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Supplement to The Oklahoman, September 9, 2012


Greetings and welcome to Home Grown Fun Ronald J. Norick Chairman of the Board Oklahoma State Fair Inc.

Timothy J. O’Toole President and CEO Oklahoma State Fair Inc.

Fairgoers walk by food vendors at the 2011 Oklahoma State Fair.

OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR A ride lights up the Midway at the 2011 Oklahoma State Fair. BY RONALD J. NORICK AND TIMOTHY J. O’TOOLE

We are pleased to welcome you to the 2012 Oklahoma State Fair. This year we are offering Home Grown Fun for everyone. The staff has worked very hard throughout the year to provide all of Oklahoma with another year of exciting entertainment, family-friendly activities, livestock competitions, exhibits and attractions that promise

to provide something for everyone in your family. For this year’s event, we have many wonderful grounds attractions, both new and returning favorites, including the Zoppe Italian Family Circus, Pets Overboard, a Firefighter Training Show, the National Rod & Custom Car Hall of Fame, Kids Celebration, Science Museum Oklahoma, Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Great American Petting Zoo & Pony Trail Rides, Allen’s Original Redwood Log House,

The Butterfly House and the Remembering Our Fallen exhibit. The Zoppe Italian Family Circus is an exciting new attraction for us this year. The show features about 12 performers with acts utilizing clowns, aerialists, acrobats, horses and dogs. It is an oldfashioned, vintage and very intimate and colorful one-ring circus. This attraction is free and brought to you in part by our friends at Dr Pepper. It can be found in Cen-

OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTOS

tennial Plaza, just inside Gate 1. We are back with the Centennial Frontier Experience. New this year will be Jerry Wayne Olson and his performing golden Palomino, JB. The Oklahoma frontier comes alive in this fun and historical attraction featuring Shenaniguns, trick roping with Rich Gratny and the Plains Indian Dancers. Each day at 1 and 7 p.m., all the acts come together for The Wild West Showcase. This is

For daily coverage and for more information on the Oklahoma State Fair, go to NewsOK. com/statefair. Also, to learn more about fair events, go to wimgo.com and search for “state fair.”

both a fun and educational experience for the entire family! The Chesapeake Energy Stage again features a varied and exceptional lineup of free performances. In addition to that outdoor location, we also

offer live musical performances at the OPUBCO Pavilion, The CONNECTION Stage Platform and on the Bandshell Stage. You can truly find something for any taste at the Oklahoma State Fair. We start this year’s Fair with a spectacular event at the Jim Norick Arena: Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream. The PRCA Xtreme Bulls Tour featuring Jake Owen on Friday night, Sept. 21 and Gary Allan on Saturday night the 22 conclude our Arena shows. Have fun and make some lasting memories at the 2012 Oklahoma State Fair. Thank you for your patronage.


State fair blends old and new BY KEN RAYMOND Staff Writer kraymond@opubco.com

The 2012 Oklahoma State Fair combines old favorites with a variety of new attractions, all but guaranteeing a good time for everyone who attends. “There are traditions,” said Tim O’Toole, president and chief executive officer of Oklahoma State Fair Inc., “but then everybody tries to upgrade and make things new.” The Vertigo ride, new to the fair this year, is a good example of that. In concept, Vertigo is similar to the YoYo ride, which has been a fair mainstay for years. Passengers sit in swings attached to the end of a series of arms that protrude from a central hub like the spokes on a bicycle wheel. The wheel turns horizontally, carrying the passengers on a circular path above the ground. The difference between the rides is this: YoYo passengers remain at the same height relative to the ground; Vertigo passengers will be carried further and further up into the air, the hub ascending a vertical pillar about 20 stories high. It ups the ante on a familiar ride, making it more exciting than ever.

New foods to savor Striking a balance between novelty and familiarity is one of the biggest challenges facing O’Toole and his staff each year. They want to introduce fairgoers to new things, but not at the expense of tradition. That explains why attendees still will be able to buy good old-fashioned corn dogs at the fair — and

The YoYo ride, a staple of the Oklahoma State Fair, is joined this year by its cousin, Vertigo, which adds greater height to the mix. PHOTO PROVIDED

Bacon-topped cinnamon rolls are shown at the 2011 Oklahoma State Fair. This year fairgoers can sample deep-fried bacon brownies and bacon smoothies. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

why they could instead choose to buy this year’s new version: corn dogs wrapped in bacon. Bacon is big these days. Last year’s fair brought questionable culinary fare such as chocolate covered bacon. This year fairgoers can try a deep-fried bacon brownie or a bacon smoothie. “I love bacon,” O’Toole said, “and I love me a good

smoothie, but I don’t know if I’d like them together.” Odds are, he would. “We had a bacon cinnamon roll last year,” said Gina Burchfiel, O’Toole’s vice president. “Everyone said it was disgusting until they tried it. Then they said it tasted like you were having your breakfast all SEE FAIR, PAGE 4S

Vertigo, a flying chair ride that carries passengers high above the ground, is new to the Oklahoma State Fair this year. PHOTO PROVIDED


Fair: Zoppe circus dates back more than 160 years

The Zoppe Family Circus, an Italian circus, is new to the Oklahoma State Fair and has a history dating back more than 160 years. PHOTO PROVIDED FROM PAGE 3S

mixed together.” The best part, O’Toole said, is that fair food doesn’t have calories — or at least you can pretend it doesn’t. “You walk it all off” at the fair, he said. There’ll be a lot of people walking. Each of the past several years, about a million people attended the fair. Rainy days, of course, resulted in slightly lower attendance figures, but not enough to make a serious dent.

Fun continues inside There’s plenty to do inside the fair buildings, which provide shelter from the weather. Two new buildings will be making their fair debut. In January, two of the fairgrounds’ nine barns were demolished so they could be replaced with more modern equine facilities. One barn is complete, and finishing touches were being put on the second in August. Together, they add 3,000 new stalls in a climatecontrolled setting. The barns have asphalt floors, higher ceilings and

Truly, day in and day out, the most favorite thing for me is just watching the people enjoy themselves.” TIM O’TOOLE

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR INC.

bathrooms that can be used as storm shelters. The fair calendar is filled with barn events, including livestock shows, barrel racing and judging, as well as the popular Barnyard Birthing Center, where visitors may see the miracle of life happening in front of their eyes. At the least, they’ll be able to see baby animals, such as piglets, chicks and calves. Children, especially those with limited exposure to rural life, will enjoy vis-

An acrobat performs as part of the Zoppe Family Circus, a new attraction for the Oklahoma State Fair. PHOTO PROVIDED

iting AGtropolis, a 26,000 square foot “city” where they can see and learn about chickens, goats, pigs, cows and alpacas. The Butterfly House returns this year. Sit inside a screened enclosure filled with about 15,000 butterflies as they fan the air with their delicate and beautiful wings. Experience the unusual Great American Petting Zoo, in which the animals roam freely and ponies take children on trail rides instead of treading endless circles, yoked to a wheel. Prefer watching trained animals perform tricks? The Swifty Swine Racing Pigs will be back, speeding around a track in the hope of winning an Oreo treat. Pets Overboard, new to the

fair this year, features a human captain and a crew of pirates comically searching for treasure; the crew is comprised of dogs, cats and rats.

Celebrating Oklahoma Dogs are among the performers in the Zoppe Family Circus, an Italian one-ring circus whose history dates back more than 160 years. The circus features acrobats, equestrian tricks and clowns and can seat 500 to 600 people for each show. “It’s in the area just north of the 14 Flags Plaza,” O’Toole said. “It’s a special attraction unto itself, complete with a big top and performing acts on the inside. ... We’re excited about it. It’s a significant

attraction for us this year.” Adding a circus to the fair isn’t a new thing. Veteran fairgoers may remember seeing the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus back when the fair lasted 17 days. That was a big three-ring circus. The Zoppe circus, Burchfiel said, is “a little more intimate.” The circus offers two performances daily and three on Saturday and Sunday. Speaking of performances, one of the best things about the fair each year is the live entertainment from famous musicians. This year’s lineup includes country singers Kevin Fowler, Candy Coburn and Neal McCoy; Christian band The Afters; rockers Eddie Money and

Pop Evil; and funk band Morris Day and the Time, among others. Those who enjoy shopping will have fun browsing the merchandise and services available from fair vendors. More than 600 vendors will ply their wares indoors, filling about 300,000 square feet of exhibit space, O’Toole said. More will set up outside. The whole thing — rides, food, concerts, livestock and more — isn’t just a diversion. The state fair is a celebration of Oklahoma, and we’re all invited. “Truly, day in and day out, the most favorite thing for me is just watching the people enjoy themselves,” O’Toole said. That’s what the fair is all about.


Jake Owen bringing ‘Endless Summer’ tour to Oklahoma BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnell@opubco.com

Even when he is playing a favorite Sooner State fall tradition — the Oklahoma State Fair — Jake Owen will be getting ready for an “Endless Summer.” The country music star will perform his hits like “Eight Second Ride,” “Startin’ with Me” and “Yee Haw” on Sept. 21 following the first night of skull-rattling action of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Xtreme Bulls Tour. The concert inside Jim Norick Arena is set just a few days before the Sept. 25 release of the Florida native’s four-song EP, “Endless Summer.” “It’s been almost a year since our album, ‘Barefoot Blue Jean Night,’ came out,” Owen said in a news release. “And, I started thinking that I really wanted to put out a few new tunes that had a summer vibe. So, we decided to cut four songs and put out an EP. ... No one ever really wants the summer to end, right? Hopefully, these songs will be ones that keep the party going into the fall and people will crank them up loud when they are out on the water enjoying their own ‘Endless Summer.’ ” Who could blame Owen for wanting to keep this year going forever? The past 12 months have yielded highlight after highlight — both personally and professionally — for the singer-songwriter.

Country music star Jake Owen will perform during the first night of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Xtreme Bulls Tour. He is promoting his album “Endless Summer,” shown below. PHOTOS PROVIDED

In September 2011, Owen, 30, scored his first No. 1 single with his third album’s summery title track, “Barefoot Blue Jean Night.” It became the first of two back-to-back, multiweek chart-toppers when his next single, the tortured love song “Alone with You,” reached No. 1 in April.

He co-wrote the album’s third hit, the fact-based ballad “The One That Got Away,” which was released as a single in May. On April 7, he proposed to his girlfriend, model Lacey Buchanan, in the midst of performing a concert in his hometown of Vero Beach, Fla. One month later, the couple — who met when she played his love interest in the music video for his hit “Eight Second Ride” and later co-starred in the “Barefoot Blue Jean Night” mini-movie — returned to his hometown, where they got married in a barefoot, sunrise ceremony on the beach. The Owens are expecting their first child in

November. But the arrival of his daughter won’t be the only autumn milestone coming up for the father-to-be, who will be the next headliner of the 11th annual “CMT on Tour.” “CMT on Tour Jake Owen: The Summer Never Ends 2012,” featuring special guests Love and Theft and Florida Georgia Line, will kick off Oct. 10 in New York City and close with his annual Jake Owen Foundation Charity Show Dec. 15 in Vero Beach, Fla. Naturally, the tour schedule includes about 2 ½ weeks off in November for the arrival of daddy’s little girl. “Being the headliner of a

tour is something I’ve been dreaming about since I was in college, performing songs every Sunday afternoon on a bar stool and playing for tips,” said Owen, who has spent the summer opening on Kenny Chesney and Tim McGraw’s massive “Brothers of the Sun” trek, in a news release. “Headlining the CMT tour is really cool for me because I was the opening, opening act in 2007, when Sugarland was the headliner and Little Big Town had the middle slot. So now, to be headlining the 11th annual CMT tour, with my buddies Love and Theft and Florida Georgia Line, it feels very surreal. I’m hon-

IF YOU GO PRCA XTREME BULLS TOUR AND CONCERTS I Who/when: PRCA Xtreme Bulls with Jake Owen at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21 and with Gary Allan at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 22. I Where: Jim Norick Arena. I Admission: $18-25 I Special deal: Fairgoers who purchase event tickets before the fair starts will receive complimentary outside gate admission. I Information: 948-6700 or www. okstatefair.com.

ored and I can’t wait to hit the road in October.” In the meantime, Owen’s schedule includes several state and county fair shows, including his return engagement at the Oklahoma State Fair. He drew a big crowd for his Xtreme Bulls debut back in 2010, said fair spokesman Scott Munz, and advance sales are strong for this year’s show. “He’s got a new single out now that’s doing well, and ... he’s certainly a performer on the rise,” Munz said. Tickets are still available for the PRCA Xtreme Bulls Tour and Concerts featuring Owen on Sept. 21 and Gary Allan on Sept. 22. Show tickets range from $18-25 and include an outside gate admission ticket to the State Fair if bought on or before Wednesday. An additional gate admission ticket is required if event tickets are purchased after Wednesday. Gate admission tickets are priced at $9 for adults; $5 for children ages 6 to 11; and free for children 5 and younger.


