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Happily Retiring as a Couple BOOMERS & Retirement Living

Reaching baby boomers 1946 – 1964


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Mark your calendar now and plan to join us for the spring 2015 women’s expos. Come with your mom or daughter or grab a friend and experience a relaxing day designed just for you! Chat with exhibitors who offer products or services that touch just about every facet of a woman’s life, including:

Health & Wellness • Finance • Fashion • Nutrition • Beauty • Home Plus Demonstrations • Shopping • Free Spa Treatments ... An all-around fun day out for women of all ages!

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Copyright © 2015 On-Line Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. b magazine is published quarterly. Single copy price $2.95. Four-issue subscriptions are $6.00. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial or graphic content in any manner is strictly prohibited. Views expressed in opinion stories, contributions, articles and letters are not necessarily the views of the Publisher. The appearance of advertisements for products or services does not constitute an endorsement of the particular product or service. The Publisher will not be responsible for mistakes in advertisements unless notified within five days of publication. On-Line Publishers, Inc. reserves the right to revise or reject any and all advertising.

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from the editor ... This issue brought back a lot of good memories. Although music was an integral part of most baby boomers’ lives, I never really listened to a lot of it growing up. Don’t get me wrong. I had four brothers and a sister who loved music, and they each had their favorite groups, so I heard a lot. I just didn’t buy records or 8-tracks myself. I must admit, though, The 5th Dimension sang some of the few songs that I actually bought vinyls of and played. They had “Up Up and Away” and “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In,” which, to me, were carefree songs. They also produced another song that was widely popular, “One Less Bell to Answer,” that was so sad but probably resonated with many girls because it’s how they felt after the breakup from the “love of their lives.” Ironically, the vinyl records we grew up with, which fell out of favor for newer technology, have made a comeback. No, vinyl record sales are never going to outsell newer sources for music, but sales were up more than 30 percent in recent years. And it’s not all reprints; some new artists are printing on vinyl. I guess people buy vinyls for more than just music; they buy it for the emotional experience too. I’ll bet you know a lot of interesting people. I hope you will let me know about them so he or she can be considered for a future issue of b magazine (crupp@onlinepub.com). There are quite a few of your friends and neighbors featured in this issue. You’ll meet a very creative entrepreneur, several men and women who have fulfilled their inner purpose through volunteerism, a family who travels by rail, a boomer who has flown to the edge of space, a Vietnam veteran, and our Good Vibrations boomer. Spring is the time for home fixups. Check out the amazing kitchen remodel inside. A contractor took a cookie-cutter kitchen and made it a warm, comfortable place to cook and

entertain. If you’re like my family, you often end up gathering in the kitchen, so it’s important that it has a pleasant ambiance. There are many more articles to peruse and learn from. Read at your leisure and enjoy!

Vice president and managing editor

bmagazinepa

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ENGAGE AS YOU AGE Retirement is a turning point. Like everything else in life, being prepared for the transition and changes that follow retirement will help you and your spouse to happily retire as a couple. The better equipped you are for retirement — which can be onethird to one-fourth of your life — the easier it will be to enjoy those subsequent years.

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VOLUNTEERING Many baby boomers are finding satisfaction through volunteerism. And there is no shortage of organizations that can use the assistance of volunteers, including the parks in Pennsylvania. Meet some local men and women who donate their time and talents for the betterment of our communities.

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GIFTING INTER VIVOS First, you may be asking what “inter vivos” is. It is the gifting of assets during one’s lifetime. If proper planning is not done to determine the amount of assets gifted inter vivos in addition to the property that will be transferred at the time of death, there could be tax implications. As with any type of estate planning, it is always wise to consult with an estate planning attorney.

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24 cover story 6 FLORENCE LARUE

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Florence LaRue had not set out to be the lead female vocalist of the popular musical group The 5th Dimension. What she intended to be was a movie star, but fate stepped in. LaRue entered the Miss Bronze California contest and won. She was presented the award by Eartha Kitt and up, up, and away went her musical career.


caregiving 50

CAREGIVING TODAY A look at the caregiver and care recipient.

general 72

GOOD VIBRATIONS Meet a fellow boomer.

health 14

BOOMERS IN THE OUTDOORS It never gets old.

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SHOP FOR A HEALTHY HEART Labeling can lead to better choices.

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VISUAL LIMITATIONS Risks increase with age.

home 30

THE SECOND TIME AROUND Creating a user-friendly kitchen.

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ideal living 52

RETIREMENT LIVING Greater and more modern options than ever before.

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SAFE AT HOME Aging in place.

nostalgia 45

10 BABY BOOMER INVENTIONS They rocked the world.

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VINYLS MAKE A RESURGENCE After almost disappearing, they’ve made a comeback.

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REMEMBERING THE MILKMAN The end of an era.

people 18

NATURAL INSPIRATION

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Local boomer’s art is influenced by nature.

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PEEKING OVER THE EDGE OF THE COSMOS One boomer’s journey to the edge of space.

travel 38

RIDING THE RAILS A great way to reach a travel destination.

veteran 62

DUTY, DISCIPLINE, AND DOUBTS The conflicting feelings of a Vietnam veteran.

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florence larue and the dimensions of her life Written by BARBARA TRAININ BLANK

“UP UP AND AWAY,” THE SIGNATURE SONG OF The 5th Dimension, also captures the unexpected singing career of Florence LaRue, its lead female vocalist and the only original member to continue through the group’s nearly 50-year history. With its un-Motown sound and hits such as “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In” (from Hair), “Go Where You Wanna Go,” and Burt Bacharach’s “One Less Bell to Answer,” The 5th Dimension became one of the most popular singing groups of the 1960s and ’70s, winning 14 Gold records and six Grammys. Yet, LaRue, a native of Plainfield, N.J., who grew up in Glenside, Pa., and now lives in California, didn’t think the group she joined in 1965 would go anywhere. “We were just five R&B and gospel singers with five different voices, who could do all kinds of pop,” she recalled. Back then, LaRue’s goal was to become a movie star—something the beautiful, youthful 70-year-old still hopes for. Her encouraging mother gave the

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cover story ) ) ) florence larue

young LaRue ballet and violin lessons. She participated in the school choir but didn’t take voice lessons until years later. The eldest of four daughters, LaRue obtained an associate art degree at Los Angeles City College and a B.A. in elementary education from Cal State. Her career took an unexpected turn when Lamonte McLemore, who was photographing a beauty contest she had entered, asked her to join his recently formed singing group. LaRue declined but changed her mind later. Incidentally, she won the Miss Grand Talent division of that contest, Miss Bronze California, singing “April in Paris” in French. One of the judges was celebrated performer Eartha Kitt, who declared her a winner. “I very much owe my career to her,” LaRue said. Though The 5th Dimension was criticized for not sounding “black enough,” for LaRue and the other members—Billy Davis Jr., Marilyn McCoo, Ron Towson, and McLemore—it represented good, clean harmonies and a fun, quality show. After 10 years, the group ran into a rough spot and stopped producing hits. Rather than disband, the remaining original members, with the assistance of their conductor, held auditions and hired

Above, middle row, second from left: Florence LaRue with her field hockey team. Right: Ronald Townson, Carol Burnett, and Florence.

other singers. LaRue, in her words, “had a lot to say” about the choices. “This happened several times, because people left for different reasons,” she explained. “In retrospect, I think it would have been better to pause to regroup—which would have given us more time to rehearse between performances—but we had many bookings [set up in advance] and wanted to honor them.” LaRue is in her jubilee year with the group, which now consists of Willie Williams, Patrice Morris, Leonard Tucker, and Floyd Smith. “We remained true to The 5th Dimension,” she said. “People expect to hear the hits and the same arrangements. “But I’m not tired of the songs,” she added. “I sing some of them in my own shows, but allow jazz and other songs too.” Ruth Antrich, reviewing LaRue’s first solo show in New York City, wrote that

the singer’s “gracious manner and homespun banter is both sincere and charming.” She added that LaRue’s voice “sounds exactly the same as it did on her original hits,” even if her range may have expanded a little, “especially in the low register.” LaRue is actually a contralto, with a three-octave range. Because so many of The 5th Dimension’s songs were written in a higher register, she sang higher to accommodate them. “My voice is so low I sing tenor in my church choir, and when people call me first thing in the morning,” she joked, “they say, ‘Mr. LaRue?’” Singing solo, she does both cabarets and a one-woman show, “Just as I Am,” which incorporates her life story. Looking back, one of the highlights of her singing career occurred when the original 5th Dimension performed at the Americana Hotel in New York City. After three months on the road, they were very tired, but when LaRue sang

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LaRue with her son.

LaRue with Oprah Winfrey.

LaRue with Frank Sinatra.

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“How Insensitive,” a gentleman approached to congratulate her performance. “That’s how I met Frank Sinatra,” LaRue said, relishing the surprise element. “I told him, ‘Oh, my mother should be here.’” Years later, The 5th Dimension helped raise money for one of Ol’ Blue Eyes’ charitable causes, a benefit for St. John’s Hospital. Sinatra thanked them for the “donation of your marvelous talent … you were wonderful!” LaRue also embraced the cause of abused children as a charitable effort for the singing group. “Anything involving children has always been of special concern to me,” she said. Among the organizations she has supported are the Children’s Village in Southern California, a resident facility for abused children that attempts, when possible, to reunite families. In 1986, the singer was named Woman of the Year by the City of Hope, a leading research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes, and other lifethreatening diseases. A research fellowship was established in her name for the study and treatment of gynecological cancer. LaRue helped to solicit donors for the fellowship. Community service is an increasing part of LaRue’s life. She volunteers primarily for the Anne Douglas Center, named for the wife of actor Kirk Douglas. Women come to the doors of the shelter with shattered lives—filled with incidents of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and often suicidal and alone—and looking for change. It’s a place where women who have had these


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experiences are welcomed and offered the chance to transform their lives and regain their dignity. “It’s a most wonderful organization,” LaRue said. “The women are taught job skills and may be reunited with their families.” As a member of the center’s celebrity council, the singer often does charity fundraising events. She also works on behalf of Homeless Ministry at her church, which serves hot meals and distributes clothing and other help to those who are down and out. LaRue retains her dreams. She still hopes to be seen on the big screen and would love to do more musical theater. She has been on TV’s Divorce Court and in Happy, a CBS Movie of the Week with Dom DeLuise. She co-hosted the Arthritis Telethon with Jane Wyman, judged two segments of Puttin’ on the Hits, appeared as a celebrity guest on Star Search, and made TV appearances on The Dale Evans Show, the Today show, The Carol Lawrence Show, and other programs. LaRue was in the national tour of the Tony Award-winning musical Ain’t Misbehavin’ and in the Toronto production of Mo MAGIC.

We were just five R&B and gospel singers with five different voices, who could do all kinds of pop.

But music remains a central focus. She has also written songs and is recording a solo CD. In 2012, The 5th Dimension put together a new album— its first in eight years. Another hat she hopes to wear is that of author. She has been working on a book with the working title of PMS: Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Health. “If you take care of yourself, age is just a number,” LaRue said. Now single, La Rue misses the married life—she was once wed to 5th Dimension manager Marc Gordon. Her son, his wife, and three children live in another state, and she is even, regretfully, pet-free for now. Although she dates, LaRue finds that men tend to run away when she speaks about celibacy before marriage. One man called her a “dinosaur.” But the singer hasn’t lost the hope that some male equivalent might come along. Sometimes life comes full circle.

