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EVEREST BUILD 2010 VOLUNTEER HANDBOOK - NEPAL


EVEREST BUILD 2010 VOLUNTEER HANDBOOK - NEPAL


Everest Build 2010 Volunteer Handbook - Nepal

Habitat for Humanity - Nepal GPO Box 24037 4th Floor, Sagaramatha Complex Naxal Kathmandu Nepal Phone: +977 14432801 Fax: +977 14432949 E-mail: arunapaul@gmail.com


Table of Contents Introduction Letter from the Country Representative Everest Build 2010 Habitat for Humanity International – Nepal Habitat for Humanity International Mission statement Mission Principles Gift giving policy

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General information Nepal Pokhara Geography Time zone Climate Flora and Fauna Population Culture Religion Language Safety and security Banking and currency exchange Currency Shopping Taxes and tipping Communications Electricity and power supply News When in Nepal Schedule

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Before you go Travel Passport Medical Insurance Immunizations and health precautions What to bring

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After you arrive Airport procedure Transportation to and from Pokhara Accommodation

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Exploring Nepal Useful Nepali expressions Embassies and consulates in Nepal

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Mount Everest

Photo: Terry Brewer


Everest Build 2010

Introduction Dear Volunteer, Welcome to the land of Mt. Everest and scenic Pokhara, the site for Everest Build 2010. I would like to personally thank you for your interest and participation in this exciting and important six-day “blitz build” event. Everest Build 2010 kicks off a twoyear project committed to enabling five thousand families to live in decent shelter and reducing poverty housing in Nepal. Additionally, this launches a program to eliminate poverty housing within the next five years, around the municipal area of Leknath, Pokhara . Thanks also for joining us in Habitat for Humanity’s larger mission to build “A world where everyone has a decent place to live”. Your time, talents and resources will go a long way towards transforming families and communities in Nepal. As much as we have enjoyed putting this event together, we hope you will also enjoy what may be one of the most profound experiences in your life. Not only will needy families be blessed with a house, but also I earnestly believe that you will also receive many blessings. HFH Nepal projects go well beyond building houses. They create an environment conducive to a stable home life, a secure feeling, and a consistent place where families can think and grow and shape a brighter future for themselves and their community. Have fun, work safe and enjoy the beauty of Nepal! Yours sincerely,

Aruna Paul Simittrarachchi Regional Program Advisor/Country Representative

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Everest Build 2010 Everest Build 2010 has brought together hundreds of volunteers from all over the world to symbolically shine a light on the scourge of substandard housing and to physically demonstrate what can be accomplished when families, communities and nations come together in an effort to build a future where every man, woman and child has a decent place to live. Everest Build 2010 will focus on completing at least 50 houses this week. Each 30 sq. meter “Everest Build� house will have a small bedroom, living room, kitchen and exterior toilet. Volunteers and home partners will be constructing houses made of prefabricated, treated bamboo with galvanized, corrugated-metal roofs. Habitat for Humanity International – Nepal (HFHI-N) is a strong supporter of preserving the natural environment and actively promotes the development and use of the sustainable building materials that will be incorporated into all 50 houses.


Everest Build 2010

Habitat for Humanity International-Nepal HFHI-N brings together corporations, individuals and partner organizations to build homes with Nepalese families in need. HFHI-N was established in 1997 to address the lack of decent and affordable housing in Nepal. Habitat for Humanity International (HFHI) initiated its Nepal program by serving 829 families in seven districts within the first seven years. Following a transition to a new model in 2005, HFHI-N has now served more than 5,800 families. Currently, HFHI-N is assisting four families per day and hopes to reach an additional 5,000 families in the next two years. Habitat families enroll in housing microfinance schemes to save money and contribute sweat equity (work hours) to build their houses. HFHI-N not only helps families and communities, it is also works to protect the environment by constructing 70% of its ecofriendly houses with versatile, strong and renewable bamboo.

Habitat for Humanity International construction of bamboo houses in jhapa Photos: Terry Brewer

HFHI is a non-profit ecumenical Christian housing ministry dedicated to eliminating poverty housing and homelessness and making decent shelter a matter of conscience and action. Since its founding in 1976, HFHI has built and renovated more than 350,000 houses with families in need, becoming a true world leader in addressing the issue of poverty housing. More than 1.75 million people have safe, decent, affordable homes because of HFHI programs. For more information visit www.habitat.org

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Mission statement HFHI’s mission is to work in partnership with God and people every where, from all walks of life, to develop communities with God’s people in need by building and renovating houses so that there are decent communities in which to live and grow into all that God intended.