FOR THE THIRD TIME, THE MAINSTREAM COUNTRY MAVERICK IS PLAYING DURING THE FAIR’S PRCA XTREME BULLS TOUR

Gary Allan to bring new music to fair BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnell@opubco.com

Gary Allan is hardly a newcomer to the Oklahoma State Fair, but this year, country music’s mainstream maverick is bringing new music to the festivities. For the third time, the multiplatinum singersongwriter will play during the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Xtreme Bulls Tour at the fair, where he will follow the bone-crushing bullriding action Sept. 22 at Jim Norick Arena. It seems appropriate, then, that Allan intends to play three new songs from his forthcoming album: the hopeful first single “Every Storm (Runs out of Rain),” the solo number “It Ain’t the Whiskey,” and “Bones,” which he described as “like an anger song: ‘I’ve got bones to pick with you.’ ” “I’ve got actually a couple new band guys, so we’ve been rehearsing and switching the show up. It should be really different, should be really fun,” Allan said in a recent phone interview from Nashville, Tenn., where he was relaxing and enjoying “a beautiful day on the lake” during a day off from the road. Along with the new songs, the tattooed honkytonk heartthrob will play previous hits like “Smoke Rings in the Dark,” “Man to Man,” “Tough Little Boys,” “Watching Airplanes” and “Nothing on

But the Radio” during a rowdy and rocking concert that he promised would be a suitable follow-up to the Xtreme bull-riding action. “You can’t go out and whip ‘em into a coma,” he said with a laugh. Rocking the Oklahoma State Fair has never been a problem for Allan. Fair spokesman Scott Munz said the MCA Nashville recording artist has previously performed during the 2007 and 2009 PRCA events. “His attendance at that (2009) performance was the best we’ve ever had for any performer at the rodeo,” he said. Advance sales for Allan’s 2012 fair show have been strong, and tickets are still available, he said. “Gary Allan has very much a cult following,” Munz said. “And they turn out in droves.” Allan, 44, plans to release his highly anticipated ninth album, titled “Set You Free,” in early 2013. It is the follow-up to his critically acclaimed 2010 effort “Get Off on the Pain,” which Jon Caramanica of The New York Times placed at No. 6 on his top 10 albums list for that year. In March, Universal released a new compilation in its “Icon” series devoted to Allan’s 16-year recording career with the company. But his fervent fans have been eagerly awaiting new music. “The biggest difference on this (album) I think is the time I had to do it. They were changing the label

Gary Allan has very much a cult following. And they turn out in droves.” SCOTT MUNZ

VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS AT THE OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR

PHOTO PROVIDED

head at my label, so I was waiting for that to happen before I turned in a record. So it’s probably been 2 ½ years,” Allan said, referring to former Capitol Nashville President/CEO Mike Dungan taking over as the head of Universal Music Group Nashville back in February. With the extra time, the California native said he was able to write more and seek out better songs for

“Set You Free.” He co-wrote “Every Storm” with Matt Warren and Hillary Lindsey, and the latter sings backup on the leadoff single, which is shipping to radio this month. “It’s one of those feelgood songs, you know, that nothing’s gonna last forever: ‘Every storm runs out of rain/every dark cloud turns into day,’ ” he said.

While that sentiment might come in handy for bull-riders at the Oklahoma State Fair who find themselves thrown to the ground by their bucking bovine adversaries, the title track of his last effort, “Get Off on the Pain,” probably fits the occasion a bit better. Allan’s video for the confessional anthem even features Guilherme Mar-

chi, a competitor on the Professional Bull Riders Built Ford Tough Series tour. The musician said his mother is a passionate follower of the sport and Marchi, which led to the rider’s co-starring role in the video. “I like bull-riding,” Allan said. “But my mom is actually a huge bull-riding fan.”


SHORTLY AFTER ONE FAIR ENDS, PREPARATION BEGINS FOR NEXT

Planning for fair is year-round operation BY RICK ROGERS Fine Arts Editor rrogers@opubco.com

Four days from now, throngs of Oklahomans will help perpetuate a century-old tradition when they flock to the 2012 edition of the Oklahoma State Fair. Whether one considers this annual event an endof-summer rite or a harbinger of fall, it promises to delight the senses with everything from the clattering of carnival rides to the aroma of corn dogs. Like clockwork, the Oklahoma State Fair opens its gates every September but few visitors stop to consider what it takes to put on an annual event of this size and scope. It requires the participation of several hundred workers, most of whom carry out their tasks in total anonymity. “The fair is not a blow up inflatable that magically comes together in August,” said Scott Munz, the fair’s vice president of marketing and public relations. “The planning is an ongoing process that starts right after one fair ends.” While the fair employs about 100 people yearround, that number increases dramatically in the weeks and days leading up to the opening of this annual event. Ticket takers, parking attendants, concession workers and carnival operators increase that number tenfold. Those involved in hiring entertainers face an even

Mike Lee, left, performs as deputy Leon P. Jones with ShenaniGuns Wild West Show during the 2010 Oklahoma State Fair. Behind him is Mike Walker playing Sheriff Hop-a-long Casually. PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES Gina Burchfiel Vice president of the Oklahoma State Fair

greater lead time since many artists are booked two to three years in advance. America recently wound up on Munz’s shortlist but the band’s Australian tour conflicted with the fair’s dates. Munz said the dozen or so casinos in central Oklahoma have changed the playing field by creating additional competition for those who book talent. He refers to that challenge as “more speed bumps to sidestep.” Identifying companies or individuals who have products to sell generally tends to be an easier process. Annual trade shows allow fair personnel to peruse any number of products that might be popular among fairgoers. “We write almost 600 contracts each year,” said Oklahoma State Fair Vice President Gina Burchfiel. “The renewal percentage is around 85 percent which is wonderful for us. When you have a good group of exhibitors and vendors,

Scott Munz Vice president of marketing and public relations at the Oklahoma State Fair

Centennial Frontier Experience provides glimpse of state’s past

everything works like a well-oiled machine.” While many people might consider the annual September event to be a tradition-bound organization, the Oklahoma State Fair has wholeheartedly embraced the advent of technological advances ranging from Twitter to Facebook. “We’ve actually hired an integrated media specialist whose sole responsibility is to work with all of those social media components,” Munz said. “We have 35,000 followers on Facebook, we have a fair blog and we offer mobile access to our website. “It’s a way of keeping your followers and fans engaged. When we have a contest, we might tell people to forward the information to 25 friends. For those of us in advertising, it’s a constant challenge to get our message out there. We have to evolve with the times.”

BY SILAS ALLEN Staff Writer sallen@opubco.com

Fairgoers will be able to see what life was on the Oklahoma frontier at one of the Oklahoma State Fair’s signature attractions. The Centennial Frontier Experience brings together artists and artisans who are keeping traditions from Oklahoma’s early days alive. The educational attraction features shows, demonstrations and historical displays, said Melinda Parsons, the fair’s senior manager for attractions and entertainment. Visitors will be able to see performances throughout the day that showcase Oklahoma’s heritage, including Plains Indian dancers, stunt riders and trick ropers. Wild West comedy troupe ShenaniGuns will also be on hand, she said. Meanwhile, craftsmen will demonstrate a number of trades, including blacksmithing and wood turning, that would have been commonplace during Oklahoma’s frontier days. A chuck wagon will be on hand to show visitors how cooking was done on the Chisholm Trail, Parsons said. The main event will be the Wild West showcase, Parsons said. Twice a day, all the performers that entertain crowds

throughout the day will come together for one hourlong showcase, she said. The show is produced by award-winning rodeo clown and entertainer John Harrison, of Soper, Parsons said. “It is really, really quite amazing,” she said. Diana Davis is a member of the Saltfork Craftsmen Artist-Blacksmith Association, which will demonstrate blacksmithing techniques at the Centennial Frontier Experience. Davis said the group was formed with the purpose of keeping skills like blacksmithing alive and educating people on a way of life that has largely been lost to time. The group comes to the fair each year because it’s a good way of showing people how older generations of Oklahomans lived. Many of the farmers who settled Oklahoma had to do their own blacksmithing, she said, because basic items like nails weren’t available. So they had to learn to make what they needed out of what they had. Generations later, after the Industrial Revolution, handcrafted metal goods aren’t as common as they once were. Davis said the group works to make sure that piece of American heritage isn’t lost. “It was starting to become a dying art,” she said. “The art of being able to make a nail or a hinge was being lost.”


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SPECIAL DAYS AND OTHER PROMOTIONS GIVE DISCOUNTS FOR FAIRGOERS

Fair offers cost-saving promotions BY CARLA HINTON Staff Writer chinton@opubco.com

There’s a deal awaiting fairgoers who take advantage of the slew of special promotions offered at the Oklahoma State Fair. Scott Munz, vice present of marketing and public relations for the state fair, said the first special is offered right from the start with the opening of the annual fair extravaganza. Admission will be $2 on opening day, Sept. 13, a savings of $7 off the regular $9 adult gate admission price. As the fair continues through Sept. 23, students, members of the military and older adults have admissions promotions geared just for them. On School Kids’ Day, Sept. 17, children through 12th grade will be admitted free. And on Sept. 18, dubbed Super Saver Tuesday, fairgoers will be admitted for $3. Sept. 18 is also Armed Forces Day. Members of the military and their spouses with their military I.D. will receive free admission to the fair on that day. Adults 55 and older also will have their special day. Senior Citizens’ Day will be on Sept. 19 and older adults with I.D. will receive free admission. Then there are the Dr Pepper promotional days. Fairgoers who bring a Dr Pepper can will receive $8 off the price of a carnival ride wristband. Those designated days are Sept. 13 and 20. The wristbands will cost $22 with a Dr Pepper can and $30 without the soda can. Meanwhile, other discounts and promotions focus on fairgoers who love the thrill of the

Owen Marler, of Oklahoma City, plays a water pistol game at the 2011 Oklahoma State Fair.

midway. Fairgoers may purchase pay-one-price wristbands for rides in advance. These may be purchased through Sept. 12 at participating Walgreens, the Jim Norick Arena Box Office or online at www.ok statefair.com. The wristbands are $20 in advance and $30 at the fair for Monday through Thursday fair

visits and $25 in advance and $35 at the fair for Friday through Sunday fair visits. Munz said the wristbands are particularly handy for fairgoers who plan to ride several rides during their visit. Munz said the ride coupons are $1 apiece and each ride takes anywhere from three to six coupons. “If you are a rider, you are go-

PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

ing to ride more than five rides,” he said. “This (wristband) is one of the strongest discounts across the board.” Pay-one-price wristbands also will be sold for children’s rides in Li’l Partnerland. These wristbands may be purchased Monday through Thursday for $14 and Friday through Sunday for $18. The Li’l Partner-

land wristbands will be available at Li’l Partnerland ticket booths at the fair. Finally, a season pass is offered for fairgoers who plan to attend fair activities on multiple days. The season pass is $25, available at the arena box office. A season parking pass also is available, good for all 11 days, for $25.


DARE TO DREAM INCLUDES MOMENTS FROM ‘CINDERELLA,’ ‘THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG’ AND ‘TANGLED’

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Rapunzel lets down her hair for fair BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnell@opubco.com

Rapunzel will let down her hair for the first time at the Oklahoma State Fair this year. Two newcomers of the Disney royal court — Rapunzel and Tiana — will join one of the Mouse House’s classic princesses — Cinderella — in retelling their tales of magic, adventure and romance in Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream. An annual favorite, the Disney ice

show glides into Jim Norick Arena for 10 performances during the first five days of the Oklahoma State Fair. “Princesses have always done well for us because little girls can certainly relate,” said fair spokesman Scott Munz. “Every little girl wants to be a princess.” With Dare to Dream, families and film fans can revisit moments from the 1950 animated feature “Cinderella,” the 2009 movie “The Princess and the Frog” and the 2010 film “Tangled.” The show also

includes Disney’s “Fabulous Four” — Mickey and Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck and Goofy — and ends with cameos from the other Disney princesses, who warmly welcome Rapunzel into their royal family. “Dare to Dream is the first Disney On Ice show that features Rapunzel ... and what’s really special about this show is our aerial act where Rapunzel and Flynn fly around on Rapunzel’s hair as it hangs from the ceiling. It’s fantastic,” said ensemble skater Kate Mahan, who per-

forms in all three segments and portrays Sleeping Beauty in the grand finale. While Princess Tiana, Disney’s first black animated princess, has been portrayed in other ice shows, Dare to Dream incorporates more of “The Princess and the Frog,” with lightning bugs, alligators and the titular amphibians leaping into the rink. Set in New Orleans during the Jazz Age, the segment bounces to a bayou beat worthy of its SEE DISNEY, PAGE 22S

From left, Cinderella, Rapunzel and Princess Tiana star in Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, playing at the 2012 Oklahoma State Fair. PHOTO PROVIDED


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OKLAHOMA WINES, HANDCRAFTED BEER WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

Wine and beer garden expected to be popular new attraction at fair BY SHEILA STOGSDILL For The Oklahoman

Tucked away in a serene setting with a backdrop of exotic foods and spirits is one of the newest venues at Oklahoma State Fair this year — the Good Life Wine & Beer Garden. Wine and beer venues are a growing trend in the fair industry and with large festivals, said Dana Murrell, fair director of sales

and development. “The fair is always a great place to try some Oklahoma-made wines,” Murrell said. “The wine and beer garden will be like no other venue.” Festivals and fairs that feature wine and beer venues have been successful, she said. Oklahoma wines, handcrafted beer and other kinds of wine and beer will be available for purchase.

With more than 50 vineyards in the state, growers are finding the Oklahoma weather and soil is very suited to growing grapes. New vineyards are popping up all across the state, ranging from a small one-acre vineyard such as a refurbished oneroom schoolhouse in Blaine County to a former bed-and-breakfast on Grand Lake. Tony’s Tree Plantation

and The Good Life Hospitality Group are collaborating to create an extraordinary venue, Murrell said. The Good Life Hospitality Group, the umbrella company for Blu, The Brewhouse, The Library and Blackbird Gastropub, will bring nontraditional fair food such as shrimp corn dogs to the event. Tony’s Tree Plantation, an Oklahoma City landscaping business, is turn-

ing the lot into a picturesque backdrop of plants and backyard swings with fire pits surrounding iron tables accented with bright cheery colorful umbrellas. “The landscaping is beyond all expectations,” Murrell said. In addition to wine tasting, eight state wineries will also be providing demonstrations and hosting wine education exhibits, Murrell said.

The fair is always a great place to try some Oklahomamade wines. The wine and beer garden will be like no other venue.” DANA MURRELL

OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR DIRECTOR OF SALES AND DEVELOPMENT


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CHESAPEAKE ENERGY STAGE IS THE PLACE TO GO FOR FREE PERFORMANCES

Concerts boast both The Time and Money BY GEORGE LANG Assistant Entertainment Editor glang@opubco.com

The promise of exciting new fried foods and wild rides on the midway brings the crowds, but the Oklahoma State Fair always boasts great live music to provide the soundtrack for these adventures, including first-rate country favorites, funk revues straight from Paisley Park and classic rock hitmakers of the 1970s and ’80s. Each day of the fair, the Chesapeake Energy Stage

is the place to go for free performances, and organizers packed the 2012 roster with highlights. The Chesapeake lineup gets into gear at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 13 with Kevin Fowler, the Amarilloraised honky-tonk king who built a significant Texas following with his 2000 anthem “Beer, Bait and Ammo.” Beer figures heavily in Fowler’s barleyscented repertoire: his latest album, 2011’s “Chippin’ Away,” featured both “Beer Money” and “Hell Yeah, I Like Beer.”

