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a cinderella life

Ideal Living

Reaching baby boomers 1946 – 1964

THE BEATLES a

50-year love affair


PUBLISHER Donna K. Anderson EDITORIAL V.P. & Managing Editor Christianne Rupp Editor Megan Joyce CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Tracy Achen SJ Anderson Lynne Gold-Bikin Lynda Hudzick Leslie Feldman Marielle Hazen, Esq. Stephanie Kalina-Metzger Stephen Kopfinger Lori M. Myers Lisa M. Petsche Jenna Rose Robbins James J. Ruggiero Jr., Esq. Rochelle A. Shenk Kathleen C. Wall ART DEPARTMENT Production Coordinator Janys Cuffe Production Artist Renee McWilliams SALES Account Executives Karla Back Angie McComsey Jacoby Jill Hubler Valerie Kissinger Susan Krieger Ranee Shaub Miller Sue Rugh ADMINISTRATION Business Manager Elizabeth Duvall Project Coordinator Loren Gochnauer Sales & Event Coordinator Eileen Culp

Copyright © 2014 On-Line Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. b magazine is published quarterly. Single copy price $2.95. Four-issue subscriptions are $6.00. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial or graphic content in any manner is strictly prohibited. Views expressed in opinion stories, contributions, articles and letters are not necessarily the views of the Publisher. The appearance of advertisements for products or services does not constitute an endorsement of the particular product or service. The Publisher will not be responsible for mistakes in advertisements unless notified within five days of publication. On-Line Publishers, Inc. reserves the right to revise or reject any and all advertising.

On-Line Publishers, Inc. b magazine 3912 Abel Drive, Columbia, PA 17512 717.285.1350 • fax 717.285.1360 www.bmagazinepa.com

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from the editor ... photograph by GeorJean Photography, Lancaster

Technology has made significant advances during the lives of baby boomers. For many of us, it wasn’t unusual to watch black-and-white television programming as a youngster. And if you recall watching The Ed Sullivan Show on Feb. 9, 1964, you were part of the 40 percent of Americans who were seated in front of their black-and-white television sets to witness one of the most memorable moments in history, musical or otherwise. It was the first of three appearances of The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show, and at the end of the final appearance in February 1964, Ed Sullivan announced his show would start broadcasting in color. It wasn’t until the 1970s that we started purchasing more color televisions than black-and-white ones, and just in time to enjoy the popular regular television program The Partridge Family. We tuned in to watch Shirley Jones and her “family” each week as they toured the country on a brightly colored bus and entertained audiences. We had the privilege of speaking with Jones, and she talks about what’s in her newly released tell-all book. We all know it’s really important to exercise as we get older, and it’s easy to pick up weight as our metabolism slows down. The trick is finding something that makes it more fun than work. Inside this issue we highlight a variety of programs that might just inspire you to start a routine. Anytime is a good time to take a vacation, and we highlight two great destinations. I love the beach, but I have to say, after reading the article about Door County, I think that would be a wonderful place to visit, too. And we thought Wisconsin was just home to the “cheeseheads.” There is a lot more in this issue that I know you’ll enjoy reading, but I’d like to remind you that although we reminisce about the past and talk about our homes, health, and finances, we also provide our readers with insight and

information to assist in two important areas of our lives, adding to the distinctive nature of b magazine compared to other publications—ideal housing options and caregiving responsibilities. Please take note of these articles and pass along this copy of b magazine so others will benefit. Happy 2014!

Vice president and managing editor

bmagazinepa

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www.bmagazinepa.com spring 2014 volume 7, issue 1

features 22

WHAT IS YOUR SKIN TELLING YOU? As baby boomers, we’ve all probably started to see “laugh” lines that weren’t there years ago and age spots that indicate we had a lot of fun in the sun over the years. But there are other skin maladies common to baby boomers, from shingles to rosacea. Learn about treatments that can either prevent or treat these conditions.

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LUXURY IN ANGUILLA A getaway to recharge and rejuvenate. Some people go to the mountains, while others enjoy cruising on their vacations. For many, however, the call of the sand beckons. Anguilla, a British overseas territory in the Caribbean, boasts pure-white sand, clear-blue water, and amazing sunsets. Sit on the beach and enjoy a novel or take up snorkeling, kayaking or another activity on your stay. There is a plethora of dining establishments, from fine dining to casual, each offering luscious food.

