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felix cavaliere 50 years of MUSIC and still groovin’

AGENT ORANGE affecting future generations

HISTORIC route 66

Reaching baby boomers 1946 – 1964


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Please, Join Us for our 2016 Events! Women of all ages –

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E DITORIAL Vice President and Managing Editor CHRISTIANNE RUPP Editor MEGAN JOYCE

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from the editor ... I love working and don’t plan on retiring anytime soon, but I do think about what my retirement days will look like. Assuming my husband and I have our finances in order, I wonder what I’ll do with the time that is available. I love to read, but let’s be honest, one can’t just sit and read all day. There has to be more to life than that. That’s why I found the article about planning for retirement interesting, and I know you will too. Planning for all aspects of retirement is important, and the author offers some great tips. Many baby boomers retire from one job only to begin a second career. Sometimes it’s in the same field. Other times it’s an opportunity to pursue a career in a totally different arena, perhaps to fulfill a passion to help others in some type of service organization. If you’re thinking about changing jobs, find out what will mark you as an “older” applicant on your resume and possibly take you out of the game. Did you just get the knack for posting on Facebook, tweeting on Twitter, and pinning on Pinterest? Now there’s Snapchat, Kik, Yik Yak, and a few others. That’s where your grandkids are hanging out now. Find out what these social media platforms are and how you can connect. You’ll be one of the cool grandmas or grandpas, or as in my case, a cool MiMi. Two local doctors share incredible information about new procedures being performed for arterial blockages. Even the stents inserted to open the arteries have improved since they were first used.

Did you know, though, that blood pressure goals in adults 60 and over were relaxed – raised from 140/90 to 150/90? Read the article and consider if you think this was a good move or not. What are your travel plans this year? Some interesting destinations are highlighted in this issue. A few area mansions would be fun day trips with historical value and reliving bygone days. Route 66, on the other hand, would be a more extended trip, not only reliving bygone days, but also featuring beautiful scenery across the United States. What does your retirement home look like? Is it where you currently live? Perhaps, but our region has a plethora of options. Learn about some inside! Of course, we’ve interviewed many of your friends, neighbors, and other acquaintances. Read about them and let us know of someone you may know who should be considered for an upcoming issue. Happy spring and happy reading!

Vice president and managing editor

spring 2016 | bmagazinePA.com „

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features

16 5 THINGS ON YOUR RESUME THAT MAKE YOU SOUND OLD Not ones to sit still, boomers may be finishing up one career but looking for other opportunities to utilize their talents and skills. When you send out your resume, make sure you’re not including things that could indicate your age. You’re vying for positions with much younger men and women and you want to make sure you are granted an interview to showcase your qualifications.

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34 ROUTE 66: THE HISTORIC MAIN STREET OF AMERICA Opened in 1926, Route 66 began in Chicago and passed through eight states and three time zones, ending at the Santa Monica Pier in California. The scenery was breathtaking along the route. As you can imagine, motels, restaurants, and other businesses cropped up along the route. Songs were written about the highway and it became a national icon. A local writer recently recreated his 1981 road trip of Route 66, visiting portions that are still in operation today. 56 AGENT ORANGE: WHAT VIETNAM VETERANS CAN DO TO HELP FUTURE GENERATIONS The Vietnam War was a different kind of combat situation, and the U.S. military used Agent Orange to defoliate hiding places used by the Viet Cong, such as fields and rice paddies. It was also used to clear the perimeters of military bases for better visibility. Agent Orange killed the vegetation but, unfortunately, it caused illness in service people exposed to it and appears also to have changed their DNA, affecting future generations.

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cover story 6 FELIX CAVALIERE The Rascals were one of the hottest bands in the 1960s. In fact, the Beatles were the warm-up act for their performance! Originally a member of the group Joey Dee & The Starliters, Felix Cavaliere later formed his own group, the Rascals. Cavaliere still enjoys a full schedule of playing to enthusiastic audiences, performing popular tunes such as “Good Lovin’,” “How Can I Be Sure,” “A Beautiful Morning,” and “People Got to Be Free.”


caregiving 62

THE DILEMMA Should your aging parent come to live with you?

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WHEN A LOVED ONE DIES Some steps you’ll need to take.

general 41

LUCK Old wives’ tales.

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GOOD VIBRATIONS Meet a fellow boomer.

health 14

PET OWNERSHIP It can yield surprising benefits.

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CARDIOVASCULAR CONDITIONS The key is to prevent and treat.

home 24

FROM BEDROOM TO BOUDOIR Renewing your relationship.

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PRACTICAL AND CHARMING RETREATS Creative uses for unoccupied bedrooms.

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ideal living 42

A HOME TO FIT A LIFESTYLE. Living in retirement your way.

lifestyle 10

A SUCCESSFUL RETIREMENT Planning is essential.

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SOCIAL MEDIA Keeping in touch with your grandkids.

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WHAT’S YOUR RETIREMENT CAR LOOK LIKE? Boomers—the largest demographic buying new cars.

nostalgia 66

’50s-ERA CARS Local car enthusiasts share their stories.

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people 48

STEPPING OUT IN FAITH Local man follows his calling and accepts its challenges.

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STAINED-GLASS ART Area artist creates awe-inspiring masterpieces.

travel 28

LEARNING ABOUT DAYS OF YORE Area mansions serve as history lessons.

veteran 52

ROBERT “GUMP” MAY From the football field to the battlefield … and back again.

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cover story

just groovin’ Written by LORI M. MYERS

FELIX FELIX CAVALIERE CAVALIERE RECALLS RECALLS DECADES DECADES AGO AGO WHEN WHEN HIS HIS BAND, BAND, THE THE Young Rascals, would roll into town to play a gig and set up all the sound equipment themselves. That’s just the way rock ’n’ roll was in the 1960s. No big deal, no big production extravaganza, just music, plain and simple. Then one day, a guy told him that perhaps next time, he could take care of their technical needs so they wouldn’t have to do it. Those were changing times, Cavaliere admits. Now there are big companies that take charge of sound, lights, and stage setup, so the only thing band members have to be concerned with is getting up on stage and whipping fans into a musical frenzy. “When we started, rock concerts were not in existence,” Cavaliere recalls. “The production now is the show. Now it’s like Las Vegas. It’s like an evolution. I mean, the U2 shows look like Star Wars. From four guys rockin’ on stage to that!” Four guys rockin’, indeed. Cavaliere, who now resides in Nashville, Tenn., was once the Rascals’ vocalist and

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keyboardist during those heady years of 1965-72 when the band churned out hit after hit. Perhaps you’ve heard a few of them: “Groovin’,” “A Beautiful Morning,”

“How Can I Be Sure,” and “People Got to Be Free.” They’re now celebrating 50 years of music during a time when what you heard on a record was what

From left: Eddie Brigati, Gene Cornish, Dino Danelli, and Felix Cavaliere.


cover story ))) felix cavaliere

Left and below: 1966 promotional pictures for the Young Rascals’ album “Good Lovin’.”

From left: The originals–Felix Cavaliere, Eddie Brigati, Dino Danelli, and Gene Cornish.

you heard in concert, up close and personal. No abracadabra technology to turn a singer’s voice into something unrecognizable. Cavaliere began his musical passion in the classical vein. Born in Pelham, N.Y., Cavaliere had a mother who noticed his musical abilities and encouraged him to cultivate that part of his creativity. “She’d interrupt my baseball games so I would practice,” Cavaliere tells me from his home in Nashville. “I practiced three times a week for eight years. When she passed, I was 13 years old.” That diligence provided Cavaliere a great foundation in music, and while his love of classical music never waned, he was there to hear the beginnings of rock ’n’ roll—Fats Domino, The Platters, and other greats. That music seeped into his pores, and that’s how rock ’n’ roll became part of his world.

Cavaliere pursued college and was a pre-med student. A summer job in the Catskills opened him up even more to the music of the times and a turning point in his life’s path. The group Joey Dee and the Starliters were about to go on a European tour when the organist quit. Dee remembered Cavaliere’s performance at the Catskill hotel and asked him to join the group on the tour. Cavaliere made the decision to leave school and joined Dee’s band to go to Germany and Sweden. It was 1963, before the Beatles came to the United States, and Cavaliere recalls the irony that the four mop-headed Liverpool lads were the warm-up act at their performance. “It’s amazing that even happened,” he says. “Good fortune has been part of my life.” That good fortune continued when

Cavaliere joined up with Eddie Brigati, Gene Cornish, and Dino Danelli to form the Young Rascals. Its first television appearance was on the program Hullabaloo in 1965, where they ultimately had modest success with the single “I Ain’t Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore.” That was followed up with “Good Lovin’,” a No. 1 single both in the United States and Canada. Cavaliere and Brigati then began writing most of the group’s songs thereafter, with several having some success. But it was “Groovin’” in 1967 that was a chart topper for the group before they had a succession of hits, including “A Girl Like You,” “How Can I Be Sure?” and “A Beautiful Morning.” After the song “It’s Wonderful,” the Young Rascals changed their name to the Rascals, and their place as blue-eyed soul and rock performers was cemented.

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cover story

Choosing a song as your favorite is like asking, ‘Who’s your favorite kid?’

“Choosing a song as your favorite is like asking, ‘Who’s your favorite kid?’” Cavaliere muses. “But it’s the song ‘People Got to Be Free’ of which I am most proud. It was the late ’60s and the record company didn’t want to release it. When it was [released], it was played in South Africa and Berlin. The song went all over the world. We were motivated

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during that time. We had a vision of how we wanted the world to be.” When “A Beautiful Morning” was written and hit the big time in music history, Cavaliere remembers it as a joyous time in his life. The Rascals were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997, the Grammy Hall of Fame, the Songwriters

Hall of Fame, and the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. Further accolades include 18 Top 40 hits, five Top 10 hits, and three No. 1 mega hits. To say that rock ’n’ roll has been kind to Cavaliere would be an understatement. “I discovered that I couldn’t create as much with classical music,” he says. But what he can create are songs of


cover story

Photo courtesy of Donna Lewis

))) felix cavaliere

his own. Nowadays, Cavaliere continues to nurture his songwriting ways in Nashville, where he has formed a band and where, as he says, “I hope to spend my life writing.” It is in Nashville’s vibrant music scene that Cavaliere feels right at home. Along with writing, he still goes out on the road playing music—30 to 50 shows

a year—mainly on weekends, and he recently received the WhyHunger award. “The WhyHunger organization is an integral part of our shows, especially the Christmas concerts,” he says. “We donate a portion of each show. It’s important because of the contribution that it makes to feeding the needy.” Cavaliere is a scuba diver and a

voracious reader, particularly books on the bestseller lists “and science fiction,” he adds. “I like to keep the cells of the brain going,” he says. Yes, good fortune has always seemed to find a place alongside Cavaliere’s musical path. A beautiful morning? Yes, indeed. )))

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lifestyle

planning is key to a successful retirement transition Written by ROBERTA K. TAYLOR

RETIREMENT IS NOT WHAT IT USED to be! People are living longer, many continuing to work well into their 70s and 80s, starting entrepreneurial ventures or encore careers, and doing volunteer work. Baby boomers today are redefining retirement and pioneering a new paradigm for a rewarding next chapter of life, one that embraces values and offers opportunities for lifelong learning and growth. But having a fulfilling life doesn’t happen on its own. Whether you’re single or in a relationship, there are questions that need to be answered and steps that need to be taken to get to where you want to be, steps that require thoughtful preparation and planning. Benjamin Franklin said, “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail.” Dave and Carol learned this the hard way. They looked forward to spending more time together and enjoying retirement. With the help of a financial advisor, they had planned realistically and were living within their means. But they hadn’t given much thought to how they would spend their time beyond playing golf and visiting their adult children and grandchildren. Carol enjoyed gardening, playing tennis, and cooking, but she no longer felt needed, as she had when she was working as a nurse.

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lifestyle

Planning for Retirement Transition According to Jerry Sedlar and Rick Miners in their book Don’t Retire, Rewire, people flunked retirement because they: • Retired for the wrong reason • Didn’t realize the emotional side of retirement • Didn’t have a plan • Thought rest, leisure, and recreation would be enough • Didn’t stay connected with others • Expected their partner to be their social life • Became bored and depressed

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Prior to his retirement, Dave had been totally consumed with his law practice. But within a few months he was bored with too much time on his hands and no sense of purpose. He began questioning his decision to retire. Dave and Carol made a common mistake. They hadn’t anticipated what it would be like without structure and a sense of purpose in their lives. It used to be that retirement planning just meant having enough money to live on. And of course, planning for your financial future is important, but today, financial planning alone is not enough. Finances are one part of retirement planning with life planning being the other; they are two sides of the same coin. We can’t all be independently wealthy, but we can envision and create a future based on what’s important and how we can affordably live the next part of life.