LaRue serves as a celebrity judge for the Miss Universe Pageant. And the American Society of Jewelry Executives named her one of the 10 most beautiful women in the world—alongside Sophia Loren and Lena Horne. Other interests include cooking; music of various styles, especially country, gospel, classical, and jazz; reading, particularly inspirational books and biographies of show-business personalities; charity work; and her growing speaking career—about such topics as success, beauty, and relationships. LaRue describes herself as “the sensitive dimension,” caring about what she does, simultaneously fun loving, deep thinking, and hardworking. At the same time, she insists singing really isn’t “work” for her. She loves being in front of an audience, presenting entertainment that appeals to people of different races and ages. ) ) )

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engage as you age: tips to happily retiring as a couple Written by MARIAN SPENCER

THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT milestones in life. From education and marriage to career choice, each milestone is approached with preparation. After all, you wouldn’t want to jump into a new job without learning about it first. The same principle applies to retirement. This turning point in your life and the life of your spouse is supposed to be enjoyed! Dr. Sara Yogev, clinical psychologist, shares a few steps in preparing for the transitions and changes that follow retirement. Beyond the Retirement Fund In contrast to the intense and extensive financial planning for retirement, people regularly neglect psychological planning and don’t prepare for the emotional aspects of retirement. People often mistakenly assume that if they have enough money, and since they know how to enjoy leisure, everything will fall into place. Since retirement can involve one-third to one-fourth of your life, it can’t be viewed as an extended vacation. People start feeling bored, restless, and at times even depressed. This is where the first misconceptions begin. Indeed, what we know from research is that one-third of retirees get depressed in the first two years of retirement. A more recent study showed that there is an increased level of problematic

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Avoid these Common Retirement Mistakes Retirement is a process that has a few stages; the early stage is what Yogev calls the “Honeymoon Phase” in chapter one of her book, A Couple’s Guide to Happy Retirement. People feel like they can do whatever they want, when they want to, and fulfill their dreams. If they have travel plans or projects—cleaning the attic or fixing up the basement—this is their chance. This stage can last anywhere from six months to two years. When that stage is over, people get into the “Disenchantment Stage.” They feel lost, confused, without purpose. This can lead to depression. Here they need to figure out what they’re going to do with the rest of their lives. This is the stage in which retirement becomes difficult for individuals, as they need to move into the next stage of reorientation and readjustment. On the couples level is where the second misconception lies; people are often unaware that, much like the birth of a first child, retirement changes the dynamic of their marriage. Among couples 65 years and older, the divorce rate had swelled from one in 10 in 1990 to one in four in 2004—an increase known as the “gray divorce phenomenon.” Another study showed that divorce rates among couples 65 years and older rose from 6.7 percent in 2000 to 9.7 percent in 2009. Interestingly, the

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drinking after retirement for both men and women.

women initiated most of these divorces. How can we avoid those pitfalls? On an individual level, retirees must find new ways to feel productive and engaged. We need to engage as we age. Think about activities that you do and that you really enjoy, activities in which you don’t realize how fast time is flying by (also called being in a state of flow). Many people start volunteering for a cause they care about. Others find some kind of passion, something that they really like doing. By finding a way to feel productive and engaged, you shorten or even completely avoid the difficult “Disenchantment Stage” and move quickly to the “Reorientation Stage.” Staying Happy as a Retired Couple In all marriages, even long-term ones, and whether it’s the first, second, or third, couples need to be ready and willing to renegotiate a lot of issues. For instance, time together and apart. Among many couples, men usually work longer hours. Very often, women adjust to their husband’s schedules. If they’re both retired, it can be difficult because she would like to continue with her own activities. Often times, women will feel guilty about leaving their spouses alone, feeling compelled to go with him to the hardware store—which she may have no interest in. Giving

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each other space to do activities apart as well as together is very, very important. Another cause of friction is the division of housework. For example, the husband may decide that he wants to pick up cooking. If the woman feels like the man is encroaching on her domain, she won’t like it. He may think he’s only trying to help and find a new way to feel useful and productive, but she might not see it that way. On top of this, he may leave messes that may cause stress for his wife. This situation can also go the other way



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around. The husband may feel emasculated by doing chores around the house when she insists on his increased participation. These small details can cause power struggles and discontentedness. Communicating will help eliminate the tension. Both husband and wife are learning and developing new roles in the home, so both need to enter with an open mind and a willingness to adjust. The issue of children and grandchildren, specifically how much time to spend with them, is another domain that can be problematic. One may feel that this is their chance

to help their adult sons and daughters or to spend more time with their grandchildren. The other may feel like this is the time for themselves or that the time has to be divided fairly among all of their children. For example, Yogev saw in her psychotherapy practice a husband who wanted to show support to a particular grandchild, a gifted basketball player, by attending all his games and practices. His wife preferred that they spend more time together as a couple or at least with other grandchildren. Talking about what’s important for both spouses and as much as possible


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Mastering Your Money The issue of money is important. In Yogev’s book, she talks about the importance of understanding the psychology of money and how it changes for people in retirement. People have different values about money. In addition, there are four different styles of money handling that she classifies, including the common two: spenders and savers. Spenders really enjoy spending. For them, money means freedom and fun. Then there are savers, for whom money means security and safety. They enjoy watching their portfolio grow and having the peace of mind that they have enough. In retirement, these mindset styles sometimes intensify. A spender may suddenly say, “This is my last opportunity to enjoy life, so I really want to go full throttle—first class all the way!” This can create a lot of fear and anxiety for the other spouse. The saver, in this instance, may be appropriately anxious. Have a conversation about how you’re going to handle your money and don’t go the wrong way. You can resolve differences. On the other hand, sometimes one’s money style changes in retirement—the saver becomes a spender or vice versa, which again can cause the need for readjustment by having conversations

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finding a way so that each can have their way while taking into consideration the other spouse’s point of view is crucial if they want to avoid a power struggle and lower marital satisfaction.

and coming to a new understanding. Whether it’s your retirement or your spouse’s, the time to prepare is now! Take the time to learn about all the different aspects of your new life together, so you can enjoy it. For more information on her book, A Couple’s Guide to Happy Retirement, visit www.familius.com. ) ) ) Dr. Sara Yogev is a clinical psychologist in the Chicagoland area and author of A Couple’s Guide to Happy Retirement. For more than 30 years she has provided individual psychotherapy for adults struggling with depression, anxiety, stress, low self-esteem, and work-family balance as well as marital psychotherapy for couples. Yogev helps couples resolve common problems and offers coaching and supervision to other therapists. www.sarayogev.com

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health

boomers in the outdoors … it never gets old! PENNSYLVANIA P PARKS ARKS A AND ND F FORESTS ORESTS F FOUNDATION OUNDATION Written ittenn by PENNSYLVANIA

HAS THIS HAPPENED TO YOU? Or is this you? Well, it can be you … Two hikers are halving the distance behind you on the trail. As they prepare to pass you by with a cheerful greeting of “On your left! Gorgeous day, isn’t it?” you glance their way and immediately notice the heavily muscled calves, sprightly pace, and … what’s this now? Loads of smile lines and graying hair? As it turns out, they are spending a morning doing what we all aspire to— enjoying a healthy retirement. Even after a grueling hike or hours of biking on a trail, active baby boomers will tell you that physical exertion is not work. Enjoying the outdoors is what they worked for. One of the most famous hikers of all

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time was Emma Gatewood, an Ohio farmwoman who went by the trail name “Grandma Gatewood.” She hiked the Appalachian Trail in 1955 at the age of 67, wearing Keds sneakers and carrying an army blanket, a raincoat, and a plastic shower curtain in a homemade bag slung over one shoulder. She became a familiar picture to Americans through articles in newspapers, a profile in Sports Illustrated, and an appearance on the Today show. In addition to completing the Appalachian Trail, she took a 2,000-mile walk (averaging 22 miles a day) following the route of the Oregon Trail from Independence, Mo., to Portland, Ore.

Of course, most of us can’t chart a course based on the accomplishments of Emma Gatewood, any more than we could swim from Cuba to Florida like 63-year-old Diana Nyad or peak Mt. Everest like 80-year-old Yuichiro Miura. What we can do is continue to look forward to the chance to get outside, breathe some fresh air, and explore the beautiful state parks and forests in our own backyard. Boomers Lead the Way The old cliché of being sedentary after 50 has been changed by a more modern trend reflecting the goaloriented baby boomers entering their


health ) ) ) boomers outdoors

Photo by Joe De Marco

retirement years with a renewed appreciation for fitness. Geriatric physicians are adamant in their message: Humans are not designed to sit. Your body is designed to move, to be walking and running throughout your life. You can make profound changes for your health no matter what your age. Many boomer athletes launch into fitness only in midlife, prodded by doctors telling them they need to shape up, lose weight, and get their cholesterol under control. Researchers know that when older adults do even light amounts of exercise — walking, strength training, and working on their balance and flexibility — the result is that they take fewer medications and go to the doctor less often. They’re less likely to fall. They are hospitalized less often and recover more quickly from injury and illness.

Take It Outside The New York Times published an interesting feature stating that emerging science suggests there are benefits to exercising outdoors that can’t be replicated on a treadmill, a recumbent bicycle, or a track. In studies comparing the exertion of running on a treadmill and the exertion of running outside, treadmill runners expended less energy to cover the same distance as those striding across the ground outside, primarily because indoor exercisers face no wind resistance or changes in terrain, no matter how subtle. A study last year of older adults found that those who exercised outside exercised longer and more often than those working out indoors. The science and the survey showed that volunteers who exercised outside, usually by walking, were significantly more physically active than those who exercised indoors, completing, on

average, about 30 minutes more exercise each week than those who walked or otherwise exercised indoors. Studies haven’t yet established why, physiologically, exercising outside might improve dispositions. A few small studies have found that people have lower blood levels of cortisol, a hormone related to stress, after exerting themselves outside as compared with inside. There’s speculation, too, that exposure to direct sunlight, known to affect mood, plays a role. But the takeaway seems to be that moving their routines outside could help reluctant or inconsistent exercisers. “If outdoor activity encourages more activity, then it is a good thing,” says Jacqueline Kerr, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, who led the study of older adults. While gyms have a role in our fitness regime, a mixture of indoor and

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Photo by Dot Monah

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Volunteer services are an integral part of state parks and forests.

outdoor exercise is ideal. It’s simple math: A little outdoor exercise equals a lot of benefit for boomer health. How to Get Out There Walking and hiking are obvious activities for getting out there. Pick your location and put one foot in front of the other. In addition, other exercise and recreational opportunities are available in many of Pennsylvania’s state parks and forests. We have some ideas for ways to choose and plan an activity or how to locate groups to educate you on the best ways to enjoy that activity at your current fitness level. Before we get to specifics, you shouldn’t overlook the best way to engage in the outdoors: become a volunteer at one of the Foundation’s Friends groups at a state park or forest closest to you. The Foundation’s Friends groups offer a wide variety of opportunities to put your own special skills to work, explore new activities, and meet new people. You can help with trail building

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or just offer to show up for what needs to be done. Pennsylvania’s state parks and forests have a role for you. To learn more, go www.paparksandforests.org and click on “What is a Friends group?” to find inspiration from the efforts of your neighbors. Then click “Opportunities” and find out where and when you can connect. Where to Go – What to Do One of quickest ways to figure out which activities might be of interest to you is to check out DCNR’s website (www.dcnr.state.pa.us), where you can search by either activity or location. For example, if you clicked on “What to Do,” and then by activity (such as “Winter Activities”), and then “Cross-country Skiing,” you’ll see a map that indicates all of the parks and forests that maintain the trails and a link to each location. You can search for many activities in Pennsylvania’s parks and forests, like bike riding, camping, fishing, hunting, swimming, hiking, horseback riding, geocaching, orienteering, rock

climbing, scuba diving, and many winter activities like skiing and sledding. Join a Group or Club Some of the most active members of local outdoor activity clubs are boomers and seniors. While the group may not be specific to boomers, there are often subgroups within the club that focus on training and outings for novices of any age. Walking and Hiking Like all hikers, boomers need to work within their stamina, personality, and fitness level. There are many trails, from flat to hilly, for walking and hiking pleasure. Canoeing and Kayaking Have you always wanted to be in one of those sleek, silently moving kayaks or canoes winding their way down a sun-dappled stream or across the lake? It could be you. Many parks have concessions where you can rent watercraft, or look for canoe and


) ) ) boomers outdoors

Photo by Pam Metzger

health

A healthy, happy group of active adults taking the Great PA Outdoor Challenge.

kayak demo days through your local outfitters. Bike Riding Even seasoned bikers love riding the trails in state parks and forests. Away from the noise and hazards of traffic, there is no greater fountain of youth than reclaiming the pure joy of riding a bike. And more good news: Riding a bicycle is low impact and easy on the joints. It’s aerobic, improving cardiovascular fitness and reducing the risk of heart attack, and helps prevent obesity, colon and breast cancer, Type 2 diabetes, mild depression, hypertension, and arthritis. Birding and Nature Observation Kick start your outdoor fitness goals by combining exercise with another activity like bird watching. There are 2.5 million acres of state forest and park land available for birding and nature observation, so whether you are looking to take a walk in the wetlands, grasslands, or forested ridge tops, you will encounter many colorful and interesting species on state forestland. ) ) )

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people

peeking over natural inspiration the edge of the cosmos Written by LYNDA HUDZICK

Webster defines a crop circle as “a large, round shape or pattern in a field that is made by cutting or flattening grass or crops.” Ron Stinson, metal sculptor and owner of Metal Expressions Limited, would define them as inspiration. Stinson discovered during his high school years that he truly enjoyed working with his hands and with metal especially. He remembers the first time someone bought a piece of his work. “I thought this was great; someone liked my stuff, and they were willing to pay me for my talent,” he said.