After Fowler gets audiences hopped up, Air Supply calms them down. Performing at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 14, Russell Hitchcock and Graham Russell struck mellow gold with early 1980s hits such as “Lost in Love,” “Even the Nights Are Better” and the Jim Steinman-produced “Making Love Out of Nothing At All.” For the fifth straight year at the fair, independent country singer-songwriter Candy Coburn will play two sets: a solo show at 2 p.m. Sept. 15, and an 8 p.m.

gig playing with Nashville favorite Neal McCoy, who will perform favorites such as “For a Change” and “They’re Playin’ Our Song” as well as songs from his 2012 album, “XII.” Conjunto Atadecer formed in Durango, Mexico, in the early 2000s and immediately drew a following for its corridas and its prodigious output — the band has released 11 albums since 2003, including its latest, “De Mil Maneras ... Sin Limites.” SEE CONCERTS, PAGE 22S

Candy Coburn

Neal McCoy


More than 10,000 entries in fair contests each year BY PAULA BURKES Staff Writer pburkes@opubco.com

Helen Mehler’s most memorable Oklahoma State Fair contest is when she was growing up in Enid, and the neighbor’s cat sampled the angel food cake she laid on the station wagon tailgate, while she, her sister and three brothers scurried to pack up their sewing, canning and

other entries. With no time to remake the dessert, her mom deftly cut out the spoiled piece and iced over it on the cake, which brought a blue ribbon that year. “Working together, we learned how to handle mistakes, or make lemonade out of lemons,” Mehler said. Today, as the superintendent of the fair’s SEE CONTESTS, PAGE 22S

Children look at the prizewinning entries in last year’s watermelon-growing contest. PHOTO PROVIDED

5 FREE CONTESTS Contests for all ages (children divided by age groups): I LEGO building contest, 3 p.m., Sept. 16, Creative Arts Building lower bay I Paper airplane contest, 3 p.m., Sept. 22, City Arts Center Theatre I Rain Gutter Regatta custom sailboat racing contest, 1-5 p.m., Sept. 16 and Sept. 23, Creative Arts Building lawn I Rock, Paper, Scissors contest, 11 a.m., Sept. 18 and Sept. 21, Creative Arts Building lower bay Contest for ages 8 and older: I Jelly bean flavor guessing contest, 2 p.m., Sept. 17 and Sept. 20, Creative Arts Center lower bay Contests for ages 13 and younger: I Bubble gum blowing contest, 3 p.m., Sept. 15, City Arts Center Theatre I Cookie stacking contest, 3:30 p.m., Sept. 23, City Arts Center Theatre For a full listing of this year’s competitions, including traditional cooking, sewing and other contests requiring preregistration, go to www.okstatefair.com/competition.


THIS YEAR IS FIRST TO HOST THE NORTH AMERICAN SIX-HORSE HITCH CLASSIC SERIES

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Fair offers a bounty of equine events BY BRYAN PAINTER Staff Writer bpainter@opubco.com

“Marc” Pankow, Oklahoma State Fair Horse Show Manager, knows she’s tipped her hand. After talking about the bounty of equestrian events scheduled for this year’s Oklahoma State Fair, she asked, “Can you tell I am beyond over-thetop excited about this year’s show?” But she knows the excitement comes with very good reason, make that

reasons. There are many examples. This is the first time for the Oklahoma State Fair to host the North American Six-Horse Hitch Classic Series. This huge and most prestigious equine event will offer $25,000 in prize money, Pankow said. “We feel sure that the world class and state of the art improvements and renovations that have enhanced the equine facilities at State Fair Park were part of the decision making process: selecting

Oklahoma City as the site for this event,” Pankow said. This is the finals and championship event for 2011-2012 — the culmination of a yearlong quest and thousands of miles in travel, to qualify for this event and the title that will be awarded here. There will not be another such event until January 2014. Pankow said all horse enthusiasts and all spectators in fact, have to be impressed with the pure “tonnage” and power of

horses that will literally be thundering into the arenas for the two heats and final round of this event. Pankow shared, “There is no way not to be impressed with the glamour, the power, the beautiful horses and harnesses and decorations used to enhance the wagons and horses/harnesses; the abilities of the talented drivers as they maneuver six massive horses, weighing approximately a ton each while pulling grand SEE EQUINE, PAGE 24S

Participants take part in the Six Horse Hitch Class at the Oklahoma State Fair. PHOTO PROVIDED BY J. BRANAM PHOTOGRAPHY


True grit is must for Xtreme Bulls BY BRYAN PAINTER Staff Writer bpainter@opubco.com

Every day the peace of an early morning was shredded with the same three words: “Bulls for breakfast.” It didn’t matter to Gene Ericsson, the one doing the shouting, that it was 6 a.m. He wanted son Ross Ericsson and buddy Cody Whitney, who was staying with them at the time, up, dressed and headed to the practice pen. Awaiting each were six bucking bulls that weren’t very happy regardless of the time of day. If you’re going to aspire to do something, you might as well

perspire — in other words put some sweat to it. If that included a little blood and mud, so be it. Whitney, 31, looks back at that time, his sophomore year at Asher High School and says, “I think that’s when I really started learning how to be a bull rider.” Each would get on their six bulls before school. Then they got on a half-dozen apiece right after school. Where does that get you? Whitney, who is planning to be among those competing during Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Xtreme Bulls action at the Oklahoma State Fair, has demonstrated where that grit and want-to got him many times over in his career.

On this year’s PRCA rodeo trail, the 5-foot-8, 140-pound bull rider has won the Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days Rodeo and the big check at other stops such as Prescott, Ariz. and Okeechobee, Fla. In 2011, the cowboy from Oklahoma made his third trip to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. In the ninth go he matched moves with Robinson Pro Rodeo’s RMEF Bugle for 90.5 points to win the round. “So we were getting on 12 bulls a day and we did that for dang near a year,” Whitney said of that year in high school, “I stayed with them most of the time that year. I wanted to get better. “We’d get on some bulls from

Dale Lyons and we’d buck them. About a week into it or two weeks into it, he’d bring up a new set.” Going into the current season, Whitney’s PRCA career earnings were about $390,000. What’s changed between those days of getting on bulls before and after school and 2012, when you’re winning Cheyenne? Not a lot, Whitney said. “Mainly because you have to go back to your basics of bull riding, whether it’s the first time, last time or every time in between,” he said. “I try to crawl down on a bull the same every time, I warm my rope up the same every time, I put my hand in the rope the same. I think an-

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other similarity is that every time I put my hand in the rope, I know I’m doing something I love.” By early August, Whitney, who resides at Sayre in western Oklahoma, was in the top 15 in the PRCA bull riding world standings with earnings of more than $50,000. Money earned during the Xtreme Bulls event Sept. 21-22 at Jim Norick Arena counts toward making this year’s NFR and the 2013 Xtreme Bulls standings. Contestants will compete one night each. The Xtreme Bulls events feature the best and rankest bulls with Beutler & Son Rodeo Co. joined by H.D. and Dillon Page at the Oklahoma State Fair.


Showing livestock builds skills BY ADAM KEMP Staff Writer akemp@opubco.com

Ritchie Oaks knows a winner when he sees one. Oaks, 60, has been involved with the Oklahoma State Fair for more than half a century either showing livestock as a boy, judging the show competition or watching his own children compete for a blue ribbon. “I started showing when I was 9, so I have been involved for more than 50 years,” Oaks said. “I help

Ritchie Oaks

with everything from the rabbits to the rodeo, is what I like to say.” The livestock competition runs this year from Sept. 14 to Sept. 23. For a

full schedule, go to www. okstatefair.com. Oaks said the benefits for Oklahoma youths when they begin the undertaking of preparing an animal for shows can’t be overstated. Oaks said the grueling work of raising show animals for six months to a year; feeding, cleaning, washing and making sure they maintain a healthy weight is enough to teach any young cowhand some responsibility. “The management of those animals is very im-

portant to those young kids as far as getting to the end product,” Oaks said. “It’s nice to win but the end product to me is the skills they learn. They are all winners. I think they are all winners whether they place first or 10th. I’m a livestock judge and I always tell the kids that every one of them are winners.” Oaks said some of the kids that show get very attached to the animal that they have spent so much time caring for. It makes it SEE LIVESTOCK, PAGE 25S

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Warren Minor, 10, of Cheyenne, gets water for his livestock during the 2011 Oklahoma State Fair. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES


Lots of Homegrown Fun is free BY SHEILA STOGSDILL For The Oklahoman

Cute animals, clowns and a life-saving firefighters’ demonstration are just part of the many new free attractions this year at the Oklahoma State Fair. I Zoppe Family Circus: The Zoppe Family Circus is a onering circus that honors Italian history and tradition and features acrobatic tricks, horse and dog shows and stunts and lots of clowning around. The 160-yearold circus began with a boy and a girl falling in love. Her father did not approve of the relationship, so together the young couple ran off and founded the Zoppe Fam-

ily Circus. I Pets Overboard: Pets Overboard is a new stage show involving animals rescued from local shelters performing in various themed shows. Dogs, cats and a rat are dressed in pirate theme costumes and they set sail for lost treasure, said Melinda Parsons, Senior Manager of Attractions and Entertainment. I Firefighter Show: The Firefighter Show gives children a chance to be a firefighter and to learn and practice life saving skills, such as “don’t hide, get outside” and “crawl low, under smoke.” The show teaches about being a firefighter and allows the children to go through a smoke-

filled house, Parsons said. I Barnyard Birthing Center: One of the most popular exhibits for fairgoers is a trip to the Barnyard Birthing Center. The exhibit serves as a gateway to the livestock, horse, and agriculture events taking place at the fair. I City of AGtropolis: Forget the petting zoos you knew as a child, the City of AGtropolis is designed as an agricultural education journey. Young farmers will plant seeds, water the orchard, pick apples, gather eggs and dig for potatoes. This exhibit allows children to view how their produce gets from the farm to their local market and how to sell their produce and receive AG-

tropolis money. Fairgoers can view the Butterfly Boarding House and possibly see butterflies emerge from cocoons or learn how beekeepers get honey from a beehive at the Honey Bee Haven. Children can also learn the difference between Alpacas and Llamas and learn how to make soap using goat’s milk. The art of wool spinning and hand weaving is also demonstrated. Another exhibit is the bug exhibit that allows children an upclose view of insects. I Centennial Frontier Experience: Having dinner at a chuck wagon camp or peeking inside a life-size teepee are just some of the attractions at the Centennial

9 Frontier Experience. The exhibit is an interactive discovery zone featuring trick roping and trick riding. There are sight gags and comedy routines along with American Indian dancers, cloggers and music by Dustbowl Gypsies. Another part of the event gives fairgoers a somber look at the Trail Of Tears and the hardships the travelers’ animals endured. The Saltfork Craftsmen Artist-Blacksmiths shows the skill of blacksmithing, making things from tools to jewelry. On Sept. 16 and 23, fairgoers are invited to the “Come As You Are” services by cowboy minister Steve Womack in the Capital City Theatre.


Shopping offers variety, novelty BY HEATHER WARLICK Staff Writer hwarlick@opubco.com

Where can you find Elvis impersonators, nearly anything deep-fried and served on a stick, racing pigs and performance artists you never dreamed of? If you guessed Las Vegas, you’re on the right track. Specifically, you’ll find a myriad of bizarre, unusual and intriguing sights at the annual convention of the International Association of Fairs and Expostitions. That’s where all the acts, vendors, foodies and entertainers strut their stuff, hoping to be booked for a fair near you.

“It’s very much an event — a fair, festival atmosphere,” said Dana Murrell, director of sales and development for the Oklahoma State Fair. Murrell has been planning all year long for the 550 “contracts” the Oklahoma State Fair will host this year. Locations, or vendor booths, are referred to as contracts in the fair world. These booths are scattered throughout outdoor spaces and housed inside four buildings — The Cox Pavilion, Centennial Building, Oklahoma Expo Hall and the Modern Living Building. Murrell has a few picks for this year’s fair that she said are big crowd pleasers, offering unusual

and hard-to-find items. First, a new location, Carolina Carports, on the walkway near Gate One. The carport sellers’ theme for the fair is “Cover My Ride” and the company has paired up with Paul Teutul, Jr. from TV’s “American Chopper.” A chopper that he designed will be on display at the location. Also, for the last Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday of the fair, the company plans to bring in some of the crew from TV’s “Lizard Lick Towing.” In an outside tent, you’ll find a fun fashion idea: Equalizer Tshirts. Inside the blackout tent, you can watch the action as these shirts, animal hats and ties light

up in vibrant colorful displays you have to see to believe. The shirts combine an “Electro Luminescent Graphic Equalizer” display with designs such as flags, logos, messages and more. Inside the Cox Pavilion, take a blast to the past at CW’s Vintage Life. The location carries copies of Life Magazine — at least one for each week the magazine was printed between 1938 and 1979. In the Centennial Building, Ideal Outdoor Living will set up shop. The location will feature high-end outdoor kitchen appliances and design services. In the Modern Living Building, Murrell recommends stopping by the new It’s a Farm Thing

10 location which sells cute T-shirts with farming themes. Of course, the fair wouldn’t be complete without the Auto Show in the Travel and Transportation Building. There, you can shop dozens of models of cars and trucks and even take test drives. And if you’re in the market for a new mobile home, you can find them for sale. Murrell said every year after the fair, she tallies up how many of the companies selling at the fair are from Oklahoma and otherwise. Last year, Murrell said out of 548 locations, 268 were held by Oklahoma companies, with Texas coming up second with 65.


Carnival rides add thrills to state fair’s midway BY LILLIE-BETH BRINKMAN Assistant Features Editor lbrinkman@opubco.com

When visitors to the Oklahoma State Fair line up this month to go on one of the ever-popular thrill rides, they’ll see three new rides and many familiar ones that bring them back to the fair year after year. What visitors won’t see

is all the work it takes behind the scenes to set them up and keep them running safely. Crews with carnival provider Wade Shows arrived in late August to start marking where each ride and Midway game was going to be. Ultimately, the rides and games arrive each year in 100 truckloads of equipment, along with welders, electricians,

builders, technicians and others required to set them up. More than 200 people also are in town to operate them. When the fair opens this year, visitors will get to enjoy three new adult rides: the 360-degree spinning “Inverter”; an 80-foot swinging tower known as the “Vertigo”; or the twirling “Viper.” Returning will be other

favorites like the “White Water Flume Ride,” the 135-foot “Mega Drop” and the “RC-48 Roller Coaster.” The Mega Drop is newly decked out with LED lighting this year, said Frank Zaitshik, owner of Wade Shows. “Every day there’s so much to see and do,” Zaitshik said. “Every time we SEE RIDES, PAGE 24S

11 IF YOU GO If you go to the Oklahoma State Fair for the rides, then there are a couple of add-on ticket options that will let you ride them over and over either without waiting in line or without buying coupons for each ride. I Armbands: Special armbands purchased in addition to fair admission will give visitors unlimited access to the rides on the day they go. Buy armbands by Sept. 12 to get a $10 discount off the regular price, which are $30 Monday through Thursday and $35 for Friday through Sunday. Buy those at participating metro-area Walgreens, online at www.okstatefair.com, by calling 9486800 or at the box office in Jim Norick Arena, 333 Gordon Cooper Boulevard. I Gold Access passes: This new VIP experience from Wade Shows allows riders to skip the lines and move to the front of the line. Each ride will have a percentage of seats reserved for Gold Access pass holders. I To learn more: For more information about carnival provider Wade Shows, go online to wadeshows.com or to its Facebook page at Wade Shows. For more information about the rides and games, go to www.okstatefair.com/state-fair/rides-and-games.