Mission Principles In all that we do in pursuing the mission of Habitat for Humanity, we pledge to: Demonstrate the love and teachings of Jesus Christ. Advocate on behalf of those in need of decent shelter. Focus on shelter by building and renovating simple, decent, affordable houses. Engage broad community through inclusive

a completed house in jhapa district

leadership and diverse partnerships. Promote dignity through full partnership with Habitat homeowners and future home partners. Promote transformational and sustainable community development.

Gift giving policy All donations and gifts must be channeled through Habitat for Humanity International and not given directly to the community. Foreigners are often seen as being wealthy and a potential source of direct assistance. If someone asking for money approaches you, gifts or favors your reply should be: “Please ask the Everest Build Coordinator or the Habitat for Humanity – Nepal staff because all such requests must be done through them. I am not allowed to make such commitments!”

Photo: Terry Brewer


Everest Build 2010

General Information

a nepali farmer

Nepal Home to majestic Mt. Everest and the aweinspiring Himalayas, Nepal is a country with deep cultural and religious traditions stretching back more than 26 centuries. The birthplace of Prince Siddhartha Gautama, the legendary Buddha, the country today is primarily rural and Hindu.Nepal is one of the poorest countries in the world where nearly one quarter of its people survive on less than US $1 per day and 31% live

Photo: Terry Brewer

below the poverty line. Agriculture provides a livelihood for three-fourths of the population and accounts for 38% of GDP. Industry is primarily agriculture related, processing the main food crops, rice and wheat, and other farm products including pulses, jute, sugarcane, tobacco, and grain. Only about 20% of the land is suitable for cultivation. Surplus food crops grown in the Terai region helps supply the food-deficient hill areas. The government is moving forward with

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Physiographic regions Mountain

C

H

Hill

I

Pokhara

I

N

D

N

A

Terai

Kathmandu

I

A

HFH Nepal projects

economic reforms to encourage tourism, trade and foreign investments, especially in the hydropower energy sector. Life can be hard especially for the majority who rely on agriculture for a living. Floods, landslides and earthquakes are a persistent threat to homes, fields and livestock. A lack of employment opportunities and the resultant poverty has led to a steady flow of job seekers to Kathmandu, and other cities. A decadelong insurgency also uprooted people from villages in search of safety. Migration and urban growth have resulted in a housing shortage, crowded living spaces and an increase in substandard housing. Such poorly built structures – usually with straw walls and thatched roofs – result in thousands of families losing their homes to fire every year and also lack clean water, adequate sanitation and electricity. a sherpa woman

Photo: Terry Brewer


Everest Build 2010

Pokhara Scenic Pokhara is Nepal’s third largest city, with a population of 200,000. The resort town is nestled in a picturesque valley dominated by the beautiful Fewa Lake, lying at the foot of the spectacular Annapurna Massif. Pokhara is a natural base for mountaineering, trekking, mountain biking, caving, rafting, paragliding and other outdoor activities and boasts an international mountaineering museum.

Geography Nepal is a small, landlocked country surrounded by India (east, west, south) and China (north). Nepal’s 145,000 square kilometers are divided into three physiographic areas: Terai Region, Hill Region, and Mountain Region. These regions are defined by parallel east – west ecological belts that delineate sectors within the framework of regional development planning by the government. Pokhara lies in the northwest corner of a valley that is a continuation of the SetiGandaki Valley. The Seti River and its tributaries have dug impressive canyons into the earth that are visible from surrounding vantage points. Unlike any other place in the world, the terrain rises dramatically from under 1000m to over 8000m within 30km. The skyline is dominated by the picturesque Mt. Machhapuchhare (fishtail) and the 8000m peaks of Dhaulagiri, Annapurna and Manaslu. The project site is in Leknath, a municipality east of Pokhara.

Time zone Standard Time Zone: UTC/GMT +5:45 hours

pokhara

Photo: Terry Brewer

Climate The weather is generally predictable and pleasant in Nepal. The monsoon season runs approximately from late June to early September. Situated 800 meters above sea level, autumn and winter months in Pokhara are mild. Summer temperatures average 25 to 35 degrees Celsius and winter temperatures average 5 to 15 degree Celsius. Pokhara receives the highest amount of rainfall in the country (over 4000 millimeters per year).

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Flora and fauna From the steamy jungles in the Terai to the snowbound peaks of the Himalayas, Nepal is rich with flora and fauna unsurpassed anywhere in South Asia. Within Nepal’s topographical extremes, ecological zones range from tropical to arctic: reatsal and sissau forests in the lowlands give way to oak, pine and rhododendron at intermediate altitudes, birch, fir, larch and hemlock at higher altitudes and finally to barren tundra, snow and ice above tree line. High desert conditions also exist in rain shadow areas within the trans-Himalayan

region. The rolling, densely forested hills and broad Dun valleys of the Terai, along with other parts of the country once renowned for ecological diversity, however, are being depleted as a result of over population, deforestation, poaching and other causes.