We all want to enjoy a fulfilling life that includes purpose and meaning. These seven tips will help you think about how to plan for your successful retirement transition and “what’s next.” 1. Plan Ahead Don’t wait until you retire to plan for “what’s next.” Transition begins when you first start thinking about if, when, and how you will retire. Learn from others. Consider talking with people who have already retired to hear what their experience has been. 2. Meet with a Financial Planner No matter how savvy you are about money, whether you’re single or married, don’t make assumptions when it comes to retirement. Working with a trusted financial advisor can help you plan for “what’s next” and whether or not that means continuing to work in some capacity. It’s important to know how to make the best of what you have. You don’t want any surprises after you retire— when it’s too late to go back. 3. Communication is Essential Whether you’re part of a couple or on your own, you need to communicate with the important people in your life. The biggest setup for failure is lack of communication, especially for couples. How will things change financially? What are the expectations around time together and time apart? What are your goals for the future? Will you stay put, downsize, or move to another part of the

Whether you’re single or in a relationship, there are questions that need to be answered and steps that need to be taken to get to where you want to be.

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lifestyle

country or the world? These are just a few of the important questions that need to be considered. 4. Create Structure in Your Life Work gives us structure. We know what we need to do and where we need to be. In retirement, your day-to-day schedule may be empty. Make sure that you have activities you enjoy doing by yourself as well as with others. Having some unplanned time is great, but a diet of it can lead to boredom and depression. And, don’t overload your plate. Some new retirees load up

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their to-do list with so many new tasks that they find it hard to prioritize and take time for the most important and enjoyable. 5. Find Ways to Be Connected and Involved When you retire, the day-to-day connection with colleagues is usually lost. You’re no longer part of that “work family.” Finding other ways to create community and connection through interests, hobbies, volunteering, and giving back is essential. Isolation can be deadly!

6. Stay Healthy: Body, Mind, and Spirit We all know that diet and exercise are important for healthy aging. But having fun, minimizing stress, and continuing to grow are equally as important. Feeding ourselves includes nourishing the mind and spirit as well as the body. Studies show that people who continue to learn and grow are healthier and happier as they age. 7. Something to Live For Whether it’s an encore career, paid or unpaid work, volunteering, taking care


lifestyle

Retirement can be the start of the most productive and satisfying chapter of life, and it takes preparation and

planning. At some point, planning for what you’re retiring “to” becomes more important than what you’re retiring “from.” Life goes on and, inevitably, change happens. Enjoying the life we choose and the time we have, fully living our lives, is both a responsibility and a gift. Plan for and use it wisely. Time is our most precious commodity, and it is limited. ))) ___________________________

Retirement Options Coach, Certified Money Coach, speaker, and coauthor of The

Couple’s Retirement Puzzle: 10 Must-Have

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of grandchildren, or finding a way to give back, what we do gives us a sense of purpose and meaning. You may work to earn a supplemental income or because you like working. Either way, make sure that what you do is enjoyable and satisfying. This comes from doing something that is aligned with your values and skills and gives you a sense of purpose and meaning in life.

Conversations for Creating an Amazing New Life Together. Taylor’s mid-life transition led to the development of Pathmaking for Life and working with individuals and couples 55 and older who are planning for “what’s next.” She facilitates seminars and workshops related to retirement transition for professional, educational, and community organizations and works with financial professionals to bring Integrative Life

Roberta Taylor, RNCS, M.Ed., is an

Planning to their organizations and clients.

experienced psychotherapist, Certified

www.pathmaking.com

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health

pet ownership can yield surprising benefits Written by PETE WISNIEWSKI

OWNING A PET CAN LIVEN UP ONE’S LIFE. UNDOUBTEDLY, CARING FOR a pet can take time and patience, but you may experience unexpected, yet welcome, benefits from loving a pet. Over the past few decades, there have been numerous studies conducted on the effect pet ownership can have on individuals, and many of the results are positive. Statistics indicate that 57 percent of pet owners confide in their pets; 95 percent talk to them; 82 percent said a pet helps when they feel sad; and 65 percent of the respondents said touching their pet makes them feel better. A pet can make a rewarding

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companion. It can provide a sense of camaraderie and friendship through the unfailing love and affection that they give. Even just stroking your pet can be a comfort. Many baby boomers have experienced major changes in their lives, whether the kids are off to school or other life adventures and the house seems too quiet; some boomers are newly divorced and feeling a little lonely; or perhaps you just retired and don’t have enough to do to fill the time. There are other scenarios where a pet might just be the therapy you need to perk up your life. Caring for a pet like a cat or a dog can help someone overcome depression. It can aid a person in getting through the loss of a loved one or provide some much-needed company if family members live far away. Loving a pet gives the owner a sense of purpose—something to interact with, to talk to, to care for, to feel needed by, and to think about. A pet can decrease anxiety levels and give the owner something to look forward to seeing and

Over the past few decades, there have been numerous studies conducted on the effect pet ownership can have on individuals, and many of the results are positive.


health ))) pet ownership

interacting with on a daily basis. Making sure your new best friend is fed, cleaned, and groomed, as well as yard duty or cleaning of the litter box or tank, become an integral part of the new pet owner’s routine. Your pet is now relying on you to take care of all aspects of its life. But perhaps some of the most important benefits to pet ownership would be those affecting the owner’s health. Owning a four-legged furry creature can yield the same results as taking a pill. Many of us aren’t getting enough exercise, and caring for a pet may be what you need to move you off the couch. Taking your dog for a walk or getting down on the floor and playing with your cat will get your blood flowing, which is good for your heart and blood pressure. You might also see the numbers begin to lower on your scale! Don’t get to socialize much? Do you live alone? Owning a pet can provide a renewed sense of social confidence. Pets are a great conversation starter. Taking a dog for a walk or to a dog park can be an easy way to discover a common interest with someone else and perhaps strike up new a friendship.

Things to consider before becoming a pet owner: Time. How much do you have? If you’re away 16 hours a day or for extended periods of time, a fish may be a better option. Cost. Besides the food and annual veterinarian visits, there are also preventative products like flee and tick and heartworm medicines that should be given to dogs and cats on a regular basis, and, just like humans, there are always the unexpected costs. Environment. Things to consider here include: How big is the living area; how close are the neighbors; and will your pet be able to move with you if that is in your future?

Studies have shown that people who own pets have lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels compared to those who do not own pets, which will help reduce the risk of heart disease. Additional studies have even shown that pet owners have a better chance of long-term survival after suffering from a coronary incident, compared to a nonpet owner. Cats and dogs are the most popular pets for baby boomers, but rabbits, guinea pigs, turtles, and birds are also

well-liked choices. Even fish are great pets. Watching them swim in their tank is a great stress reliever and may be the trick to soothing some frazzled nerves. Before deciding to own a pet, the potential owner must figure out what the right pet for him or her would be. The age of a pet is a factor; a kitten or a puppy may not be the best choice for a baby boomer since they require a lot of training and attention, so it may be better to go with a dog or cat that is already mature and trained. Your local pet shelter would be a great place to start your search. Adopting a dog or a cat from a local shelter will take the animal from feeling unwanted to settling down in a loving home. Does the pet have a temperament that is similar to the owner’s? Not everyone has the energy it takes to love a Weimaraner, Dalmatian, Brittany spaniel, or other dog that demands a lot of exercise. If you’re not a high-energy person, a cat may be a better option for you. So what’s a downside to owning a pet? They, their toys, their food bowl, or the pet itself could be a tripping hazard if you’re not careful. So pay attention to where you’re walking and what is underfoot. Pets have an endless supply of love; don’t miss out on that love and affection. )))

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feature

5 things on your resume that make you sound too old Written by MARC MILLER

THE FORMAT AND CONTENTS OF YOUR RESUME SAY A LOT ABOUT YOUR age. Age discrimination is a fact of life in today’s job market. This goes both ways for the young and the old. I want to discuss your resume’s signs that you are over 50 years of age and, ideally, get you past the initial gatekeepers who might think you are too old. Home Address For many years, we sent our resume and cover letter through the mail. We put our home address right on the top. Fact is, there is no longer a need to put your home address on the resume anymore. Reasons not to include your home address: • Economic profiling • Length of commute • Personal safety If the employer needs your home mailing address, they can ask for it. Email Address One sure sign that you are over 50

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You do not want to be filtered out by staff who are screening initial resumes and lose the opportunity to demonstrate your talents and skills.

is to have an aol.com email address or even an email address from your cable provider on your resume. Either sign up for a Gmail address or get an email-forwarding service from: • A professional society – I have had email addresses from IEEE and ACM, both technology associations • Your Alumni Association – I have an email address from my Northwestern Alumni Association • Get your own domain – I have one client who acquired his full name as a domain name, like MarcMiller.com All of these options say something about your professional brand. I always recommend using a separate email address for your job search.


feature ))) resume

Home Phone Number Who under 45 years of age still has a home phone? We ditched our home phone five years ago, and I am quite a bit older than 45. If you still have a home phone and do not want to give out your cell phone number, get a Google Voice number. Put the Google Voice number on your resume as your cell number. You can set it up so that it will ring on multiple phones (both home and cell). It can be configured to transcribe the message and then email and text you the transcription. Some of the transcriptions can be really funny. I had one recruiter leave me a message, and her name was transcribed as “stressed-out waters.”

managed IBM mainframe computers, and lots of other obsolete technologies. Unless I was applying for a position that required these skills, all it tells the reader is that I am over 50 years of age and maybe older. Look at your resume—what does it say about your age? Show it to others and ask them what it says about you. Age discrimination is a fact of life in

the job market today. You do not want to be filtered out by staff who are screening initial resumes and lose the opportunity to demonstrate your talents and skills. By the way, I chose to use resume rather than résumé in this article for the purists. ))) ___________________________ Marc Miller of CareerPivot.com and author of Personal Branding for Baby Boomers: What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional and Repurpose Your Career – A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers. https://careerpivot.com/2014/ resume-say-age. www.careerpivot.com

Double Space after Period I am going to go out a limb and declare that putting two spaces after a period is obsolete. It is how most of us were taught to type on a typewriter. Therefore, most of us who do this (I have taught myself to stop putting two spaces after a period, and it was hard) are over 50 years of age. Over the years, I have heard that this has been used as a method of screening out older candidates. Skills Limit the skills you list on your resume to current and relevant skills. I have seen many technical resumes that list every system, software program, and technology that the applicant has ever worked on. I could list that I wrote MS-DOS control programs, wrote machinelevel code developing word processors,

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lifestyle

keep tabs on your legacy with these social media gems Written by ALLEN TAYLOR

IF YOU THINK JOINING FACEBOOK AND TWITTER IS GOING TO ENDEAR you to your grandchildren and make you seem hipper than the average grandparent, I’ll give you a second guess. Facebook is more popular among those over 40 than the youngadult crowd. Your grandchildren may be hanging out elsewhere. They’re not trying to get away from you. Young people just have their own ideas about what it is to be social. Let’s respect that. Still, you can see what they’re up to if you show up at the right venues. Here are a few of the social media hotspots young people are flocking to these days. Instagram Where do you go if you spend most of your time on your phone and you don’t want to be on Facebook? Instagram, of course. Instagrammers share photos and videos with each other through their smartphones, but you can access the site if you have an Instagram app on your PC. Two popular ones are Webbygram and Webstagram. You have to have an Instagram account, though. Sign up at www.instagram.com.

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lifestyle ))) social media

Snapchat Snapchat is the coolest thing since blue cotton candy. You can take a photo or a video with your phone, add a caption, and share it. Young people like it because their shares disappear after 10 seconds. So, if you snooze, you lose. Wake up and log on at www.snapchat.com. Kik If you get a kick out of seeing what your grandchildren are up to, no matter how old they are, then you’ll love Kik. It’s a chat app you can download to your smartphone, which means you can send a quick note to Junior to bring you some eggs when he drops by for dinner. www.kik.com Yik Yak Ever wonder what Millennials are doing on their phones all the time? They might be Yik-Yakking. This mobile app streams a live newsfeed of what people are posting within a 1.5-mile radius, so if your grandchildren are close by, you can see what they’re yakking about. It almost feels like spying. One problem with Yik Yak is that posters are often anonymous, so you may not know which

LET’S

highly visual and members can post quickly and easily. Readers can then like and interact quickly and easily. Join Tumblr at www.tumblr.com.