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Those first pieces, made in the mid1970s, were simple designs based on things found in nature, like flowers and leaves. In 1983, however, he put his artwork aside and began what would be a 12-year break. “I was working in corporate America—I do have a degree in

finance, and I have my MBA—and I was supporting a family at the time,” said Stinson. “But there came a time when I realized I hated [corporate America]. I didn’t want my boss’s job, and that was going to be the next step. I decided I needed a change.” Much to the surprise and perhaps


people ) ) ) natural inspiration

From the Crop Circle gallery– Right: Dolphins; Opposite page: Egyptian Swallows; Below: Sextant.

unease of his family, he left a perfectly good job with tremendous benefits to pursue the dream he had put aside. “I didn’t make a lot of money the first couple of years, so I spent a lot of time on full-time dad duty,” Stinson remembered. “I did make contacts with galleries and art shows so I could get my work out there, but you don’t realize how much expense is involved in just the equipment needed to create the pieces, the raw materials, and also what’s needed to transport and display the pieces.” His creations continue to be influenced by nature as he works to capture the sense of motion and dimension associated with those influences. When relaxing, Stinson enjoys the History Channel and said it was there that he found the

inspiration for his many of his current pieces. “In the [opening sequence of a program], they showed really intricate crop circles, and they fascinated me. I looked them up, did some research, and found there are amazing aspects of math, science, biology, and spirituality wrapped up in these designs,” he said. Stinson created his first crop circle piece more than three years ago and now has 10 different designs in his collection. It is in those pieces that he gets the most satisfaction from crafting. “Creating these designs out of metal is unique to me,” he said. “I’m not sure anyone else is doing them. Some people look at [my sculptures] and think they’re just cool shapes, but others know exactly what they are.

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) ) ) natural inspiration

people

Top: From the Crop Circle gallery, Fibonacci, based on the Fibonacci numbering sequence. Above: Energy Vortex, a one-of-a-kind abstract made from red copper. Right: The Cube, a one-of-a-kind outdoor sculpture.

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people ) ) ) natural inspiration

Ron Stinson in his studio.

Either way, those who purchase the pieces are inspired by them and are excited to take them home.” His art is created from stainless steel, a difficult but incredibly sturdy metal to work with. It needs very little

care and is quite weather resistant, which is a good thing since often his pieces are displayed outdoors. “It’s basically your kitchen sink,” he said. “Just shine it up a little bit now and then.”

To begin a new piece, Stinson will use hand sheers or a plasma torch to cut the raw stock metal into more manageable pieces. By hand, he then uses hammers and wooden frames to bend and shape the materials. Many of

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his designs include welded and brazed elements, based upon the color and strength desired for the finished piece. Recently, he has been working on 8foot-tall, 150-pound, freestanding monsters, he said. In his full-size fabrication shop, he is able to create fullscale, public, outdoor art. As the scale of creativity grows, so does the need for different tools. Once Stinson sells one of his metal sculptures, he often asks his clients to text him a photo of where they hang the piece. He really enjoys seeing how it fits into their lives. Many of the art shows Stinson participates in throughout seven different states are fundraisers for nonprofit organizations, and he will typically donate a piece to those causes when asked. Stinson attends shows in March through October, and, as you can imagine, he’s quite busy the rest of the year preparing for the shows, but he does also present a few classes from time to time. So how does he know what will appeal to the shows’ attendees? “They’re typically pretty high-end shows that I’m involved with, and honestly, these days I gear my work toward those who have no trouble spending thousands on a piece if they really want it.” And happily for Stinson, things are now going very well. The 2008 recession, however, took its toll. “I had to go back to making smallerticket items just to keep my head above water,” he said. “But now I’m fortunate to be able to choose the kinds of pieces that really give me satisfaction and that I truly enjoy sharing with others. ) ) )


“I haven’t been everywhere, but it’s on my list.” ~ Susan Sontag


health

shop for a healthy heart government-approved labeling leads consumers to make better choices Written by MATTHEW M. F. MILLER

SUPERMARKET SHELVES ARE CROWDED with products that claim to make the average eater healthier, thinner, and well balanced. Not all claims are created equal, however, and there are simple guidelines to follow to ensure your food purchases live up to their promises. “Heart-healthy eating is about making good choices,” says Cathy Fitzgerald, registered dietitian with MFit, the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) Health System’s health promotion division. “A basic way to do that is use the governmentapproved food-guide pyramid that emphasizes the food groups that we need to include in a heart-healthy diet. “More specifically, what you want to do is work to include more whole grains, more fruits and vegetables, and low-fat and nofat dairy products, as well as lean protein sources.” Fitzgerald offers these tips on what to look for when it comes to heart-healthy eating:

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health

Nutrient Content Claims Government regulations require that a food must have 3 grams of fat or less to be considered low fat and must contain at least one nutrient that provides 20 percent or more of the daily value suggested by the FDA to be labeled as a “good source.” Since these are regulated claims, you can feel confident that you are making educated choices when you select these products, Fitzgerald says. Foods with Fiber Fiber aids in digestion and helps to lower cholesterol. Buy products labeled “high in fiber” or “excellent source of fiber,” as they must contain at least 5 grams of fiber in each serving. Foods carrying the label “a good source of fiber” must have 2.5 grams per serving. Beans, whole-grain breads and cereals, oatmeal, and products with barley in them are all considered good sources of fiber. Omega-3 Fatty Acids These are among the healthiest fats to consume for overall heart health, Fitzgerald says. Fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, and trout are good sources of omega fats and are low in saturated fat. Sterols and Stanols Plant sterols and stanols help to lower cholesterol and have recently begun to be

added to higher-fat foods, such as margarine and salad dressings. Unless you purchase them in chew and liquid form, Fitzgerald says, it can be difficult to find these products because they are not always labeled clearly. Check the label to guarantee that the cholesterol-lowering benefits of the product are a result of plant sterols and stanols. “Reading the labels is a great way to be guided toward healthier choices for your heart and for general reduction of all chronic diseases today,” Fitzgerald says. “So think about using the front of the package as well as the nutrition facts on the back when you are out shopping.” © CTW Features

) ) ) healthy heart

“May Reduce the Risk of Heart Disease” Fitzgerald says products that carry this label are no-brainers when it comes to bettering your heart because companies aren’t permitted to put this phrase on packaging without government approval. “This claim means there is scientific evidence that the Food and Drug Administration has decided is strong enough to support it,” Fitzgerald says.

Reading the labels is a great way to be guided toward healthier choices for your heart and for general reduction of all chronic diseases today.

FOR OVER 25 YEARS, CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA HAS BEEN CALLING LEBANON CARDIOLOGY THEIR HOME FOR CARDIOVASCULAR CARE. Our 12 Board Certified Cardiologists, Electrophysiologist and Interventionalists offer state-of-the-art care while maintaining close physician-patient relationships. Our physicians are available 24 hours a day and are currently accepting new patients. We are conveniently located between Harrisburg/Hershey, Lancaster, and Reading

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health

Written by BARBARA TRAININ BLANK

AS WE AGE, OUR EYES BECOME more prone to conditions that impact sight.

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One is macular degeneration, the leading cause of severe vision loss in adults over 50 in the United States. It’s “a deterioration or breakdown of the macular area, a small area in the center of the retina that allows you to see fine details clearly and perform such activities as reading and driving,” said Dr. Mark Maria, ophthalmologist and partner in Fava & Maria Eye Associates in Lebanon, Pa. In macular degeneration, a certain layer of the retina—the RPE— deteriorates and doesn’t work well, said Dr. John Pratt, a partner in Kilmore Eye Associates in Mechanicsburg, Pa. “That’s the part responsible for nourishing the retina and ‘taking out the trash.’ When the ‘trash’ accumulates, you begin to see yellowish-white spots

called drusen. The longer they’re there, the more likely they’ll interfere with retinal functioning, and vision suffers.” Macular degeneration usually doesn’t involve peripheral vision. No one knows why age-related macular degeneration (AMD) develops, and no treatment has been uniformly effective. But “the greatest risk factor is age— especially over 60. Other risk factors are being Caucasian, lightly pigmented, a family history, poor diet, heart disease, and smoking,” said Maria. Avoiding ultraviolet exposure through using sunscreens and quality sunglasses is important in maintaining healthy eyes, added Pratt. There are two kinds of macular degeneration: dry and wet. The former,


health ) ) ) visual limitations

Dr. John Pratt, a partner in Kilmore Eye Associates in Mechanicsburg, Pa.

The greatest risk factor for macular degeneration is age – especially over 60.

caused by aging and thinning of macular tissues that impact central vision, is more common and progresses more slowly. Most wet age-related MD begins as the dry type. The wet kind can progress more rapidly and lead to the sudden loss of vision. One treatment for wet macular degeneration is a group of medications collectively called anti-VEGF (or vascular endothelial growth factor). These are injected into the eye to stop the formation of blood vessels, and in some cases cause the “bad” blood vessels to go away, said Pratt. But the injections must be repeated, sometimes on a monthly basis, maybe forever, and can be very expensive. Most people don’t realize they have a

macular problem until blurred vision becomes obvious, said Maria. But it can be detected through viewing of the macula by an eye-care professional, special photographs of the eye called fluorescein angiography, and measuring retinal thickness with special scans. Antioxidant vitamins, in combination with other supplements, can reduce the impact in some patients. One large study found that those at risk for advanced stages of AMD lowered their risk by about 25 percent when treated with a high-dose combination of vitamin C, vitamin E, lutein, zeaxanthin, zinc, and copper. A second version of the study recommended that vitamin A (beta carotene) be replaced by lutein and zeaxanthin.

“But vitamins are not a cure for AMD, nor do they restore vision you may have already lost,” said Maria. “They may help in maintaining vision.” “There’s a debate as to whether vitamins are good as a preventive measure,” said Pratt. “But it stands to reason they may help.” The symptoms include distorted vision and a blank spot in vision that doesn’t go away. If you experience this, see an eye-care professional immediately. Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness in the United States, especially in older populations, causes loss of peripheral vision and can eventually lead to complete blindness. “The optic nerve carries the images we see from the light-sensing retina at

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) ) ) visual limitations

health

Regular ophthalmologic exams, including dilation, are the best way to detect glaucoma.

the back of the eye to the brain,” said Maria. Glaucoma is defined as a slow decline of the optic nerve, typically due to high eye pressure. In most cases, the eye doesn’t drain as well as it did and pressure builds slowly. Aging, genetics, and “bad luck” play a part, said Pratt. Some glaucomas run in families. In open-angle glaucoma, the more common type, the drainage angle is open but the drain becomes defective, causing a gradual increase of pressure within the eye. Narrow-angle glaucoma is a condition in which the drainage angle becomes blocked in people whose eyes have narrow angles. The iris either completely or partially blocks off the drainage angle, resulting in a rapid and dangerous rise in eye pressure. Symptoms include blurred vision, severe eye pain, headaches, rainbow haloes around lights, and nausea and vomiting. Secondary glaucoma occurs when there is an identifiable cause, such as prior trauma, inflammation, or surgery. Other than age and pressure, “the most important risk factors for glaucoma are family history, African or Spanish ancestry, farsightedness or nearsightedness, past eye injuries, and

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Dr. Maria, opthalmologist and partner in Fava and Maria Eye Associates.

systemic health problems, including diabetes and poor circulation,” said Maria. “Regular ophthalmologic exams, including dilation, are the best way to detect glaucoma.” Eye drops can bring pressure down and slow the worsening of the damage. There is also a “fast and painless” laser procedure that can be done in the office. If it works, its effect will last from one to five years and the procedure can be repeated. If glaucoma is advanced, surgery can cut the eye and help drain it. Also, when a person has cataract surgery, the doctor can put a tiny stent in the drainage channels of the eye to improve the outflow. If you see small specks or clouds moving in your field of vision, they’re

floaters. “These can appear as different shapes, such as little dots, circles, lines, clouds, or cobwebs,” said Maria. Technically, these are tiny clumps of gel or cell within the vitreous, the clear, gel-like fluid that fills the inside of your eye. What you’re seeing are the shadows the floaters cast on the retina. Retinal detachment must be treated with surgery or laser. Tears are treated with a laser to prevent a detachment. When people reach middle age, the vitreous gel starts to thicken or shrink. If the gel thickens, it may pull away from the back wall of the eye, causing a detachment. “A torn retina is always a serious problem, because it can lead to a retinal detachment,” Maria said. Post-vitreous detachment is more


We provide the best quality and continuity of your vision care needs from basic eye care through eye surgery.

common in people who are nearsighted or have undergone cataract operations. Generally, floaters are “harmless and either fade over time or become less bothersome, requiring no treatment,” Maria added. “However, even if you’ve had floaters for years, you should see an ophthalmologist if you develop new ones.” Flashes look like flashing lights or lightning streaks—the kind you experience if you’ve been hit in the eye and “see stars.” They occur when the vitreous gel rubs or pulls on the retina and can appear off and on for several weeks or months. While not all floaters and flashes are serious, it’s best to have an eye exam to make sure no damage has occurred to the retina. See your eye care professional as soon as possible if even one new floater appears suddenly; you see sudden flashes of light; or you notice any loss of side vision. Flashes and floaters are related and usually occur at the same time. They don’t go away, but the brain often learns to ignore them. “Fifty percent of people over 50-60 have them, and they’re usually not dangerous,” said Pratt. “Some people think a floater is a bug and swat at it.” Flashes and floaters are not truly genetic but are common in people with nearsightedness, which runs in families. ) ) )

Medical

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Personalized services such as contact lenses, brand names, and follow-up adjustments are provided by professional staff opticians.