Disney: Show has comedy, Concerts: Stage concludes action for girls and boys schedule with Eddie Money FROM PAGE 10S

FROM PAGE 12S

spunky heroine. “Tiana premiered in a different show ... but this is the first show where we have her as both a princess human and a princess frog,” said Mahan, 22, who has been skating since she was 3 years old, has skated competitively and joined “Disney on Ice” at age 18, previously performing in the productions of “100 Years of Magic,” “Let’s Celebrate,” “Finding Nemo” and “Toy Story 3.” “When I found out I was coming to this show, I was wondering how they were going to do the frog segment or even do frogs. How were they going to pull this off? Then I remembered as a kid seeing ‘The Lion King,’ and I starting thinking, ‘If they can make lions skate, they can make frogs skate.’ ” Even in the midst of the feisty new princesses, Mahan said Cinderella still shines in her part of the show. “We go through her whole story, where she loses the slipper and she finds the prince. To me, I’ve gone to Disney World — I live two hours away — and I’ve met Cinderella there and she has already gone through this story. ... Our Cinderella gets to relive this story every show,” she said in a phone interview from her hometown of St. Augustine, Fla. “It’s amazing to me: It never gets old. Every audience member reacts like it’s their first time seeing it when she tries on the slipper.” While the production’s three protagonists are young women, Mahan said the show offers plenty of comedy and action that both girls and boys can enjoy. In fact, one brave yet comical supporting character almost upstages the fair maidens. “Maximus when he makes his first entrance has some of the loudest cheers that we have in the show,” Mahan said, referring to the tenacious palace horse who is determined to track down the wily thief Flynn Rider — another crowd-pleasing character — in Disney’s Rapunzel adaptation “Tangled.” “I didn’t realize that he would get that big of a crowd reaction but he’s definitely ... a favorite.” Youngsters who are wondering how the Disney On Ice crew can get a horse to skate, Mahan proved surprisingly willing to divulge the secret.

The eight-piece band will perform at 3 p.m. Sept. 16. Contemporary Christian rock band The Afters started up in Mesquite, Texas, in 2000 and debuted on Epic Records five years later with “I Wish We All Could Win.” The band will perform its anthemic praise rock, including songs from 2010’s “Light Up the Sky,” at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 17. For two straight days, the Chesapeake Energy Stage will be consumed with burning love during the Elvis Extravaganza, in which homegrown Elvis Presley impersonators and amateur hip-swivelers do their best tributes to the King of Rock ’n’ Roll. Future kings can sign up to compete during the 7:30 p.m. Sept. 18-19 performances at www.elviscontest.com. Modern grunge band Pop Evil returns to Oklahoma City to perform songs from its latest album, “War of Angels.” The

Princess Tiana is depicted in “Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream.” PHOTO PROVIDED

IF YOU GO ‘DISNEY ON ICE PRESENTS DARE TO DREAM’ I When: 7:30 p.m. Sept 13-14; 11:30 a.m., 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 15; 1:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sept. 16; 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 17; and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 18. I Where: Jim Norick Arena. I Tickets: $14, $18, $23, $30, $40. I Information: 948-6700 or www.okstatefair.com.

“You take long hours and train him. Bags of oats, carrots, sugar cubes. Whatever the horse wants,” she deadpanned before bursting into laughter. Actually, she added, the secret is “Disney magic.” And children aren’t the only ones susceptible to it. “It’s fun to perform for the little kids, definitely, but it’s also fun to perform for those big kids that are enjoying it right next to them, those parents. Some of those parents, we come off the ice after and we’re like ‘Oh my gosh, that mom was more into it than her kid!’ or ‘That dad just couldn’t get enough!’ And those are sometimes the people that just make shows memorable,” she said.

Grand Rapids, Mich.-based rock band led by vocalist Leigh Kakaty plays at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20. A key component of the Minneapolis funk revolution in the 1980s, Morris Day and The Time were the party-starting jesters in the court of Prince. The original band, featuring Day, Jerome Benton, Jesse Johnson and the monstrously successful production team of Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, generated several classics at its peak, including “Jungle Love,” “The Bird,” “777-9311” and “Wild and Loose.” Day and the current lineup perform at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21. The Chesapeake Energy Stage concludes its concert schedule with Eddie Money, who charted two classic rock staples in 1977 with “Baby Hold On” and “Two Tickets to Paradise,” then racked up a string of hits in the 1980s with “Shakin’,” “Think I’m In Love,” “Wanna Go Back” and “Take Me Home Tonight.” Money plays at 8 p.m. Sept. 22.

Contests: Free registration FROM PAGE 13S

junior arts and crafts contests for ages 18 and under, Mehler, 58, of Guthrie, has countless more examples of such “happy mistakes” — like the hand-painted Christmas ornament entered by the mother of a toddler who’d obviously stuck his hand in paint and then grabbed hold of it. “His mom likely took one look at his creation, and thought ‘Hmm. I think I’ll enter this in the fair,’ ” she said. The fair’s creative arts department showcases the work of talented Oklahomans of all ages in quilting, woodworking, baking, cooking, canning, winemaking, photography, ceramics, painting, antiques and other crafts, manager Nancy Nortz said. Out-of-the-box competitions include a “fancy feet” shoe-decorating contest and a “beautiful bras” sewing contest to benefit breast cancer awareness, she said. This year’s fair features 87 prejudged contest divisions that each bear up to 20 subdivisions, Nortz said. Oklahomans entered more than 10,000

items last year, and nearly $10,000 in $1to $100-prizes were awarded, she said. The oldest contestant was 85. Contestants may enter online at www. okstatefair.com. Registration is free, though there is a $10 late fee for entering after Aug. 15 and a $15 fee for Sept. 8 and 9 on-site registrations. The fair will feature 23 live contests like a grilled cheese cooking championship, which require preregistration, and seven free “on-the-spot, walk-up” contests, including new “Paper, Rock, Scissors” and jelly bean flavor guessing competitions, Nortz said. The creative arts contests rely on the expertise of some 40 judges, including Sharon Lee of Piedmont, who for the past several years has assessed antiques and collectibles. “I love seeing and catching up with friends, including one who’s been a longtime judge of toys and dolls,” she said. Lee, who grew up on the Tulalip Indian Reservation in Marysville, Wash., said she particularly enjoys judging American Indian collectibles, which includes baskets, pottery and more.


Rides: Midway will feature new attractions for children FROM PAGE 19S

get a new spectacular ride, I feel that’s going to be our signature piece of equipment.” Also returning is the always popular giant wheel known as the “Enterprise.” There are also new rides for children who aren’t big enough to ride the larger ones, including the “Lady Love Bugs” and the “Jungle Twist Coaster.” It’s up to Wade Shows to get the rides and Midway games ready for the fun, a job that Zaitshik has relished for decades. The Oklahoma State Fair “is one of my favorite fairs

because I played it as a kid,” said Zaitshik, who lives in Florida. When he came back to it in 1993 as one of the new owners of the carnival provider, “it was really nostalgic for me.” Seventy-five rides, along with carnival games, landscaping and other items brought in for the fair will make up this year’s Midway. This year’s effort also is designed to be more environmentally friendly with a focus on efficient practices that use less fuel, Zaitshik said. Gina Burchfiel, vice president of the State Fair Division, noted that the carnival industry recognizes Wade

Shows as one of the top providers in the nation. “We’re thrilled to have them present our carnival,” she said. “It’s such a major part of what people want to do when they come to the fair.” Zaitshik is also proud of the inspection process that keeps the rides safe: Each ride is inspected by an independent team hired by Wade Shows, a separate one provided by the Oklahoma State Fair operation and by the Oklahoma Department of Labor. “I rank Oklahoma’s inspection program one of the highest,” he said.

Twins Mariah and Mario Chavez, of Oklahoma City, ride Wipeout at the 2011 Oklahoma State Fair. PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Equine: Announcers offer ‘vast and amazing education’ FROM PAGE 14S

wagons, often weighing almost two more tons.” “The sounds alone will make you tingle,” Pankow said. “The noise of the serving platter-sized hooves pounding around the arena … the jingle of the harness … the massive wooden wheels as they are pulled around in the packed dirt of the arena, the cheers of the crowd encouraging their breed and wagon of choice, it is energizing for all.” The events held during the Oklahoma State Fair offer something for those who know and love horses and those who have never been around horses or specific breeds of horses, she said. “We pride ourselves at Oklahoma State Fair in offering to both horse lovers of Oklahoma and nonhorsey fairgoers ... equine

events and breeds that may not be seen again at any Oklahoma entertainment venue,” she said. “Where else, in one climate controlled venue, can you see the diminutive but very opinionated Miniature Donkeys, the flowing hair and beauty of the colorful Gypsy Horses and the awesome grace with power that will be exhibited by the Draft Horses being shown here, all in a single day during the fair? Plus, any power aficionado will be awed by the dedication, heart and massive strength of the Draft Horse Pull Teams that will also be competing.” The Draft Horses, Drum Horses, Gypsy Horses and Miniature Donkeys will all compete in both “Halter Classes” as well as in “Performance Classes.” Included in the schedule are various “Farm Classes” on Sept. 21, starting at 10

a.m., in which spectators will see several authentic pieces of long-ago-used farm equipment. The Miniature Donkeys will compete in a few jumping classes “where these little guys will often jump higher than their own personal height, without a rider of course.” The Draft, Gypsy and Drum horses will also be judged under saddle in various classes. And there will be fun classes. “In addition to the above mentioned breeds, we also have classes scheduled on Sept. 23 for the P.O.A.’s, which stands for Pony of the Americas,” Pankow said. “As the name denotes, these are ponies, no more than 56 inches tall, and usually with the colorful patterns and markings of the Appaloosa Horse. This is a family based event for mostly Youth exhibitors and the

Ponies will be displayed in Halter and many varied performance (under saddle) classes.” Pankow said the Oklahoma State Fair will also feature other equine disciplines ranging from the fast-paced speed competition of Barrel Racing on opening day; a precise, colorful and musically enhanced “Drill Team Competition;” the fastest growing equine sport of Ranch Sorting; and the elegant and graceful Dressage competition, the sport that was so much in the news recently during the Olympics. “The Draft Horse Overload Pull Competition that we host on the last Saturday and Sunday evenings of the fair is one of my personal favorites,” she said. “It is such an honor to work with the owners and handlers of these massive teams of horses. These

horses live for their pulls and they can’t wait to show you what they can do when hooked to sleds with blocks totaling (eventually) upward of 13,000 pounds. But then they stand quietly and contentedly, waiting for their next turn to show their strength and power. The owners and linesmen love these horses and the competition with a passion that is usually passed on for several generations and the care and respect they give these horses is impressive to any animal lover. “Some of the best teams from all over the country will converge on Oklahoma City that weekend to vie for over $7,700 in potential prize money as well as gorgeous custom-made trophy buckles to the average winners in both the Lightweight and Heavyweight divisions.” Pankow additionally

said that many of the equine events and breeds that are offered to exhibitors and spectators at the 2012 Oklahoma State Fair have decades of history, tradition and purpose behind them. “Our professional announcers offer vast and amazing education with regard to these events,” she said. So a spectator is not only watching the essence and best of equine competition, but learning about why these animals do what they do, how the sport or work they are doing came about and how the competition has evolved. All the while, he or she is gaining information about the animal involved. “I can’t think of any other place in Oklahoma that will offer such a variety of top notch equine competition and entertainment,” Pankow said.


THE OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR HAS EVERYTHING A FOODIE NEEDS

Eat, compete or do both at Oklahoma State Fair BY DAVE CATHEY Food Editor dcathey@opubco.com

Oklahoma State Fairs come and go, but the food stays pretty much the same: fried delights, stickmounted delicacies and cinnamon rolls that draw lines worthy of TSA checkpoints. But this year, the state fair will introduce a major new attraction with The Good Life Wine & Beer Garden. Run by The Good Life Hospitality Group, which owns Norman restaurants Blu, Coach’s Brewhouse, The Library, and Blackbird Gastropub, the upscale, lushly landscaped area will offer atypical fair food like pot roast sliders, shrimp

corn dogs and cheese plates to complement the spirits. But fair fare fanatics needn’t fear, the deepfryer ain’t going anywhere. In fact, as usual, some new and unusual combinations will take the plunge into vats of 400-degree oil: bacon brownies, bacon dogs, cookie dough on a stick, peanut butter cup Frenchies, and strawberry shortcake. The Juicy Lucy will make its debut in Oklahoma. What’s a Jucy Lucy? You might’ve seen this bad boy featured on Food Network. Ultimately, it’s s a cheeseburger with cheese inside the meat patty rather than on top. A piece of cheese is surrounded by raw meat and cooked until

it melts, resulting in a molten core that tends to gush out at the first bite.

Challenges The number of cooking contests is staggering. Competitors are already finalizing their best breads, brownies, cookies, cakes, cupcakes, pickles, canned fruits and vegetables, dried foods, jellies, jams, butters, pickles, preserves and relishes. The fair also will host live competitions, including the Pillsbury Pet-Ritz Pie Baking Championship, the Great American SPAM Championship, the Karo Creative Cookie and Dessert Contest, the Eggcellent Oklahoma Breakfast, the Some Like It Hot: Fresh Salsa Contest, the State

Wheatheart Bread Baking Contest, the C&H Sugar Special Award Cake Baking Contest, the Oklahoma Peanut Cooking Contest, the Shawnee Mills Corn Bread and Biscuits Contest, the Scrumptious From Scratch: Pies, Cobblers and Cheesecakes contest, international pantry’s “Out of this World” Cooking Contest, the Chocolate Extravaganza Dessert Contest, “What a Crock” Crock-Pot Cook-Off, From Cow to the Cone: Homemade Ice Cream Contest, Smorgasbord in a Pan: Creative Casseroles, the Oklahoma Pride Cooking Contest, the Spectacular Salads Contest, the Ugliest Cake Contest, the Grilled Cheese Championships,

The Sweet Shop manager George Ellis with some bacon cinnamon rolls at the 2011 Oklahoma State Fair. PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

and Forward Foods’ Cheese Contest. Whether you go to eat or

compete, the Oklahoma State Fair promises you’ll get your fill.