Population According to the 2001 census, the total population of Nepal was 23,151,423. The projected total population by 2009 was 27,504,280. The average family consisted of 5.44 members, and life expectancy was 63.3 years.

a BOY selling rhododendron flowers

Photo: Swapnil Acharya


Everest Build 2010

manEy - buddhist prayer wheels

Culture The rich cultural heritage of Nepal has evolved over the centuries, at different altitudes, into today’s mosaic of ethnic, tribal, and social groups, each expressing their respective traditional music and dance, arts and crafts, folklore, language, literature, philosophy, religion, festivals, food and drink in a unique fashion. Because of this diversity, citizens celebrate a multitude of religious and cultural festivals. The plethora of magnificent ancient and contemporary temples throughout the country is evidence of a highly developed artistic heritage. The three Durbar Squares in the Kathmandu Valley are historical examples of the fine craftsmanship still practiced today. The typical meal consists of daalbhat (lentil soup and cooked rice) with tarkari (vegetable curry), which is usually consumed twice daily, mid-morning and shortly after sunset. Daalbhat can vary from a simple dish to an elaborate meal served with various curries, greens and sweets. Traditionally, Nepali food is not as spicy as Indian food. Newari culture includes its own variation of daalBhat that is served with chiura (dry beaten rice) and a variety of spicy side dishes. A typical mid-day snack is chiura/baji

Photo: Terry Brewer

served with tea. Meat, eggs, and fish are common menu items except for beef, which is considered sacred in the Hindu religion. Steamed or fried momos (dumplings) are a popular meal or snack. Most Nepalis prefer to take food with their right hand, though spoons, forks, and knives are usually readily available. Chiya (milk tea) is enjoyed throughout the day as well as coffee, however the latter is usually the instant variety. Espresso and gourmet brewed coffee is available in many upscale coffee shops and restaurants. Rakshi is traditional Nepali homemade distilled liquor made from rice or millet. Soft drinks (Coke, Pepsi, Fanta, Sprite) and fruit juices are readily available. In Kathmandu and Pokhara, you can find almost any international cuisine imaginable; from Middle-eastern to Mexican, steaks to curries, that can be surprisingly authentic. Your HFHI-N hosts will help to satisfy your personal preferences and meet any special dietary requirements.

Religion Evidence of Hinduism and Buddhism in Nepal dates back more than two millennia:

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a typical hindu festival decoration

Lumbini is the birthplace of Buddha; Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu, an old and famous temple of Lord Shiva, is considered one of the holiest places for Hindus to be cremated. In addition to the many Hindu and Buddhist religious sites are places of worship for a variety religious groups. According to the 2001 census, Nepal’s population was 80.6 percent Hindu, 10.7 percent Buddhist, 4.2 percent Muslim, 3.6 percent Kirat (an indigenous religion with Hindu influence), 0.45 percent Christian, and 0.4 percent classified as other (such as BÜn).

Photo: Terry Brewer

Language With 36 different ethnic groups and some 123 spoken languages, Nepal is truly a multilinguistic nation. Languages belonging to Indo-Aryan, Sino-Tibetan, Austro-Asiatic and Dravidian families are still spoken. The official national language of Nepal is Nepali. It is quite easy to get by with just English; however, it is helpful to learn a little bit of Nepali. A list of useful Nepali words and phrases has been provided in this arrival pack.


Everest Build 2010

Safety and security

Traveling in Nepal is relatively safe, however, there are certain nuisances and hazards tourists need to be aware of. Some visitors find the persistence touts from people selling souvenirs and other items, including illegal substances, to be annoying. Visitors are advised to buy products from established shops and never take a tour with someone they meet on the street. Although taxis are required to have a meter, drivers resist using them, so be sure to agree on a price before getting in. Single women sometimes attract unwanted attention though few have been physically threatened or harmed. Women should dress conservatively and avoid walking alone, especially at night. Make a photocopy of your passport and keep it in a separate place from the original, preferably on your person, so you wont risk losing the original by carrying it around all the time. Keep your passport and other valuables stored in the hotel safety deposit box. Do not bring items with any significant monetary and/ or sentimental value. Ask your hotel clerk to call for taxis or arrange other transportation needs.

