pleasing background. Whether it be grand landscapes or a facet of colors, this is my way of creating an image that complements both the subject and their surroundings. Some of the photos I have includ-

ed were taken during this period of my self reflection, through the quarantine and up until now. I realized much more than I ever could have anticipated. The world today needs more love. More love toward your neighbor and more love for yourself. This is the only way we will ever move forward in beating a malevolent virus and begin mending the deep wounds of racism found in every inch of this country. I aspire to bring out some of that self love through my photos and remind my friends or anyone who views my work to share the love; by lifting up unheard voices and supporting one another in a time of uncertainty.

“The world today needs more love. More love toward your neighbor and more love for yourself.”

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student interview

Interning at a Fashion PR Agency with Bella Villanueva words by cruz rendon Senior public relations major Bella Villanueva spent her summer as a virtual intern at Linda Gaunt Communications. The agency is responsible for top fashion brands such as Todd Snyder and Eileen Fisher. “I secured this internship in February and was planning to spend my summer in New York City,” Villanueva said. “[Quarantine] was disappointing at first, but I’m learning a lot at my internship and the agency is giving me a lot of opportunities for career growth.”

student: bella villanueva major: public relations class: 2021

After news of the stay-at-home orders, Villanueva had to adapt rapidly as her world started to change. She celebrated a quarantine birthday, cancelled her spring break trip and lost her job. Luckily, she was able to shift her NYC internship to a remote experience. In quarantine, Villanueva has learned the importance of staying connected with people that matter to her personally and professionally. She credits being a PR student at Moody for preparing her for this internship by allowing students to connect with professionals in the communications industry. Looking ahead, Villanueva would like to start working with brands on their social media presence.

Managing a Band with Julia Greenspan words by maya dandashi Newly graduated, 22 year-old advertising major and Texas Creative student Julia Greenspan began managing a local Austin band, “Dean Keeton”, just as quarantine started.

student: julia greenspan major: advertising class: 2020

Greenspan decided to continue managing the band despite moving back to Connecticut after graduation.

I would always go to the sessions and be an extra ear, give my opinion.”

“Most managers do function over the Internet anyway. So working from home in Connecticut means not much has changed,” Greenspan said. “I do miss being there when the boys recorded their songs though.

Greenspan looks forward to possibly continue working in the music industry in the future. “I’m so much happier working for musicians and creatives than I would be at an ad agency,” Greenspan said. “I think it’s because it’s not as much a commodity as it is a passion and a message being sold to people.” “COVID-19 has given me the opportunity to learn a lot. At the beginning it felt very dooming. Once I realized that this wrench in the whole system is exactly what the creative mind wants, I started to look at it as a way to expand on my skills more.”


“I started mass downloading cute and slightly cursed frog pictures,” Parma said. “My mission soon became to give both common and uncommon names love so that everyone may feel included … the motto was something along the lines of ‘these frogs will be the keychain you never got.’” Parma discovered her inner creativity and sense of drive. “I see the same in other people, too! We’re all using our time to explore our interests and work on new skill sets,” Parma said. Now, with such a large platform, Parma can bring happiness to many. But beyond pure joy, Parma uses the account to encourage fundraising for social justice causes. “When I asked my 200,000+ followers to donate to UNICEF in Yemen through me, I was overwhelmed by the amount of people who answered my call so quickly … in 11 hours, we raised a total of $1,050! Then in the next week, we raised a total of $1,493 for UNICEF. I am so so proud.” Parma felt lucky to be a part of something digital that crossed borders during a time of social distancing and isolation.

student: joie parma major: radio-television-film class: 2023

“Outside of Moody, my frog account has actually given me a greater global community to be a part of … hearing about their experience with the same virus is so interesting and brings a strange sense of community, despite thousands of miles between us,” Parma said.

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creative submission

An Ode to my Hometown words by sloane wick (journalism ‘23) art by isaac watson Tomorrow I say goodbye to the only place I’ve ever called home So tonight I drive around town The light turns green I am at the hospital I was born in Two left turns It’s my elementary school One more left There’s my middle school Two blocks away My high school looms On the radio the saddest song from my favorite childhood movie plays on repeat The world is a museum dedicated to me I watch it fold out The love The memories The almosts The could have beens Every moment that made me who I am is playing on a loop inside my head And I feel nothing This town My home town It made me who I am But not who I’m going to be

This city is a too tight t-shirt Worn from the wash With a thousand holes in it

It was good while it lasted But now I need to throw it out 9

I’m ready to move on


Cough Cough Coffee You don’t remember me I hand you your latte when you come in Monday morning before work Or I make your iced americano with three sugars, extra ice, and light heavy cream You don’t remember me But now you call me a hero When covid-19 invaded cafes I went from barista to essential worker I went from making $9 an hour for making frappes to making $9 for risking my life everyday Cough, cough A co-worker shows symptoms Cough, cough A maskless customer leans around the 2x2 glass meant to protect me Cough, cough Buy one, get one back Cough, cough Inside seating is now open Cough, cough A co-worker’s mom tested positive Cough, cough I get a headache while handing out a mocha and don’t know if I need water or an emergency room Cough, cough They say I’m a hero, I know I’m a sacrifice But anyways Your change is 37 cents, enjoy your caramel macchiato

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patient zero

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creative submission

art by quinto fernandez (advertising ‘21)

“The first piece ‘Index case [.0]’ was the first painting I created during quarantine. It was inspired by the evolution of Covid-19 and how it all felt when quarantine began,” Fernandez said.


moving forward: the summer zine

“The second piece ‘Faces of an Element’ was the last piece I made around the time when July ended. It’s unrelated to the situation but shows my thought process while creating my art with myself being blended into my surrounding environment,” Fernandez said.