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Howard B. Melnick, MD • John J. Moffitt, MD Glen J. Mesaros, MD • Donald Short, M.A., FAAA • Sharon K. Hughes, M.S., CCC-A spring 2015 |

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home

a kitchen the second time around

Written by LORI M. MYERS

BETH GLASS WANTED TO MAKE the kitchen in her new home feel more like hers. She had married her husband, Matt, a widower, who had built the home about 10 years before with his first wife, who died soon after the home’s completion. Glass found it difficult to move into “another woman’s house.”

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The cost of purchasing a different home of that size was another factor that made the couple think twice about moving. But as an avid watcher of shows on HGTV that featured room redos, Glass came up with a solution. It amazed her how a renovation project could change the look and atmosphere of a room, so she and her husband decided to reach out to a contractor and see what could be done to make their house more functional. “We really wanted to take down the wall between the kitchen and the dining room to create a more open floor plan,”

she says. “That is when we met Sherwin Wenger from Wenger’s Construction in Lancaster.” When Wenger arrived at the home, he found a non-user-friendly stock kitchen in need of updated appliances and additional pantry space. As with other clients desiring a renovation, Wenger asked about needs, wants, and budget. What would the perfect kitchen look like? Is a show kitchen wanted or one for practical use? Eat-in or a separate breakfast area? Remove walls or closets? What are their frustrations with the present design?


home ) ) ) kitchen

Left: Remodeled kitchen with island. The window on the left is the original kitchen window, shown in the inset pictured. Right: The copper farmhouse sink adds a special touch to the kitchen.

“Once I have answers to those “Onc questions, questtio then I come up with a preliminary design showing the floor plan prelim the and th h major components,” Wenger says. “Once “Onc c the layout is determined, we work oonn tthe h finer details. This involves one or more m or meetings with a cabinet maker to ppick ick the wood species, finish, door style, aand nd hardware. It is important to find out early what appliances are desired so that ea tthe h cabinets can be built accordingly.” Wenger has a team of subcontractors who have worked effectively and w efficiently together for many years to complete this and many other kitchen remodels. The wall between the existing kitchen and formal dining room was removed to create the open floor plan that Glass desired. The floor plan was revamped to allow for better traffic flow for the family and for entertaining, and the kitchen relocated to the original dining room space, allowing for a larger eat-in kitchen. Wenger then opened the floor plan even more than Glass had envisioned. He created larger doorways to two adjacent areas: a study and a family room. Pocket French doors were installed at the study to give the homeowners flexibility for privacy if needed. Custom arches and columns were added between the family room and breakfast area to delineate between the spaces, yet keep it open. Fleming Tile & Marble, Inc. installed a granite-topped

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) ) ) kitchen

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Above: The larger remodeled kitchen with wall removed (shown left). This area was once the dining room. Pocket French doors to the right.

kknee nee wall to giv give it the perfect accent aand nd to make it an inviting area to sit and chat. Glass chose a copper farmhouse sink that added a special touch to the kitchen. She calls it a “showpiece,” but it is functional at the same time. “It is all one big, open bowl,” she says. “It is easy to do big pots and cookie sheets in this sink. The character of the sink changes all the time as the metal is exposed to different elements.” Beautiful handcrafted cabinetry by Wellborn Cabinetry, supplied through Lezzer Lumber, was selected for the kitchen cabinetry. To meet the need for

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additional storage, Wenger’s installed a deep pantry cabinet that was designed with pull-out shelving. Some of the cabinets run to the ceiling to maximize the available space, and an x-cube cabinet was included for wine bottle storage. Hess Flooring, Inc. laid hand-scraped hickory-wood flooring throughout the entire first floor. Lighting was another important aspect of the design. Rohrer Electrical installed lighting underneath the cabinets, which creates a warm and inviting ambience in the evening when the kitchen is not being used.

Additionally, there are about three other lighting options depending on what the space is being used for. Glass’s absolute favorite item in her new kitchen is the 8-foot espresso island, which was topped with different granite from that of the other countertops and was also supplied by Fleming Tile & Marble, Inc. Glass appreciates not only its beauty, but its functionality as well. “There is a ton of storage space below it, and it is a wonderful work surface,” she says. “The granite that we chose on the top looks like you are looking into a stream with all of the different colors and detail.”


home

Of course, the entire renovation received a fresh coat of paint, meticulously applied by F&M Painting Company. Clients come to Wenger with many different ideas, some workable and some not. He tries to fine-tune those ideas and find ways to include the features they want into the finished product. He says it’s important to keep in mind product longevity, current style and trends, and how those affect appraisal rates and a home’s resale value. A kitchen project may take six to eight weeks if the space is being completely gutted along with installing

) ) ) kitchen

Kitchen renovations are not for the faint of heart, but the short-term sacrifice can lead to long-term gain.

new mechanicals, lighting, flooring, etc. If the space isn’t being gutted or walls aren’t being removed, then four weeks is usually sufficient. “If needed, we assist the homeowner with setting up a temporary kitchen in another part of the home so that the food preparation and refrigeration needs of the client can be met during construction,” Wenger says. Glass is more than thrilled with the results, which also includes lazy Susan units installed in the corner cabinets and pull-out drawers inside some of the other cabinets, making it easy to reach all items. It’s a kitchen, she adds, with not one inch of wasted space. The room

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is beauty and functionality all wrapped up into one and a place to create new memories. Kitchen renovations are not for the faint of heart, Glass explains, but she feels that short-term sacrifice led to long-term gain. You should work with a trusted contractor so that you know his or her subcontractors are reliable and proficient. “Be sure to use a contractor who is well versed in kitchens and is willing to hear your needs and work with you to get them,” she advises. “By telling them your must-haves, they can work with you to find a plan and budget that you can work with.” ) ) )

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feature

finding satisfaction in volunteering Written by REBECCA HANLON

ANDRE WELTMAN volunteer by accident.

BECAME

A

The 50-year-old Cumberland County man believes if you just show up, people will put you to work, and that’s how he came to be president of the Friends of Pine Grove Furnace State Park. He and others in the region are among the many who don’t just donate their time during April’s celebration of National Volunteer Month but instead volunteer all year long. In 1996, Weltman and his wife moved to Pennsylvania from New York. They built a log cabin next to the historic Pine Grove Furnace State Park, where the couple who once lived in the city would learn to chop their own wood and raise chickens. As a public health physician with the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Weltman used his time in the park to escape the demands of his career. He would immerse himself in the historical significance of the park and eventually started participating in reenactments and doing academic research for local journals. “I was noticed around the park,” Weltman said. “If you show up, you get pulled in, whether you want to or not.”

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Above: Charcoal-making living history demonstration at Pine Grove Furnace State Park. Shown are, from left: Andre Weltman, Donna Weiser, David Sucke, and Diane Batt. Below, from right: The table with information on the demonstration, and Andre Weltman raking the pit for finished coal.

In 2010, Weltman was asked to help form the park’s first Friends group, following a tradition used by many state parks to recruit volunteers to provide programs and find funding to keep them running. In addition to applying for grants and keeping an eye over the park itself, Weltman has encouraged visitors to learn about the deep industrial history that Pine Grove offers. Despite the work involved in volunteering, Weltman has found a great deal of satisfaction. He writes articles, prepares fact sheets, and often dons his

reenactment costume for walking tours. “The enjoyment makes up for the loss of time,” he said. “To be honest, I find the Friends group to be more fun than my career.” He hopes people who visit realize how different the forest is from how it appeared 150 years ago. The woods were used for lumber, he said, and timber provided the charcoal to make iron. Weltman tries to relive those days in his life, growing his own food, buying half a pig to make sausage, and pressing apples to make cider.


feature ) ) ) volunteering

Above: Painted turtles using basking platforms. Far right: Sally Ray at entrance of Gifford Pinchot State Park, where she is a volunteer. Right: A painted box turtle.

“Those sorts of things are lost arts,” he said. “It’s healthy, fun, and you never know when you’re going to need it.” Follow the Turtle Sally Ray has been fascinated with nature as long as she can remember. The 68-year-old York County woman spent 21 years working as a biology teacher in the Cumberland Valley School District before trying to retire in 2001. Her attempt at rest didn’t last, and Ray found herself working with the Pennsylvania National Heritage Program. When she retired for the second time in 2012, Ray still couldn’t keep still. She volunteers at Gifford Pinchot State Park, where she’s spent more than a decade tracking box turtles. Whenever she finds one, she takes a series of measurements. Then, she files a couple of notches on the outside of the shell that allow her to identify each turtle with a number. If that turtle is found

years later, Ray will be able to say where it had been prior to that, how far it had moved, and any changes in its condition or size. She also documents where turtles are hit on the road and finds nesting sites throughout the park. “I don’t know when I’ll decide I’ve done enough research,” she said. “I haven’t officially declared an end (to my work).” Ray has to have permits from the state Fish and Boat Commission, as well as the department of state parks, and she’s required to submit data to those organizations each year. She often reminds park rangers that turtles should not be moved, and that it’s now illegal in Pennsylvania to pick up a turtle from a park and take it home as a pet, Ray said. “That’s their home. That’s where they stay,” she said. “When people take them home and then release them somewhere

Sally Ray with her dog.

You sometimes don’t realize the potential of all you can do.

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else, they have doomed that turtle. It will try to get home, wherever home is.” As treasurer of the park’s Friends group, Ray also has helped in building turtle platforms and cleaning hiking trails throughout the park. In all the work, she still finds time to photograph nature and monitor amphibians in the park, not for any official purpose, she said, but just for her enjoyment. “All of this is pleasure in my book,” she said. “One of the things I enjoy is just walking with a purpose. I’ve got to start looking for something. Counting it, photographing it—something. Everyone has different ways of finding things they enjoy doing in their retirement, and for me, that’s what it happens to be.”

A Better Quality of Life Gary Smith also has found himself among nature for most of his adult life. When he retired as the regional manager for 25 state parks in southcentral Pennsylvania in 2010, the Susquehanna Township man had to find ways to keep busy. At 62, he’s spent much of that retirement enjoying nature. After seeing firsthand how Friends groups contributed to state parks, Smith jumped on board as treasurer for the Pennsylvania Parks and Forest Foundation. He spends most of his time making sure checks get signed and money for programming ends up in the right place.

To him, the work is enjoyable but not difficult. When he isn’t spending time in area parks, he’s at the hospital, donating bone marrow and blood platelets to save other patients. Smith first got on the national bone marrow transplant list in the mid1990s, after a co-worker’s son suffered from leukemia. Even though Smith wasn’t a match, he later was called on to donate his bone marrow to a 33-yearold woman with the same cancer. He didn’t know it until a year later, but he had saved the life of an Australian nurse, who he had the chance to meet in 2008. After becoming a donor, Smith was

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As the treasurer for the Pennsylvania Parks and Forest Foundation, Gary Smith spends most of his time managing their funds.

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hooked on being able to provide a better quality of life for so many people. In addition to donating bone marrow and blood platelets, Smith volunteers as a courier, transporting others’ donations across the country and around the world. He’s been to London, Italy, Sweden, Germany, and France to deliver and pick up donations. If doing that wasn’t enough, Smith decided he’d help promote the cause by participating in bike tours. Just this fall, Smith rode 535 miles in 104-degree temperatures during a promotional ride in Texas. It was the fourth of the biking tours he’s done, including one where he rode

2,750 miles from Minnesota to Florida and a 10-day tour in South Africa. “It’s very satisfying to help people,” he said. “When you deliver that bone marrow, or somebody’s blood supply, it’s very precious. But the park service also brings me great joy. You see families roasting marshmallows around the

campfire, and you think in some small way you had something to do with that.” Smith believes he’s received more satisfaction from what he’s done outside of work than in all the years of his career. “You sometimes don’t realize the potential of all you can do,” he said. ) ) )

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travel

photo courtesy of Amtrak

Interior of an Amtrak Superliner.

riding the rails Written by ROCHELLE A. SHENK

THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE USE SOME type of train to commute to their jobs or to school in major metropolitan areas. But there’s more to train travel than commuting; it’s also a great way to reach a travel destination.

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For avid rail fans Helen and Harold “Smoke” Shaak, Adamstown, it’s also a way to combine their love of trains with family fun. “Traveling by train is more relaxing than driving. It’s a slower pace, and even when you’re sleeping, you’re still heading toward your destination. You can watch the scenery, and if you travel through cities like Chicago during daylight, you have a chance to look at the buildings. I find some of the older buildings interesting—I like to think about how people would have lived when the buildings were new,” Smoke explains. Although they’ve ridden tourist trains for more than two decades, the couple, who are both members of the

Lancaster Chapter NRHS (National Railway Historical Society), began traveling by train in 2002. The destination was Mount Pleasant, Iowa, where a NRHS conference was being held. “We wanted to see what it was like to go cross-country on a train,” Helen says. They traveled with their granddaughter, Elizabeth, who was only a toddler at that time. “We took Elizabeth with us to give her mom a break, and we thought that she would enjoy it, which she did. “There are a lot of things to interest a child on a train,” Helen explains. “It was an overnight trip—we traveled from Lancaster to Pittsburgh in


travel ) ) ) riding the rails

photo courtesy of Amtrak

Top, left: Dining car table set for a meal. Above: The roomette Harold shared on a trip to Tacoma, WA. Left: Harold "Smoke" Shaak (left) and Helen Shaak (right), their daughter and grandchildren in the dining car during a trip to Fort Worth, Texas.