Banking and currency exchange Banks and ATM machines have made it easier to use international credit and debit cards to withdraw cash. Credit cards can be used in place of cash at most major commercial banks, larger hotels, a few shops and some restaurants in Kathmandu and Pokhara, Visa and Mastercard being the most widely accepted. ATMs are available at many locations for cash withdrawals (Nepalese Rupees only). Most Nepalese banks are open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sunday through Friday but subject to change based on location, day of the week, load shedding (power outages) and frequent national holidays, especially during the month of October, so always plan ahead. ATM machines are unreliable at this time too despite being peak tourist season. Licensed money exchangers are usually open for 12 hours a day making it easier to exchange your money for a fee. Although credit and debit cards are faster and more convenient, traveler’s cheques are also accepted. To avoid additional exchange

sign displayed outside a tour agency

Photo: Terry Brewer

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rate charges, visitors are advised to take traveler’s cheques in US Dollars. Traveler’s cheques can be difficult to exchange outside Kathmandu.

Currency Nepalese Rupee (NPR) in denominations of 1000, 500, 100, 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1.

Shopping Shopping is fun and exciting in Kathmandu and Pokhara where you will find numerous interesting shops catering to locals and tourists alike. Be sure to ask for a discount to get the bargaining going in your favor. In areas like Thamel in Kathmandu, you will find shops bursting with stunning jewelry, beautiful statues, colorful clothing, rugged outdoor gear and traditional Nepalese handicrafts. In Bhaktapur, you can purchase clay pottery inside shops created by the artisans you are likely to see outside perfecting their craft. The traditional craftsman’s colony of Patan is also a famous shopping destination for Nepalese handicraft enthusiasts. Note: Antiques replicas require special permission granted by the Department of Archeology before they can be taken out of the country. Along Pokhara’s Lakeside and Damside, shopping is a relaxing outdoor activity. Laid back shopkeepers offer a welcome change from the hard-driving sales tactics employed in Kathmandu, even if the prices and selections don’t quite compare. Specialties include batiks, wooden flasks, hand-knitted woolen sweaters and socks, dolls in ethnic dress and fossil-bearing shaligram stones from the nearby Kali Gandaki River.

restaurants. Additional tipping is not usually expected and can confuse less savvy waiters and cashiers.

Communications Nepal Telecommunication Corporation (the phone company) provides ISD, STD, telex, fax and telegraph services. Private communication centers and some hotels offer ISD, STD, Internet calling, email and fax services. International Code for Nepal is 977. To make an international call from Nepal, dial 00 + the country code + the area code + the telephone number. Cell phone SIM cards are available and Internet facilities are common. These services are limited outside of urban areas.

Electricity and power supply Major towns in Nepal have electricity, however, load shedding (outages) can limit power to only eight hours total per day. Most of the major urban hotels, shops and restaurants have back-up power systems. Electricity – when available – in rural areas is ironically more reliable because it is usually being generated by local hydropower and/or solar systems. Electricity is 220V/50 cycles. 120V appliances manufactured for use in the USA may need a transformer, so check with the manufacturer and abide by their recommendations. Electric supply (female) sockets in Nepal usually accept only round (male) pins like those found on appliances manufactured by commonwealth countries. Socket adaptors are available in most street-side electric shops.

Taxes and tipping

News

A 13% sales tax or VAT (value-added tax) is added to most purchases and an additional 10% service charge (gratuity) is added in most

English-language newspapers in Nepal include: Nepali Times, Republica, Kathmandu Post, Himalayan Times, Rising Nepal.


Everest Build 2010

When in Nepal Nepal heartily welcomes all of its valued visitors. When trekking in the countryside or exploring towns and villages, we suggest that you treat the land and its people with care and respect. Below are some tips on how to keep the environment clean and show appreciation for age-old cultural traditions and religious beliefs that can be astonishing and surprising for newcomers. Therefore, please consider these tips: Set a good example by not littering and refusing plastic shopping bags when possible. Avoid buying water in plastic bottles by treating your own and carrying a reusable water bottle. To show gratitude and respect, use both hands when giving or receiving something, even money. Extend a flattened hand to bring someone’s attention to a sacred place or object instead of pointing. Avoid touching women and holy men. Nepalis, especially women, don’t normally shake hands when they greet one another. Instead, press your palms together in a prayer-like manner and say “namaste” (na-ma-stay). Don’t eat with your left hand. Never eat beef in front of Hindus; beef is strictly prohibited and cows are considered sacred. Try not to step over or point your feet at a person, sacred place or hearth. Remove your shoes when entering a home, temple or monastery and leather items at Hindu temples. Do not smoke or wear revealing dress in religious settings. Avoid touching people or their offerings when they are on their way to a shrine Don’t offer someone food after you’ve tasted it or eat directly from a common pot. Avoid touching your lips to drinking vessels, such as a bottle of mineral water, which is considered common property once it’s open. Nepalese men holding hands is a common sight, but public displays of affection between opposite sexes is frowned upon. Walk around a Stupa in a clockwise fashion, keeping the outer walls on your right side. When passing by a Mani Wall, stay to the left. Don’t lose your temper. Raising your voice or shouting is seen as extremely bad manners and will only make problems worse. Don’t purchase ivory or fur from an endangered species. Don’t give money to begging children. It may encourage their parents to keep them out of school. If you want to help, donate to a trustworthy charity or school. Get permission before taking someone’s photo.