Periscope Yes, here’s another mobile app. What Periscope allows users to do is share a video in real time. If your grandchildren are into that, they may very well be on Periscope. www.periscope.tv

Young people just have their own ideas about what it is to be social.

poster is your Little Miss Prissy. Try it anyway: www.yikyakapp.com Tumblr Tumblr is a social blogging platform. While blogging is popular among people from all backgrounds and every generation, Tumblr is unique in that it is a blogging platform that is also a social community, which might be why young’uns like it so well. Posts are

Fair Warning: Be Prepared for the Unexpected Let’s face it, your grandkids are human. When they think nobody is looking, they could be up to stuff that won’t meet your approval. If you’re thinking you’d like to keep tabs on your grandchildren and you want to do that through social media, I’d recommend you don’t. First off, they may feel like they’re being spied on, and if your loved one catches you doing it, it might hurt your relationship with them. A better approach is to simply ask them if they use the services and if they’d mind you connecting with them through these apps. If they give you the go ahead, have some fun. )))

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health cardiovascular conditions: prevent and treat

Written by BARBARA TRAININ BLANK

AMONG THE MEDICAL CONDITIONS MORE LIKELY TO OCCUR AS WE AGE is atherosclerosis—commonly called “hardening of the arteries.” “This is a broad term describing the process of plaque buildup in the lining of an artery that can lead to the development of a blockage,” said Dr. William Bachinsky, medical director of vascular services at PinnacleHealth’s CardioVascular Institute. The term goes back to the 16th to 17th centuries, when doctors began to do autopsies. Upon opening the chests of men who had died suddenly in their 40s, 50s, and 60s, they felt something crunchy and hard in the arteries—calcification,” said Dr. Gregory Cox, cardiologist with Red Rose Cardiology in Lancaster. Arteries are responsible for the delivery of oxygen-rich blood to the vital organs and areas, including the brain, heart, and kidneys, as well as the legs. With blockages, muscles and tissues don’t get all the blood they need. “Some plaque buildup is part of aging, but genetics also play a big

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role, especially if someone has a family member who had a stroke or heart attack before the age of 65,” said Bachinsky. Major environmental contributors include obesity/inactivity and a history of diabetes, hypertension, or high cholesterol. Pennsylvania has a very high incidence of obesity and diabetes. “The most important way to prevent atherosclerosis is to control the risk factors—watch your diet, do at least three hours of aerobic exercise weekly, and stop using tobacco,” he added. Other risk factors are our saturatedfat-rich Western diets; salt, which can increase blood pressure; and the stress of living in an advanced society, said Cox. Because arteries supply many different areas of the body, the classic symptoms of blockages vary. Those of a heart attack, for example, are often described as severe “chest pressure.” In the legs, patients may complain of pain in the

buttocks or calf muscles. Treatment is composed of two approaches: either medications—such as beta-blockers, which decrease cardiac demand, or blood thinners—or a procedure, a bypass that opens the blockage with a balloon or stent. “The body, however, may react as if the stent is a foreign body and grow scar tissue, and there can be re-stenosis,” said Cox. “But stents have improved since they were first used, in 1993 or ’94.” In about 2012, a new way of doing cardiac catheterization—both for diagnosis as well as to open blocked arteries with balloons and stents, among other purposes—became more widely used. This procedure places the stent through the radial artery in the wrist rather than through the leg. Although 80 to 90 percent of catheterizations had been done through the leg since the 1960s, because of better


health ))) cardiovascular

Dr. William Bachinsky, medical director of vascular services at PinnacleHealth’s CardioVascular Institute.

equipment, the trend is now moving toward more of them being done through the wrist. “The advantages include a much smaller risk of bleeding than through the leg,” said Cox. “Patients don’t have to lie in bed for two to three hours [after the procedure], and there is less discomfort at the cath site. Recovery is also much quicker.” More than 10 different trials are under way at PinnacleHealth, studying new ways to open blockages in the neck, kidney, and leg arteries. The hospital and healthcare system, for example, is testing new bio-absorbable stents, which can prop up the artery but dissolve completely 12 to 18 months later. In July, the CardioVascular Institute enrolled the second patient in the United States and the first in Pennsylvania in a trial assessing the safety and effectiveness of a new type of stent for leg-artery

The most important way to prevent atherosclerosis is to control the risk factors—watch your diet, do at least three hours of aerobic exercise weekly, and stop using tobacco.

blockages. The trial will enroll 280 subjects in up to 40 sites in the United States and Germany. The BioMimics 3D Nitinol stint has a unique helical curvature that adapts a straight-stent design to a threedimensional helical shape, which more closely mimics the natural geometry of the human vascular system. “This cutting-edge technology is available only at PinnacleHealth for patients with pain in the legs due to leg-artery blockages,” said Bachinsky, principal investigator locally at PinnacleHealth. “It’s a game changer in the femoral artery stent technology, allowing for greater flexibility within the artery and potentially less risk for stent fracture or re-narrowing after the stent is placed.” In 2000–2002, doctors started using a small amount of chemotherapy in stents—called “drug-eluting stents”—

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health

Dr. Gregory Cox, cardiologist with Red Rose Cardiology in Lancaster, checks an incision site on a patient.

which keep scar tissue from growing back. The number of stent procedures has also diminished. “Not every blockage needs a stent, if you can control risk factors significantly, like through a better diet,” said Cox. Recommendations about blood pressure treatment are also changing. According to guidelines released in February 2014 by the Eighth Joint National Committee, blood pressure goals in adults 60 and over were relaxed from 140/90 to 150/90, said Dr. Atizazul H. Mansoor, a noninvasive cardiologist with PinnacleHealth. The authors concluded in the Journal of American Medical Association that 13.5 million adults—most of them older than 60—who had previously been considered to have poorly controlled blood pressure would now be considered to have adequately managed blood pressure. That makes the proportion of

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those considered eligible for medication fall from 41 to 32 percent, said Cox. The guidelines also eased goals for adults with diabetes and kidney disease. Currently, one in four adults over 60 is treated for high blood pressure. These medications can lead to dizziness and other side effects; they may also mean a patient needs multiple medications. But the new guidelines are “controversial,” said Mansoor. “Uncontrolled blood pressure is a risk factor for heart attack and stroke.” Cox further noted that out of the 17 panelists on the Joint Committee, four or five disagreed with the guidelines. “Many members of the American College of Cardiology don’t agree either,” he added. “Cardiologists generally treat patients with far more risk factors than in the general population. If they use those guidelines, they might be doing a disservice to certain populations, like African-

American females, who have a higher tendency toward blood pressure issues and therefore a much higher risk of stroke. “If we don’t treat these groups, in five to 10 years physicians are likely to see an increase in cardiovascular disease.” Moreover, in September, the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) at NIH released data stating that intensive blood-pressure management may save lives. Intervention in the trial carefully adjusts the amount or type of blood pressure medication to achieve a target systolic (top number in readings) of 120. The SPRINT study, launched in 2009, included more than 9,300 individuals. The standard group received blood pressure medications to achieve a target of less than 140. The intensive-treatment group received medications to achieve a target of less than 120. “This reduced rates of cardiovascular


the year was ... events, such as heart attacks and heart failure, as well as stroke, by almost a third, and the risk of death by almost a quarter, as compared to the target systolic pressure of 140,� Mansoor said. The subjects in the study were adults 50 and over with high blood pressure but did not include individuals with diabetes or polycystic kidney disease. Though the complete data hasn’t been released, Cox believes they will indicate the need to be very aggressive in treating higher-risk populations. “If a patient has no risk factors and no calcium, we may feel more

comfortable not treating it aggressively. But about a third of the population in this country has very significant cardiovascular disease that leads to death,� said Cox. But even if the complete findings bear out the initial ones, questions remain, said Mansoor: Are the patients willing to take the medication(s) required to lower blood pressure readings, and can they tolerate them? Above a patient’s certain age, how aggressive does the physician want to be? And is the data true decade-todecade of life? )))

Television Highlights: September 1960 – My Three Sons debuts and runs until August 1972. The show would total 369 episodes. September 1960 – The Flintstones cartoon airs and runs until September 1966. October 1960 – Candid Camera begins and runs until September 1967. October 1960 – The Andy Griffith Show debuts. The show would have 249 episodes before its ending in September 1968. October 1960 – Route 66 premiers and runs until September 1964, totaling 116 episodes.

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home from bedroom to boudoir: a guide for renewing your relationship Written by KIMBERLY BLAKER

HAS YOUR BEDROOM LOST ITS TOUCH? DOES IT SEEM LIKE THE SAME DULL routine every time you head to what was once a magical lair? After being together for a while, that once yearned-for familiarity turns into a longing for the unexpected.

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home

Aromatherapy Aroma is an essential ingredient in creating the right mood. Choose from many fragrant scents that come in a variety of forms, from incense, sprays, and candles to cologne and scented body lotions. Also, try some of these aromatic touches.

For lasting fragrance, lightly spray your favorite cologne on the sheets for a fresh, inviting scent. Open the windows and let the fresh breeze softly whisper through to enhance your room. Set out a box of gourmet chocolates. The aroma of chocolate alone is a great aphrodisiac. Fresh-cut flowers are an inviting addition. Try different types to determine which have lingering scents. However, too much fragrance is bothersome to some. Strive for a pleasant aroma that’s not overpowering. If your partner is sensitive or allergic to fragrance, forego it altogether. An Irresistible Vision Men are most stimulated visually, so they want to see the woman they are with. Play this up, and you’re bound to hold his heart. Everyone looks their personal best in particular colors—and those colors may not necessarily be red or black. Choose those that look best on you. To determine which colors complement you, there are several books available to assist in finding your best colors and shades. Drape different colors over your shoulders to determine what each color does for your appearance. You’ll likely

))) bedroom to boudoir

So why not give your room a lift? As the ancient Chinese philosophy of feng shui points out, your surroundings play a large role in the quality of your love life. Although much of this philosophy is rooted in superstition, there’s no question that environment plays a crucial role in our mood and desires. Incorporate pleasures in your bedroom for all of your senses to savor, from romantic sounds, sensual sights, and exquisite touchables, to savory tastes and aromatic fragrances. Try some of these ideas and transform your humdrum room into a lover’s lane.

find that some colors make you look drab, while others reveal your true radiance. Choose eye-pleasing fabrics. Flannel is unlikely to be a hit, while men find clingy or shiny fabrics irresistible. Don’t forget the lingerie. Many men love it. Yet, keep in mind that they all have different tastes. Ask your partner what styles or articles he finds most appealing. It’s All in the Music Music is also important to setting the mood. It brings about relaxation, perfect after a hard day or for breaking the silence. Avoid loud rock, country, or hip-hop music, which can be a real distraction. Try some of these favorite albums for setting the mood: • Jon Secada – popular, vocal • Kenny G – Breathless, jazz, instrumental • Luther Vandross – Best of Love 2, popular, vocal • Celine Dion, popular, vocal • A Romantic Tribute to the Titanic – popular/classical, vocal/instrumental • Adele – 21, popular, vocal • Chris Botti – Slowing Down the World, jazz, vocal/instrumental • Mark Whitfield—Forever Love, jazz, instrumental

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))) bedroom to boudoir

home

Try some of these ideas and transform your humdrum room into a lover’s lane.

• Raphael/Intimacy—Music for Love, contemporary/New Age, piano • The Romantics—A Windham Hill Sampler, New Age, instrumental • Michael Bublé – To Be Loved, popular, vocal • Paul McCartney – Working Classical, popular/classical, vocal/instrumental Musts Don’t be caught without these necessities: • A nightstand or small chest next to the bed to eliminate unnecessary fumbling. • A firm, comfortable mattress; good box springs; and a solid bed frame for comfort and quietness. • Soft, quality sheets; a lightweight comforter; and fluffy pillows for relaxing and lingering. • An occasional change in furniture arrangement to keep the environment feeling new. • A neatly made bed with fresh sheets.

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Instant Mood Killers Avoid these common bedroom mistakes: • A television in your bedroom is a definite no-no. This passive individual activity is sure to destroy the allure of your bedroom as a place for intimacy. • Both bright lights and no lights can detract from the moment. Your partner wants to see you, yet doesn’t want to be under a spotlight. Use a small bedside lamp with a low-watt bulb for soft lighting. Candles also make a pleasing substitute. • Keep exercise equipment any place but in your bedroom. The thought of a sweaty gym is good way to detract from the moment. • Decorate in ways that are appealing to both of you. An atmosphere that is either too masculine or too feminine can destroy yours or your partner’s mood. • Keep clutter hidden. A messy room is a reminder of work that needs to be done.

Just for Fun An occasional change in scenery creates interest. So, try these fun ideas for a change in pace. • Use a purple, blue, or red light bulb for a new effect. • Add vibrantly colored satin sheets as an eye catcher. • Set out a bowl of scrumptious fruits such as strawberries, cut melons, and grapes next to a bottle of chilled wine. • Toss a few fresh rose petals on the bed. They’ll add fragrance and are perfect for tickling, too. • Install a mirrored wall or large mirror for a different view. • Put a furry or soft throw rug or a comfortable armchair in your room for added coziness. ))) ___________________________ Kimberly Blaker is an author and freelance writer. Her articles have appeared in more than 200 newspapers, parenting and women’s magazines, and other publications throughout the U.S.