FACES OF AN ELEMENT


creative submission

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11. (EXCERPT) INT. RED SUV - DAY Charlotte and Vince drive through the bohemian and rapidly-gentrifying Heights neighborhood. Huge trees canopy over the streets, cloaking their faces in shadows. Charlotte slips a CD in, starts flipping through the tracks. The first notes of Nirvana’s “All Apologies” kick in. Vince nods along.

So what’s this?

VINCE

CHARLOTTE Telling me you don’t know Nirvana?

VINCE I’m not a dumbass, I know who Nirvana is. But, I never like, gave them the time. CHARLOTTE And why is that? VINCE Just seems pretty wild to me all these white musicians get the privilege of talking about “how they feel” and can sell millions of records. Meanwhile, I gotta be wildly provocative just to turn a eye. CHARLOTTE “You” have to be? You got music? VINCE Not really. Well yeah, I write. And my boys and I got a group we’re working on. CHARLOTTE Got anything you can show me? Not yet...

VINCE

Vince looks at her. It’s like he already knows they’re something more than strangers. VINCE (CONT’D) But, I will.

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creative submission

photography and words by leigh dougal (public relations ‘23) This past July I traveled to Anchorage, Alaska to attend a photography workshop to expand my portfolio and learn from creative professionals. In order to comply with the law in Alaska, our entire group was COVID-19 tested before we left for our trip and we all managed to stay safe! I met with and photographed three different real couples. Probably the craziest part of the trip was shooting from 10pm-2am. The sun doesn’t set in Alaska in the summer so we had all day and night to shoot. I was creatively challenged in ways I had never been and the entire trip was a huge step out of my comfort zone.


moving forward: the summer zine

Coronacation

words by riley church (radio-television-film ‘24) When I found out that my senior year of high school was cancelled, I needed a way to process my emotions. So I created my first film in quarantine, “Virtual Life.” But a lot has changed in the world and in my life since then, so it needed an update. When I saw that ORANGE Magazine was looking for submissions, it seemed like fate. For this film, I wanted to take something we all recognize — the five stages of grief — and reformat it to fit the current era, as we are all learning how to manage our grief over what the pandemic has taken from us. I’m lucky to have such talented friends like Piper Lee Duffee, and using her beautiful music was a must. I can’t speak to her original meaning of the song, but in the times of quarantining and isolation, I believe we’ve all grown at least a little bit sick of our surroundings.

Scan to watch “Coronacation”. https://bit.ly/coronacationvideo .

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student interview

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moving forward: the summer zine

words by lydia wagner art by emma overholt Bella Vargas has two new hobbies: sewing with a machine, and protecting the public health. The 20-yearold communication and leadership student and UT powerlifter has made and donated over 100 masks during the pandemic. “My boyfriend’s dad is the one who actually taught me how to use a sewing machine. He taught me the basics. Then I decided to put my own little twist,” Vargas said. She made her masks reversible, sturdy, and multi-layered with stylish patterns. Soon after, Vargas started selling her masks for $7 each to support herself and give back to her community. “It’s just a nice thing to do right now for the community,” Vargas said. “Because it’s important that we do wear masks and that we are cautious when we go out.”

Vargas is on the UT powerlifting team and is pursuing a minor in social work outside her Moody classes. She enjoys leadership roles and event-planning, and she is very close with her family. “I really like the classes. I’ve learned a lot from them ... I’m still trying to figure out what I want to do in the future.” Vargas traditionally spent all summer with her family. When the pandemic began, her mother and sister moved into her apartment for a month while she finished her classes. “My mom was making me all my favorite dishes, and we were always watching movies,” Vargas said. “It wasn’t challenging since I’m super close to my family and it was such a fun experience.” Vargas’s family went back to her hometown of Brownsville, TX, while she spent the summer with her boyfriend’s family, making masks. Vargas looks forward to growing her business and balancing her happiness.

student: bella vargas major: communication and leadership class: 2022

“I’m happy that patience is the one thing I gained out of this, because in the beginning I was driven a little crazy. After that, I realized I need to make the best out of this. I can deal with this.” said Vargas. 18


creative submission

These Days words by ariana pleasure (communication studies ‘21) art by isabel canales One day I will look back on these days and smile. I’ll think of it as the summer I spent dreaming of both old and new moments. When I would reach back to old words to find some comfort. The times I finally got to sit and take a breath. I wouldn’t know how much I needed those moments until I was forced to look back at my old self. I sit in my childhood room day in and day out and constantly check in on myself. That’s how I have begun to realize just how long it had been since I asked myself “how are you doing?”. Only to reply each time with “I’m not sure”. I take long pauses to take in what the world is pushing out and fight to find some sanity in it all. One day I will look back on these days and mourn. The days where grief struck the world in more ways than one. People banded together to protect their futures, without much of a choice. Days in which the unexpected and possibilities were thoughts drowned in fear. Times in which I remained wildly eager for the future while also extremely worried about it. I’m not sure what happens next or how things will continue to change. All I know is that I miss the normal I once had that was accompanied by plans of who I wanted to be. Reflection and odd worries have become my new way of moving on. Days in which I wonder about what will be and what could’ve been.

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moving forward: the summer zine

2020 experience art by joseph wallace (radio-television-film ‘20)

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Profile for ORANGE Magazine

Moving Foward: The Summer Zine  

A collection of Stories and Creative works from the Moody College Student Body.

Moving Foward: The Summer Zine  

A collection of Stories and Creative works from the Moody College Student Body.

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