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BEAUTIFUL OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE It’s spring and you’re itching to get outside. We want the front of our homes to be welcoming to passersby and our backyards to be an extension of our living space. This year, personalize your yard and create something beautiful on the outside–somewhere you can go to relax and enjoy the sights and sounds al fresco.

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THE BEATLES A 50-year love affair.

cover story 6 SHIRLEY JONES

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Shirley Jones started performing at the age of 19. She has appeared in many musicals and television shows and generally comes away with the reputation of prim and proper. But with her new autobiography just released, Shirley Jones: A Memoir, she reveals her true self.


caregiving 52

CAREGIVER AGREEMENTS A two-way street.

financial 48

PROTECTING YOUR CREDIT SCORE Steps to take before and after a gray divorce.

general 72

GOOD VIBRATIONS Meet a fellow boomer.

health 18

BOOMERS FIND NEW WAYS TO STAY FIT Sweatin’ to Zumba, tai chi, hula hoops, and other workouts.

home 42

WILL YOUR ROOF PASS THE SEASONS TEST? Protecting you and your investment.

ideal living 56

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WHEN DOWNSIZING ISN’T ENOUGH A retirement home may be the best choice.

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HOW A GERIATRIC CARE MANAGER CAN HELP Could you benefit from their services?

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PAYING FOR NURSING HOME CARE Can children be held responsible?

lifestyle 46

GRAY DIVORCE How living longer is affecting marriages.

music 10

PATSY CLINE The legend lives on.

people 34

NOT OF HIS OWN DOING

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A local boomer finds his calling in metal work.

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VINTAGE MINI COOPERS A collector’s passion.

travel 24

DOOR COUNTY One of the country’s top 10 small towns.

veteran 64

THEY WERE SOLDIERS ONCE … AND YOUNG. A veteran of the Calvary that served in Vietnam.

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cover story

WRITTEN BY Lori M. Myers

SHIRLEY JONES PHONES ME AT THE EXACT SCHEDULED TIME, and we are not even a minute into our interview when there is a knock on her hotel room door. “Excuse me,” she says politely, and I hear her having a conversation with a hotel employee. She returns to the phone, apologizes, and explains that it was the maid asking her for her menu selections. This reminder to eat is a good one. It’s been a busy few days in New York for Jones as she makes the rounds of television appearances—Katie Couric’s talk show and Good Morning America to name a few—to promote her new book, Shirley Jones, which, as it turns out, is anything but a Marian-the-librarian memoir. “Readers will learn more about me,” she says. “They’ll discover another side of my life than what they saw.” What many of us saw and remember was Jones as the

Back row: Shaun Cassidy, Shirley, and first husband Jack Cassidy. Front row: Patrick Cassidy

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characters of Laurey in Oklahoma!, as Mrs. Partridge on the iconic The Partridge Family television sitcom, and, of course, as Marian the librarian in The Music Man. She had appeared as that freshfaced, sweet, and prim actress who hailed from the Pittsburgh suburb of Charleroi, Pa., the only child of a beer manufacturer and a homemaker. Laughing, she tells me that the town had 800 residents when she lived there, “and now there are 799 because I left.” Jones’s success came early and relatively easily. At the age of 19, instead of heading to college to become a veterinarian as planned, Jones traveled to New York City to audition for a Broadway agent. Her first audition was for a

director who was casting various shows for Rodgers and Hammerstein, the famous musical-theater writing duo with a string of popular Broadway musicals that lit up the New York stage in the 1940s and 1950s. They loved Jones’s trained soprano voice and saw tremendous potential in this teenager who had come to the city to make it big. They immediately cast her in a minor role in South Pacific and then the Broadway show Me and Juliet, in which she was a standout. Rodgers and Hammerstein then eventually signed her to play the lead on tour. In 1955, they cast her as the female lead in the film adaptation of their hit musical Oklahoma! “It was exactly that—a Cinderella life,” Jones muses. “I barely knew

From left: Shaun Cassidy, Shirley and Marty, David Cassidy, Patrick Cassidy, and Ryan Cassidy.