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travel learning more about the days of yore – area mansions serve as history lessons Written by STEPHANIE KALINA-METZGER

EVERY MANSION TELLS A TALE, AND MUCH CAN BE LEARNED FROM THE knowledgeable docents who provide us with their compelling backstories. The Fort Hunter Mansion in Harrisburg, the Conestoga House and Gardens in Lancaster, and the Cameron/ Masland Mansion in Carlisle are located within an easy drive of each other, making it convenient to take a day or two to visit them all. Fort Hunter Mansion The Fort Hunter Mansion, nestled along the banks of the Susquehanna

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River just 6 miles north of Harrisburg, tells a tale of our region’s past, encompassing several hundred years. Docents take visitors on a journey back in time when Fort Hunter was originally established as “The Fort at Hunter’s Mill.” The area was named after Samuel Hunter, who owned a grist mill in the area. The small settlement was fortified by the British, who built a series of forts from Harrisburg


travel ))) area mansions

travel

Opposite page and right: Fort Hunter Mansion and various rooms that are shown during the tour. Bottom right: The Tavern House at Fort Hunter, currently housing Dauphin County’s Parks and Recreation Department.

to Sunbury to protect it from being attacked during the French and Indian War. Built in 1756 in a bend along the river, the sturdy structure was a supply depot and alarm station. After the war, it fell into disrepair until Archibald McAllister purchased the land and turned it into a thriving frontier village. It was later purchased by Harrisburg businessman Daniel Dick Boas. The property stayed in the Boas family for years until a niece by the name of Margaret Meigs decided to turn the property into a museum by creating a foundation to preserve its history. According to author Carl A. Dickson, who wrote Fort Hunter Mansion and Park, A Guide, Meigs quickly became an “evangelist” for the museum, preaching the history and hiring photographers for stills and postcards. She developed slogans and printed materials to advertise the property as well, with one of the most oft-used slogans, “Where Godey’s Lady’s Book Comes to Life,” referring to a popular women’s magazine at the time. Today, Dauphin County owns the property and strives to maintain its historical integrity as Meigs intended. Guests will be invited to watch a short film on the history of the area before

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travel

The exquisite gardens at the Conestoga House are open to the public for self-guided tours as seasonally scheduled.

being escorted through the Federal-style mansion, where they’ll see many original furnishings and paintings depicting the residents and their families. Visitors will view an old hearth upon which the family cooked, the outdoor kitchen, the parlor, and bedrooms, complete with the antique “tub” used for bathing. They will also be able to see the clothes worn by the lady of the house, tools used to run the homestead, and other antique artifacts that belonged to those who once resided there. A walking tour of the grounds provides magnificent views of the

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Susquehanna and a centuries-old buttonwood tree. An old icehouse, a rare luxury built back in the 1780s, is also situated on the property, along with a centennial barn built in 1876, a springhouse built around the year 1800, and the tavern house, where overnight travelers sought rest. The self-guided grounds tour is free and the 45-minute mansion tour cost is minimal. “It makes for a nice little outing without having to spend a lot of money,” said Julia Hair, park manager. For more information, visit www. forthunter.org.

The Conestoga House and Gardens Conestoga House and Gardens is the estate of the late James Hale Steinman and Louise Tinsley Steinman of Lancaster. The Steinmans purchased the land, including the original house and several outbuildings, in 1927, and it was there they resided. Soon after purchasing the home, Lancaster architect Frank Everts was commissioned to design extensive additions and modifications, creating what has been described as an outstanding example of Colonial Revival architecture. The work was completed


travel ))) area mansions

The historic Italian villa-style stone Cameron/Masland Mansion, atop of South Mountain.

in 1929, and Conestoga House itself has remained essentially unchanged since then. Visitors who take the free tour will learn about owner James Hale Steinman, who, along with his brother John Frederick, transformed the Intelligencer Journal into a highly successful newspaper enterprise. James Steinman was a Yale graduate, a practicing attorney, a veteran, and an entrepreneur, with a keen interest in radio and television. By the 1930s, he and his brother owned nine AM stations in eastern Pennsylvania and Delaware. In 1949, the brothers founded WGAL-

TV as the 37th television station in the country. At the peak of their interest, the Steinman brothers owned six stations. The Steinmans were known for their bridge parties, tennis matches, and other outdoor entertainment in the gardens. Said one social columnist in 1946: “Everyone who visits the James Hale Steinmans in Lancaster hints like mad for a return invitation. The reason one casts the amenities to the wind and resorts to such out-and-out measures is the combination of beauty, comfort, and fun that Conestoga House offers to every one of its continuous stream of weekend visitors.”

After James Steinman’s death, the house and grounds were incorporated as part of the James Hale Steinman Conestoga House Foundation. During the summer season, guests can view the property from the gardens, where a plethora of attractive horticultural displays awaits. The extensive collection includes 3,300 annuals, 400 tropical plants, and 160 varieties of perennials. The fragrant rose garden is always a hit with visitors and contains approximately 160 bushes representing 20 varieties of rose. Guest taking the garden tour will view the verdant backyard, which spills

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over with flowers in hanging baskets, urns, tubs, and topiaries. They will view the pool complex where the Steinmans entertained, with its 60-foot swimming pool, bathhouse, and outdoor dance floor. A boxwood garden reveals a variety of unusual tropicals amidst the refreshing sight of a small fountain, and the water garden comes alive with hardy lilies, aquatic plants, and happy koi. For more information and hours, visit www.conestogahouse.org. Cameron/Masland Mansion At the end of a winding road through

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Kings Gap Environmental Education Center in Carlisle stands a stately structure built in 1908 to resemble an Italian villa. Commonly referred to as the Masland Mansion, the majestic dwelling was built by James McCormick Cameron from native Antietam quartzite quarried in the area. Materials used in the construction were intended to make it as fireproof as possible. The use of steel-reinforced concrete for the interior was said to be one of the first applications of its use in local construction. Cameron’s impressive ancestry includes a grandfather who served as Abraham Lincoln’s secretary of war and a father who served as Ulysses S. Grant’s secretary of war. During his life, Cameron was a successful businessman. His business dealings included the railroad industry; energy, storage, and steel companies; and tenant farms. After Cameron’s death in 1949, the Masland family, of carpet fame, stepped in and purchased the 32-room mansion. The Maslands refurbished the mansion, adding wallpaper, new furnishings, and, of course, carpet. The dwelling and its 1,430 acres were sold to the commonwealth in 1973 and became part of the Pennsylvania State Park system. Beginning in the summer of 2000, the mansion underwent a $1.6 million renovation project. The renovations included construction of a new addition that houses two first-floor, wheelchairaccessible bedrooms and a bath as well as a new larger dining room; a new enclosed fire escape; replacement

and upgrade of electrical, plumbing, and heating systems; and new paint, carpeting, and tile throughout. With the completion of the renovations, the mansion now has 38 rooms. In February 2011, the commonwealth purchased the 1,077 acres designated as the “Irishtown Gap Tract,” and it became part of Kings Gap. The property was originally part of the Cameron estate but was sold to the Ritter family in the early 1950s when the estate was broken into two tracts following Cameron’s death. This purchase essentially reassembles the original Cameron estate, and Kings Gap now totals 2,531 acres. The center grounds are open year round, seven days a week, from sunrise to sunset. Visitors are invited to take in the view from the mansion terrace and to explore the mansion garden and grounds. The public can tour the first floor of the mansion most Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. from Memorial Day weekend through October. The center offers a wide variety of educational and recreational programming year round and has more than 20 miles of hiking trails. Programs run by staff include hiking, camping, ecology, and historic interpretation. The Cameron-Masland Mansion and its surroundings offer sweeping views of mountains and the Cumberland Valley. The mansion is open from mid-April through mid-November with limited hours during the holiday season. For more information, visit www.friendsofkingsgap.org or www.dcnr. state.pa.us. )))


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feature

route 66:

the historic main street of america

Written by JOHN J. KERECZ

THE FIRST WEEK OF 1981, AT 20 YEARS OLD, I LOADED UP MY motorcycle and headed southwest. I left my home in Allentown, Pa., determined to get to Texas and pick up Route 66. Little did I know that almost 35 years later, at age 53, I would recreate part of that journey. But with only a week for vacation, I settled for just portions of the road and some of the more iconic stops in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. Route 66 was opened in 1926. Beginning in Chicago, it passed through the Midwest, Great Plains, and Southwest, traversing eight states and three time zones. Along the way, the route went through Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and ended at the Santa Monica pier in California, covering 2,448 miles. Route 66 developed into the symbol of America’s golden age of the road. Route 66 was the major corridor for those who migrated west. Businesses located along the route prospered as

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motorists flocked to the restaurants, motels, and service stations. Over time, Route 66 accumulated many nicknames, such as “The Main Street of America,” “The Mother Road,” and “The Will Rogers Highway.” A popular tune first recorded by the Nat King Cole Trio in 1946 and written by Bobby Troup, “Get Your Kicks on Route 66,” reflects the excitement and freedom of the highway as it details the many cities along the route. The song was inspired by Troup’s personal journey from Pennsylvania to Los Angeles, a trip much like the one I took when I was 20. The Interstate Highway Act, signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1956, led to the creation of newer highways, which, in turn, led to the demise of smaller, less direct routes like Route 66.

In 1985, The Mother Road was sadly decommissioned. Parts of the original route are still drivable, some are merged with the newer Interstate 40, and many of the original businesses along Route 66, steeped in history and nostalgia, still lure travelers in for a visit. For my adventure, my girlfriend and I flew into Dallas, Texas, and picked up our rented Electro Glide Harley. Our first stop was the art deco U-Drop Inn, which is listed in the National Register of Historic places. Located in Shamrock, Texas, the inn served as both a restaurant and gas station in the heyday of Route 66. The architecture is a bit unusual and was designed by J.C. Berry. Today, it has been historically renovated and adapted into a museum, visitors’ center, and gift shop. It also hosts the city’s


feature ))) route 66 feature ))) resume

Top: The Big Texan in Amarillo, Texas. Above: The Cadillac Ranch, just west of Amarillo.

chamber of commerce. In fact, a staff member of the chamber of commerce told me they get busloads of people on Route 66 tours. And it’s more than just an American thing, she said. They get many European tourists. Route 66 represents the freedom to get in the car and drive across America. No borders, no passports. Many Europeans grew up seeing Route 66 as the Freedom Highway in magazines and on TV, and they want to see it firsthand. Our next stop was The Big Texan in Amarillo, Texas. This “steak ranch” and motel proves everything’s bigger in Texas! It’s reminiscent of I-95’s

South of the Border attraction in South Carolina. At The Big Texan you can test your hunger with a 72-ounce steak. If you can finish the whole thing, it’s free. Think John Candy in The Great Outdoors. A little farther down the road is one of the most quirky collections on Route 66, the Cadillac Ranch. It’s just west of Amarillo and basically comprises 10 old junker Cadillac cars planted halfway into the ground, nose first. Visitors use the cars as graffiti canvases, so the names and pictures change constantly. The Blue Swallow Motel in Tucumcari was our first stop in New

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feature ))) route 66

Left: The Blue Swallow Motel in Tucumcari, N.M.

Mexico. Its sign is one of the famous retro, neon motel signs along the route. Each unit in the Blue Swallow features an attached garage. I found this unique not only because I never stayed at a hotel or motel with individual garages, but they also had murals of iconic scenes of Route 66 painted in them. Across the street is the Tee Pee Curios Shop, where it becomes obvious that in New Mexico almost every other person you meet is an artist. We had a nice chat with the owner/artist about his original merchandise before we continued west. With the signage throughout New Mexico, it was easy to know we were on the right track. At Albuquerque intersections there were “Historic Route 66” signs pointing the way from all four directions! In Holbrook, Ariz., not too far from the Grand Canyon, is one of the few remaining Wigwam Motels. This was a hotel chain set up in the ’30s, famous for its rooms that are shaped like teepees, not wigwams. Currently, there are only three Wigwam Motels left, another of which is also on Route 66 in Rialto, Calif.

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Above: Tee Pee Curios Shop in New Mexico. Right: Wigwam Motel, Holbrook, Ariz.


feature ))) route 66

Above: A real western train offering rides from Williams, Ariz., to the Grand Canyon. Below: Views from a helicopter ride over the Grand Canyon.

Staying here reminded me of Doctor Who’s TARDIS, compact on the outside and surprisingly larger on the inside. The whole experience made for a very pleasant stay. On the way to Flagstaff and Williams, Ariz., is the Jack Rabbit Trading Post. It’s really just a convenience store near Joseph City, Ariz., but it’s famous because of the frequent billboards advertising it along the route. The last is a big one saying, “HERE IT IS.” Anyone who’s traveled far enough on American roads knows billboard advertising is alive and well. Of course, most of the allure of

traveling Route 66 isn’t the memorabilia of the 1950s and ’60s; it’s the Western American landscape. Probably the most beautiful part of the road is in Arizona, where it passes near the Painted Desert, the Petrified Forest, and the Grand Canyon. Although we did not have time to stop at the Petrified Forest or at the meteor crater, there was a real western train ride that we took from Williams, Ariz., to the Grand Canyon. A helicopter tour of the Grand Canyon meant that we got to appreciate the beauty of not only the canyon, but also the Painted Desert in the distance.