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Schedule September 30: October 1: October 2: October 3–8: October 9: October 10:

Depart from home country (international travel) Arrive in Kathmandu Travel to Pokhara and Opening Ceremony Breakfast Construction and safety orientation (first day only) Work from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (lunch provided on site) Free time Dinner Free time Return to Kathmandu (lodging and meals provided) or proceed with activity of choice Depart to participant’s home country

construction AT the build site

Photo: Terry Brewer


Everest Build 2010

Before you go Travel

Volunteers are responsible for their own travel arrangements to and from Kathmandu. Make reservations as early as possible to ensure optimum arrival and departure dates. All international volunteers must be in Kathmandu by October 1, 2010.

Passport All international volunteers are required to have a passport valid for at least 6 months.

Medical insurance Mandatory insurance coverage consists of policies recommended by Habitat for Humanity International’s legal department and approved by the Habitat for Humanity International board of directors. Coverage ensures a comprehensive risk management program and provides protection to all Habitat International volunteers. Volunteers are requested to contact your national Habitat countries to purchase travel and medical insurance. The cost is not included in the in-country budget.

Immunizations and health precautions

Contact your doctor and your embassy for traveler’s health information, recommended preparations and vaccinations. A few general health tips include: Get the immunization process started early; some vaccinations are administered in series over a period of time. Drink only sealed bottled water or better yet, water that you have personally made arrangements for and carried in your own personal water bottle. Wash your hands often with soap and water or hand sanitizer. If you or someone near you has an open wound, clean and cover it immediately. If someone has a serious wound, please contact a staff member or your house leader immediately. Use sunscreen and insect repellent. First aid and emergency care will be at the build site at all times.

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What to bring Required items for build site Work boots or shoes. Open-toed shoes will not be permitted. Recommended items for build site:

Long pants Long-sleeved shirt Work gloves Heavy socks Sun hat Sun glasses Bandana Sun block

Tools Below is a list of needed items, but please feel free to bring additional tools if possible. Items left behind will be donated to Habitat Nepal.

Tool belt or nail apron Claw hammer Chalk line Safety glasses Ear plugs Adjustable wrench Screwdrivers (regular and phillips head) 25 foot tape measure Carpenter’s pencils Utility knife Speed square Wood chisel Flat bar Cordless drill

Other items

Rain jacket or wind breaker Wool or fleece sweater Comfortable shoes Casual pants Casual shirts Extra socks Underwear Sleep wear Toiletries Hand lotion Fast drying towel and washcloth Prescription medications Over the counter medications for headache, body aches and diarrhea Personal first-aid kit Extra pair of prescription glasses or contacts Money pouch Flashlight with extra batteries Alarm clock Camera

If you are planning other activities please pack accordingly.


Everest Build 2010

After you arrive Airport procedure International volunteers will arrive at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu. After arrival you will first pass through customs, then immigration where you will present a completed immigration form along with 2 passport size photos, US $30 cash, and a passport valid for 6 months to the attendant official to get your visa. Immigration forms are distributed to passengers on the flight to Kathmandu and are also available at stands near the immigration counter. The process takes very little time and is hassle-free provided you are in possession of all the required items. Visas are available upon arrival for all countries except the following: Afghanistan, Iraq, Ghana, Swaziland, Palestine, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, Liberia, Cameroon, Somalia, and Egypt. After that, proceed downstairs to collect your luggage then to the exit where you will be met with welcoming smiles from the Everest Build staff holding “Habitat for Humanity – Everest Build� signs. They will then direct you to pre-arranged transportation to the hotel.