cover story

scenes twice: one for regular CinemaScope screen format and the other for CinemaScope 55. As a result, he walked off the set and quit the film, with MacRae being called in to take his place. However, recently, Jones discovered the true story. “Last year I was told that the real reason Frank quit the movie was because his wife, Ava Gardner, was going to Africa to do a film with Clark Gable,” Jones says. “She called Frank and said that if he didn’t come down to be with her, that she would have a relationship with Gable.” Along with MacRae, Jones’s other favorite leading men include James Stewart, with whom she starred in The Cheyenne Social Club; Glenn Ford in The Courtship of Eddie’s Father; Marlon Brando and David Niven in Bedtime Story; and Burt Lancaster, with whom she

) ) ) shirley jones

who Rodgers and Hammerstein were. It was an unbelievable thing.” Other roles came her way in quick succession, such as Carousel, April Love, and The Music Man. Jones played opposite one of her idols, Gordon MacRae, in Oklahoma! and Carousel, and the two became good friends. “I remember when I was 16 and I would lie in bed and listen to Gordon MacRae sing, and here I was acting in two films with him,” Jones says. But the pairing in Carousel almost didn’t happen, according to Jones. Before MacRae was slated to star, Frank Sinatra had originally been cast as Billy Bigelow. He had even prerecorded the songs he was to sing in the film. The rumor that had been around for many decades was that Sinatra hated doing scene retakes and that when he arrived on the set of Carousel, he was told he’d have to shoot

Shirley and her stepson, David Cassidy

Right: Jones in The Partridge Family (1970-1974)

Right: Shirley and Marty Ingels’ first date in 1974. They were married in 1977. Left: Shirley, Marty, and the pups.

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) ) ) shirley jones

cover story

Jones, 1934

Jones, 3 years old.

Jones with her parents after winning Miss Pittsburgh in 1952.

Jones in high school.

Jones with her Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in Elmer Gantry.

Jones in her teens.

Jones serving in the choir, age 12.

filmed Elmer Gantry in 1970. “All of them were wonderful people,” Jones recalls. “They had great respect for the work. Burt got me the role in Elmer Gantry. He fought for me.” Fortunately, Lancaster got his way, and Jones is forever grateful. Her role as Lulu Bains, a revengeful prostitute, earned her some hate mail from fans but also an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. While some stars hide their Oscars in closets or use them

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as doorstops, Jones has hers out there for all to see. “It’s in the center of my living room on a pedestal,” she says. “Next to it is a picture of all the cast.” One can’t write about Shirley Jones without mentioning and honoring Mrs. Partridge, the first-ever working mother on television. Jones remembers the experience of doing the show from 1970 to 1974 as “wonderful” and an opportunity to work, stay in Los Angeles, and raise her children with

then-husband Jack Cassidy. She took the job after turning down the role of Carol Brady on The Brady Bunch—a role that ultimately went to her very good friend Florence Henderson. Now married to comic actor Marty Ingels for the past 36 years, a man Jones describes as “crazy as a loon,” Jones’s memoir discusses mostly her troubled relationship with Cassidy, who died tragically in an apartment fire in 1976.


cover story ) ) ) shirley jones

Jones and Mae West looking gorgeous. Jones with Burt Lancaster at the 33rd Annual Academy Awards.

Jones in Oklahoma!, 1955.

Robert Preston and Shirley Jones in The Music Man, 1962. Shirley Jones and her husband, Marty Ingels.

“He was well read; he was bipolar,” she admits. “He taught me so much about sex. We had what dreams are made of.” Jones and Cassidy had three sons together—Shaun, Patrick, and Ryan— and she is grandmother to nine; Cassidy had one son, David, who starred alongside his stepmother in The

Partridge Family. Even though Jones never became a veterinarian, she supports animal organizations and shares her home with two dogs. Jones will be 80 years old this year and continues to act in front of the camera. Did you catch her in her recent appearance in The Miracle of Flight 232?