It’s enjoyable to watch the grandkids as they’ve experienced train travel— it’s something they’ll remember as they get older.

daylight, from Pittsburgh to Chicago during the night, and then on to Mount Pleasant during the day.” Since then, they’ve traveled by train to NRHS events whenever possible. Destinations have included Fort Worth, Texas; Tacoma, Wash; and Portland, Ore. Helen says it’s definitely her preferred way to travel, and Smoke agrees. Rail cars from Chicago and west have two levels. Bathrooms and showers are in the lower level, while the upper level features seating with a panoramic view.

“You can see more, and you get a different viewpoint,” Helen says. The 2008 journey to Fort Worth was the first time that the couple traveled with their daughter, Candi, and both grandchildren—Elizabeth, and her younger brother, Graham. Helen recalls that the scenery through the South and into Texas was really interesting. “The South has a lot of different plants and trees, some dripping with Spanish Moss. Texas is pretty flat. Every time we head south we go through Washington, D.C., and one

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time we saw the cherry blossoms,” she says. Having both grandchildren along was interesting, too. “Elizabeth was older and knew the tricks of traveling by train. It was really neat to see her showing Graham how to open the doors,” she says. “It’s enjoyable to watch the grandkids as they’ve experienced train travel—it’s something they’ll remember as they get older. On the train trips they found some other kids around their ages and played together. Unlike a hotel, you don’t really have to worry about them wandering off—they’re on the train, so it’s pretty safe,” Smoke adds. A three-day journey to Tacoma,

Wash., had some other highlights. The couple traveled with their daughter and two grandchildren, but this time they had sleeping accommodations—a roomette. The first night, Helen, her daughter, and granddaughter shared the two bunks, but the second night they were joined by her grandson. “The bunks are not very big, so it was a bit tight with two of us in each bunk, but we made do,” she said. That was the most recent Amtrak trip they’ve taken, but it surely won’t be the last. And for overnight journeys, they’ll probably be booking sleeping accommodations. Amtrak also offers Acela Express, high-speed rail service between

Washington, D.C., and Boston. Speeds can be up to 150 mph. My husband, Tom, and I are also rail buffs, and a few years ago while I was attending a conference in Baltimore, he checked out this rail option with a short hop to D.C. Although the trip was a short one, he enjoyed the upscale seating and the train ride itself. And for many “snow birds” who don’t want to face an arduous drive, Amtrak’s Auto Train is a great way to travel from the cold winter weather to enjoy the warmth of Florida. The auto train leaves from Lorton, Va., and passengers and their vehicles disembark just outside of Orlando, Fla. ) ) )

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gifting inter vivos Written by SYLVESTER E. WILLIAMS, IV

IT IS A GOOD IDEA TO CONSIDER the tax implications of gifting assets as part of estate planning. An individual could have tax concerns if proper planning is not done to determine the amount of assets gifted over one’s lifetime (inter vivos) in addition to the property that will be conveyed to another at the time of death.

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Taxes can be imposed on transfers made at the time of death, so it is important to understand how the government treats these inter vivos transfers. The United States considers estate and gift tax to be a unified tax system. Simply stated, assets transferred as gifts during a person’s lifetime are combined with those transferred at death and then subject to a single tax rate based upon a schedule provided by the government. The estate and gift tax is imposed on bequests at death and on inter vivos gifts. The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (P.L. 112-240) established

permanent rules for the estate and gift tax for 2013 going forward. The principle rules for the tax structure are as follows: • In 2011, estates and lifetime gifts had a combined exemption of $5 million in asset value, indexed for inflation. This exemption was made permanent and is $5.43 million as of 2015. • The estate tax rate on the taxable portion of the estate, if any, is 40 percent. • The exemption from the estate tax applies to estates and lifetime inter vivos gifts in the aggregate. The


feature ) ) ) gifting

separate annual exemption per donee for inter vivos gifts is retained; it is also indexed in $1,000 increments and has increased from $13,000 in 2012 to $14,000 in 2015. • Transfers to spouses remain exempt, but spouses can inherit any unused portion of the exemption from each other, so that the combined exemption for a couple is $10 million. Other estate tax deductions, such as those for charitable contributions, are retained. • A number of special rules for farms and small businesses are retained. Most relatively simple estates (cash, publicly traded securities, small amounts of other easily valued assets, and no special deductions, elections, or jointly held property) do not require the filing of an estate tax return. A filing is required for estates with combined gross assets and prior taxable gifts exceeding $1.5 million in 2004–2005; $2 million in 2006–2008; $3.5 million for decedents dying in 2009; $5 million for decedents dying in 2010 and 2011 (note: there are special rules for decedents dying in 2010); $5.12 million in 2012; $5.25 million in 2013; $5.34 million in 2014; and $5.43 million in 2015. The exemption for 2015 is $5.43 million, and it is indexed for inflation. Although the rates of the tax are graduated, the exemption is applied in

the form of a credit and offsets taxes applied at the lower rates. Thus the taxable estate is subject to a flat 40 percent rate. This rate is higher than the 35 percent rate that prevailed in 2011 and 2013 but lower than the 45 percent rate that applied in 2009. The government allows individuals to exempt annual gifts of $14,000 per recipient, which, coincidentally, are not counted as part of the decedent’s

It is a good idea to consider the tax implications of gifting assets as part of estate planning.

lifetime exemption. The government does index the annual gift tax exemption in $1,000 increments. Likewise, a generation-skipping tax is imposed to address estate-tax avoidance through gifts and bequests to a later generation. Most importantly, the government does allow transfers between spouses to be exempt. In other words, estates are allowed to take deductions for charitable contributions and administrative expenses incurred.

Furthermore, estates are allowed a deduction for taxes paid on estates and inheritances imposed by states. Estates are allowed to exempt up to $5 million in remaining assets from the tax. A spouse is permitted to inherit any unused exemption from the decedent. Thus, if a husband dies and leaves an estate of $3 million, the remainder of his $5.25 million exemption can be used by his wife, whose exemption would be increased by the $2.25 million difference. This election must be made on a timely filed estate-tax return for the decedent with a surviving spouse. As part of the planning process, it is important to understand the difference in how bequests and gifts are treated for valuation purposes. The gift tax is tax exclusive (i.e., the tax is imposed on the gift net of the tax), whereas the estate tax is tax inclusive (i.e., the tax is applied to the estate inclusive of the tax). This means that heirs take the value of the asset on the date of the decedent’s death as their basis for future capital gains. The government refers to this treatment as a step-up in basis, and it provides that no capital gains tax is paid on the appreciation of assets during the decedent’s lifetime. For example, say a decedent purchased stock for $100,000, and the value of the stock at the time of death was $200,000. If the heir sells the property for $250,000, a gain of $50,000 ($250,000 minus the steppedup basis of $200,000) is recognized.

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The $100,000 of gain that accrued during the decedent’s lifetime is never taxed. The step-up rules do not apply to gifts, in which case the carryover basis is applied. In that case, the original basis of $100,000 would be carried over and the gain would be $150,000 ($250,000 minus $100,000). Both the gain accrued by the donor and the gain accrued by the donee are taxed. Aside from the different exemption levels in some estate-tax rules, there are other differences between the taxation of gifts and bequests. As noted above, gifts do not benefit from the step-up in basis. When the donee subsequently sells an asset, the cost (referred to as basis) deducted from the sales price is the original cost to the donor. For example, if a donor purchased stock for $100,000 and the value of the stock at the time of the gift were $200,000, when the donee sells the property for $250,000, a gain of $150,000 ($250,000 minus the original basis of $100,000) is recognized. The basis cannot be less than the fair-market value at the time of the gift if a loss is realized. The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 has provided some key benefits for individuals, and as part of any estate-planning process, these new changes should be taken into effect while developing or changing your estate plan. It is important to note the exemption levels have changed and the transfer stipulation for spouses is different. Most importantly, spouses

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can use the unused portion of a decedent’s transfer allowance. This is a huge benefit for a surviving spouse. One of the most important distinctions is understanding how bequests and gifts are treated. Inter vivos gifts have substantial benefits for the taxpayer, but be mindful of the limitation and how the gifts are computed as part of the estatevaluation process. If you want to make inter vivos gifts and not worry about keeping track in relation to the above stated limits, make gifts for as many relatives as you’d like to cover dental, medical, and tuition expenses, but here is the catch—pay the provider directly. By using this approach, the inter vivos gifts don’t count toward any of the limits. Likewise, another inter vivos tactic could be to fund 529 college savings plans for your children or grandchildren. If you proceed down this path, don’t forget to take advantage of the five-year election provision. This rule allows you to put five years of annual exclusion gifts in a plan all at once. You would be required by the government to submit a gift tax return, but the good news is that there is no gift tax. But you must make sure that no other gifts are given to the child over that same period. The new rules are wonderful, but it is highly advisable to seek assistance through a financial planner, accountant, or attorney to develop the proper strategy in managing your estate. ) ) )


Written by KATE FORGACH

BABY BOOMERS HAVE MADE THE EARTH A BETTER PLACE TO LIVE, THANKS TO MANY ground-breaking inventions. We have seen more meteoric changes than our parents could ever have conceived, even if flying cars aren’t an automotive staple yet.

nostalgia

10 baby boomer inventions that rocked the world

Here’s a list of the top 10 baby boomer inventions that rocked our world — in no particular order.

born a vastly easier method of connecting your computer to everything from printers to digital cameras.

1. DNA Fingerprinting Where would CSI be without DNA fingerprinting, invented by Sir Alec Jeffreys (born 1950)? The Knight of the British Empire discovered sequences within strands of DNA that vary from one person to the next in a unique ridge pattern on fingertips.

7. The Ethernet You can thank Robert Metcalfe (born 1946) and his ubiquitous invention for your ability to share documents, printers, and connections to the Internet. The system is so incredibly useful that roughly 250 million new Ethernet switch ports are shipping worldwide each year.

2. The Jarvik 7 Dr. Robert Jarvik (born 1946) was inspired to create the implantable artificial heart after his father needed surgery for an ailing heart. The Jarvik 7 was the first such device to actually be implanted inside a human body. His work came long before surgical methods to transplant other human organs.

8. The Nanoscale Motor A team led by Alex Zetti (born 1956) invented a motor that was just 500 nanometers across. That’s roughly 300 times smaller than the diameter of a single human hair. The invention set the stage for a future in which nanoscale machines will increase computer speeds, perform intricate surgeries, and generate solar energy more efficiently.

3. Apple II People tend to forget Steve Wozniak (born 1950), partner of Steve Jobs, who launched a technological revolution. Thirty-five years ago, the two baby boomers created and marketed the Apple II personal computer. The milestone included a sound card, color graphics, expansion slots, and other features that made it the earliest version of a PC.

9. Synthetic Skin Since the early 1980s, burn victims have sung the praises of Gail K. Naughton (born 1955). That’s when she invented a method of “tricking” cells into responding as if they were inside a human body. As a result, growing tissue can be stretched, resulting in the secreting of proteins that make for stronger tissue. Eventually, this discovery led to synthetic skin that temporarily covers burn wounds until the body is able to regenerate skin on its own. The field has grown tremendously since the 1980s and now encompasses synthetic skin spun from spider silk.