Transportation to and from Pokhara Habitat Nepal offers two travel choices. Please Note: All domestic air flights and ground transport will be arranged by Habitat Nepal. Habitat Nepal has secured the best possible prices for airfare and other services and the savings has been passed on to volunteers. Option 1: Fly (approx. thirty five minutes airtime), return by luxury tourist bus (approx. 5 hours, lunch included). For an additional US $50 volunteers can fly back to Kathmandu. Please let us know when you confirm. Transportation from the hotel in Kathmandu to the airport for your flight to Pokhara will be provided. Volunteers will be met at the Pokhara Airport by staff members and transported to the hotel. Option 2: Luxury tourist bus, both ways (lunch included).

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A HOTEL ROOM

Exception: Volunteers, who prefer not to overnight in Kathmandu, can take a connecting flight to Pokhara. You will receive connecting flight tickets from Everest Build staff at the airport in Kathmandu then be escorted to the domestic terminal. Please note: You will need to arrive in Kathmandu no later than 3:00 p.m., October 2nd to qualify for this exception.

Accommodation Volunteers will share a room with one other volunteer in 5 star hotels. The hotels in Pokhara are approximately 20-25 minutes from the build site. The hotels will be providing most of the meals included in the package price. Booking is on a “first come first serve� basis. If you plan to arrive early or stay longer, please contact your hotel directly once reservations are confirmed. Single rooms are available for an additional US $40 per day (including meals), paid in advance to Habitat Nepal.

Photo: Gaurav Dhwaj Khadka

Hotel details in Pokhara: Fulbari Resort and Spa (Gold Sponsor ) www.fulbari.com Hotel Shangrila www.hotelshangrila.com Fewa Prince www.fewa-prince.com Hotel Details in Kathmandu: Hotel Shangrila www.hotelshangrila.com Park Village Resort www.ktmgh.com/parkvillage


SAMPLE VISA FORM


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paragliding


Everest Build 2010

Exploring Nepal If you would like to explore Nepal before or after the event, please consider contacting the professional tour company listed below for trekking, cultural tours, paragliding, mountain flights, rafting, mountain biking, jungle safari and many more exciting activities! mountain biking

trekking

a scenic view of the mountains from pokhara

All Photos: Terry Brewer

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gold s

ponsor

Greetings from Fulbari Resort and Spa – one of the world’s great hotels We are conveniently located just fifteen minutes from Pokhara Airport, in an exclusive, secluded section of the verdant Pokhara Valley surrounded by serene lakes, glorious mountain ranges and rugged canyons. Our idyllic resort offers the very best in service and facilities – including a world-class spa and health farm – in a charming and elegant Nepalese setting. The entire Fulbari Resort family is proud to be an official Gold Sponsor of Habitat for Humanity Everest Build 2010. We will be providing deluxe accommodation and excellent meals to hundreds of volunteers, VIPS and VVIPS from around the world for seven days during build week, October 2 to October 9, 2010. Together we can help change the lives of the world’s underprivileged. One way, as exemplified by Everest Build 2010, is by coming together to build cost effective, ecofriendly houses for families in need. This project in Lekhnath Municipality, is part of Habitat for Humanity’s global campaign to eliminate poverty housing within the next five years and we are honored to serve those participating in such a noble cause. Best wishes to all volunteers on the Habitat for Humanity team. The Fulbari Resort Family

Fulbari Resort, Casino, Golf and Spa – Pokhara Phone: 977-1-4461918/4462248/4464388 Fax: 977-1-4462005 Mobile: 9841534698 Email: sales@fulbari.com.np Website: www.fulbari.com

Official Everest Build 2010 Travel Agent Bijesh Charan Raya

Raya Tours and Travels Pvt. Ltd

Naya Baneshwor, Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: 977-01-4490 834, 977-98 41 24 23 92 info@rayatours.com, bcraya@rayatours.com, bc.rayatours@gmail.com www.rayatours.com


Everest Build 2010

Useful Nepali expressions People around the world are delighted when foreigners try to speak their language –even if it is only a few words – because language is a part of our personal and cultural identity. Locals will be happy with your efforts and eager to teach you. Relax and have a good time!!!

Greetings Hello Goodbye Good morning, afternoon, night

Namaste Bida paau Namaste

General Where is the toilet? Please Thank you Excuse me Sorry How are you? I’m fine What is your name? My name is ….... I don’t understand Do you understand? Do you speak English? What’s this? How much does it cost? It’s too expensive for me I want to buy...... I’m lost I’m sick I’m hungry I don’t eat...... I’m a vegetarian What time is it? I’m thirsty