While her schedule is busy, fans of Shirley Jones will be happy to know that her life and her marriage to that “loon” are all part of that Cinderella story. “Marty makes me laugh all the time,” Jones muses. “He cares about me” And so it seems this Cinderella has found her prince ... ) ) )

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music The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley is featuring the “Becoming Patsy Cline” exhibition through July 6, 2014.

patsy cline – the legend lives on Metzger WRITTEN BY Stephanie Kalina-M

FOR PATSY CLINE FANS, IT’S DIFFICULT TO BELIEVE THAT THE YEAR 2013 marked the 50th anniversary of the legendary singer’s death, but fans and devotees continue to keep her memory alive. Movies, books, musicals, plays, and even blogs pay tribute to the life of this iconic singer. And for those who want to share their enthusiasm for the popular singer, a loyal fan club, run by her daughter Julie Fudge, is still going strong. Cline’s modest home on Kent Street in Winchester, Va., where she grew up, is open for tours from April through October, and a major museum exhibition, “Becoming Patsy Cline,” will be on view at the Museum of the

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Shenandoah Valley through July 6, 2014. Born to a Teenage Mother Born Virginia Patterson Hensley in 1932 to a 16-year-old seamstress mother and a 43-year-old blacksmith father, the family moved often before settling into the small home on Kent. Introduced to music at an early age, Cline sang along with her mother, Hilda, in church. When her father, Sam, left the family in 1947, she


music ) ) ) patsy cline

Above: Part of the “Becoming Patsy Cline” exhibition at the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley. Right: A promo shot.

dropped out of high school to work various jobs, including waitress and soda jerk, to help support the family. Cline, who admired singers of the era like Jo Stafford and Hank Williams, convinced a radio disc jockey to allow her to sing on his show in 1947. Impressed, the talent coordinator invited her back. This, in turn, led to more appearances at local establishments, where she would sport her signature fringed Western outfits, designed by the singer herself and sewn by her mother.

Her First Big Break Patsy Cline gained national attention in 1957, when she performed on Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts. Singing her now-famous song “Walkin’ After Midnight,” she wowed the audience, sending the applause meter into the stratosphere. “Walkin’” shot up to No. 2 on the country-music charts and made it to No. 16 on the pop charts, officially giving her the distinction of being one of the first country singers to achieve a “crossover” pop hit.

From Triumph to Tragedy Cline reached the height of her popularity in the early 1960s and was named the No. 1 female artist in 1961 and 1962. When she released “I Fall to Pieces,” it, too, became a crossover hit and climbed to No. 1 on the country charts and No. 6 on the pop charts, once again demonstrating her wide appeal. She went on to receive acclaim for a string of hits before tragedy struck. On March 3, 1963, Cline sang at a benefit held at the Soldiers and Sailors

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Right: Childhood home of Cline on Kent Street in Winchester, Va. Below, right: Cline’s promotional photograph shortly before her 1961 life-threatening car accident.

Memorial Hall in Kansas City for the family of disc jockey “Cactus” Jack Call, who had died in an automobile accident about a month earlier. Fog prevented her from flying out of town the following day. Although friend Dottie West tried to convince her to take the 16-hour drive back to Nashville in the car, Cline opted instead to fly out on a small Piper PA-24 Comanche plane on March 5, ignoring reports of continued inclement weather and high winds. Cline’s manager, Randy Hughes, untrained in instrument flying, took the helm and, on the evening of March 5, 1963, crashed the aircraft in the driving rain approximately 90 miles from Nashville. Cline was dead at the age of 30. Fans Keep Her Memory Alive To this day, fans remain dedicated to keeping Patsy Cline’s memory alive.

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Her childhood house is open to tours, guided by dedicated volunteer docents who are eager to share details of the singer’s short life. Docent Tim Poole said people travel from all over the world to visit the historic abode, and he considers it a labor of love to show others the house where Cline lived from 1948-1957. “Patsy Cline has given me many hours of entertainment, lifted me up when I’ve been down, and made me happy, so it’s my way of giving back to her,” Poole said. Fan Mark Borchers said he wasn’t exposed to Patsy Cline until 1980, when he was permitted to purchase six eight-track tapes for a penny as part of his enrollment in a music club. “One of those was The Patsy Cline Story. I played that tape to death and still have it to this day,” he said. Borchers, who read a book about Cline, knew her mother Hilda’s general

address and sent her a note. Hilda wrote back, and that was the beginning of a burgeoning friendship. Not only did Borchers learn how to join the fan club, but he was also eventually invited to Hilda’s house, where he dined with the family and even held Cline’s Lifetime Achievement Grammy. “Hilda retrieved it from the closet and I held it in my hands—talk about a special moment in a young man’s life,” said Borchers.