Livestock: ‘Students are the backbone of our country’ FROM PAGE 16S

hard for them to part ways at the end. “For some, these animals become part of the family,” he said. “We can’t shelter these kids, they have to know that is part of life and that their animal is part of the food chain. It’s just a lesson you have to learn.”

Educating the masses Along with Oaks, Bill Majors is also increasingly aware of the importance of having farm-fresh newbies out to the state fair to educate them on where their food and other daily products come from. Majors, 73, and his wife Rosalie have volunteered at the fair in the City of AGtropolis exhibit, educating children and their parents by exposing them to live chicken hatchings, cattle pens, a mock

farm and a live beehive. Majors said he wouldn’t have volunteered for the past 20 plus years if he didn’t think what he was doing was vital to sustaining the agriculture field. “This is an educational tool for the people who don’t really have an idea of what goes on in the agriculture end of it with the livestock and what have you,” Majors said. “The one reason I keep doing it is because these FFA students and 4-H students are the backbone of our country. If we don’t educate them on agriculture then where are we going to be down the road?” Majors, who has been dubbed the Mayor of AGtropolis, said while the rest of the state fair is for fun and entertainment, the exposure the agriculture industry gets from it is vital in informing the public about the hard work it takes to get every-

thing from the pasture to their plate. “Most people don’t have a clue what farmers and ranchers have to go through in their daily lives to put food on their plate,” he said. “At the state fair they get to learn where their food chain actually starts.”

Life skills learned With the economy being down the last few years, Oaks said he imagined that fewer kids would have been competing in the competition. But he has remained pleasantly surprised each year as the number of people entering the show have stayed the same and in some years increased. Oaks said most competitors that show end up learning good communication skills because of their need to explain to judges why their animal should be in con-

sideration for the top prize. “They must talk with the livestock judger and make abstract thoughts and it helps them develop really good social skills and great communication skills because of them going through these programs,” Oaks said. “These young people will have a lot of success in whatever field that they go into because they have these responsibilities and these communication skills to be able to go ahead and excel in life.” Oaks said he hopes his involvement with the state fair helps keep the passion alive in youth for agriculture. “I was raised in it, and I was shown a love for raising and exhibiting,” Oaks said. “It was the experience, not the winning, but of showing and learning those character qualities that made me so passionate about it. I love the whole deal.”


2012 Oklahoma State Fair Park guide

JIM NORICK ARENA

Li’l Partnerland Midway Games Super Stock Car Racers Dr Pepper Family Fun Zone Kiddie Tractor Rides Petting Zoo & Pony Trail Rides

Clydesdale Alley Birthing Center & Surgery Suite FFA Exhibits Antique Tractors The TheGood GoodLife LifeWine Wine&&Beer BeerGarden Garde The CONNECTION City of AGtropolis

y p Vineyard Marketplace The Butterfly House Heritage Plaza Spirit of Oklahoma Plaza 4-H Exhibits Creative Arts Exhibits Photography & OK Art Exhibit Auto Show

Pig Races Dale K Hypnosis Show Kids Celebration Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show 411 Band Science Museum Oklahoma National National Rod Rod && Custom Custom Car Car Hall Hall of of Fame

RAM Test Drive Okie Karaoke Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus Redwood Log House Wild West Showcase Firefighter Training Show Runa Pacha Native Music Pets Overboard Remembering Our Fallen Exhib Remembering Our Fallen Exhibit


State Teacher of the Year to be named BY CARRIE COPPERNOLL Staff Writer ccoppernoll@opubco.com

A dozen teachers from across the state are in the running to be named the state’s best educator and take home thousands of dollars in prizes. The 2013 Teacher of the Year will be named Sept. 18 in a ceremony at the Oklahoma State Fair. There will be just one winner, but the process is a reminder that

Oklahoma is home to good educators, said Alicia Currin-Moore, executive director of teacher and leader effectiveness for the state Education Department. “There are so many outstanding and superior teachers across Oklahoma,” she said. “While our 12 finalists are outstanding and superior teachers, we all know outstanding and excellent teachers in our local classrooms who we should support and encourage and honor.”

The state teacher of the year finalists are regional winners among district teachers of the year. Usually, district teachers of the year are chosen from among teacher of the year winners at individual schools. Contestants submit portfolios and videos, and then they go through individual and group interviews Sept. 6. A panel of judges look to make sure the portfolios are completed correctly and look to the content of the port-

folios, Currin-Moore said. The judges discuss the candidates and then come to a consensus about the winner, she said. “The Oklahoma Teacher of the Year will be selected that day but will be kept in secret,” she said. The winner will spend the next year speaking throughout the state and serving as an ambassador for Oklahoma teachers, she said. The winner is also in the running for the title of National Teacher of the Year and

will have the chance to meet the president at a summit in Washington, D.C. The winner receives prizes, including use of a car for the year and a weeklong trip to Space Camp. Donors chip in everything from cash prizes to tuition waivers to gifts. All the prizes for the 2012 Teacher of the Year haven’t been finalized, but CurrinMoore expects it to be similar to prizes in the past, which have totaled thousands of dollars.

CINDY BAILEY

CAROL BRINSFIELD

ANDREA BROCK

DANIEL BUCKMASTER

KYLE COOPER

TIFFANI COOPER

Bailey teaches Algebra I, geometry, pre-calculus and ACT prep at Altus High School. She has 14 years of teaching experience and National Board Certification.

Brinsfield teaches thirdand fourth-grade reading at Checotah Intermediate School. She has 16 years experience and has National Board Certification.

Brock teaches seventhgrade math at Moore West Junior High School. She has eight years of experience.

Buckmaster teaches sixth-grade science at Belle Isle Enterprise Middle School in Oklahoma City. He has seven years experience and National Board Certification.

Cooper teaches prekindergarten at Central Elementary School in Coweta. He has eight years experience.

Cooper teaches Advanced English I and II at Owasso Mid-High School. She has five years of experience.

ELAINE HUTCHISON

LISA LAMONT

LANE MATHESON

ANGELA MCKENNA

BRENDA ROBERTS

LEE ANN STONE

Hutchison teaches math at Fairview High School, Chamberlain Middle School and the Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics Regional Center in Fairview. She is the high school assistant girls basketball coach. She has 19 years of experience and has National Board Certification.

Lamont teaches kindergarten at Irving Elementary School in Muskogee. She has 13 years of experience and has National Board Certification.

Matheson teaches AP and pre-AP physics, digital electronics and engineering robotics at Memorial High School and Engineering Academy in Tulsa. She has 16 years of experience.

McKenna teaches choral music at Sequoyah Middle School in Edmond. She has been teaching at the school for 15 years and has National Board Certification.

Roberts teaches thirdgrade at Homer Elementary School in Byng. She has 13 years experience.

Stone teaches kindergarten at the Woodward Early Childhood Center. She has more than 21 years experience.


CONTEST ATTRACTS HUNDREDS OF FANS AND PARTICIPANTS

Elvis tribute artists to compete at fair BY GEORGE LANG Assistant Entertainment Editor glang@opubco.com

This year marked the 35th anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death, an event that spawned a worldwide cultural phenomenon: the proliferation of Elvis impersonators. After Presley’s death on Aug. 16, 1977, the population of men with jet-black hair and sideburns wearing bejeweled jumpsuits multiplied, and the Elvis Extravaganza, an annual event at the Oklahoma State Fair, offers Oklahoma’s best Elvises the chance to be crowned king. Presley impersonation is serious business, so serious that the people who regularly perform as the King of Rock ’n’ Roll have a preferred title for their profession: Elvis tribute artists, or ETAs. The Elvis Extravaganza Fan Club, which will stage the Oklahoma State Fair contest at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 18-19, is described by organizer Jamie Coyne as the largest Presley fan club in the world. It was founded in 1989 as a way of creating Elvis-like experiences for fans who never got a chance to see Presley in concert. The contest is one of the top draws at the fair, attracting hundreds of fans and participants. Contestants who receive 150 points or more during the competition will advance to the Elvis Extravaganza National Finals and Fan Convention, Feb. 15-16 in Tampa, Fla.

The 411 Band will perform Motwon hits in a Las Vegas-style show at the OPUBCO Pavilion at 6 and 8 p.m. nightly. PHOTO PROVIDED

Motown and explosive science to take stage at OPUBCO Pavilion BY HEATHER WARLICK Staff Writer hwarlick@opubco.com

Mike Black, a local Elvis Presley impersonator, entertains a crowd of about 300 people at a carnival at Del City Elementary School in October. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

LEARN MORE For information on the contest and registration, go to elviscontest.com.

In 2012, three competitors won at the finals: Alabama-based performer Jerome Jackson won the “Best Lookalike” category, while Jason Baglio, of

Louisiana, won the “Best Sound-alike” award. “Best Overall” went to Billy Lindsey, of Tampa, who wears a version of the fringed jumpsuit Presley favored during his 1970 Las Vegas shows. Registered contestants will perform their favorite Presley songs with the Elvis Extravaganza Show Band, a full group with backup singers who can play the singer’s full repertoire.

While experiencing the 2012 Oklahoma State Fair, stop by the OPUBCO Pavilion to take in an interactive science demonstration, then get your body in gear for some top-notch live Motown music. The Pavilion is near the space needle, and all entertainment there is free. The 411 Band will perform at the Pavilion at 6 and 8 p.m. nightly and boasts a Motown/Las Vegas style show complete with powerhouse vocals and a horn section. This will be the fourth year the Oklahoma Citybased band has been a featured act at the fair. “We want to make sure

To promote them is awesome because they’re doing it strictly to give back to the community.” MELINDA PARSONS

SENIOR MANAGER OF ATTRACTIONS AND ENTERTAINMENT FOR THE OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR

that we have bands that intrigue people,” said Melinda Parsons, senior manager of attractions and entertainment for the fair. The 411 Band provides performances that appeals to a broad spectrum of fairgoers, Parsons said. Science Museum Oklahoma volunteers its time this year to help excite kids and adults about science.

The museum offers free, interactive “explosive” science demonstrations at the OPUBCO Pavilion daily at 1:30, 3 and 5 p.m. Additional shows are set for 11:30 a.m., Sept. 17, 18, 20 and 21. “To promote them is awesome because they’re doing it strictly to give back to the community,” Parsons said.


Items lost during fair find way to park’s Safety Center BY CARLA HINTON Religion Editor chinton@opubco.com

With thousands of visitors each day, the Oklahoma State Fair can be likened to a small town or city. The odds of items being left behind or forgotten are pretty high with all the foot traffic up and down the midway, inside the various exhibit buildings and other areas of State Fair Park. Scott Munz, vice president of marketing and public relations for the state fair, said strollers, cellphones, keys, clothing and sunglasses are the types of items people often lose at the fair. Items are often left in restrooms or in other areas. Munz said it’s surprising that wheelchairs are among the things left behind at the fair. “You would think that if you needed a wheelchair to get in, you would need it to get out,” he said. Munz said one of the more astonishing finds one year was a wooden leg that someone forgot about. He said lost items will be turned in to the State Fair Security Desk in the Safety Center on the west end of the Oklahoma State Fair administration building. Munz said the building is across from the City Arts Center. He said lost items will be kept for a few days until they are turned over to the Oklahoma City Police Department and booked into the department’s downtown property room. Meanwhile, officials shared the following tips for anyone who gets separated from a child or other friend or relative while visiting the fair: I Find a police officer or state fair personnel and inform them of the situation. If a child has been found, an officer or other personnel can inform worried parents where their child can be found. I Instead of searching the park, stay at the place where the separation occurred and allow the officers and fair personnel to use their resources to help you reconnect. I Keep a cellphone handy so you can quickly reconnect with missing children. I Plan a meeting place in case someone gets lost either before or upon arriving at the fair. I Take note of what your child is wearing before leaving for the fair, in case you have to describe him or her to someone else. I The Safety Center can be reached by calling the Oklahoma State Fair offices at 948-6700.

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

What to bring, what to leave behind when visiting the fair For 11 days in September, the Oklahoma State Fair will entertain nearly 1 million of people from across the state and U.S. To ensure a safe and successful trip to the fair, take a look at our guide on what to bring and what to leave behind when visiting the state fair.

What to bring with you

WHAT TO DO IF THERE IS AN EMERGENCY The Oklahoma State Fair is an event known among many as a time for food, family and fun. As more than one million people flood State Fair Park over 11 days, it is important to be well-informed about what to do in case of medical emergency. Emergency medical personnel will be located inside the Safety Center. The Safety Center is on the west end of the administration building, which is in the northeast corner of the property, across the street from the City Arts Center. Medical personnel from the Emergency Medical Services Authority and also chaplains and police officials will be inside the Safety Center. If you’re able to make it to the Safety Center, that would be the best place to go, said Scott Munz, the vice president of marketing and public relations for the Oklahoma State Fair. If you’re not able to make it there, several people will be around the fair park who could help you. EMSA and fire department personnel will be riding around the fair park on bicycles. Police officers will also be traveling throughout the fair park. Administrative staff will be on golf carts going through the fair park as well. If a medical emergency occurs while you’re inside one of the buildings, you can either try to find one of the building attendants, usually by the entrances, or check outside to see if someone is nearby. You can also still dial 911 in case of emergency. You should tell the dispatcher that you’re at the state fair and explain your location.