Our trip ended by riding to Flagstaff, Ariz., to return the motorcycle and fly home. If you want adventure and a piece of American history, take a trip back through the past along The Main Street of America. Explore the iconic landmarks full of charm and character, a reminder of when small towns were in their heyday. Capture the feeling of freedom from the golden age of the road; let The Mother Road embrace you. Bobby Troup, the songwriter, said it best. “If you ever plan to motor west, travel my way, take the highway, that is best. Get your kicks on Route 66.” )))

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home practical and charming retreats YOUR CHILDREN HAVE FLOWN THE COOP, AND YOU NOW HAVE A couple of empty bedrooms. Perhaps you have begun thinking of all kinds of creative uses for the unoccupied space. Before you turn those spaces into sewing rooms, dens, libraries, or offices, consider this: Your children might not be out and on their own for long. If you have children headed to college, you’ll need to keep their bedrooms intact, of course. After a semester of unrelenting stress and anxiety, your scholars will need to decompress in the comfort of their old, familiar environs. Even after graduation, immediate job prospects with sufficient income may be scarce. That graduate may have to take a

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lower-paying position in a field other than what their degree is in, which means they may not be able to afford to be on their own while they’re waiting for a break in their situation. Moving back home is becoming a common scenario. This should be a temporary situation, however, and soon enough those young adults will be up and running with budding new careers, finding a place of their own, getting married, and having children. You’ll still want to have a comfortable

Written by MIKE CLARK

place for them when they visit for special occasions and holidays. But it doesn’t mean that you have to keep their bedroom a shrine to days gone by. Converting that room into a cozy guestroom is usually uncomplicated and relatively inexpensive. If you have grandchildren, you might want to plan for overnight visits from those little ones by dedicating a guestroom just for them. What’s better than having a large pancake breakfast ready as your grandchildren crawl out of


home ))) charming retreats

bed on a weekend morning? Out-of-town friends and relatives may be able to enjoy a longer visit if you have a cozy spare room they can settle into for an extra night or two. Your visitors will no longer have to rent hotel rooms and can enjoy a measure of your hospitality when they visit. To get a good idea about how to make a new guestroom warm, inviting, and comfortable, think about what would make you feel relaxed and welcome if you were visiting someone else’s home. Usually, simple and relatively inexpensive renovations to the old bedrooms are all that are necessary to convert these well-worn spaces into practical and charming retreats. Start your project by purging the available rooms of all obsolete décor. Changing colors of pink, lavender, blue, black, and any other wild shade that might have struck the fancy of the occupant growing up in that room will be your first move. This usually means walls will have to be cleared of any dog-eared posters, murals, old photographs, and any other

paraphernalia that has been left attached to the walls. Sometimes, those mementos are still meaningful to a departing child, and they might have to go along to their new digs. Lucky for you. If the walls are scarred with tack holes, picture hangers, or drywall dings, you’ll have to repair the damage with spackling and joint compound. These are usually easy fixes. Choose a professional-grade spackling compound that is non-shrinking and can be easily sanded to a smooth finish. A 2-inch putty knife is usually adequate for the application and leveling of the spackling compound. Larger holes might require small pieces of drywall scrap and joint compound. You’d be surprised by what damage you might find behind a child’s dresser or desk. These repairs require a bit more expertise. After you have sanded and smoothed the repairs, you’ll need to thoroughly clean those walls of all dust and residue. Also, it is a good idea to seal the spackled spots with a stain-killing primer to keep the repairs from showing through the top

coat of paint. Even though many modern paints now come with a primer already incorporated into the mix, it can’t hurt to dab a dedicated, tinted primer onto the spots. Check the door and window trim for cracks and splintering. Replacing the wood trim is generally not necessary. You can fill in the small cracks and gouges with a good-quality wood filler or putty. Again, be sure to sand the repairs smooth and clean the area before painting. It might be time to replace ill-fitting windows to cut down on drafts. This will, in the long run, save on heating and cooling costs. If budget constraints are an issue, get an expert to advise you on how to make your current windows more energy efficient. OK, the walls and woodwork are repaired and ready to paint. What colors will you choose? Those choices are limitless, to say the least, and will depend on what type of guestroom it will become. Will the décor be formal, or will it be more casual? The color scheme will depend on what effect you are trying to achieve.

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))) charming retreats

home

New and popular shades for 2016 are available at all paint stores. There is also a whole range of historic colors available, if that fits in better with the rest of your home décor. Matte or eggshell finishes are more washable than the flat finishes. For smooth application and good coverage, a 3/8-inch nap roller is a good choice. To complement your wall color, the woodwork in that room will look elegant in a satin-finish shade of white. That’s right, white comes in more shades than you would imagine.

Also, for cutting in straight edges on the woodwork, you’ll need a 2-inch angular paintbrush. You should also add a 2-inch straight brush for the flat surfaces. Let’s look at the floor in the new guestroom. Depending on when the carpet was laid, you might want to keep that carpet in place. Maybe all it needs is a thorough, professional cleaning. However, if the carpet has been down for more than 18 years, you might want to freshen and update the room with new carpeting. A solid, neutral

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shade of carpet will allow more options when choosing the paint color. There are numerous carpet stores and dealers in the area where you can learn about the different grades and quality of the carpet you need to complete your project. Instead of choosing colors to match existing carpeting, you can now paint the walls whatever colors you like, and then choose an area rug with designs and shades to match your walls. It will also give the room personality. If you have wooden floors, your color possibilities have widened. Wooden floors are very popular today and can be refinished if necessary. A combination ceiling fan/light and a couple of pieces of vintage furniture from an area consignment shop should complete the conversion from a child’s old bedroom to a comfy and relaxed guestroom. Not sure how to coordinate the bedding, furniture, drapes or curtains, and other room accessories? An interior decorator would be happy to help you. )))

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old wives’ tales about luck Bad luck comes in threes. Cross your fingers when you wish for something to happen. If you break a mirror, you’ll have seven years’ bad luck. It’s bad luck to walk under a ladder. The number 13 is unlucky. You’ll have bad luck if you put your shoes on the table. You’ll have bad luck if you open up an umbrella inside. You’ll have bad luck if a black cat crosses your path. You’ll have good luck when you find a four-leaf clover. You’ll have good luck if you find a horseshoe. A rabbit’s foot will bring you good luck. You’ll have good luck if you wear your clothes inside out. If you find a coin heads up, you’ll have good luck. It’s bad luck to give someone a purse as a gift without a coin in it. Wearing an opal will bring you bad luck if it is not your birthstone.

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ideal living

a home to fit the lifestyle

RETIREMENT ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE. FOR MANY BABY BOOMERS, the last thing they want to do is grow old on the couch with reruns of Jeopardy playing all day.

Written by REBECCA HANLON

things differently than their parents,” said Kristen Heisey, vice president of strategic development and marketing for Messiah Lifeways. “They want to be in control of things as they age and remain mobile. They want to stay active but without the maintenance demands that come with the home where they raised their kids.” The first cottage was built at Mount Joy Country Home, a Messiah Lifeways community, in Lancaster County in 1994. Today, the campus sits on a plot of 33 acres with 15 of those acres already

developed. New cottages will be added soon with plans for assisted living or personal care facilities to be built. The cottages at Mount Joy Country Homes are designed for the 55-andolder residents who want flexible living without the hassle of home ownership, Heisey said. Although a few cottages have basements, most of the campus is “step-free,” whether it’s from the garage into the house or the patio to the sidewalk. Electrical outlets also are built higher on the walls for easy access, and toilets

Today’s boomers are as diverse as their population. Instead of working around the clock, they downgrade to part-time jobs. Some fill their schedule with volunteering. Others are on the road at any given opportunity—traveling locally and abroad with newfound time. It comes as little surprise that baby boomers are ready to downsize on their living space to accommodate their new lifestyle, many looking for active communities that offer convenient, modern living. “A lot of baby boomers want to do

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ideal living ))) fit the lifestyle

Left and this page: Living is easy and comfortable at Mount Joy Country Homes, a Messiah Lifeways community.

are installed at a more comfortable height. These are options residents may not have given much thought to but will likely find convenient as they age in place. “We tried to develop products and services that allow our residents to age in place,” Heisey said. “There aren’t a lot of modifications that need to happen once they move in.” Many baby boomers don’t want to see shower grab bars because it reminds them of a nursing home, Heisey said, but those can be installed later if the resident decides he or she wants them. An on-site community center with one part-time and two full-time staff

members help a resident council fill the social calendar with seasonalrelated charity events, shuffleboard tournaments, and other activities. “It’s more of a small-town setting that allows residents to be as involved as they want,” Heisey said. Some residents are drawn to this type of independent living community because they offer little to no maintenance. That’s a big selling point for Brett Warren, project manager at Roth’s Farm Village, a 50-plus condo community in York County, who said the community is home to residents anywhere from 50 to 90 years old. Many active adult communities like

It comes as little surprise that baby boomers are ready to downsize on their living space to accommodate their new lifestyle.

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ideal living

Roth’s Farm Village has a floor plan to complement your lifestyle.

Roth’s Farm Village offer a couple of floor-plan options. So that residents have room for overnight guests, both floor plans feature two bedrooms and two bathrooms, but one condominium’s floor plan is slightly larger and includes a twocar garage.

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While many baby boomers are willing to downsize on space itself, they don’t want to give up modern amenities or conveniences, Warren said. Each resident has the opportunity to make their condo unique by choosing the flooring, paint, cabinetry, countertops, and other

finishes. The ranch-style condos also feature no steps, wider hallways, step-in showers, and lever faucets. Many people use the chance to pick the condo’s features as a way to upgrade, he said. Some residents pass on granite countertops and special flooring while


ideal living

They want to use their time to do other things.” For other baby boomers, apartment living is a convenient downsize option that can sometimes be a bit more affordable. Although Springetts Apartments and Powder Mill Apartments in York County and Manor House in Lancaster County are owned by The Manor Group, they don’t cater to the baby boomer population per se. However, many older residents have fallen in love with the quiet communities and easy living that an apartment can provide, said Melissa

Ohliger, director of marketing. The single-floor living plans offer laundry, storage space, private entrances, patios, and kitchen appliances. Each apartment also has shower grab bars for safety and a dining area to offer space for entertaining right in the home. Amenities vary by location but may include a technology class, an on-site fitness center, aerobics, a community pool, tennis and basketball courts, and a 1-mile walking loop in a parklike setting, Ohliger said. Springetts Apartments even has a dog park where

))) fit the lifestyle

raising a family, but they want to take advantage of those things when finances and fewer messy fingers allow for it. A homeowners’ association has an office in the campus community center where residents can use the common area for weekly prayer groups, bingo games, potluck dinners, pancake breakfasts, and summer picnics. “The low-maintenance, worry-free aspect is what we see draws a lot of people,” Warren said. “I get a lot of people who have an acre or two of property to maintain, and they just don’t want to keep up with it anymore.

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www.RothsFarmVillage.com spring 2016 | bmagazinePA.com „

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ideal living

The Manor Group has beautiful apartment complexes rich with amenities.

residents can allow their pet to play offleash while they enjoy time chatting with neighbors. Even though the complexes are quiet and set in wooded areas, they are close to highways, shopping, and restaurants for convenient social events. The property management group offers a shopping shuttle to visit area malls and grocery stores, as well as to take residents on scheduled lunch outings. Many residents enjoy the community center’s free fitness classes, themed

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dinners, summer cookouts, seasonal parties, and wine tastings. And a community garden allows residents to keep their green thumbs active. “A lot of baby boomers who come to our community have raised their children and are done taking care of the lawn and upkeep on the home,” Ohliger said. “This is still their home, but they don’t have to rake the leaves, shovel the snow, or mow the lawn.” Because it’s a fair housing community that features a mix of ages,

many residents find the complexes welcoming and convey a positive feeling where single people, young families, and retirees can all interact. “For many people, downsizing to an apartment lets them continue to save for the future when they plan to move on to [personal care],” Ohliger said. “Being around a wide range of families and age groups also helps them feel young. They aren’t in a retirement home yet; they’re just finding something that works for them now.” )))


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people stepping out in faith Written by LYNDA HUDZICK Photos courtesy of CURE International

IT’S NOT THE FIRST TIME IN HISTORY THAT A SHEPHERD HAS BEEN asked to do things he never imagined he would be asked to do. In Dale Brantner’s case, his varied experiences (which, yes, included some time working as a shepherd in Galilee) have led him to the position of president and CEO of CURE International—and all because each time he was asked to move on and do more, he relied on his faith and accepted the challenge. CURE International was founded by Dr. Scott Harrison, a successful orthopedic surgeon and international businessman. According to the CURE website, in 1986, Harrison was asked to perform spine surgery and teach highlevel orthopedic surgery skills to local medical practitioners in Malawi.