The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley Presents ‘Becoming Patsy Cline’ Through the first week of July, fans can visit a major museum exhibit held in Cline’s hometown at the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley (MSV). Patrons will learn the story of Virginia Patterson Hensley before she achieved fame and fortune as Patsy Cline. They will learn where Ginny lived and the struggles her family faced as they moved from town to town trying to escape poverty. On display are some of her trademark Western outfits, many of which were made by her mother on the 1938, aptly named Singer sewing machine, which is also part of the exhibit. Fans can gain additional insight from reading letters Cline wrote to family members. “It’s an exhibit that will appeal to all generations,” Corwyn Garman, director of exhibitions, said. “People come in and have an idea of who she is, but often leave having learned something they didn’t know. Her family members shared stories with us, which gives this exhibition a personal touch.” MSV Executive Director Dana Hand Evans called the exhibit, which was three years in the making, “the most ambitious exhibition the MSV has organized to date.” For the devoted Patsy Cline fans who enjoy her songs, sing her praises, and are just plain “crazy” about the songstress, the pilgrimage to Winchester is a must. More information on this ambitious exhibition can be found at www.theMSV.org, and arrangements to tour her childhood home can be arranged by visiting www.celebratingpatsycline.org. ) ) )

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anniversary

the beatles – yeah, yeah, yeah! WRITTEN BY Lori M. Myers

THEY WERE FOUR MOP-H HAIRED SINGERS/MUSICIANS from across the pond who landed at John F. Kennedy International Airport 50 years ago. Thousands of fans bid them adieu at London’s Heathrow Airport and thousands welcomed them in America.

They had a sort of silly name—The Beatles—and we had only heard some of their tunes, such as “I Want to Hold Your Hand” and “Love Me Do,” simple sentiments about love and relationships. Yet, girls screamed and boys began imitating them in hairstyle and clothing. It was the beginning of the British invasion, and The Beatles had no idea the mark they would leave on music and American culture. But they soon found out as they took to the stage on The Ed Sullivan Show two days after their arrival. Beatlemania was here to stay. Facebook was not in existence in 1964, but I decided to use technology to trigger some friends’ memories. Cindy Dlugolecki of Mechanicsburg, Pa., recalls watching The Beatles’ American television debut that one momentous Sunday night. “I staked my place on the floor in front of the TV to watch The Ed Sullivan Show like every other teenage girl in America,” she recalls. “My father knew better than to say a word during their performance, but I’ll never forget what he said after: ‘Cindy, in 10 years, no one will remember these guys.’” Dlugolecki bought all of the group’s 45s for 99 cents and still has most of their albums and knows all the lyrics. “When our family went to the New York World’s Fair, The Beatles were in NYC for a concert,” she said. “My thought was, ‘I’m breathing the same air as they were,’ especially

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Paul, whom I dreamed of marrying.” Another boomer friend hooked up a tape recorder to their television’s sound system that night and recorded this first TV appearance. Suddenly, she and her siblings became the most popular kids in the neighborhood. For other boomers, being introduced to The Beatles and the albums that followed was their first foray into rock music and generational tensions. One friend remembers that her home became a battleground with her father, who preferred classical and opera, and so she ended up dancing in her room with the door closed. Another said her mother hated The Beatles because of their long hair and the signs of a culture shift they represented. She wouldn’t allow her daughter to listen to their music until high school. Ironically, 50 years later, her mother now likes many of the early Beatles tunes. But others of the older “don’t trust anyone over 30” generation embraced the music and the message. One friend recalls her English teacher taught poetry using the songs “She Loves You” and “That Girl.” The priest teaching her theology class taught “Can’t Buy Me Love.” Some boomers view their own shifts in beliefs and tastes as coinciding with The Beatles’ changing attitudes and direction in their lives. One friend was in seventh grade when Beatlemania hit, graduated high school and entered college