FROM STAFF REPORTS

STATE FAIR VISITORS HAVE MANY PARKING OPTIONS, INCLUDING FREE AND PAID SPOTS The Oklahoma State Fair offers visitors several acres of parking, both the free and paid variety. Free parking is available outside gates 1, 2, 6, 9 and 10. Paid parking ($5 per car, per day) is available outside gates 5, 6, 9 and 10. Gates 1, 9 and 10 can be accessed from NW 10, gates 2 and 5 from May Ave, and gate 6 from Reno Ave. A season parking pass, which provides admission to the fair for all 11 days, is available for $25 and can be purchased at the arena box office, located on the south edge of fair park. Handicapped parking is available at all outside gates. For more information, call 948-6700 or go to www.ok statefair.com. RICK ROGERS, STAFF WRITER

1. Comfortable clothes and shoes When you go to the fair, you want to get your $9 worth of fun. It’s best to set yourself up for success by wearing versatile clothing and shoes you can walk hours in without developing blisters. 2. Weather gear Oklahoma is known for its changing weather. If it’s expected to rain the day you’re planning to attend the fair, it would be best to pack a folding umbrella and a rain jacket. If it is expected to be sunny, don’t forget the sunscreen. It’s still possible to get a sunburn, even in September. 3. A stroller Most attendees spend several hours enjoying the food and fun. It’s best to have a stroller in case your little one gets tired and needs a walking break. 4. The Oklahoman’s state fair guide It’s not just a shameless self promotion. This guide has a map and several other fair resources in it. It would be helpful to have when you’re lost and have five minutes to get to Disney On Ice. 5. A happy attitude Fair officials expect one million people to attend the state fair over its 11-day stretch. Wouldn’t it be neat if all one million of them were smiling?

What not to bring with you 1. Weapons No weapons of any kind are allowed at the park. 2. Pets As much as Fido loves the dog park, he might not enjoy the fair park. It’s best to leave any of your furry or feathered friends at home. They’re not allowed at the fair, unless they are service animals. 3. Your two- or three-wheeler All-terrain vehicles, motorcycles and Segways are not allowed. Best to leave it in the parking lot. 4. Bicycles, skateboards or roller skates Navigating through the crowds on wheels would be difficult, anyway. The only people you’ll see on bicycles will be medical emergency personnel. 5. Outside food or beverage Unless it’s for a medical purpose, you’re not allowed to bring outside food or beverages. And who would want to anyway? With menu items like deep-fried bacon brownies, deep fried peanut butter cups and roasted turkey legs, there’s more to eat at the fair than you can even imagine. Oh, and don’t forget your wallet. SOURCE:

SCOTT MUNZ, OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS


nalizing the construction of the citizen-financed $33 million Bricktown Ballpark, now considered one of the nation’s finest minor league baseball parks. O’Toole’s experience includes seven years as director of operations for the Amateur Softball Association/USA Softball, based in Oklahoma City, where he planned and managed the association’s inaugural participation in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. O’Toole also served as Director of Operations for the 1989 U.S. Olympic Festival held in Oklahoma City.

O’Toole is a graduate of Bishop McGuiness High School and Southern Nazarene University. O’Toole serves on the boards of the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce, OSUOKC Advisory Board and the Oklahoma State Fair Board of Directors. O’Toole is married to Kathleen, and has three children: Stacy, Ryan, and Blake.

Executive Committee

Board of Directors

Timothy J. O’Toole President & CEO

Timothy J. O’Toole has served as the President & CEO of the Oklahoma State Fair and State Fair Park since January 2004. Beginning in 2005, State Fair Park has undergone a $90 million renovation to its Equine and Livestock facilities under his leadership. Plans are underway to revitalize the exposition facilities and gateways to State Fair Park as part of Oklahoma City’s Maps3 program. O’Toole served as president and general manager of the Oklahoma RedHawks Baseball Club in Oklahoma City from 1998 to 2004. He worked with local government officials fi-

David Thompson President & CEO, InvesTrust

John Michael Williams Attorney, Williams, Box, Forshee & Bullard

G. Rainey Williams Jr. President, Kestrel Investments, Inc.

Melissa Sikking Corporate Secretary, Oklahoma State Fair, Inc.

Bill Anoatubby Governor, Chickasaw Nation

David L. Boren President, University of Oklahoma

MIchael A. Cawley President, Noble Foundation

Ralph Chain President, Chain Land & Cattle Co.

William H. Crawford Chairman & CEO, First Southwest Bank

Peter B. Delaney President & CEO OG&E Energy Corp.

Carl Edwards Chairman, Price Edwards & Company

Dr. Gilbert C. Gibson Retired Chairman & CEO Citizens Bank, Lawton

David F. Griffin President & General Manager, Griffin Television, LLC

V. Burns Hargis President, Oklahoma State University

Robert Henry President, Oklahoma City University

Kirk Humphreys The Humphreys Company

Dr. Glen D. Johnson Chancellor, Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

Bruce Lawrence President & CEO INTEGRIS Health

Gregory M. Love President & COO, Love’s Country Stores, Inc.

Edmund O. Martin Chairman, Ackerm Ac Ackerman man M McQueen cQue cQ ueen en

J.W. Mashburn J.W. Mashburn EEnterprises

Dr. Tom J. McDaniel President, American Fidelity Foundation

Herman Meinders Chairman Emeritus, HCM Investments

J. Larry Nichols Chairman of the Board & CEO, Devon Energy Corp.

David E. Rainbolt President & CEO, BancFirst

Charles P. Schroeder ExecutiveDirector,National Cowboy&WesternHeritageMuseum

Dr. Pa Paul W. Sechrist President, PPr eside Oklahoma City Community College Com

Ann Simank Executive Director, Oklahoma City Metro Alliance

Lee Allan Smith Vice Chairman, Ackerman McQueen

Dick Stubbs President Cattlemen’s Steakhouse

Christopher C. Turner President & CFO, The First State Bank

Michael C. Turpen Partner in Law Firm Riggs, Abney, Neal, Turpen, Orbison & Lewis

Board of Directors continued on next page

E. Carey Joullian IV President, Mustang Fuel Corp.

Clayton I. Bennett Chairman, Oklahoma City Thunder President, Dorchester Capital


Tony Tyler Tyler Media

J. Blake Wade Roy H. Williams Executive Director, The American President, Greater Oklahoma Indian Cultural Center Foundation City Chamber of Commerce

Darrell Chabino Real Estate, Investments and Development

Luke R. Corbett Retired Chairman & CEO, Kerr-McGee Corp.

William E. Durrett Senior Chairman, American Fidelity Group

Dr. James E. Halligan State Senator, State of Oklahoma

Dan Hogan III Investments

Stanley F. Hupfeld Chairman, INTEGRIS Health Family of Foundations

McGee Award for outstanding leadership to Downtown Oklahoma City –presentedbyDowntownNow;theAwardofExcellence–presentedby The Arthritis Foundation and the Oklahoma Hall of Fame – presented by the Oklahoma Heritage Association among many others. Ron attended Oklahoma City public schools and graduated from Northwest Classen High School before going on to earn a Bachelors of Science Degree in Management from Oklahoma City University. He is married to Margaret (Kandy) Norick. Both his daughter Allyson and his son Lance graduated from Oklahoma City University. Allyson has two daughters, Emily & Caroline.

M.O. “Bud” Breeding The Insurance Center

Robert F. Browne

Lt. Gen. Richard A. Burpee Consultant, RAB Enterprises, LLC

William M. Cameron Chairman & CEO, American Fidelity Group

Maj. Gen. Jay T. Edwards Air Force Retired

Robert A. Funk Chairman & CEO, Express Personnel Services

John D. Groendyke Chairman & CEO, Groendyke Transports, Inc.

Brooks K. Hall Vice Chairman, Fred Jones Companies

Frank A. McPherson Retired Chairman & CEO, Kerr-McGee Corp.

James H. Norick Norick Investment Co.

Bill Mathis President, Mathis Brothers Oklahoma City, LLC

Aubrey K. McClendon Chairman & CEO, Chesapeake Energy Corp.

G. Jeffrey Records Jr. Chairman & CEO, MidFirst Bank

Lindy Ritz Director, Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center

James D. Couch City Manager, City of Oklahoma City

Eugene Seyler The Honorable Janet Barresi The Honorable Willa Johnson Chairman, Greater OKC StateSuperintendentofPublicInstruction, OklahomaCounty Metro Hotel Association StateDepartmentofEducation Commissioner,District1

Dr. Kenneth E. Smith Owner & Operator, K.S. Oil Co.

Marion J. Story Manager of Special Projects, Mustang Fuel Corp.

Ex-Officio Members

William N. Pirtle Russell M. Perry Retired Utility Executive, President & CEO, Perry Publishing & Broadcasting Co., Inc. Oklahoma Natural Gas. Co.

Honorary Board Members

also Chairman of the Board of Trustees and Executive Committee for Oklahoma City University. He also currently serves as Chairman of the Oklahoma City Riverfront Redevelopment Authority and Chairman of theOklahomaCityDowntownTIFReviewCommittee. Norickiscurrently Vice-Chairman of the Oklahoma Industries Authority and sits on the BoardofDirectorsoftheGreaterOklahomaCityChamberofCommerce. Additionally, Mr. Norick serves on a number of civic, community, educational, corporate and public boards, commissions and committees. Ron has received many awards for his civic duty including the Distinguished Alumnus Award – presented by Oklahoma City University; the Dean A.

Continued from previous page

Ronald J. Norick Chairman of the Board

Ronald J. Norick serves as Controlling Manager of Norick Investments Company LLC, a family-owned limited liability company, which is engaged in investments. Mr. Norick was previously employed by Norick Brothers, Inc. for over 30 years, serving as the President of the company from 1981 to 1992. From April 1987 to April 1998, Mr. Norick was Mayor of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Norick is highly involved in many professional, civic and charitable organizations. Mr.NorickhasbeenaDirectorofBancfirstCorp.since2002 and also a Director at Merlon International, Inc. Norick currently serves not only as the Chairman of the Board for Oklahoma State Fair, Inc. but

The Honorable Mary Fallin Governor, State of Oklahoma

The Honorable Mick Cornett Mayor, City of Oklahoma City


Fair brings the country to urban environment BY CHRIS SCHUTZ For The Oklahoman

Fairgoers browse The CONNECTION inside the Oklahoma Expo Hall last year. PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE STATE FAIR

The CONNECTION provides visitors Oklahoma experience BY JENNIFER PALMER Business Writer jpalmer@opubco.com

The Yellow Rose Dinner Theater credits onequarter of the sales of its season passes last year to the exposure it received at the Oklahoma State Fair. As one of the local vendors featured at The CONNECTION an attraction that showcases Oklahoma products and services inside the Oklahoma Expo Hall, the Yellow Rose was able to attract people through lively performances and then educate them about the theater, said Michael Cooper, director of advertising and entertainment. “The state fair was able to put us in front of a lot of people that didn’t know we exist,” he said. The Yellow Rose will be back this year inside The CONNECTION, as will

other favorites, such as several wineries and the Orr Family Farm, said Dana Murrell, State Fair director of sales and development. New vendors include the Oklahoma Food Cooperative, Red Hot Mamma’s Pickles, Andrews Honey Bees and Oklahoma Natural Gas. Eric Lyons, president of the Oklahoma Food Cooperative, said their booth will span two sides of an aisle like a walk-through grocery store. Some of the coop’s 4,300 products will be featured and members will be available to talk about membership. The CONNECTION gives fairgoers the feel of a modern day train station, transporting them on three colored “lines” to various stops along the way. Stops include Resource Square, featuring city and state agencies, Recreation Station, which spotlights the-

ater, sports and more, Backyard & Beyond, the MIO Trading Post, which is full of local products, the Business District featuring Oklahoma-based companies, Vineyard Marketplace, host to eight local wineries, AGtropolis, which focuses on Oklahoma’s agricultural industry, and the Station Platform, where fairgoers will see a variety of entertainment. On the stage this year will be muralist Bob Palmer, Art Moves by the Arts Council of Oklahoma City, the Oklahoma City Barons, Fort Gibson living history, storyteller Miss Molly Lou Belle and more. The CONNECTION gets better each year, and its vendors are held to high standards, Murrell said. Most return every year. “The proof really is in the energy you can feel when you go in this building,” she said.

A bit of the country sets up shop in the middle of Oklahoma City in time for the annual Oklahoma State Fair. At different sites around the fairgrounds, city folk can learn a bit more about the animals that are the sources of their favorite meals. The Barnyard Birthing Center located in Barn 3 may offer some surprises for people who live in an urban environment, said Gina Burchfiel, vice president of the State Fair. Last year, about 40 animals were born there during the fair. For instance, visitors may be amazed at the number of piglets crowding around their massive mothers to nurse. Pigs have large litters — sometimes as many as 10 piglets. It’s possible that visitors to the Birthing Center will see a mama goat with twins or triplets — that’s common, Burchfiel said. Despite the center’s name, visitors may not actually witness animals giving birth, Burchfiel said. Many of those happen at night when the exhibit is closed. “You can’t really force a birth,” she said. However, if a birth is taking place, “we don’t allow the crowd to swarm the area,” she said. Visitors are not allowed to touch the animals for a couple of reasons, Burchfiel said. One is to prevent the passing of germs back and forth. The other is for the safety of visitors. “Sows are incredibly protective,” she said. The Oklahoma Veterinary Medical Association donates staff members’ time to help care for animals that will be birthing during the fair. The animals are “very well cared for,” Burchfiel said. The Birthing Center also features a surgical suite where visitors can watch a veterinarian performing a spay procedure on a female dog. The surgeries will take place at 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, according to the fair’s website. Veterinarians will be on hand at the Birthing Center to answer questions, promote veterinary medicine as a career and help send a message about responsible pet ownership. The farm animals are either borrowed

or purchased for the fair, Burchfiel said. The dogs come from the Oklahoma City Animal Shelter; spaying is performed with the hope of making them more adoptable. Elsewhere at the fair, the City of AGtropolis, located in the Oklahoma Expo Hall, offers information on farm life for both children and adults. The exhibit uses live animals and fictional animal characters to teach the value and uses of sheep, goats, cattle, swine and other animals in daily life. At the City of AGtropolis, visitors can learn such things as the fact that it takes a chicken 24 to 26 hours to lay one egg, she said. Members of Future Farmers of America are on hand to answer questions, Burchfiel said. The FFA members “are very familiar with these species of animals,” she said. “We want to make sure the message does get to children,” Burchfiel said. However, she’s noticed the exhibit attracts as many adults as children. She encourages fair visitors to observe some of the livestock and horse show competitions. Judges are aware that lay people may be in the audience, Burchfiel said. The judges “give a lot of information about why they select certain animals as champions of their breeds and of their type. Were they raised in a way that they’re going to be good for production?” Other farm-related areas of interest at the fair will include: I America’s Farmers Mobile Experience, a traveling exhibit sponsored by Monsanto, which will be at the fair from Sept. 19-22 in front of Barn 4. The 53-foot tractor-trailer folds out to create 1,000 square feet of exhibit space on how much food production will be needed to keep up with global population growth. For more information on the exhibit, go to www. americasfarmers.com. I Clydesdale Alley in a row of stalls in the Superbarn. Express Ranch sponsors this exhibit about the history of draft horses. Technology has now taken over the role once played by draft horses, but people are still fascinated with the animals, which can weigh a ton, Burchfiel said. I Vintage tractors displayed by the Canadian Rivers Old Iron Club. The club conducts a parade of the tractors at noon on Senior Day, Sept. 19. The parade starts on Land Rush Street.