4. The WWW The software language that allowed for the creation of Web pages and the first browser was invented by Sir Tim Berners-Lee (born 1955). Interestingly, the mathematician’s parents worked on the Ferranti Mark 1, the first commercially sold computer. 5. Free Shipping Jeff Bezos (born 1964) revolutionized Internet e-retailing when he pioneered the concept of free shipping with Amazon. Today, consumers often abandon their online shopping carts if a merchant doesn’t offer this perk. 6. The Universal Serial Bus Port Better known as a USB, the device invented by Ajay Bhatt (born 1957) allows you to plug peripherals into your computer as easily as you plug a lamp into the wall. Thus was

10. Flex Foot Prosthesis Van Phillips (born 1954) lost his left leg in a waterskiing accident. Unhappy with the clumsy artificial leg with which he was fitted, Phillips switched majors and went on to invent a limb based on the C-shape of a cheetah’s rear leg. The result was a flexible and strong artificial leg made of carbon graphite that allows users to jump and run. Kate Forgach is a baby boomer consumer specialist for Kinoli Inc. She has written about senior issues for 11 years as a Cooperative Extension specialist and for a wide variety of media outlets, including USA Today, Detroit News, New Orleans Times-Picayune, The New Yorker magazine, ABC World News, and NBC’s TODAY. www.kinoliinc.com spring 2015 |

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people

peeking over the edge of the cosmos Written by MEGAN JOYCE

AS A CHILD DURING THE 1960S, JOHN KERECZ REMEMBERS WHEN the earthbound world seemed to stop to watch its humans take flight—space flight, that is. “Space was big in the ’60s. I remember being let out of school to stay home and see the space flight,” Kerecz recalled. “They’d stop everything in school and wheel the big TV in on a stand, and we’d stop class just to watch the space flights.” Kerecz, 54, never outgrew his fellow baby boomers’ common childhood fascination with space. The children who watched Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin crunch their bulky boots amongst the moon rocks are now middle-aged “kids” who still look skyward, enthralled. It was this long-held cosmic allure that drove Kerecz, an information technology generalist for the Department of Environmental Engineering, to allow himself to be hurtled spaceward strapped inside a small Russian space vessel in January 2014. Kerecz, of Harrisburg, had been waiting and searching for just such an opportunity. He had been combing the Internet periodically for offers from various companies worldwide that offer trips to the upper stratosphere—the “edge of space”—for anyone able to get the security clearance and visa, pass the physical exam, and, of course, pay their way. Kerecz, who had inherited some

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funds when his father passed away a few years ago, compared the cost of his flight to “the price of a car.” It was his father’s passing—in addition to some medical issues of his own—that helped motivate Kerecz to pursue this experience, which had long been on his “bucket list.” Although the United States does not offer such opportunities, other countries do, including Russia. Sokol Airbase in Nizhny Novgorod would send Kerecz and a pilot into the upper stratosphere, where both Earth and space are visible, inside a MiG-29 supersonic jet. “I went up in 1977 technology,” Kerecz said. Kerecz’s journey to Russia was not without its figurative bumps. After paying the fee and securing his visa, the MiG-29 jet needed to be repaired, postponing his trip. During this time, he also contracted bronchitis. There was the problem with his connecting flights to Russia, too. Kerecz was supposed to fly from Philadelphia to New York to Rome and then on to Moscow, but he ended up rerouted from Philadelphia to Minnesota to Paris to Rome before finally arriving in Moscow. Kerecz had ample praise for his Russian hosts and the Russian people as well, whom he found to be friendly and courteous despite the language barrier.

From top: Behind the MiG-29 supersonic jet that would take him on his trip; with the Russian pilot during preflight check; strapped in as copilot; and back on earth, with his Russian pilot after flight.


people ) ) ) cosmos

On the one side of you, it’s very bright; on the other side of you, you could see the black of space.

The day after arriving in Moscow, Kerecz embarked on the five-hour train ride through the snowcovered country to Nizhny Novgorod, providing him a scenic view of a very foreign land. “Russia doesn’t have a lot of rural infrastructure like we’re used to in this country,” he noted. “Basically, you have to live in the city because if you don’t, there’s nothing there.” The morning of his space flight, Kerecz went over emergency procedures with the pilot and underwent the required physical, another area of stress for him. “I was healthy enough to pass the physical they gave me, but I was taking medication for bronchitis,” he said. “I wanted [the space flight] to be over and know that I did it. Getting it done was more of a concern than how much fun I was having because I was afraid it wasn’t going to actually happen.”

Kerecz was fitted for his high-altitude pressure suit. During flight, the force of the speed causes the body’s blood to want to go to the feet; the suit keeps the blood in the head. Kerecz and his pilot were strapped into the small, two-seater fighter jet. It’s at this claustrophobiainducing point, Kerecz said, that some people bail

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Above: Inside the Kremlin.

Above: Kerecz did some sightseeing before the flight, including a visit to the Colosseum.

Right: Kerecz’s favorite ride on Earth.

on their adventure. “The minute they strap you in [is intense], even if you’re not claustrophobic,” he said. “Some people, once they’re strapped in, they just can’t do it.” Kerecz’s aircraft took off down the runway, quickly reaching a speed of Mach 2. The takeoff, he said, “was nice. The jet takes off a lot faster than passenger planes. You don’t need as much of a runway. “Other people hear you break the sound barrier, but you don’t because you’re the one doing it,” he said. In very little time, Kerecz had zoomed into Earth’s stratosphere, where the vessel spent several minutes hovering in that ethereal limbo between our home planet and what lies beyond.

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Below Kerecz was the blue of Earth. The black above him, however, was space. “On the one side of you, it’s very bright; on the other side of you, you could see the black of space,” Kerecz said. He could also feel the temperature rise inside the jet, the way a car’s interior gets hot when sitting in the sunlight. “You feel the sun in a lot more glory than you do down here because the sun is right there.” His descent included a series of aerial tricks, loops, and rolls that stimulate the adrenaline and cause the gravitational forces (G-forces) to fluctuate while the jet’s rate of acceleration varied. “That’s when you really feel the G’s,” Kerecz recalled. “You get up to weighing about 1,200 pounds. Your

arms feel heavy and it’s hard to move.” And then, in what felt to Kerecz like a 60-minute blink—it was over. “The whole flight was an hour, but it seemed like 10 minutes,” he said. The landing was rough, he said, as the pilot didn’t quite have the landing pattern down. At one point, the pilot hit the accelerator and then banked the jet, and Kerecz said the G’s went up to 7 and then back down again. This is the only point when Kerecz felt ill. He later returned to his hotel and took a 3.5-hour nap to recover from what he likened to “a really bad motion sickness.” “Some people get sick and some don’t. There are people who will not fly out that night because they don’t feel good enough to. I left that night to go


people

not surprised.” Despite having achieved one of his major childhood dreams, Kerecz’s thirst for interstellar knowledge is not entirely quenched. Mainly, he wants to see the world’s passion for space exploration rejuvenated. “When you were a kid, you wanted to go to space,” he said. “I find it frustrating that people don’t seem to be quite as interested anymore.” He has contributed money toward and

is a backer of the Mars One program, a nonprofit foundation working toward establishing a permanent human settlement on Mars starting in 2024. He would also love to see NASA’s space exploration and research revived. “There are a lot of things they discovered and developed when we were doing the space program that we ended up [using] in everyday life,” Kerecz noted. “I don’t think we’re really as far along as they thought we’d be.” ) ) )

) ) ) cosmos

back to Moscow, but I stayed the whole week [to do some sightseeing],” he added. Although there may have been some understandable concern for his safety, Kerecz said his friends and family were unsurprised by his decision to embark on his space adventure. “I think they’ve known me to be a little odd,” he laughed. “If I say I’m going to do something, they know I’m going to do it. Anyone close to me was

www.bMagazinePA.com Your guide to choosing the right living and care options for you or a loved one. 19th Edition Now Available!

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caregiving

caregiving today: a snapshot Written by LISA M. PETSCHE

IN APPROXIMATELY 30 PERCENT of households, unpaid care is regularly provided to someone who is chronically ill, disabled, or aged and whose ability to carry out activities of everyday life is compromised. It’s not necessary to live under the same roof as the person who is being helped, or to provide assistance with personal or medical care, in order to be considered a caregiver. Who Are the Caregivers? The typical caregiver is an adult child providing help to a parent or parent-in-law. But a caregiver may also be a friend or neighbor, grandchild, sibling, or other extended family member, spouse, or parent. The majority of caregivers are female and married. A significant portion are younger seniors caring for older seniors and may have health issues of their own. Most often, though, caregivers are in the 45-to-65 age group. Those at the younger end are likely to have children still at home and consequently have been labeled “the sandwich generation.� Close to two-thirds of family caregivers are employed. They juggle

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caregiving

Who Are the Care Receivers? The typical recipient of care is female, over 70, widowed, and living alone. The older the care receiver, the more likely they are to require personal care; 50 percent of those over 85 fall into this category. The 85-plus age group is, of course, a rapidly growing demographic. The most common types of health conditions associated with care needs are age related—for example, osteoporosis, arthritis, and vision loss. Other common medical diagnoses of care receivers are cancer, heart disease, neurological disease (such as Parkinson’s disease), dementia, and mental illness (such as depression). Caregiving Activities Caregiving tasks fall into two categories: basic activities of daily living (known as ADLs or BADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). Typically, care receivers need help with IADLs before they require help with ADLs. ADLs are basic, daily self-care tasks including feeding, toileting, dressing, grooming, bathing, and mobilizing. Less than 25 percent of caregiving situations involve helping with these needs. IADLs are the more complex skills

involved in living independently—skills normally learned during adolescence and early adulthood. They include using the telephone, way-finding, managing transportation (whether it’s driving or using public transit), handling finances, shopping, preparing meals, managing medications, and performing housework and basic indoor and outdoor home maintenance.

includes obtaining assistance from family members and friends and accessing community services that can maximize the care receiver’s functioning and aid the caregiver with necessary tasks. Outside help improves the quality of life of both the caregiver and care receiver. ) ) )

Reflection To help ensure caregiving is sustainable, it’s important that caregivers use available help. This

Lisa M. Petsche is a social worker and a freelance writer specializing in boomer and senior concerns. She has personal and professional experience with elder care.

) ) ) a snapshot

caregiving with paid work and other responsibilities, such as maintaining their own household and attending to other family members. It’s no surprise that self-care is a low priority for caregivers, given the demands on their time.

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ideal living

Written by KATIE MARKEY MCLAUGHLIN Photos courtesy of LANDIS HOMES

) ) ) retirement living

what boomers are looking for in retirement living IF YOU’RE IN THE MARKET FOR A retirement community, you’ve probably already noticed that your options are greater—and more modern—than ever before. With the baby boomer generation reaching retirement age, they now represent one of the largest demographics in the housing market. In turn, one-size-fits-all institutions are quickly being replaced by communities offering residents maximum choice. This theme of “choice” dominates almost every aspect of today’s retirement living, from housing options and community spaces to meal plans and fitness facilities. The result? Baby boomers are able to find retirement living that suits them just right. Housing Options & Home Features Recent research by Ecumen1, which develops and operates senior housing in 37 U.S. cities, shows that institutional senior living is declining in this country—with just 7.4 percent of Americans aged 75 and older living in a nursing home, compared to 10.2 percent in 1990.

Patio-size balconies on hybrid homes provide space for outdoor living.

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Great rooms with large windows offer an open floor plan with abundant daylight.

These traditional nursing homes are being replaced by a plethora of housing options that run the gamut from independent to assisted living. Active adult communities—which are often age-restricted but do not offer direct medical care or staff—are becoming increasingly popular due to their extensive amenities and resortlike settings. Continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) are also thriving, as they offer an independent-living lifestyle but greater levels of healthcare

Open floor plans of hybrid homes accommodate a variety of furniture arrangements in the great room.

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services as needed. Various styles of housing are also available. While some baby boomers might be interested in a single-family home, others might prefer a townhome or apartment-style living. Still others might prefer a little bit of both, such as the new hybrid homes offered by Landis Homes near Lititz, Pa. “The hybrids are an attempt to cross some of the benefits of cottage living with some of the benefits of apartment living to create something

that has the best of both,” explained Linford Good, vice president of planning and marketing. The three-story, apartment-style structure has many of the draws of cottage living, such as garage parking and larger balconies. Good also noted that, in general, residents today are looking for more square footage than was desired previously. “Most people want at least two bedrooms or one bedroom with a den, and two bathrooms or at least a bath


ideal living ) ) ) retirement living

Mission-style exterior of hybrid homes combine brick, stone, and stucco.

and a half,” he explained. This is in stark contrast to the 1970s, ’80s, and early ’90s, when one bedroom and one bathroom seemed sufficient for most retirees. Baby boomers are also expressing a greater interest in more modern, open floor plans featuring a lot of natural light and connections to the outdoors, be it through larger windows, larger porches and patios, or both. “With apartment-style housing, there’s more effort to try to build so that the exterior wall is staggered, so that more homes are on a corner and therefore have two outside exposures,” explained Good. Additionally, baby boomers are looking for eco-friendly living. Landis Homes’ most recent expansion features homes with sustainable materials and practices, partially because potential residents are looking for greener construction and improved energy efficiency. Community Spaces Now more than ever before, the social scene is as important as the home when it comes to choosing a retirement-living situation.

As such, many retirement communities are now offering plenty of communal space where residents can socialize, get to know one another, and attend events together. Residents can form their own groups and go out and do things together. An important aspect to be considered when planning or redesigning space within retirement communities these days is the need for more large gathering spaces—for meetings, lectures, concerts, and more. It can be a big investment, but communities are finding it is a worthwhile expense. Additionally, residences themselves are being redesigned to accommodate boomers’ desire for increased social interaction with their peers. Good explained that many retirement communities, including Landis Homes, are now breaking down a larger campus setting into smaller groups of households—sometimes called neighborhoods—to encourage social connection within a smaller cluster. “We break it down into smaller entities so social interaction is more likely to happen,” he said.