Photo credit: Portum for Wikipedia

) ) ) the beatles

Photo credit: United States Library of Congress Prints and Photographs division

anniversary

Above: Photograph of The Beatles as they arrive in New York City, Feb. 7, 1964. Left: Abbey Road studios.

during their activism and psychedelic periods, and found marriage and career just when The Beatles’ members sought refuge from their public life. In 1965, The Beatles returned to the United States and performed at Shea Stadium to a screaming, boisterous, and even fainting crowd of more than 55,000 fans. Some of my Facebook friends were there, and one recalls the cost of that ticket being $5.65. Her father drove five girls stuffed in the backseat of his Chevy Impala, with some of the girls sitting on milk crates. He waited outside the stadium during the concert, watching frustrated fans try to get in to see their favorite group, with one scaling the wall until police tackled him and ushered him out. Her father loved telling this story

until the day he died, always ending it with “the show on the outside was better than the show on the inside.” Another boomer remarks that the sound of all the people was akin to a 747 airliner or 10 big trucks revving their engines. “You could hear the music, but you weren’t sure what it was.” And yet another friend speculated that if one were to be exposed to The Beatles today, with no prior knowledge of them, that person would think their music to be new and contemporary. While other musicians’ works embodied the times during which they were creating, The Beatles evolved; they mirrored the upheaval and change of the 1960s as well as leading the way for a generation who yearned for new, progressive ideas.

The Beatles had no idea the mark they would leave on music and American culture.

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) ) ) the beatles

anniversary

One friend noted that The Beatles’ entire career, as an intact recording group, encompassed a relatively short amount of time: from 1963 to when they broke up in 1970. Their albums, from Please Please Me to Let It Be, encompass music techniques and messages that no other group has been able to replicate. Even their simple songs remain “now” and are being embraced by generations tired of cookie-cutter performers and repetitive tunes. The Beatles changed the music industry by writing their own songs and

raised the bar for those serious musicians who perhaps felt inhibited by the music that came before. The Beatles experimented with story and theme and reveled in bringing different music into the mainstream. They changed how pop/rock albums were produced when they created the first “concept” album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, transforming music from a set of singalong lyrics into an art form. They proved it possible that stadiums and television shows could fill the seats with fans who would go to the ends of

the earth to listen to their favorite performers and be part of a community of music lovers. “The Beatles changed pop culture in many ways,” says avid Beatles fan Ted Ciuzio of New York. “They changed how we wore our hair and dressed. They sang about love and helped bring transcendental meditation into the mainstream. They ushered in the psychedelic era, alluding that drugs expanded their minds creatively. They revolutionized album cover art and galvanized us with every album released.” ) ) )

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health

WRITTEN BY Leslie Feldman

Master Jose Johnson, chief instructor, Jose Johnson’s Chinese Martial Arts & Wellness Center in Harrisburg, leads a tai chi class.

ZUMBA. TAI CHI. HULA HOOPS. MORE AND MORE BABY boomers are putting on their sneakers and sweats and heading to the gym. Workouts have gone way beyond basic aerobics, Jane Fonda workouts, and walking on the treadmill. Today, it is about getting a workout but having fun while doing it. Research has shown that exercise can improve quality of life; help prevent or delay many diseases and disabilities, including some types of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes; improve balance, flexibility, and strength; and build endurance. But fitness during the midlife stages

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can be more difficult. Muscle fibers start to shrink in size and number with age, a process known as muscle atrophy. Weight gain, especially around the middle, starts to take place, and there is a loss of muscle mass caused by a slower metabolic rate, which also comes from age. That is why some form of exercise a few times per week is so important. It is also much better to build up

gradually when starting an exercise plan, allowing your body to acclimate and build strength over time. Martial Arts for Physical and Mental Well-b being Martial arts have gained popularity with all ages over the past decade. The internal styles of martial arts take a little more gentle approach on the body.