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In the years that followed, he and his wife returned to Malawi many times to help children with disabilities, but they were haunted by the overwhelming physical and spiritual needs of these children. The Harrisons wanted to help but had to wait until the time was right. That time came in 1996 when CURE International was founded with the goal to help and heal underserved children with physical disabilities. Two years later, the first CURE hospital was opened in Kenya. Over the following years, the organization grew successfully under the Harrisons’

leadership, opening new hospitals and establishing specialty programs. But in 2012, Harrison decided it was time to ask Brantner, who had been serving as senior vice president with CURE, to take over the position of CEO. Since that time, CURE has continued to grow and has taken advantage of new opportunities. CURE International now has a presence in 29 countries and has performed countless surgeries, serving some of the poorest people on the globe. “Although I’ve traveled and worked and studied all over the world, my roots are here where I grew up. I married my high school sweetheart, Dianne, and our


people ))) cure international

Dale Brantner, president and CEO of CURE International.

children graduated from the same high school my wife and I graduated from. I went to Messiah College, and I’ve pastored in this area,” Brantner said. “I still find it amazing that I now lead a globally known organization that is based from right here in Lemoyne, Pa.” Brantner, who said he always knew growing up that he wanted to reach out into the world, started out thinking he would do so through a military career. “But in high school, I had a religious conversion and thought about becoming a military chaplain,” Brantner said. “Instead [of going into the military] I felt a strong call to ministry, and I ended up enrolling at Messiah College.” He received his bachelor’s from Messiah and his master’s from the Evangelical School of Theology, and he has done both undergraduate and graduate work in Israel as well as Ph.D. work at the University of Pretoria in South Africa. Brantner served as department head of biblical studies, professor of

Old Testament and Hebrew, and then president of the Theological College of Zimbabwe from 1996 to 2002. His work has taken him to Israel and the West Bank, where he studied archaeology and ancient Near Eastern culture. Closer to home, he has also served as an associate pastor in Mechanicsburg and as an adjunct faculty member at Messiah College. “I’ve done and experienced so many things,” he said. “My wife and I have had front-row seats to national uprisings and observed a number of terrorist attacks. And I think all of those experiences helped prepare me for the work I’m doing now with CURE.” One of the major roles Brantner plays as CEO of CURE is as lead fundraiser for the organization, and he is grateful for the generosity of the American people. “I also travel a great deal, one to two countries a month,” he said. “I am so blessed that my wife and family are very supportive of my work.”

Although he frequently rubs elbows with celebrities and royalty, one of his favorite things is getting the chance to actually meet some of the many underserved children whose lives have been changed by the services CURE has provided. “These children don’t have access to simple surgeries, and so when CURE can provide that for them, it has such a positive impact on not only their lives, but also the communities they live in,” Brantner said. Brantner recalls an instance where he was visiting the Dominican Republic, taking some donors with him to see CURE in action. “We were out in the poorest part of Santo Domingo, and we were visiting a little boy whom CURE is doing multiple surgeries on, and I noticed this mother and young-adult son standing nearby,” remembered Brantner. The young man introduced himself as Andreas, a recipient of spinal surgery provided by CURE and done

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))) cure international

people

CURE Afghanistan

CURE Malawi

by Dr. Scott Nelson when he was just a young child. Had the surgery not taken place, Andreas would very likely have ended up paralyzed. “He told me that not a day goes by that he doesn’t thank God for CURE,” Brantner said. “He is now a

math teacher and helps others in his community. I was so excited about this story that I had to text Dr. Nelson and tell him.” It turned out that at the same time Brantner was texting him, Nelson had been lecturing to a group of students

and using that exact example as a case study. This is just one example, Brantner said, of many success stories for these children. “As a father myself, it’s so difficult to see how some of these children suffer,” Brantner said. “In the developing-world

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people ))) cure international

Spiritual director with a patient at CURE Zambia.

CURE goes in and sets up model hospitals, teaching hospitals, and we teach those in the indigenous population so they can, in turn, serve in their own communities.

countries, healthcare monies are often available only for immediate surgical needs, results of accidents and that kind of thing. There is rarely anything left over for curable disabilities children suffer from; it’s just not a priority. “CURE goes in and sets up model hospitals, teaching hospitals, and we teach those in the indigenous population so they can, in turn, serve in their own communities.” As a faith-based organization, founded on the biblical principles of discipleship and healing, Brantner emphasized that it is the goal of CURE to both “eliminate

a child’s suffering today and also to help heal relationships between God and mankind.” He is quick to emphasize that although his life has taken many twists and turns, he’s always relied on his faith when asked to take another step in an unknown direction, always believing that there a perfectly orchestrated plan for his life. “Now, as the CEO of CURE, I feel like everything I’ve done and been through over the years has led me to exactly where I am supposed to be,” he said. “I love what I do and hope I get to do it for the rest of my life.” )))

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veteran

Left: May today. Below: May, No. 63, as a member of the Quantico football team. These teammates were also from Pa.

from the football field to the field of battle Written by STEPHEN KOPFINGER

THERE’S AN OLD EXPRESSION: “ONCE A MARINE, ALWAYS A MARINE.” For Robert “Gump” May, that’s a credo that has guided him from the gridiron in Virginia to combat in Vietnam and back to the football field as head coach at Hershey High School for three-plus decades. “I’ll be 70 in November,” says May, who lives in Hummelstown, not far from The Milton Hershey School where he was raised from pre-school kindergarten to graduation. Currently, May says, “I don’t know what I want to do when I grow up.” May is joking, but he did plenty of growing up in Vietnam, where he was first assigned to Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, as a platoon commander in

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the United States Marine Corps. He entered the Officer Candidate School in Quantico, Va., in September 1968 and rounded out his schooling to become a Marine officer at the Reconnaissance Replacement School at Camp Pendleton in California. May was one of four men who made the school; one of his fellow Marines was future Marine Corps Combat Officer Joseph James Henry, a Seattle native who penned a 2009 autobiography titled Lieutenant Henry – Memoir of a Marine. In his writing, Henry, after musing over the fact that May beat him in the Marine physical fitness test, recalled “Gump” as possessing “a ‘fireplug’

body,” which meant short, big, but buff. Those types of physiques don’t lend themselves to endurance events very well. But May played football at West Chester University and played in the 1966 Tangerine Bowl. His personality was outgoing and extremely gung-ho. “He gave me the impression his shirt was mine if I needed it,” Henry wrote. Gung-ho was needed where May was going. Before long, May was in Vietnam, landing at Da Nang. There was serious duty ahead. Not far from Da Nang was a landscape of booby traps and the ever-present threat of the elusive Viet Cong. It didn’t faze May. This is a man who


veteran ))) from the football field

Left: Class at the basic school–ECHO Company. May is pictured fourth from right, front row.

Above: May, second from right, and fellow reconners. Left: May in the middle.

had to sign a waiver to get into service, as he had once cut off his big toe in a mowing accident while coaching football at University of Virginia. “If I professed to being a tough, hardnosed football coach, then I should do my duty for my country in the Marine Corps” and “I wanted to get into the bush,” May said of military duty. “That’s what you train for.” Then again, life was never soft for “Gump,” who nicknamed himself not for the Tom Hanks movie character Forrest Gump, but legendary New York Rangers goalie Gump Worsley. Gump spent kindergarten through grade 12 at Milton

Hershey School, originally founded as an all-boys’ orphanage. That’s where he came up with the “Gump” nickname. May played goalie for the school’s first hockey team, so the name fit. May put his school-forged sense of camaraderie to good use in Vietnam. “When you are out in the field … you deal with it,” May says pragmatically. “For me, it wasn’t traumatic. [You] accomplish the mission and bring as many men home as you can.” That wasn’t always easy, especially when it came to the terrain. “Our level was flat,” May recalls.

“It was open, but tree-lined.” May remembers “a lot of rice paddies and villages.” Those paddies could be places of sudden death or injury. May likened them to “human mine sweeps” when the men had to soldier through. He remembers one comrade who fell victim to a booby trap “when he didn’t pay attention and follow the man ahead of him while we were sweeping through rice paddies.” But in his recollections, May bounces back to his sense of humor. “My platoon was in the Da Nang garbage dump for two weeks!” he says.

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))) from the football field

veteran

Above: May, on left, with his first patrol. Right: Retirement party from the Marine Corps, 1971.

If I professed to being a tough, hardnosed football coach, then I should do my duty for my country in the Marine Corps.

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Another time, “we had to form a human bridge” to get across a stream that had turned into a river in the monsoon rains. There could always be a sniper waiting when his platoon was setting a perimeter in the sand dunes along a major highway. While May was doing isometric military presses, a sniper shot at him from a distant tree line. To show his disdain, May dropped down and finished with a bench press in the sand. Explaining the thoughts of his men, “The guys were scared to death of going up north, and all the guys up north were scared of going south,” May says with irony. In April 1970, May transferred to Alpha Company 1st Recon Battalion as a platoon commander. During his time with 1st Recon Battalion, he was awarded the Bronze Star, with Combat V. In service, May and his two patrol teams ran 17 long-range patrols. Those patrols dealt with everything

from calling airstrikes against the North Vietnamese and setting up ambushes to just keeping an eye on things. He left Vietnam in September 1970 and went directly to Quantico to play football for the Quantico Marines. After the 1970 football season, May served as 1st lieutenant, physical training officer at Officer Candidate School in Quantico, until his discharge in July 1971. Despite the tense times of the Vietnam War era, May does have a couple of happy memories. Before he shipped out, May and some buddies got to meet the famous dancer Blaze Starr, who was notorious for her affair with the governor of Louisiana, Earl Long. But May recalled Starr as the soul of graciousness. “She was a nice lady to the Marines,” May remembers, always willing to sign a photograph. Three-plus decades of coaching eventually followed—33 seasons at Hershey and, at one point, two years at Bishop McDevitt High School in Harrisburg. His football career could be


veteran

teach hard work and commitment will produce success.â&#x20AC;? Currently May is an assistant football coach at Palmyra Middle School. Of the nation he served, May sums up: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think our country is a great [and] good country.â&#x20AC;? He expresses admiration for the service men and women who volunteer to serve in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s global trouble spots, but adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We should have a draft. Everyone should do their share to help defend our freedom.â&#x20AC;? For inspiration, May cites a 1993 book titled When Heaven and Earth Changed Places by Le Ly Hayslip,

a Vietnamese woman who endured suffering in a village, which, as it turned out, was one of the places May served. The village was a hotbed of activity, between the South Vietnamese and the Viet Cong. But Hayslip prevailed, as a symbol of her often war-scarred country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These people are just fighters,â&#x20AC;? May says of the Vietnamese. Closer to home, May touches back to his upbringing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was raised in the Milton Hershey School where it was important to be a man; now I think it is most important to be a man of God.â&#x20AC;? )))

))) from the football ďŹ eld

bumpy at times. The people of Hershey were shocked when May stepped down in 2009, as noted in the Patriot News. Some felt Mayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coaching style was too in-your-face; others felt he was tough but fair. May doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind the conflicting opinions, remembering a quote from Winston Churchill: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If someone doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like you, you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stood for anything.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an outlook that guides May to this day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help your kids by making things easy,â&#x20AC;? May states. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I tried to

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feature

agent orange: what vietnam veterans can do to help future generations Written by REBECCA HANLON

NO ONE NOTICED IT AT FIRST. T TH THE E HERBICIDE USED TO CLEAR TRACTS of rainforest during the Vietnam War was given the name “Agent Orange” for the brightly colored stripes on the barrels. And while it did its job of killing vegetation, it also was doing something else in the DNA of men and women who served in the Armed Forces. While U.S. forces would withdraw in 1973, the Vietnam War didn’t end until 1975. But between 1962 and 1971, the United States sprayed approximately 20 million gallons of dioxin-contaminated herbicides over some 6 million acres of Vietnam, according to a report by the National Organization on Disability. All the while, veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange and other herbicides were slowly starting to experience their own changes. The Department of Veterans Affairs received its first reports of conditions related to Agent Orange in 1977. Since then, it has been a long road of determining how Agent Orange might have affected those exposed to its chemicals—even plaguing future generations—and how the government can now provide assistance. Vietnam Veterans of America, based in Silver Spring, Md., has been pushing legislation to help collect data from veterans and find ways to help the generations that continue to suffer from some of the effects, including spina

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bifida and an incomplete closing of a fetus’ spine, as well as issues related to learning, attention, and weak immune systems. For decades, Vietnam veterans were denied disability and health benefits for exposure to Agent Orange. It wasn’t until 1991 that certain illnesses were finally linked to the herbicide. But hope might finally be in sight. Last year, senators pushed for a bipartisan bill that would allow veterans who served in Vietnam and on the surrounding shoreline and have a disease associated with Agent Orange to receive health and disability benefits. Betty Mekdeci of Birth Defect Research For Children Inc. in Florida knows how hard of a struggle it has been to provide relief for Vietnam veterans. “It’s a shame that these veterans waited so long for someone to take notice,” Mekdeci said. “The research wasn’t there for such a long time, and it was like we were starting from scratch to get it.” Working with the Vietnam Veterans of

Above: Agent Orange cropdusting. Below: Agent Orange being sprayed from US C-123 planes.

America, Mekdeci was able to start a national birth defect registry to help determine how children and grandchildren of veterans were reacting to Agent Orange exposure. While spina bifida is the main defect seen in future generations of male veterans, there are 18 birth defects found in the children and grandchildren of female veterans, Mekdeci said. As the data rolled in, Mekdeci said, they expected to see cleft palate and spina bifida pop up in the listings. But it was the nonphysical defects—the pattern of children with learning, attention, and immune disabilities—that caught her attention.


air M Intr systemost adv o du a i cing n the innced M ic du s t r r oS oot y – he!