Their buildings also include more semi-public spaces, open only to those who live in the neighborhood and their visitors, again to foster a greater sense of community. Dining When it comes to dining, choice and flexibility are of utmost importance to baby boomers. To accommodate this, some communities are beginning to offer more options for how and where the residents spend their money. The “where” includes increased choices of dining venues. While many communities continue to offer a formal, sit-down dining option, it’s now likely to be complemented by more casual dining venues as well—bistros, coffee shops, and delis. Similarly, the food options are expanding to accommodate boomers’ more varied tastes. Cuisine from around the globe is often offered side by side with traditional meat-andpotatoes meals. Directors of dining and nutritional services at most communities understand the new eating patterns of their guests and are committed to

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accommodating residents’ differing dietary needs and restrictions. There is more awareness of people who are vegan or vegetarian or have a gluten-free restriction. Wellness The average age for moving into a retirement community is dropping, meaning residents are more independent— and active—than ever. To accommodate residents’ desire to stay physically active, communities are offering onsite, indoor fitness facilities and swimming pools, plus outdoor options like tennis courts and walking paths. What’s more, boomers can expect greater options when it comes to mental wellness, too. “People living in retirement have always been interested in continuing education,” explained Good, “but there’s more being offered that’s targeted specifically to them. In the past you could audit college courses, but that doesn’t always quite fit.” Today, boomers are looking for onsite courses or lectures targeted to their specific interests, and communities are working hard to meet that desire. Over the past decade or so, retirees have started looking for places where they want to live, as opposed to places they feel like they have to live. Boomer and senior housing has been changing and expanding to create those kinds of spaces—offering fewer cookie-cutter living options and more one-of-a-kind retirement experiences. ) ) ) Ecumen. 2009. “A New Day and New Trends in Senior Housing Development.” Accessed at www.ecumendevelopment.org/aging-whitepapers/ 1


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ideal living

safe at home Written by ROCHELLE A. SHENK

AS THE BABY BOOMERS AGE, SO DO THEIR PARENTS. MAKING SURE THAT parents are safe and their needs are met in their home becomes an increasingly important issue, particularly when one parent passes on or when one parent has health issues. I can vouch that knowing your parents or parent is receiving needed care is really important, and that trying to “do the best thing” for them is not always easy. My mom developed some serious health issues in spring 2012 and passed away in April 2013. I helped take her to medical appointments and sat in on

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them to be an “extra set of ears.” My dad, who passed away last October, had been living alone prior to his death and had several health issues. I had the responsibility of making sure that he received the care he required. While South-Central Pennsylvania has the advantage of having a wide

variety of living communities that meet the changing needs of seniors, many of our parents prefer to remain in their own homes, even though that home is no longer suited to their current health needs. Although this may seem to be a situation without a solution, that’s not the case. There are some steps to take


ideal living ) ) ) safe at home

to ensure that a parent can “age in place”—remain safely in their own home—and provide some peace of mind for you. Elaine Charest, director of therapy for HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of York, offers a starting point. She suggests first assessing what your parents need help with and how often it will be needed—daily versus weekly. Some things to consider may be housekeeping, grocery shopping, and personal care. Modifications may also need to be made to the home. Some modifications can be easily done, such as eliminating clutter and tripping hazards. If your parent has mobility issues or needs a wheelchair, consider if a ramp is needed to get into the home. Charest also recommends reviewing resources that may be available in the local community, such as adult daycare services and enlisting family, friends, and members of your parents’ church community for companionship. She suggested considering pet ownership to provide your parent with companionship and a caregiver role. There are several pet adoption organizations, including PAWS (www.paws.org/cats-anddogs/adopt/seniors-for-seniors). Professional caregivers and home care agencies can provide a number of services. Some agencies focus on medical needs, while others offer companion services and light housekeeping or help with errands, such as grocery shopping. “We have a large senior population in this state, so there are a lot of

agencies that provide services. The most important thing that people can do is to be an informed consumer. Consider more than one agency, and ask questions of those agencies that you’re considering as care providers,” says Lesley Reyes, RN, BSN, director of home care and nursing services for MediQuest Staffing, Lancaster. Reyes provided some questions to ask: • What type of staff does the agency have, and are they licensed? This is important as a person’s needs for care may change, and working with an agency whose staff is broad based—for example, CNAs (certified nursing assistants), home support personnel, RNs, and LPNs—can mean remaining with that agency and not having to invest time in searching for another agency to provide services. • How is staff trained, and are staff members experienced in the healthcare field? • Pricing • Is staff bonded, insured, and covered through workers’ compensation? • Will the agency handle long-term insurance claims? “A company that does that can lessen the load for children,” Reyes says. • What is their policy for overnight shifts? She said that some agencies may allow their staff to sleep when they’re covering an overnight shift. “Care providers are there to provide a needed service, even in the middle of the night,” she said.

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Reyes also suggests asking an agency for referrals—clients whom you can talk with about the service the agency provides. “When you make that decision of whom to hire and the number of hours a day, you want to have peace of mind that your parents can safely live in their home with the help of an extra set of hands,” she advises. Even if your parent or parents are living in your home or in-law quarters on your property, you may need that “extra set of hands” for respite care while you take a break, whether it’s to lunch with a friend, do errands, or take a vacation. “We need to take care of the caregiver; we don’t want people to get burned out,” Reyes explains. Speaking from experience, I strongly urge children who are providing or managing care of a parent or parents to take that muchneeded respite. It doesn’t have to be something big—it can be treating yourself to a massage, having lunch with a friend, spending quiet time reading the book you’ve wanted to

I strongly urge children who are providing or managing care of a parent or parents to take that much-needed respite.

read, going to an exercise class, a nice dinner with your spouse, or golfing with some friends. A staffing agency is but one of the options to consider; there are some other services that may be helpful, including alert buttons that summon help in an emergency situation or if a parent falls and cannot get up. If your parent is homebound, some geriatric practices or medical professionals may make house calls. Meals-On-Wheels can provide nutritious meals—a hot lunch and a cold sandwich-type meal for dinner. If managing medications is a concern, medisets are available to help organize pills. It can be filled by a spouse, or a child can fill it during a weekly visit. Some pharmacies offer a service that delivers pre-filled medisets on a weekly basis. Your county’s Office of Aging and care providers’ staff can also help direct you to other available services to ensure your parent’s needs are met and that you have the peace of mind that he or she is safe while remaining in their own home. ) ) )

Information and support at your fingertips —

CAREGIVER SOLUTIONS Call for your free copy — 717.285.1350 or

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veteran

duty, discipline, and doubts Written by STEPHEN KOPFINGER

COLLINS LUNGER ADMITS CONFLICTING FEELINGS WHEN IT COMES TO his service in the Vietnam War. He credits the United States Marine Corp with giving him the confidence to overcome what his family and teachers assumed was a troublemaking attitude in school. But he remains disillusioned with the way the government handled the conflict and its aftermath. Lunger, who lives near Dover, York County, is also still plagued by the effects of posttraumatic stress disorder. “The military does not ‘de-program’ you,” Lunger says of his post-Vietnam years. “I was angry. I don’t want to go through that again. It was almost harder than being in ’Nam.” A native of Somerville, N.J., Lunger joined the Marines as a green kid. It

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was a way out of a difficult situation. “I was doing so poorly in school,” recalls Lunger. “I was getting into a lot of trouble. My dad said, ‘This is not going to work.’” The military provided an option. “I was happy with that,” Lunger says. “If it weren’t for the Marines, I would have been one of those people who wouldn’t have amounted to anything.” As it turned out, the Marines unexpectedly offered a diagnosis as to why Lunger had been struggling in school. “I didn’t find out until the service that I was 100 percent dyslexic. Nobody

Lunger’s students presented him with this tool wall clock upon his retirement.

knew what that was in the 1950s. “I couldn’t pass the service exam,” recalls Lunger, who worried that his family wouldn’t allow him to come back home. “A captain overheard this conversation. He took me aside and asked me 25 questions.” That meant Lunger passed the exam orally. He went to Parris Island in South Carolina for basic training and then to Camp Geiger, a satellite division of Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, for advanced infantry training. Lunger became a member of the School of Infantry of the Second Marine Division, attaining the rank of corporal E-4.


veteran

This was 1962. As for the name “Vietnam,” Lunger admits he had “never heard of it,” at the time. He joined the Marines “to learn something” and smiles at the irony of not really thinking about combat “until they [issued] orders!” It was in late 1963 when Lunger shipped out for Okinawa, Japan. It was there “where I first started hearing about Vietnam,” Lunger remembers. Okinawa, Lunger recalls fondly, was a paradise. Duty definitely called, but so did the beach. Vietnam was a distant name in the news, a place where “advisors” were sent, not Marines. That soon changed. By 1964, Lunger found himself in that unknown country. “My main base was in Da Nang,” says Lunger. Work, however, was concentrated on building the airstrip at Chu Lai, an airbase built by the Marines that today is an international airport. “That was a very strategic location,” Lunger states. “[The North Vietnamese]

) ) ) collins lunger

Lunger holding a fully functional Frick steam engine that he engineered. He also made the two-wheel boneshaker 1864 bicycle, and the three-wheeled tricycle from the 1800s, shown on the table.

Lunger with part of his John Deere tractor collection.

were constantly trying to take it back. Four or five times, we were attacked. It’s hard to run a bulldozer with an M-1 in your lap!” Lunger’s duties also saw him on the deadly Ho Chi Minh Trail, a supply route for the North Vietnamese. “There were skirmishes,” Lunger says. “It wasn’t like World War II, where you were constantly under attack.” But it was unnerving all the same. So were a couple of missions into Cambodia, where, officially, America was not supposed to be at the time. Lunger is still reluctant to talk about that. As for the Vietnamese, “they were clever,” Lunger says, meaning one was never sure who was friend and who was foe. “They would be in camp with you.” Lunger recalls one Vietnamese socalled “advisor” who had a habit of dropping lit cigarettes around. They turned out to be signals to the enemy.

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“Sure enough, when they attacked, they knew right where to put their mortars.” Lunger’s worst memories of Vietnam weren’t all combat related. He remembers how service branches such as the Air Force had lavish clubs where the men could unwind. “We got three warm beers,” Lunger joked. So the men decided to build their own little place for relaxation. Some local girls hung out at the improvised club. Lunger later found out that the women were killed by the North Vietnamese. It’s a memory that shakes him to this day. After two tours of duty, Lunger came home in 1968. It was the height of antiwar sentiment in America. “I got in so many fights over being called a baby killer,” Lunger remembers. Eventually, he became a teacher of tool making and a machinist at Community College of Baltimore County. He worked in a tough neighborhood, but there were rewards.

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You don’t have to be under fire more than a few times and you remember it all of your life.

“To this day, I get calls from students,” says the retired teacher with pride. His post-service life has its downside, however. He has dealt with diabetes and neuropathy, both of which he says are


veteran ) ) ) collins lunger

During off-duty hours, Lunger and his buddies rode motorcycles and even had a chance to ski in the French Alps.

results from his exposure to Agent Orange, a powerful defoliant used to clear the jungles of Vietnam. And postwar stress contributed to the breakup of three marriages, though, happily, he has been married to his current wife, Joyce, for 16 years. “You don’t have to be under fire more than a few times and you remember it all of your life,” Lunger says. He also states that the secret missions into Cambodia as well as benefit cuts to today’s veterans have undermined his trust in the way government plays a role in America’s wars. As for Vietnam, Lunger admits he’s not even sure why America was there. “If you’re attacked, that’s different,” he says of such incidents as the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. But Lunger maintains an optimistic spirit. He’s happy to work on his house, set in rolling countryside. One room is empty. “That’s a dance floor!” he says with a grin, noting his love of dancing with Joyce. And while the Marines helped Lunger tackle dyslexia, he does admit one last thing: “My biggest fear is that I won’t live long enough to learn everything I want to learn!” ) ) )

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April 15, 2015

Nov. 13, 2015

9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

York Expo Center Memorial Hall – East 334 Carlisle Ave., York

Spooky Nook Sports 2913 Spooky Nook Road Manheim

This event is in support of our veteran (of all ages) and military community and their families. With nearly 200,000 men and women transitioning out of the military each year, access to information about products, services, benefits, and job opportunities is a top priority.

www.veteransexpo.com Sponsor & Exhibitor Opportunities Available spring 2015 |

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nostalgia Paul Hamilton, owner of Iko’s Music Trade in York.

Written by JOHN DUFFY

A STRANGE REALIZATION SLOWLY came over the music industry over the last couple years: the possibility that the vinyl LP might, in fact, outlive the compact disc, that thing that was said to have killed it off sometime in the late 1980s.

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Sales of compact discs have declined steadily since the dawn of digital music about a decade ago. However, vinyl long players have seen steady increases, from around 300,000 sold in 1993 to just over 1 million sold in 2000. And since then, growth has been exponential. Demand has reached the point where there is a backlog in manufacturing. Earlier last year, Minneapolis folk-rock band The Jayhawks had to delay a reunion tour set to coincide with new

vinyl re-releases of their back catalog. There simply wasn’t any way to have the product ready in time. A band that wants to press a couple hundred 45s to sell at their shows has to wait three to four months. Sound crazy? Last year, wax sales topped 6 million and this year will likely hit


nostalgia ) ) ) vinyl records

In 2003, a loose coalition of independent music retailers banded together to start Record Store Day, a celebration of both the music and the experience of buying it.