NW 63

44

NW 50 NW 36 NW 23

66 Lake Overholser

44

NW 10 Reno

40

State Fair Park

35 235

40

Oklahoma River

SW 15 SW 29 SW 44

Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience 5:30 p.m. Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 8:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis 6 p.m. Best Dressed Pumpkin Contest, Creative Arts Building The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Youth Pony Barrel Race, Performance Arena 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 6:30 p.m. Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza New Hope Cowboy Ministries (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 7 p.m. The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience

Bryant

Sunnylane

240

Eastern

Western

Pennsylvania

SW74

May

SW 59

35 Portland

8 a.m. Barrel Racing Clinic featuring Karla Oller (until 2 p.m.), Performance Arena 10 a.m. Auto Show (until 9 p.m.), Travel and Transportation Building City Arts Center Pottery Demo (until 2 p.m.), Creative Arts Building American Sewing Guild Demo (until 3 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Sooner Scribe Calligraphy Demo (until 4 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 11 a.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis 11:30 a.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Noon Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 12:30 p.m. Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience 1 p.m. Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 1:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza

Wilshire

Meridian

THINGS TO DO

Lake Hefner

Britton

MacArthur

8 a.m. Opening Day: $2.00 Admission 1 p.m. Dr Pepper Armband Day 5 p.m. Oklahoma State Fair Opening Ceremonies, 14 Flags Plaza 7:30 p.m. Kevin Fowler, Chesapeake Energy Stage Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena

Hefner

Rockwell

FEATURED EVENTS

Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza The Beau Weevilz (until 2:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 2 p.m. The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Breast Cancer Awareness: Beautiful Bras! Contest, Creative Arts Building Spectacular Salads Contest, Creative Arts Building 2:30 p.m. Highland West Jr High Choir (until 3:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre 3 p.m. Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion 3:30 p.m. Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 4 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 8 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Exhibition Barrels, Performance Arena 13 Seeds (until 5 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience 4:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza 5 p.m. Some Like It Hot: Fresh Salsa Contest, Creative Arts Building Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre Two Nice Girls Trio (until 6 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Pet Rescue 911 (until 8 p.m.), Barn 3 Cooking with the Oklahoma Beef Council Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis

How to get there

Council

SEPT. 13

NW 122

County Line

State fair schedule

35

Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre 5D & AQHA Barrel Racing Competition (until about 9 p.m.), Performance Arena 7:30 p.m. The Chase Stites Band (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 9 p.m. Captain T Andrews (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 14 FEATURED EVENTS 7:30 p.m. Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena Air Supply, Chesapeake Energy Stage

THINGS TO DO 7:30 a.m. Livestock Judging Competition, Super Barn 10 a.m. Auto Show (until 10 p.m.), Travel and Transportation Building Gourd Painting Demo (until 2 p.m.), Creative Arts Building China Painting Demo (until 2 p.m.), Creative Arts Building STEM Safari-Robotics Demo (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building

11 a.m. Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Canning Demo, Creative Arts Building Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis 11:30 a.m. Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Markkii Notes, Bandshell Stage Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Noon Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Oklahoma Trotters (until 1 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Live Scrapbook Challenge: Greeting Cards, Creative Arts Building Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 12:30 p.m. Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience 1 p.m. OKEDA Drill Team Competition (until about 7 p.m.), Performance Arena Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Pet Rescue 911 (until 7 p.m.), Barn 3 Ostrich Cooking Demo (until 8 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 1:30 p.m. Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Christophe and The Prairie Fire (until 2:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion 2 p.m. The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience 2:30 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Alana, Bandshell Stage Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience 3 p.m. Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Mallory Lawless, Bandshell Stage Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience


3:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 4 p.m. Shenaniguns! Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Smokey Bones (until 5 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 8 p.m.), City of AGtropolis 4:30 p.m. Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience 5 p.m. Crafting with Deluxe Artists Demo (until 8 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Club Lamb Breeding Ewes Show, Super Barn Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Kay-O, Bandshell Stage Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience 5:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Ryan Sparks, Bandshell Stage Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 8:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis 6 p.m. OKC Knitters Guild Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience “What a Crock” Crock-Pot Challenge, Creative Arts Building 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience 6:30 p.m. OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza 5 Dollar Thrill (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza 7 p.m. Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza

Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre 7:30 p.m. 2nd St (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion 9 p.m. Leah (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 15

FEATURED EVENTS 11:30 a.m. Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena 2 p.m. Candy Coburn, Chesapeake Energy Stage 3:30 p.m. Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena 7:30 p.m. Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena 8 p.m. Neal McCoy with Candy Coburn, Chesapeake Energy Stage

THINGS TO DO 9 a.m. Prospect Steer Show, Barn 3 Junior Market Barrow Show (until about 1 p.m.), Barn 8 Junior Market Wether Sheep Show (until 3 p.m.), Super Barn 10 a.m. Oklahoma Art Exhibition Awards Ceremony, Capital City Theatre Kids of the Year Pageant (until 2 p.m.), City Arts Center Auto Show (until 10 p.m.), Travel and Transportation Building OSU’s Insect Adventure (until 2 p.m.), City of AGtropolis OKEDA Drill Team Competition (until about 7 p.m.), Performance Arena Celebrating 100 Years of Girl Scouts (until close), Creative Arts Building 11 a.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 7 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Max Ridgway Trio, Bandshell Stage Great American SPAM Championship, Creative Arts Building 11:30 a.m. Junior Commercial Heifer Show, Barn 3 Amanda Longley, Bandshell Stage Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 6:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience

Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Noon Holly Beth, Bandshell Stage Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Graffiti Painting Demo (until 6 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 12:30 p.m. Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza 1 p.m. Junior Charolais Show, Barn 3 Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Pet Rescue 911 (until 7 p.m.), Barn 3 Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience 1:30 p.m. Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Katie Best, Bandshell Stage Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza 2 p.m. Forward Foods Cheese Contest, Creative Arts Building Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Dazzlers Drill Team (until 3 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Junior Commercial Gilt Show, Barn 8 Junior Chianina Show, Barn 3 OKC Thunder Entertainment Team (until 6 p.m.), 14 Flags Plaza 2:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience 3 p.m. Donna Marie Urbassik, Bandshell Stage The Biggest Bubble Contest, City Arts Center Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Cooking with the Girl Scouts (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience 3:30 p.m. Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn

Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza 3:45 p.m. Junior Gelbvieh Show, Barn 3 4 p.m. Reflections of Elvis, Bandshell Stage Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience 4:30 p.m. MoonSwept, Bandshell Stage Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience 5 p.m. Desert Fire Belly Dancers (until 6 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre Junior Red Angus Show, Barn 3 Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience 5:30 p.m. Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza 6 p.m. Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Cooking with the Oklahoma Beef Council Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Chocolate Extravaganza Dessert Contest, Creative Arts Building 6:30 p.m. Still Breathing Band (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza 7 p.m. Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre 7:30 p.m. Sets of Failure (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion

Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 9 p.m. G3TSUM (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 16

FEATURED EVENTS 1:30 p.m. Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena 3 p.m. Conjunto Atardecer, Chesapeake Energy Stage 5:30 p.m. Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena

THINGS TO DO 8 a.m. Open & Youth Rabbit Show (until 1:30 p.m.), Barn 9 9 a.m. RSNC and AQHA Ranch Sorting (until about 7 p.m.), Performance Arena Junior Breeding Gilts (until about 2 p.m.), Barn 8 Junior Breeding Sheep (until about 3 p.m.), Super Barn 9:30 a.m. Come As You Are Church Services, Capital City Theatre 10 a.m. Tole Diggers Painting Club Demo (until 1 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 4-H Cooking Demo (until Noon), Creative Arts Building OSU’s Insect Adventure (until 2 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Auto Show (until 9 p.m.), Travel and Transportation Building Junior Beefmaster Show, Barn 3 10:45 a.m. Junior Saler Show, Barn 3 11 a.m. OK Kids (until Noon), Bandshell Stage Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 7 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience 11:15 a.m. Junior Simmental Show, Barn 3 11:30 a.m. Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 6:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Noon Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza


Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Homothumadon Drama Ministry (until 1 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Oklahoma Chisholm Trail Leather Guild Demo (until 6 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 12:30 p.m. Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Cooking with the Oklahoma Beef Council Demo (until 4:30 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 1 p.m. Lace Making Demo (until 6 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Junior & Open Maine Anjou, Barn 3 Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Pet Rescue 911 (until 7 p.m.), Barn 3 Rain Gutter Regatta (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 1:30 p.m. Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Porch Mice, Bandshell Stage Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion 2 p.m. The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis Dawn Rising, Bandshell Stage From Cow to the Cone: Homemade Ice Cream Contest, Creative Arts Building Central Oklahoma Polymer Clay Guild Demo (until 6 p.m.), Creative Arts Building OKC Thunder Entertainment Team (until 6 p.m.), 14 Flags Plaza OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 2:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre MADDOX ROSS, Bandshell Stage 3 p.m. Lego Building Contest, Creative Arts Building Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Emily Faith, Bandshell Stage Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza 3:30 p.m. Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier

Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 4 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Sydney Adams, Bandshell Stage 4:30 p.m. Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Oklahoma Salsa Fever & Friends (until 5:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 5 p.m. Cake Decorating Demo (until 8 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 5:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Lauren Raquel, Bandshell Stage 6 p.m. Ugliest Cake Contest, Creative Arts Building Digital Photography Shootout People’s Choice Voting, City Arts Center Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience 6:30 p.m. At Long Last (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza 7 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Digital Photography Shootout Awards, City Arts Center Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience 7:30 p.m. Avenue Brigade (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion

9 p.m. Broken Dream (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 17

FEATURED EVENTS 8 a.m. Kids’ Day: Kids through Grade 12 get in FREE 10:30 a.m. Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena Band Day Parade Competition, Outdoor Space 7:30 p.m. The Afters, Chesapeake Energy Stage Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena

THINGS TO DO 9 a.m. RSNC and AQHA Ranch Sorting (until about 7 p.m.), Performance Arena 10 a.m. Mid-Del Art Guild Demo (until 8 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Leonardo’s Discovery Warehouse (until 1 p.m.), Creative Arts Building STEM Safari — Robotics Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building OSU’s Insect Adventure (until 2 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Auto Show (until 9 p.m.), Travel and Transportation Building 11 a.m. Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience 11:30 a.m. Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Noon Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 12:30 p.m. Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience 1 p.m. The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Scrumptious From Scratch: Pies, Cobblers, & Cheesecakes, Creative Arts Building Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Wild West Showcase, Centennial

Frontier Experience 1:30 p.m. Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Band Day Color Guard and Drum Line Workshops, Bandshell Lawn Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion 2 p.m. The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Band Day Awards Ceremony, Bandshell Stage Jelly Bean Flavor Guessing Contest, Creative Arts Building 2:30 p.m. Sydney Natale, Bandshell Stage Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre 3 p.m. Pampered Chef Demo (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Ellerie West, Bandshell Stage Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion 3:30 p.m. Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 4 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 8 p.m.), City of AGtropolis MLP Band (until 5 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 4:30 p.m. Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience 5 p.m. Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Laura Mae, Bandshell Stage Pet Rescue 911 (until 8 p.m.), Barn 3 Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 5:30 p.m. Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 8:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis

6 p.m. 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Smorgasbord in a Pan: Creative Casseroles Contest, Creative Arts Building Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Fancy Feet Contest, Creative Arts Building Best Dressed Cow, Barn 3 Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience 6:30 p.m. Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Rebecca J Brock and The Company (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 Dairy Showmanship, Barn 3 Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza 7 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza 7:30 p.m. Sequoia Rapids (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion 9 p.m. Byron McKedy & The Bandits (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 18

FEATURED EVENTS 8 a.m. Armed Forces’ Day: Military Personnel & Spouses get in FREE 7:30 p.m. Elvis Extravaganza, Chesapeake Energy Stage Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream, Jim Norick Arena

THINGS TO DO 9 a.m. Open & Junior Dairy Goat Show (until about 10 p.m.), Super Barn Open & Junior Dairy Cattle Show (until about 2 p.m.), Barn 3 Open Nigerian Dwarf Goat Show (until about Noon), Super Barn Dressage Competition (until about 6 p.m.), Barn 8 Stock Dog Trials/Competitions (until about 6 p.m.), Performance Arena 10 a.m. STEM Safari — Robotics Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building


Oklahoma Sewing Machine Artists Demo (until 3 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Auto Show (until 9 p.m.), Travel and Transportation Building Leonardo’s Discovery Warehouse (until 1 p.m.), Creative Arts Building OSU’s Insect Adventure (until 2 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Open Pygmy Goat Show (until 1 p.m.), Super Barn Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Rock, Paper, Scissors Contest, Creative Arts Building Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis 11:30 a.m. Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Gypsum River Band (until 1 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Noon Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza 12:30 p.m. Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience 1 p.m. Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience 1:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Worship Warrior, House (until 2:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion 2 p.m. Cooking with Cast Iron Demo (until 4 p.m.), Creative Arts Building The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience 2:30 p.m. MagicJon Comedy & Illusion Show (until 3:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience

3 p.m. Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience 3:30 p.m. Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza 4 p.m. Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 8 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Basket Weaving Demo (until 8 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Mirror Image (until 5 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre 4:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience 5 p.m. JL Jones, Bandshell Stage Pet Rescue 911 (until 8 p.m.), Barn 3 Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 5:30 p.m. Kailyn Jolliff, Bandshell Stage Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 8:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis 6 p.m. The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Pillsbury Pet-Ritz Pie Baking Championship, Creative Arts Building Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Cooking with the Oklahoma Beef Council Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 6:30 p.m. The Jason Scott Band (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags

Plaza

7 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience 7:30 p.m. Predestined Nation (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 9 p.m. Lost N Found (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 19

FEATURED EVENTS 8 a.m. 36th Annual Senior Citizens’ Day — 55+ FREE!, Carriage Hall 7:30 p.m. Elvis Extravaganza, Chesapeake Energy Stage