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According to the Department of Veterans “Doctors didn’t know what to do. Affairs, biological children of veterans Families were frustrated,” she said. “We exposed to Agent Orange may receive a needed to do more research.” Years later, Mekdeci has closely followed monthly monetary allowance based on their level of disability, as well as vocational legislators who debate the passing of bills training for job placement and healthcare that would bring benefits to veterans and benefits. their children. While Vietnam Veterans of America has “Agent Orange turned birth defect focused on the families of veterans, veterans research on its head,” she said. “We of more recent wars have reported similar thought of birth defects as structural heath issues in younger generations. With things—heart defects, cleft palate, missing limbs. But it isn’t just bones and organs that hopes of initiating research on all toxic exposures to those in the Armed Forces, form during pregnancy. It’s all the things the Vietnam Veterans of that make our bodies America’s Agent Orange/ function.” Dioxin Committee has But getting help for The more been hard at work veterans exposed to Agent time passes, the pushing new legislation. Orange is still a challenge. more time we’re The organization The official list of introduced identical diseases recognized as missing out on bills in both chambers related to Agent Orange opportunities of Congress, H.R. 1769 has grown slowly and to prevent and S.901—the Toxic sporadically, mostly more harm. Exposure Research Act because of underfunding of 2015. Both bills have and uneven research, Our veterans bipartisan sponsorship. according to the National deserve more The Toxic Exposure Organization on Disability. than that. Research Act of 2015 More than a decade directs the VA secretary after the war, the skin to select one VA Medical disease chloracne, which Center to serve as the national causes disfiguration, was center for the research and diagnosis the only illness officially associated with and treatment of health conditions of Agent Orange exposure. Others have been descendants of individuals exposed to toxic added, including chronic B-cell leukemia, substances during service, according to a Hodgkin’s disease, ischemic heart disease, news release. Parkinson’s disease, prostate cancer, “We needed this type of research done respiratory cancers, and several groups of years ago,” Mekdeci said. “It really can’t cancers found in soft tissue, such as muscle, wait any longer. The more time passes, fat, and blood. the more time we’re missing out on Today, 14 illnesses are recognized by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs as opportunities to prevent more harm. Our being a result of Agent Orange exposure. veterans deserve more than that.” )))

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people Beautifully designed window Lerew fabricated of Benjamin Franklin for the PA State Library.

an awe-inspiring masterpiece Written by LYNDA HUDZICK

THROUGHOUT HISTORY, THE TERM STAINED GLASS HAS BEEN USED almost exclusively when referring to windows of churches, mosques, and other significant buildings. More recently, however, the term has been used to include threedimensional structures and sculpture. Regardless of the physical nature of the piece, every stained-glass creation is unique, reflecting the personality of the artist who created it. Bryan “Buck” Lerew, owner of Cumberland Stained Glass in

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Cumberland County, has a great appreciation for fine craftsmanship in general, and that of stained glass in particular. “During my high school days I spent a lot of time in the shop building

furniture. That is when I knew I wanted to be a craftsman,” he said. Lerew took a job with Ernest Saltzer & Son out of Harrisburg and spent 14 years there learning the stained- and leaded-glass trade.


people ))) masterpiece

Below: Sheets of glass Lerew keeps in stock to accommodate the many colors used in his creations.

Above: The cut glass of St. Monica before fabrication. One of the 15 windows for St. Monica Catholic Church in Sunbury, Pa. Left: Full-size working design of St. Monica.

In 1992, he decided to establish his own company “to pursue my stained- and leaded-glass goals and endeavors.” Currently, Cumberland Stained Glass employs three full-time and two parttime skilled team members who assist Lerew in his work. “They all have been trained by me to perform their duties pertaining to all facets of the stained- and leaded-glass trade,” he said. “I have learned to treat my employees as if I were one of them.”

Stained-glass and leaded-glass work has always been hands-on, requiring those who work with it to be highly skilled. Evidence of stained-glass windows in churches and monasteries in Britain can be found dating back as early as the seventh century. Lerew believes that “from homes to businesses to churches, stained glass brings personality, intrigue, and a story to each building. As history shows, the gothic cathedrals and the stained-

glass windows that they contained were considered and referred to as the ‘Bible of the poor.’” Lerew explained that excerpts and stories from the Bible were depicted on the windows, giving the poor, many of whom could not read, a way of learning the scriptures and gaining personal meaning from them. Skilled at both restoration work and also the designing and creating of new pieces, Lerew said that these are two

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))) masterpiece

people

Left: Lerew soldering a window connecting all-lead came at intersections to make a complete matrix. Below: Lerew working on a sketch for another project in the works.

very different aspects of the craft. “Restoration work is very different from new work because you are going through the process of restoring and preserving the original historic window,” he said. “Our goal during the restoration process is to preserve the window as it was originally intended by the artist.” When asked to create a new piece, Lerew said the design process is determined by the client—sometimes they have a design idea in mind, and in other cases, Lerew and his team are given the opportunity to come up with a suggested design of their own. “We can then create a design from just about anything—photos, wallpaper, tile, or parts of other window designs,” he said. “The size and design determine the cost.” What was one of his favorite projects? “The complete restoration of the

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windows at the State Capitol and complete restoration and new wood frames for St. Paul’s UCC in Somerset, [Pa.]” Lerew said. And what was one of their more unusual projects? “The construction of a new dome frame and leaded-glass panels for a home,” he recalls. “The dome was 7 feet wide, 15 feet long, and arched 3 feet!” Lerew enjoys a variety to his days, but that variety keeps him very busy. From the initial contact with clients to bidding projects, from ordering materials to working in the field with his staff, it’s never a dull moment. “I enjoy meeting with customers in business clothes to review and plan their project, and then showing up in work clothes to work beside my employees to fulfill the client’s vision,” he said. Lerew wants to assure us that beauty

does still exist in the world, and one way to see it is through the craftsmanship and artistry of stained glass. As he so eloquently puts it on his blog, imagine walking down a street at night, distracted by worries, when you suddenly notice something that almost looks like neon, but is much more beautiful. “Because the moonlight is hitting it just right, it’s burning a hole in the fabric of the night. It’s glowing like a carnival, and suddenly you find all your bad feelings and anxieties are on the shelf. It’s a bit of a surprise; you can’t remember the last time good feelings swept you up like a broom. As you come closer you realize that it’s a church that you’ve been staring at and its stained-glass windows. It’s the first time you ever really noticed the aweinspiring beauty of stained glass. It’s a … masterpiece.” )))


caregiving should your aging parent come to live with you? IF YOU HAVE A PARENT WHO LIVES ALONE, YOU MAY BE CONCERNED about his or her physical or emotional well-being—or both. Especially if he or she (the latter will be used from here on) does not live close by or is clearly not managing well, you may wonder whether you should invite her to move in with you. Before making an offer, ask yourself the following questions and take time to honestly and thoroughly answer each one.

for such an arrangement to work. Would you still have enough time to devote to them?

Interpersonal issues. What kind of relationship do the two of you have? How do others in your household get along with your parent? Any personality clashes are sure to be magnified when you’re living under the same roof.

Lifestyle issues. If you’re employed, how might the primary caregiver role impact on your work? How would it affect your social life, vacation plans, and other pursuits? Decide what adjustments you’re prepared to make.

Your needs. Consider your physical and mental health. Would you be able to provide hands-on assistance if needed? Could you cope with the ongoing stress involved in primary caregiving?

Your parent’s needs. Determine what kind of practical assistance your parent requires at present and how much time it involves on a daily or weekly basis. Can she be left alone? If she’s been diagnosed with a chronic illness such as Alzheimer’s disease, how are her needs likely to change in the future?

Your family’s needs. What do others in your household—spouse and any children—think of your parent moving in? It’s crucial to have their support in order

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Available supports. If you have

Written by LISA M. PETSCHE

relatives in the area, what kind of regular support would they be able and willing to provide to help make this work? Perhaps they could accompany your parent to appointments, regularly have her over for dinner, or periodically take her into their home for the weekend. Many creative arrangements are possible whereby caregiving responsibility is shared among family members, at least to some degree. This helps to prevent caregiver burnout. What kinds of community support services are available in your area to assist you in meeting your parent’s needs, either now or in the future? Find out about accessible transportation services, seniors’ recreation centers, day programs, home healthcare services that offer nursing, homemaking and various


caregiving

Finances. Give thought to how household expenses would be shared. Find out, too, whether your parent has savings or insurance that would cover the cost of any needed medical equipment or healthcare services. If not, are you able to pay for them yourself? Home setup. Is there sufficient space in your home to meet everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs for privacy? Would your parent have separate quarters or would it be a communal living arrangement?

The decision. If, after careful thought, you conclude that moving your parent in with you is not feasible, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be swayed by guilt. Instead, help her develop a workable planâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whether it be arranging in-home services or finding another place to liveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and provide as much practical and emotional support as possible. If you decide to move your parent in, allow plenty of time for everyone involved to adjust to the inevitable changes in family dynamics and household routines. There are bound to be some difficulties, but these can usually be worked through if you are committed to making the arrangement work.

The rewards can be great: a closer relationship with your parent; a feeling of fulfillment that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing something worthwhile; the satisfaction of being able to give back to someone who has done much for you; and the peace of mind that comes from knowing your parent is well cared for. No matter how positive you feel about the long-term viability of your plan, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t promise your parent you will never pursue placement in a care facility, since you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what the future holds. Unexpected events can alter the best-made plans, so flexibility is key. )))

))) aging parents

types of therapy, and residential respite programs. If you live in a different town, how easy would it be to link your parent with needed medical supports, such as a new primary physician?

Consider, too, your homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accessibility. Would renovations need to be made, and if so, what is the estimated cost and who would pay it? Can you afford the renovations and/or are there programs within the community that can assist financially? Your parentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wishes and expectations. Would your parent want to move in with you? If so, can you anticipate her expectations in terms of privacy, financial arrangements, and practical help? Make them feel respected and welcomed. Give them â&#x20AC;&#x153;choresâ&#x20AC;? around that house that complement their level of mobility and acuity.

           

                                  !"  

Other options. Before making any decisions, explore alternatives: in-home services, adult day programs, live-in help, or an assisted living facility or nursing home. Determine whether any of these options are appropriate and affordable. Consider the least disruptive ones first.

spring 2016 | bmagazinePA.com Â&#x201E;

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caregiving

what to do when a loved one dies Written by JASON ALDERMAN

WHETHER IT’S EXPECTED OR ACCIDENTAL, THE DEATH OF A LOVED ONE can shake you to the core. The last thing you want is to have to interrupt grieving to deal with mundane tasks, but unfortunately there are many actions that must be done on behalf of the deceased. Some must be taken immediately, while with others you can take your time and reflect on the best path to follow. If the death occurs under hospital or hospice watch, they will notify the proper authorities and help you make arrangements with the coroner’s office for transport of the remains. If it happens at home, call local police or 911 for assistance. If he or she was an organ

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donor, you’ll need to act quickly. Reach out for help in making arrangements and locating key documents. Split up such tasks as contacting others who will want to know, taking care of pets, collecting mail, and safeguarding the deceased’s home if it’s now vacant. Look for a will or other document that spells out the deceased’s burial or cremation wishes—many people make funeral arrangements in advance, even paying ahead of time. The funeral home can guide you through the paperwork process, such as placing an obituary and

ordering death certificates. Hopefully, the deceased prepared a will that names an executor to oversee the disposition of his or her estate; otherwise, the court will have to appoint one. In sorting through their files, also look for: a trust; insurance policies; bank, credit card, mortgage, and loan accounts; safe-deposit box key; contact information for lawyer, doctor, accountant, or other professional advisors; and passwords to computer and other accounts. Within the first few days, start notifying organizations with which


caregiving

• Contact banks, credit unions, credit card issuers, and other lenders to close accounts—or, if you are a surviving spouse, to convert accounts to your name only. If they had a safe-deposit box and you don’t have the key, ask what documentation you need to gain access.

• Contact current or former employers for information about possible final wages, accrued vacation, retirement benefits, life insurance, or other death benefits. • Contact the Social Security Administration. If they were receiving Social Security benefits, you’ll need to stop payment right away. Funeral homes often do this, but be sure to ask. • Contact prescription coverage providers. Once you’ve notified Social Security, they will contact Medicare to cancel benefits. However, if they were enrolled in a Medicare Prescription or Advantage Plan or had a Medigap policy, contact each to cancel coverage. • Contact the Veterans Administration. Veterans, their immediate family members, and certain others may be entitled to burial at a national cemetery.

))) loved one dies

the deceased had business or financial arrangements. In most cases you’ll be required to submit a certified copy of the death certificate, so be sure to order ample copies. You’ll need to:

• Contact insurance companies to cancel auto and homeowner’s policies; however, consider keeping them activated until assets are sold, in case of theft or damage.