8 million. But it’s important to keep some perspective. The global music industry as a whole takes in only half of what it did in 2000—half, and vinyl sales make up a miniscule part of that picture in total. That music industry in general was suffering and was worsened by the fact that small, independent stores were losing out to the boxes like Borders, Barnes & Noble, Walmart, and Target. Today, those stores are either gone, not selling music, or are drastically cutting their CD shelf space. Your average Barnes & Noble has more cutout discs taking up space than new titles. Curiously enough, though, there are racks of $30 record albums. In 2003, a loose coalition of independent music retailers banded together to start Record Store Day, a celebration of both the music and the experience of buying it. In-store artist appearances, special reissues, and label exclusives brought in record numbers of customers. The coalition has since added a special Black Friday event as well. Did it help? Well, vinyl resurgence picked up steam almost overnight, and independent record stores are doing better than the big boxes. Some people

in the industry are expecting to see LP sales climb to as much as 10 million in domestic sales. The ultimate irony is that not only will vinyl outlast the CD, but the last record store in the world will probably be a place in a sketchy part of town and populated by middle-aged music nerds, punks, and hipsters. It will be an independent, not Walmart, selling the vinyls. Many boomers relinquished their vinyls somewhere along the way between “I do” and today. However, they are moving into that phase of life where they want to reconnect with the past. One way to do that is through the music of their youth. With more disposable income that is more, well … disposable, they are purchasing the records they once gave away. Paul Hamilton, owner of Iko’s Music Trade in York, however, is not so sure that it’s really going to be the baby boomers who give vinyl the big bounce moving forward. After 23 years in music retail, he thinks boomers will be looking to lighten their load, not add to it. “When you retire, you don’t start to add more stuff to your nest,” says Hamilton.

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U M $ RIV H Y He thinks they will start following the habits of their kids and grandkids and start streaming more music as online services, like Amazon Prime and Spotify, expand their catalogs. “The reason vinyl has come back is not baby boomers; it’s 25-year-olds. To them, this is not nostalgia; it’s

something entirely new,” Hamilton said. That said, of the top sellers of 2014, almost half were older catalog titles, and half were new releases. And while millennials have not yet shown the consumer power of the boomers, just this year, Lazeretto, a new vinyl-only album from Jack

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White, sold 44,000 copies. “That hasn’t happened since Pearl Jam did Vitalogy in 1994,” Hamilton said. In its debut week, White had the No. 1 album on the Billboard charts. And it was an LP, vinyl-only release. A decade ago, the whole industry was in freefall. No one was buying CDs anymore, and no one was buying very much music online yet … they were getting it online for free. Once things rebounded, vinyl shot through the roof. Compact discs recovered sluggishly, to the point where LPs make up 90 percent of Hamilton’s business. It once made up a small fraction. Thanks to vinyl’s rebound, Hamilton says he might even be able to retire himself on his own terms. “Half a decade ago, I was worried,” he said. His store has participated in Record Store Day from the beginning. It’s neat and easy to navigate. The shelving is clean, and there are no piles of random musical ephemera. No rotting vinyl stink. ) ) ) So what’s next on the agenda for resurgence—cassette tapes? I’ve got milk crates full of Hall & Oates, Doobie Brothers, and Journey, if anyone is interested. ) ) )


nostalgia

nostalgia

remembering the milkman

) ) ) toy trains

Written by STEPHANIE KALINA-METZGER

BEING A MILKMAN WAS OFTEN A THANKLESS JOB, BUT THOSE old enough to remember the days of milk delivery often look back with nostalgia on that period of time when life operated at a slower pace. Folks would begin the day by opening their doors to retrieve bottles of milk, fresh from the farm, just waiting to be enjoyed by adults and children alike. Sweet Recollections Maryland resident Judy Bach remembers hearing the clinking bottles early in the morning as the milkman arrived at her house and even recalls a certain jingle after all these years. One thing that stands out in Dennis Moyer’s mind is a little mischief he engaged in back in those days. “My mother always left a note in the milk box on our front porch with our order,” the Perry County resident said. “Once I got in trouble by imitating her printing and adding one quart of chocolate milk to the bottom of the note.” He also recalls the bottles being used for something other than milk. “The opening of those returnable bottles was about 1 inch wide. At kiddie birthday parties, we used to play a game to see who could drop the most old-style clothespins into those bottles by holding the clothespins at waist height.” Pat Fallon, who currently lives in Catasauqua, Pa., said, “My grandmother lived in an old, but wellmaintained, four-floor apartment building in Scranton. There were two apartments per floor, with a common stairwell in the center.

“I can still remember hearing the clinking of the glass milk bottles as the milkman went up and down the stairs leaving cold bottles of milk on the back porches. Everyone used to have a little milk box by their back door. The bottles of milk had a small, round cardboard lid that fit snug just down in the top of the glass bottle; you pulled up with a little tab in the center to pry it open. “The bottles were smooth, curved glass, but they were easy to handle and pour as they were not that big in diameter and fit in your hand. I think they had an emblem engraved in them instead of a paper label.” Starting a Successful Milk-Delivery Business According to most accounts, milk delivery began in the 1800s, when milkmen traveled by wagon with cans full of the product, which they ladled out with dippers into customer-provided containers. Carlisle resident Charles Kruger, now in his mid-80s, tells how milk not only nourished his family physically, but provided for them financially as well. “Sometime around 1916 or 1917, my mother made a deal with this

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) ) ) remembering the milkman

Photo courtesy of the East Pennsboro Historical Society

nostalgia

I can still remember hearing the clinking of the glass milk bottles as the milkman went up and down the stairs leaving cold bottles of milk on the back porches.

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farmer to bring his milk in and she would peddle it. Those days they used buckets, crocks, jars—whatever customers brought to hold the milk. Kids would pull the express wagon with the can of milk on it. My dad was a railroader and he got hurt, so he had to quit and do other things. “During WWI, they conscripted the railroad guys to haul equipment to the seaports, so Dad returned to the railroad. At that time, my mom sold milk off her wagon. When the war was over, all the railroad guys got their jobs back, so my dad was bumped. He said, ‘Mother, how we gonna make a living?’ She said, ‘Well, this milk business isn’t so bad,’ so Dad bought a horse and wagon and started to peddle milk,” he said. Kruger said his father would visit a local farm after the twice-a-day milking. “He started to cool the milk in an ice bath and stirred it until it was cold.

What he was doing was stopping the growth of bacteria because most people’s milk was sour in the morning as it curdled overnight,” he said, adding that his dad’s milk became popular because it would last several days. “They thought we were putting something in it,” he said with a laugh. Before homogenization, customers would have to shake the milk to distribute the cream evenly. Kids, in particular, used to enjoy the cream that would rise to the top. “In the winter, when the milk froze, it would pop up the cap and the first kid out the door would get the cream ball,” said Kruger. The Plights of the Profession As milk delivery became increasingly popular, the milkmen of yore contended with problems unique to the profession. An article in the San Francisco


Before insulated porch boxes were used, sunlight would oxidize milk left on the doorstep. Kruger tells the story of how a local glass company made an error on a large lot of amber bottles. “We got a heck of a deal on a bunch of them,” he said, adding that they just labeled over the problem. The dark protected the milk from the sunlight, providing his company with a competitive edge. “We marketed it as more wholesome.”

) ) ) remembering the milkman

photo courtesy of Charles Kruger

nostalgia

Chronicle, dated Sept. 6, 1902, said, “He comes and goes like a shadow in the early dawn, communicated with, if at all, by means of notes, which he has to strike a match to read.” It continues with tales of beleaguered milkmen who were vexed with a litany of issues. Inspectors would halt them on the street and subject their milk to a lactometer test, forcing those who failed to dump their product out on the streets or into the marshes. Thieving competitors, who would run short on their own routes, might swipe a few bottles from another’s porch delivery. The article suggests there was a time when milkmen held keys to residences. “He is baffled by bunches of keys for which he must select one for every

door along his route.” Until delivery trucks arrived on the scene, another challenge milkmen faced was training the horses where to stop along the route. “We had horses until 1939 on two routes,” said Kruger. “They were later replaced by a specialized Diamond T Pak-Age Car, which was open on both sides. Often the helpers on the trucks would run out both sides at the same time.” Other problems revolved around the milk bottles themselves—from the customer who refused to wash them, to the careless ones who forgot to return them, and the unscrupulous scofflaws who had other ideas for their use. Milkmen often returned from their routes short many a bottle. One reported catching a customer preserving fruits in his bottles and sharing a laugh with her about it, only to return later with helpers to recapture the stolen bottles. Needless to say, he wasn’t invited back. Many a milkman may have welcomed the advent of “returnable bottles,” which gave customers a financial incentive to “remember” to relinquish them. The onset of the war brought even further challenges to the milkmen. “They were trying to conserve fuel, so delivery was reduced to every other day,” said Kruger. “Our competitors found this out and used it against us, delivering on the off days, so instead of a family ordering 4 quarts from us, they’d order 2 from us and 2 from the other guy.”

The End of an Era? As time passed, so did the need for the milkman. Refrigerators reduced the need for frequent deliveries, and many families purchased second cars, so any spouse could drive to the supermarket whenever the need arose. Soon dairies like Kruger’s began to merge in order to stay in business. The age of milk delivery reached its nadir near the 1970s, although some businesses continued the practice years later. Today, milk delivery is more of a novelty, although a search on the Internet proves that it’s still taking place. Here in Central Pennsylvania, a business called Mr. Milkman touts home delivery in Cumberland, Dauphin, York, and surrounding counties. Does this prove that what’s old is new again and that there’s a modern market for the days of old? Only time will tell, but for now there will always be those who long for the good old days when the cream would always rise to the top. ) ) )

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Christopher Tillotson ))) Birthday: January 22, 1957 ))) Resides in: York, Pa. ))) Profession: V.P. Sales ))) High School: Dallastown Area, 1975 ))) College: York College, 1979

From left: 5 months old, 3 years old, 10 years old. Right: 9th grade school picture.

BEST MEMORIES I grew up in a terrific neighborhood in the Leaders Heights area of York County. Our neighborhood was pretty big for a rural area with lots of kids within a few years of one another. We had a lot of good athletes and a few very good athletes. Ironically, the girls were among the very good athletes. Our summers were primarily playing baseball and then switching to football after school started. We had big yards so we were able to play a traditional-size baseball field and a full 100-yard football field. MY BEST FRIEND My best friend was my cousin, Mike. He lived within a block of my home and we spent most of our free time together. We built a go-cart starting with a wooden frame, and we used salvaged lawnmower parts for the steering, axils, wheels, and the engine. As I grew older we started to hunt; small game was my favorite. The first day of small game was a big deal for Mike and me. We spent days preparing and were ready at the break of dawn. We continued to hunt

Left: 5th grade with family.

)))

together all the way through high school. We would hunt deer and turkey in the Michaux State Forest in Adams County. Mike died about 15 years ago at the tooearly age of 42, so when traveling home from the Chambersburg area, I will take the road through the Michaux Forest. It brings back some very fond memories. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL I spent kindergarten through eighth grade attending Catholic grade school. Those nuns were tough. I got my ears boxed and pulled, as well as my hands smacked with a ruler too many times to count. I probably spent one week a year in the coat closet. There was a transom in the coat closet that went into the classroom. When boredom would set in, I would hold the mop head up at the transom and bop it along like a puppet. Of course, the class would laugh and the sister would flip out; the rest is a blur.

times that someone would get wet, but no more than a leg or a foot went under water. WORDS OF ADVICE My father gave me many words of advice, most not appropriate to repeat, but maybe the best was to get a college education. There was a time just after high school that I thought of just getting a job and not a degree. He said, “You will appreciate going to an office to work when you’re 57,” and I do. He also told me to get uncomfortable, because until you are uncomfortable you are not improving. MY FAVORITE (AND PROBABLY THRIFTIEST) MEAL Cream tomato on toast—a slice of tomato on a piece of white toast and covered with a white cream sauce. The best! I miss my mom.

Our grade school had very good basketball and baseball teams. Our basketball coach in eighth grade made a huge impact on my life, and I think on most of us. Mr. Tom Keesey was a soft-spoken man that understood the game and made an average bunch of eighthBelow: Cruise with family, June 2012. graders overachievers. LAZY DAYS I don’t recall us doing anything special on hot summer days, but I do remember playing ice hockey on the frozen pond. We would have a bonfire and spend hours playing hockey. The one end of the pond would not freeze well, so when the puck would stop on that section of ice, it was scary trying to retrieve it. There were a few

Read more of Lil Jackson’s story online at www.bmagazinepa.com/goodvibrations. What memories would you share? To be considered for a future good vibrations column, please visit www.bmagazinepa.com.


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