Toilet kahaa chha? Kripaya Dhanyabad Dhanyabad Maaf paau Tapaai laai kasto chha? Malaai thik cha Tapaaiko naam ke ho? Mero naam …… ho Maile bujhina Tapaaile bujhnu bhayo? Tapaai Angreji bujhnu hunchha? Yoke ho? Yesko kati parchha? Yo malaai mahango laagyo Malaai……kinaa man laagyo Ma haraye Ma birami bhaye Malaai bhok laagyo Ma …… khadina Ma sakahari hu Kati bajiyo? Malaai tirkha laagyo

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Construction terms Wait Stop Finished Come quickly Is this correct? How do you do it? Do it like this Good work Wall Floor Roof May I have......? Hammer Cement Sand Shovel Trowel Nails Timber Tape measure Bamboo Mud Clay Brick Stone Glove Water

Parkhanus Roknus Siddhiyo Chhito aaunus Yo thik chha? Tapaai le kasari garnu hunchha? Yesari garnuhos Raamro kaam garnu bhayo Bhitta Bhui Chhana Kemaile……pauna sakchhu? Ghan Cement Baluwa Shovel Karai Killa Kaat Napne tape Baas Maato Mucheko maato Inta Dhunga Panjaa Paani


Everest Build 2010

Embassies and Consulates in Nepal American Embassy PaniPokhari Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: + 977-1- 441 1179 + 977-1- 441 1179 Fax: + 977-1- 441 9963 Web Site: http://kathmandu.usembassy.gov Email: usembktm@state.gov Australian Embassy Bansbari Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: 977 1 371 678 977 1 371 678 Fax: 977 1 371 533 Web Site: http://www.nepal.embassy.gov.au/ Austrian Consulate 22, ManakamanaMarg Nagpokhari, Naxal Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (+977) (1) 443 4648 (+977) (1) 443 4648 (+977) (1) 443 4690 (+977) (1) 443 4690 (+977) (1) 443 4860 (+977) (1) 443 4860 (+977) (1) 443 4825 (+977) (1) 443 4825 Fax: (+977) (1) 443 4515 Email: autconktm@wlink.com.np Belgian Consulate BhagawanBahal, Thamel, AmritMarg 643/26 Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: + (977) (1) 441 37 32 + (977) (1) 441 37 32 Fax: + (977) (1) 441 03 30 Email: diplobel@wlink.com.np British Embassy P.O. Box 106 Lainchaur Kathmandu, Nepal

Phone: +977 1 4410583 +977 1 4410583 / 4414588 Fax: (977) (1) 4411789 / 4416723 Email: britemb@wlink.com.np Canadian Consulate c/o Canadian Cooperation Office Lazimpat Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (011 97 71) 415-193/389/291/861 Fax: (011 97 71) 441-0422 Email: cco@canadanepal.org Chinese Embassy Baluwater Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: 00977-1-4411740 00977-1-4411740 Fax: 00977-1-4414045 Web Site: http://www.chinaembassy.org.np Email: chinaemb_np@mfa.gov.cn Cypriot Consulate P.O. Box 133 JyotiBhawan, Kantipath Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (009771) 4225490 (009771) 4225490 , 4226327, 4221290 (Res.), (00977) 9851020435 (00977) 9851020435 Fax: (009771) 4226314 Email: pjyoti@mail.com.np Czech Consulate P.O. Box 36643/487 Jawalakhel Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: 009771/5524741 009771/5524741 , 5521730 Fax: 009771/5521730 Email: Kathmandu@honorary.mzv.cz

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Habitat for Humanity - Nepal

Danish Embassy P.O. Box 6332 761, Neel SaraswatiMarg, Lazimpat Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: +977 1 413 010 Fax: +977 1 411 409 Web Site: http://www.ambkathmandu.um.dk Email: ktmamb@um.dk Dutch Consulate P.O. Box: 1966 Bakhundole Height, Lalitpur Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: 977 1 5523444 977 1 5523444 Fax: 977 1 5523155 Web Site: http://www.netherlandsconsulate. org.np Email: consulate@snv.org.np Finnish Embassy P.O. Box 2126 Bishalnagar Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: +977-1-4417 221 +977-1-4417 221 , 4416 636 Fax: +977-1-4416 703 Web Site: http://www.finland.org.np/ Email: sanomat.kat@formin.fi German Embassy P.O. Box 226 Gyaneshwar Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (00977 1) 441 27 86 (00977 1) 441 27 86 (00977 1) 441 65 27 (00977 1) 441 65 27 Fax: (00977 1) 441 68 99 Web Site: http://www.kathmandu.diplo.de Email: info@kathmandu.diplo.de Greek Consulate P.O. Box 925 Thapathali Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (009771) 222050 (009771) 222050 , 233113 Fax: (009771) 261192 Email: bonne@naag.htp.com.np Greenlandic Embassy 761, Neel SaraswatiMarg, Lazimpat Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: +977 (1) 441 3010 +977 (1) 441 3010 Fax: +977 (1) 441 1409 Web Site: http://www.ambkathmandu.um.dk Email: ktmamb@um.dk