THINGS TO DO 8 a.m. Senior Day — Sing-A-Long with Randy Lunsford, Carriage Hall 8:15 a.m. Senior Day — Not Just Country Line Dancers, Carriage Hall 8:45 a.m. Senior Day — Zumba Gold, Carriage Hall 9 a.m. Open & Junior Dairy Goat Show (until about 10 p.m.), Super Barn Senior Day — Tai Chi, Carriage Hall Open Nigerian Dwarf Goat Show (until about noon), Super Barn 9:30 a.m. Senior Day — Not Just Country Line Dancers, Carriage Hall 10 a.m. Open Pygmy Goat Show (until 1 p.m.), Super Barn 4th Annual Needle ’n Thread Day (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Lace Making Demo (until 2 p.m.), Creative Arts Building C&H Sugar Special Award Cake Baking Contest, Creative Arts Building Oklahoma State Fiddlers (until noon), Bandshell Stage Stock Dog Trials/Competitions (until about 6 p.m.), Performance Arena Woodcarving Demo (until 6 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Central Oklahoma Quilters Demo (until 4 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Cooking with the Oklahoma Beef Council Demo (until 1:30 p.m.), Creative Arts Building King & Queen of Hearts Senior Royalty Contest, Carriage Hall Seniors Out & About on the Strip! (until 2:30 p.m.), Carriage Hall Auto Show (until 9 p.m.), Travel and

Transportation Building 10:30 a.m. Senior Day — Zumba Gold, Carriage Hall High Stakes Numbers for Seniors Contest (until 12:30 p.m.), Carriage Hall 11 a.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Senior Day — John Harrison’s Roping Exhibition, Carriage Hall Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience 11:30 a.m. Senior Day — Vegas Live! Look-A-Like Contest, Carriage Hall Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Noon Music Central, Bandshell Stage Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Senior Day — Antique Tractor Parade, Outdoor Space Senior Day — Not Just Country Line Dancers, Carriage Hall Senior Day — Grab Some Lunch, Outdoor Space 12:15 p.m. Senior Day — Kirk Heldreth’s, Reflections of Elvis, Carriage Hall 12:30 p.m. Paige Norman Perry, Bandshell Stage Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience 1 p.m. Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Senior Day — Tai Chi, Carriage Hall Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience 1:15 p.m. Senior Day — Music Central, Men’s Acappella Chorus, Carriage Hall 1:30 p.m. Senior Day — 2012 Oklahoma City Indian Princesses, Carriage Hall Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Heaven and Earth Music (until 2:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 1:45 p.m. Senior Day — Let’s Make a “Fair” Deal Game Show, Carriage Hall

2 p.m. The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Oklahoma Peanut Cooking Contest, Creative Arts Building 2:30 p.m. Senior Day — Take a Stroll on the Strip (aka Fair Grounds), Outdoor Space Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Michelle Dunn, Bandshell Stage 3 p.m. Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Pampered Chef Demo (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Making Shrunken Treasure Miniatures Demo (until 8 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Larry Perkey, Bandshell Stage 3:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience 4 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 8 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Broadway Kids (until 5 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 4:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience 5 p.m. Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre Denzell Washington, Bandshell Stage Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Pet Rescue 911 (until 8 p.m.), Barn 3 Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience 5:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience C3NTURY (until 6 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 8:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis 6 p.m. Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience


Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Senior Day — Brothers of Stomp Dance Demonstration, Carriage Hall 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion 4-H Cooking Demo (until 8 p.m.), Creative Arts Building City Arts Center Weaving Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience 6:30 p.m. Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza The Fabulous Senior Swing Dance, Carriage Hall Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Dutch Creek Bluegrass Band (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 7 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre 7:15 p.m. Senior Day — Not Just Country Line Dancers, Carriage Hall 7:30 p.m. The Sucker Punks (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 8:15 p.m. Senior Day — Not Just Country Line Dancers, Carriage Hall 9 p.m. In Union (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 20

FEATURED EVENTS 1 p.m. Dr Pepper Armband Day 3 p.m. Heat 1-North American Six-Horse Hitch Classic Series Finals, Performance Arena 7:30 p.m. Pop Evil, Chesapeake Energy Stage

THINGS TO DO 10 a.m. Children’s Philharmonic Instrument Playground (until 1 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Leonardo’s Discovery Warehouse (until 1 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Food for Body & Soul Quilts Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Deaf Awareness Day (until 9 p.m.), Carriage Hall Open & Junior Brahman Show, Barn 3

Draft Horse Show (until about 3 p.m.), Performance Arena OSU’s Insect Adventure (until 2 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Auto Show (until 9 p.m.), Travel and Transportation Building 11 a.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience 11:30 a.m. Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Noon Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 12:30 p.m. Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Sophia Massad, Bandshell Stage Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience 1 p.m. Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Eggcellent Oklahoma Breakfast Cook-Off, Creative Arts Building Open & Junior Santa Gertrudis Shows (until about 5 p.m.), Barn 3 Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 1:30 p.m. Hanging Haley (until 2:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza 2 p.m. Jelly Bean Flavor Guessing Contest, Creative Arts Building The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience City Arts Center Pottery Demo (until 6 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 2:30 p.m. Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience All Saints Showchoir (until 3:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre 3 p.m. Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial

Frontier Experience Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience 3:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 4 p.m. Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 8 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Lakeview Elementary Honor Choir (until 5 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience 4:30 p.m. Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience 5 p.m. Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre Cheer 4 Christ (until 6 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Pet Rescue 911 (until 8 p.m.), Barn 3 Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 5:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 8:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience 6 p.m. 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion the international pantry’s “Out of This World” Cooking Contest, Creative Arts Building Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience 6:30 p.m. Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Cody O’Neill & The Crosswind (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 7 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre

Deaf Chat/Bingo (until 9 p.m.), Carriage Hall Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza 7:30 p.m. D.I.C.E (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion 9 p.m. Zero2Sixty (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 21

FEATURED EVENTS 3 p.m. Heat 2-North American Six-Horse Hitch Classic Series Finals, Performance Arena 7:30 p.m. PRCA Xtreme Bulls Tour & Concerts, Jim Norick Arena Morris Day and the Time, Chesapeake Energy Stage

THINGS TO DO 10 a.m. Leonardo’s Discovery Warehouse (until 1 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Draft Horse Show (until about 8 p.m.), Performance Arena STEM Safari — Robotics Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Auto Show (until 10 p.m.), Travel and Transportation Building OSU’s Insect Adventure (until 2 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Open & Junior Angus Show, Barn 3 Food for Body & Soul Quilts Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 11 a.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Rock, Paper, Scissors Contest, Creative Arts Building 11:30 a.m. Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Byng Gymnasts (until 12:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Noon Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience 12:30 p.m. Sierra Sikes, Bandshell Stage Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags

Plaza Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience 1 p.m. Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Shawnee Mills Corn Bread & Biscuits Contest, Creative Arts Building Pet Rescue 911 (until 7 p.m.), Barn 3 Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience 1:30 p.m. Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Meanstreak (until 2:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza 2 p.m. The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience 2:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Yumare Mexican Folkloric Dancers (until 3:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience 3 p.m. Pampered Chef Demo (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience 3:30 p.m. Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience 4 p.m. Shotgun Rooster (until 5 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 8 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre 4:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience 5 p.m. Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Pee Wee Showmanship, Barn 3 OK Chorale Men’s Chorus (until 6 p.m.), Bandshell Stage


Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 5:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Grilled Cheese Championship, Creative Arts Building Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 8:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience 6 p.m. Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Llama Show (until about 10 p.m.), Barn 8

Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza 6:30 p.m. Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Walking Relic (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza 7 p.m. The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City

Theatre Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza 7:30 p.m. Lauren Raquel Band (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 9 p.m. Straight 2 Video (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 22

FEATURED EVENTS 7:30 p.m. PRCA Xtreme Bulls Tour & Concerts, Jim Norick Arena 8 p.m. Eddie Money, Chesapeake

Energy Stage

THINGS TO DO 7 a.m. Miniature Donkey Show (until about 4 p.m.), Performance Arena 8 a.m. ASC Cheerleading, Dance & Pom Pon Competition (until 12:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8:30 a.m. Llama Show (until about 7 p.m.), Barn 8 9 a.m. ABGA Boer Goat Show (until about 7 p.m.), Super Barn Junior Market Goat Showmanship, Super Barn 10 a.m. Auto Show (until 10 p.m.),

Travel and Transportation Building Woodturners Demo (until 10 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Open & Junior Western National Brangus Show (until about 8 p.m.), Barn 3 Junior Market Wether Goat Show (until about 3 p.m.), Super Barn OSU’s Insect Adventure (until 2 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Shawnee Mills’ Kids’ Pancakes, Flapjacks & Griddle Cakes Contest, Creative Arts Building 11 a.m. Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Karo Creative Cookie and Dessert Contest, Creative Arts Building

Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 7 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience 4-H Interactive Exhibits (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 11:30 a.m. The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 6:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza


Noon Oklahoma Chisholm Trail Leather Guild Demo (until 6 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience Max Clayton Stained Glass Demo (until 6 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza 12:30 p.m. Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza 1 p.m. Pet Rescue 911 (until 7 p.m.), Barn 3 Ostrich Cooking Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 1:30 p.m. The Okie Stompers (until 2:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza 2 p.m. The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 OKC Thunder Entertainment Team (until 6 p.m.), 14 Flags Plaza 2:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience First Southern Encounter Choir (until 3:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 3 p.m. Into the Wild Blue Yonder: Paper Airplane Contest, City Arts Center Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience 3:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis 4 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience

Sonya & The H.D.’s (until 5 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 4:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience 5 p.m. STEM Safari — Robotics Demo (until 10 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Draft Horse Overlad Pull Competition-1st Go (until about 9 p.m.), Performance Arena Velocity Dance Company (until 6 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 5:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience 6 p.m. 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Oklahoma Pride Cooking Contest, Creative Arts Building Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience 6:30 p.m. OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience The Del Toros (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza 7 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza 7:30 p.m. Brown Note (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion 9 p.m. FauxKISS (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage

SEPT. 23

FEATURED EVENTS 2 p.m. Final Championship Heat-North American Six-Horse Hitch Classic Series Finals, Jim Norick Arena 3 p.m. Oklahoma Centennial Rodeo Opry, Chesapeake Energy Stage 6 p.m. Oklahoma State Fair Closing Ceremony, 14 Flags Plaza

THINGS TO DO 8 a.m. Miniature Donkey, Draft and Gypsy Shows (until about 2 p.m.), Jim Norick Arena Ponies of the Americas Show (until about 5 p.m.), Performance Arena 9 a.m. ABGA Boer Goat Show (until about 7 p.m.), Super Barn Junior Prospect Doe Show (until about 4 p.m.), Super Barn Llama Show (until about 4 p.m.), Barn 8 9:30 a.m. Come As You Are Church Services, Capital City Theatre 10 a.m. Food for Body & Soul Quilts Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Woodturners Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Auto Show (until 9 p.m.), Travel and Transportation Building Open & Junior Shorthorn (until about 1 p.m.), Barn 3 OSU’s Insect Adventure (until 2 p.m.), City of AGtropolis 11 a.m. Log Cabin Handspinning Guild Demo (until 7 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Chuckwagon Cookin’ (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Oklahoma Kids — Stigler (until noon), Bandshell Stage Ostrich Cooking Demo (until 6 p.m.), Creative Arts Building 11:30 a.m. Goat’s Milk Soap Making Demonstrations (until 6:30 p.m.), City of AGtropolis Saltfork Blacksmiths At The Forge (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience The Lost Art of Wooden Bowl Turning (until 7 p.m.), Centennial Frontier Experience Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Wild West Stunt Riders, Centennial Frontier Experience Noon Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Gravity Dance (until 1 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of

AGtropolis Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience C&H Kids Cookie Contest, Creative Arts Building 12:30 p.m. Oklahoma State Fair Arm Wrestling Classic, 14 Flags Plaza Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience 1 p.m. Rain Gutter Regatta (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn 4-H Interactive Exhibits (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building State Wheatheart Bread Baking Contest, Creative Arts Building Pet Rescue 911 (until 7 p.m.), Barn 3 1:30 p.m. Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza The Ballpark Figures (until 2:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 2 p.m. The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience OKC Thunder Entertainment Team (until 6 p.m.), 14 Flags Plaza Open & Junior Hereford Show, Barn 3 OKC Modern Quilting Demo (until 5 p.m.), Creative Arts Building R&B, Bandshell Stage OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 Honeycomb Extracting Demonstrations, City of AGtropolis 2:30 p.m. Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Dustbowl Gypsies, Centennial Frontier Experience 3 p.m. Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience Showstoppers Senior Dance Company, Bandshell Stage 3:30 p.m. Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Cookie Stacking Contest, City Arts Center Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn

4 p.m. Jennica Kenny, Bandshell Stage Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Open & Junior Limousin Show, Barn 3 4:30 p.m. Stick Horse Rodeo, Centennial Frontier Experience Kaylee Losawyer, Bandshell Stage Plains Indian Dancers, Centennial Frontier Experience Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza 5 p.m. Max Clayton Stained Glass Demo (until 9 p.m.), Creative Arts Building Science Museum Oklahoma, OPUBCO Pavilion Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre Rob Banks & Positive Productions (until 6 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Mutton Bustin’, Centennial Frontier Experience Rowdy Rooster Puppet Show, City of AGtropolis Draft Horse Overlad Pull Competition-2nd Go (until about 7 p.m.), Jim Norick Arena 5:30 p.m. Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza Shenaniguns!, Centennial Frontier Experience 6 p.m. The Okie Karaoke Contest, Centennial Plaza Pets Overboard, Bandshell Lawn The Centennial Frontier Cloggers, Centennial Frontier Experience 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion Zoppe’ Italian Family Circus, Centennial Plaza Dummy Roping Clinic, Centennial Frontier Experience 6:30 p.m. Firefighter Training Show, 14 Flags Plaza Rowdy Rooster Roust About, 14 Flags Plaza Jennifer Sam’s Band (until 7:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage Trick Ropin’ Extraordinaire, Centennial Frontier Experience OVMA Animal Surgical Suite, Barn 3 7 p.m. Wild West Showcase, Centennial Frontier Experience Kids Celebration, Capital City Theatre Swifty Swine Racing Pigs, Entertainment Plaza 7:30 p.m. The Black Jack Gypsys (until 9 p.m.), Bandshell Stage 8 p.m. Comedy Hypnotist Dale K, Capital City Theatre 411 Band — It’s Motown Live!, OPUBCO Pavilion 9 p.m. The Revolving (until 10:30 p.m.), Bandshell Stage



State Fair 2012