The last thing you want is to have to interrupt grieving to deal with mundane tasks.

• Close email accounts. • Cancel magazine subscriptions and utilities.

• Forward their mail to a secure address so you don’t miss important correspondence. • Cancel their driver’s license to avoid identity fraud.

Finally, the executor will have to deal with issues such as locating beneficiaries, distributing inherited property, filing final tax returns, and settling outstanding debts. You’d be wise to work with an attorney who specializes in probate issues. ))) ___________________________ Jason Alderman directs Visa’s financial education programs. To follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/

PracticalMoney

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view it online at onlinepub.com/cgs spring 2016 | bmagazinePA.com „

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nostalgia Syd Young (left) and Terry Sides (right) with two of their prized possessions.

’50s-era cars spark two local car enthusiasts’ interest THE ’50S ERA APPEALS TO PEOPLE IN A NUMBER OF WAYS. IT WAS THE time of Elvis, sock hops, drive-ins, and now-classic TV shows such as Leave It to Beaver.

Written by ROCHELLE A. SHENK

employee bulletin board. “I didn’t really need another car, but I bought it. I really like the limegreen color; it’s original to the car,” he explains. The two-door Studebaker is a smaller car, and its “smooth lines” appealed to Sides. He recalls seeing a similar Studebaker as he was growing up in Lititz. The owner had put mag wheels on it, and Sides says that it was odd to see a younger person own this type of vehicle. “It’s more of ‘your father’s car,’ and young guys usually went for Mustangs and other Muscle cars,” he chuckles. Sides says that he bought the car on a Monday night and then went to pick up his daughter from cheerleading practice.

As they walked toward the car, he played a bit of a prank on her. “She thought the car was really neat. I didn’t tell her it was my car, but told her that we should take it for a ride. She was really concerned, until I told her it was my car,” he recalls with a smile. Sides has always liked cars; his first car was a ’67 Mustang. “My dad didn’t like cars to sit in the yard with people working on them, so the Mustang was brand new. I loved that car. I learned about fixing cars by helping my friends work on their cars,” he said. Since Sides purchased the Studebaker, he’s put in a new engine, a Chevy 350 V-8, and had the transmission repaired and the interior redone.

Some of today’s iconic cars, like the Corvette and T-bird, were launched during the ’50s, and toward the end of the decade, “fins” were the big trend in cars. Two Lancaster County car guys show their love of the ’50s with their vehicles. Manheim-area resident Terry Sides purchased his ’59 Studebaker from Charlie Lehman, a co-worker at his former job at Alcoa. “[Charlie] drove it every day to work. I loved that car and told him I was interested in buying it if he ever wanted to sell it,” Sides says. He had the opportunity to do just that a year or so later when the notice that the car was for sale was posted on the

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nostalgia ))) ’50s-era cars

The dashes of Young’s 1955 Chevy 210 Del Ray (left) and Sides’1959 Studebaker (right).

“It had a Studebaker engine in it when I bought it, but that was not the original engine. Studebaker parts are getting harder to find, and when you do they’re a bit pricey,” he explains. “The interior is as close to the original as possible, but I haven’t replaced the headliner yet. A lot of people go to Florida in the winter, but I go to my garage and work on my car or other projects.” He and his friend, Syd Young, built the Chevy engine for the car—Sides is the machinist and Young is the mechanic. Over the years, Sides has taken the ’59 Studebaker to numerous car shows and car cruises. He’s scaled back in the past few years and now only takes it to about three car shows annually: LCBC’s show outside of Manheim, the Lititz Lions Club Car Cruise, and Cruisin’ the Square in Manheim.

“It’s a car that I do drive. I won’t trailer it to a show,” he says. Although he enjoys the Studebaker, it does not have creature comforts such as power steering and air conditioning. Young has a collector car (or six) of his own, including a ’77 Corvette and a ’55 Chevy 210 Del Ray. Like Sides’s Studebaker, it’s a two-door, but it’s a sport coupe. And, like Sides, he purchased it from somebody he worked with. Young explains that it was a family car of the guy he bought it from. It had been restored about 20 years before he purchased it, but it needed some work by the time he bought it in 1990. The front (hood, doors, front fenders, and quarter panels) were bare metal and the interior was ripped and torn and had to be redone. Even so, the car appealed to him. “The 1955 is one of the most sought-

after Chevys. It has a timeless body style, and 1955 was the first year for Chevy’s V-8 engine,” he explains. Young has worked on a lot of cars, including an MG that he just finished restoring. “Working on cars is what I like to do. I do most of the work myself, but I don’t have a spray booth, so I can’t paint,” he says. After he first purchased the ’55 Chevy, he repaired rust and then had it painted. The car was in his garage, and he would take individual pieces to a friend’s body shop to have them primered and then painted. “By doing it a bit at a time, the car wasn’t in the way at his body shop. I could prepare the pieces for painting and he could paint as I brought them to him,” Young explains.

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))) ’50s-era cars

nostalgia

Syd Young’s 1955 Chevy 210 Del Ray.

Terry Sides’ 1959 Studebaker.

After the Chevy was repainted, he tackled the interior, redoing the seats, carpet, headliner, and visors. The engine and transmission also received attention. The 265-cubic-inch V-8 engine and Powerglide transmission were replaced with a 406 V-8 and a Turbo 400 transmission—the larger motor bumped the horsepower from 162 to 400 and the transmission went from a two-speed to a three-speed. It still has drum brakes, but they’ve

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been rebuilt. Young is currently restoring the ’55 Chevy to its correct factory paint scheme: onyx black and Indian ivory. Young has been into cars for a number of years. He worked on his first motor as a teen; he fixed the flathead in the family’s lawnmower. His first car (at age 16) was a ’52 Plymouth; he rebuilt the motor and replaced the clutch. That was followed by a ’49 Plymouth convertible that he says was his first hot rod. The stock engine was a flathead 6,

but he put in a larger V-8 engine from a ’58 Chevy. “I had a lot of Plymouths over the years, but now I’m a Chevy man,” he proudly proclaims. All of his current classic cars are built for performance, and all of them are “drivers.” The variety in his garage also includes a ’70 Chevelle that is only used for racing and an ’88 Caprice that he and his wife have driven cross-country to explore Route 66. )))


  

   

   

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lifestyle

what’s your retirement car look like? Written by REBECCA HANLON

MAYBE IT’S THE ROAR OF THE ENGINE, THE SHEEN OF a new coat of paint, or the adventure that waits on the open road. Whatever the appeal, baby boomers aren’t ready to join the ranks of community transportation just yet. Instead, the boomer population is becoming the largest demographic to whip out their wallets and buy a new car.

The University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute reports that boomers age 55 to 65 are surpassing the 35- to 44-year-old age group, which previously held the title of most likely to buy a car. J.D. Power and AARP released a study several years ago when the trend was first noticed. The study showed that in 2001, only 39 percent of those 50 and older were contributing to the newcar market. By 2012, 62 percent of adults 50 and older were buying new cars. For many baby boomers, a new car is a chance ncee to hold on to youth and independence, said Pam Oakes, a member of the National Automotive Authority, an ASE Certified Technician and owner of Pam’s Motor City in Fort Myers, Fla. Oakes also wrote Car Care for the Clueless and has helped people of all ages find cars to fit their lifestyles. “A lot of baby boomers hold on to their cars for years, and when things just aren’t working as conveniently as they

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used to, they want to upgrade,” she said. Even though baby boomers have been investing in newer cars the past few years, some are overwhelmed by all the new gadgets found in many of these cars, Oakes said. “Many people want something that feels familiar and secure,” Oakes said. “They want seats that feel comfortable, they want their line of vision to be clear, and they don’t want to get overwhelmed by too many distractions.” Before a baby boomer hits the car lot, Oakes said, they should consider how they’ll use the car. Does a grandmother plan to keep her grandchildren for long weekends and might need extra space? Does a new retiree plan to go fishing, hunting, or on long drives? After they have decided how the car will be used, the car buyer should have five models that appeal to his or her eye. If it doesn’t look good, once a little rattle starts or a light flashes on the dash, the new owner will throw in the towel on the car, Oakes said.


lifestyle ))) retirement car

Another person who So, while looks aren’t just uses the car for everything, they’re a short trips and stays good place to start, she away from traffic won’t said. need it as often. An Next, the car buyers experienced mechanic should visit a rental can help the driver business and rent the car It’s the figure out their level of for the weekend, Oakes vehicle they’ll driving to go along with said. Drive it to the drive for years to the factory maintenance grocery store. Take it 30 schedule, she said. miles down the highway come, and they If a new-car owner and make sure the seats should make sure plans to do some feel comfortable. Some it’s everything maintenance on his or dealers even offer 24her own, it’s important hour “test drives.” they dreamed it to use the right kind of By the time the would be. oil in a new car, Oakes shopper has driven all said. five models, they’ll “The car has been naturally weed out what designed to run on they like and dislike, she a specific chemical said. balance of oil, and the When it’s time to same type needs to be used all the time,” she said. go to the dealership, Oakes recommends getting financing Some of the newer technology available in cars today will preapproved by an outside bank. Many banks have low interest become even more beneficial as boomers age. Vehicle-torates, and some people might find that insurance companies vehicle technology, seen in Honda, Ford, Toyota, and other finance at reasonable rates, as well. car manufacturers, means cars speak to one another through Baby boomers on a fixed income also might benefit from computer technology, allowing them to brake automatically. getting an insurance quote before purchasing the car to see if it will save them money or cost them more per month. For older drivers who may have a slower reaction time, Oakes If those steps are taken before the car buyer visits the lot, said, this new technology could allow them to drive longer. it cuts down on wasted time and gives the buyer more haggling But no matter what a baby boomer might be looking for power during price negotiations, she said. in a new car, Oakes suggests taking things slow. Keep in mind After a new car is purchased, Oakes suggests finding an that dealerships that try to rush a buyer into making a quick established garage and following the mandatory factory sale will still have the same car on the lot tomorrow, she said. maintenance that’s created by the engineers who designed the “Many baby boomers are looking to buy their retirement cars. Someone who drives during rush hour, lives in a warmer car,” Oakes said. “It’s the vehicle they’ll drive for years to climate, and goes more than 10 miles in one direction for work come, and they should make sure it’s everything they dreamed or errands might need more maintenance, she said. it would be.” )))

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James Joyce ))) Age: 62 ))) Resides in: Strasburg, Pa. ))) Born: In Philadelphia ))) Work: Sales management background, now semi-retired ))) Hobbies: Umpiring youth baseball, gardening, crosswords, following the Phillies and Eagles

Jim Joyce, 1953, 5 months.

WHEN YOU WERE A KID, WHAT DID YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU GREW UP? A major league baseball player. More precisely, a Philadelphia Phillie. When I was a bit older, being a veterinarian seemed interesting. In high school I decided that being a history teacher was my path. I was a substitute teacher for one year, and then decided to take another career path into sales. WHAT WAS THE FUNNIEST THING YOU AND A CHILDHOOD FRIEND EVER DID? When I was around 6, my friend Kenny Friedman and I dropped water balloons out the second-story window on my father. Our laughter was short lived. WHERE WAS THE BEST VACATION SPOT YOU REMEMBER GOING TO AS A KID? Without question, a lakehouse at Sailor’s Lake in the Pocono Mountains. All of my great-aunts, uncles, and grandparents were there. The cottage accommodated up to 20 people. All day we would swim and play ball and at night my grandfather would take me out with the flashlight for his idea of the “bear hunt.”

) ))

1962.

WHAT IS YOUR FONDEST MEMORY FROM ELEMENTARY SCHOOL? Playing outside all day. In Philadelphia, there were always 20 kids outside at all times. We just had the best time being kids. WHAT DID YOU DO ON A HOT SUMMER DAY? Play baseball, ride bikes, run through an open fire hydrant. We would wait every afternoon for the ice truck to make their delivery to Cy’s drugstore. The driver would always give the kids a chunk of ice to chew on. We were outside from early morning until sunset. WHAT WAS YOUR MOST SPECIAL HOLIDAY TRADITION AS A CHILD? DID YOU CARRY THAT ON WITH YOUR FAMILY? On Christmas Eve, we would get the tree in the stand and string the lights. The ornaments and Christmas yard under the tree, which included Lionel trains, were finished by Santa. It made for a more magical Christmas morning. We did not continue that tradition as getting to bed at 3 a.m. was not too appealing.

Above: Jim playing policeman, 1956. Right: Jim and Lisa at their 1977 wedding.

Jim (right) and his father, December 2004, at his daughter’s college graduation dinner, West Chester, Pa.

Read more of James Joyce’s story online at www.bmagazinepa.com/goodvibrations.

What memories would you share? To be considered for a future good vibrations column, please visit www.bmagazinepa.com


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b magazine Spring 2016  
b magazine Spring 2016  

Cover story Felix Cavalier from the Rascals discusses his 50 years in the music biz. PLUS travel down historic Route 66, how to make your re...