Indian Embassy P.O. Box - 292, 336 KapurdharaMarg Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: 00-9771-4410900 00-9771-4410900 ,4414990 Fax: 00-9771-4428279 Web Site: http://www.indianembassy.org.np Email: pic@eoiktm.org Israeli Embassy P.O. Box 371 Bishramalaya House, Lazimpat Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: 00-977-1-4411811 00-977-1-4411811 ; 00-977-1-4413419 00-977-1-4413419 ; 00977-1-4419103 00-977-1-4419103 Fax: 00-977-1-4413920 Web Site: http://kathmandu.mfa.gov.il Email: info@kathmandu.mfa.gov.il Japanese Embassy P.O. Box No. 264 PaniPokhari Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: 977-1-4426-680 977-1-4426-680 Fax: 977-1-4414-101 Web Site: http://www.np.emb-japan.go.jp Email: culjpn@mos.com.np Korean Embassy Jhamsikhel, Lalitpur Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: 5521084, 5521855. Malaysian Embassy P.O. Box 24372 2nd Floor, Block B KarmachariSanchayaKoshBhawan, Pulchowk, Lalitpur Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: +977-1-5010004 +977-1-5010004 / 5010005 Fax: +9771-1-5010492 Web Site: http://www.kln.gov.my/ perwakilan/kathmandu Email: malkatmandu@kln.gov.my Myanmar Embassy P.O. Box 2437 Krishna-Galli, Patan Gate, Lalitpur Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (0097) (1) 5521788, 553 4766, 553 4778, 555 5469 Fax: (0097) (1) 523402 Email: emb@myanmar.wlink.com.np


Everest Build 2010

New Zealand Consulate PO Box 224 Dilli Bazaar Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (+977) 1 4412 436 (+977) 1 4412 436 Fax: (+977) 1 4414 750 Norwegian Embassy Surya Court, Pulchowk, Lalitpur Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: +977-1-5545-307 +977-1-5545-307 ; From mobile within Nepal: (01) 5545307 Emergency phone: +977-98510-23681 +97798510-23681 Fax: +977-1-5545-226 Web Site: http://www.norway.org.np Email: emb.kathmandu@mfa.no Pakistani Embassy P.O. Box 202 Pushpanjali, Maharajgunj, Chakrapath Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (+977-1) 4374024 (+977-1) 4374024 Fax: (+977-1) 4374012 Email: info@pakemb.org.np, pakemb@mos. com.np Philippine Consulate P.O. Box 2640 Toyota House, Sinamangal, Tinkune, Lazimpat Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (+977) (1) 4474892 (+977) (1) 4474892 / 4409 or (+977) (1) 4478301 (+977) (1) 4478301 to 5 Fax: (+977) (1) 4471195 or (+977) (1) 4486243 (+977) (1) 4486243 Email: voith@mos.com.np,phicongen@voith. com.np Russian Embassy P.O. Box 123 Baluwatar Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (+9771) 441-21-55 (+9771) 441-21-55 , 441-10-63 Fax: (+9771) 441-65-71 Email: ruspos@info.com.np Slovak Consulate P.O. Box 3664 Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (977 1) 5521 730 (977 1) 5521 730 or 5524741 Email: cdkarky@wlink.com.np

Sri Lankan Embassy P.O. Box 8802 Baluwatar Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: +977-1-4419-289/ +977-1-4413-623 +977-1-4413-623 Fax: +977-1-4418-128 Email: embassy@srilanka.info.com.np Swedish Consulate Meera Home, Khichapokhari Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: +977-1-422 0939 +977-1-422 0939 , +977-1-422 1287 +977-1-422 1287 Fax: +77-1-422 1826 Email: meerahome@wlink.com.np Thai Embassy P.O. Box. 3333 167/4 Ward No. 3, Maharajgunj-Bansbari Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: (977 1) 4371410 (977 1) 4371410 , 43711411 Fax: (977 1) 4371408, 4371409 Web Site: http://www.thaiembassy.org/ kathmandu Email: thaiemb@wlink.com.np Turkish Consulate Khetan’s Industry House, Bijuli Bazaar Kathmandu, Nepal Phone: +977-1 549-225 Fax: +977-1 549-224 Email: scaktm@wlink.com.np

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Everest Build 2010 - Volunteer Manual  

Volunteer Manual published by Habitat for Humanity Nepal on the occassion of Everest Build 2010, in Lekhnath, Pokhara.

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