health ) ) ) stay fit

Tai chi is the best known and has the most documented health benefits, such as increased balance, improved bone density, and reduced blood pressure. It is slow paced and much easier on the body than most other forms of martial arts. Bagua and xingyi are a little less known here in the U.S. but are popular with people who shouldn’t do the more physically demanding styles of kung fu that younger students study but aren’t quite ready to slow down to tai chi speed yet. Qigong is perfect for those who are dealing with health and stress issues. Its primary focus is on the integration of the mind and the body. It helps with improving joint mobility, circulation, mental clarity, and focus. “As boomers, we need to really be conscious of how to conserve energy. That’s not saying that we don’t need to break a sweat, but the way we approach wellness has to be a little more balanced,” explains Master Jose Johnson, chief instructor, Jose Johnson’s Chinese Martial Arts & Wellness Center in Harrisburg. “Our bodies don’t recover as quickly as they did in our 20s and 30s. Our joints don’t respond well to the pounding we could give them in our earlier years, simply because of the miles we have put on them. Many of us are trying to come to grips with the changes we see in our bodies and our lives. So there is a real need for things that address the mental and spiritual aspect of our lives as well as the physical. My oldest black-belt student is

in her 80s!” Johnson believes that staying active is a key to a long life. “Every person I have ever met that has been healthy and happy at an old age has always been active. It’s OK to take your foot off the gas a little, to not push so hard all the time, even coast a little when necessary. Our bodies and minds crave challenge. They want to work. Give them what they need and they will be there for you.” Join the Party! Zumba® for Good Health Zumba is a dance-fitness program that involves dance and aerobic elements. The choreography

incorporates hip-hop, soca, samba, salsa, merengue, mambo, and martial arts. For baby boomers with some orthopedic issues, Zumba Gold and Zumba Gold Toning, with the motto “get grooving at your own pace,” take the Zumba formula and modify the moves and pacing to suit the needs of these participants, as well as those just starting their journey to a fit and healthy lifestyle. Rae Johnson-Bundy, a Zumba instructor at Superfly Fitness in Lancaster County and fellow baby boomer, says middle-aged adults and older love this exercise program because they are the original “party animals.”

Rae Johnson-Bundy, a baby boomer herself and Zumba instructor, leads a class at Superfly Fitness.

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) ) ) stay fit

health

Left: Peg Owen leads a Fit Forever step class at the Carlisle Family YMCA, tailored to mature adults.

“ Right: Members at the Carlisle Family YMCA benefit from a vinyasa flow yoga class that incorporates posture and breathing techniques.

“They like to dance and actually grew up during the age of disco,” says Johnson-Bundy. “They are looking for a group with whom to have fun and socialize. For those who may have lost their spouse or are single, it is a wonderful social outlet.” She adds that Zumba allows participants to feel like they have exercised, without feeling pain or getting hurt. “This group may have started to have some medical issues or physical limitations that need to be addressed

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with modifications and understanding.” Exercise Has Many Benefits MaryLynn Schwartz, a fitness instructor at Carlisle Family YMCA who teaches Hot Hula, Zumba, and senior dance fitness, believes baby boomers are more active than ever and enjoy taking advantage of the many opportunities available to stay fit. “I believe there are many benefits that this population enjoys above the others,” says Schwartz. “The first is

Middleaged adults and older love [Zumba] because they are the original party animals.

the social outlet: being with other boomers, making new friends, and establishing a strong support group. “The second benefit, I believe, is working on balance exercises so that by the time these boomers are seniors, it will keep them safer from falls and injuries caused by lack of balance. When assessed recently for risk of falling, the participants in my class stunned the evaluators with their abilities. It became quickly apparent the difference between those who exercise and do balance activities


health ) ) ) stay fit

MaryLynn Schwartz, fitness instructor at the Carlisle Family YMCA, leads the HOT HULA demonstration at the recently held Cumberland County women's expo.

versus those who don’t.” HOT HULA fitness® is a new craze you’ll find at the Carlisle Family YMCA. Do you know what it is? Is it using hula hoops? No, although even hula hooping is another wildly popular fitness routine that is catching on, as evident at the women’s expos (www.aGreatWayToSpendMyDay.com) where each event ends with the Hula Hoop Contest.

HOT HULA is similar to Polynesian dancing with the sounds of reggae music and drum beats … all you need is a tropical beach. It’s a good fitness routine for just about anybody and gives a great workout in 60 minutes, with emphasis on the abs, glutes, quads, and arms. Be Safe When Exercising Both aerobic and weight-bearing workouts can leave athletes susceptible

to a condition that has been characterized as “boomeritis,” episodes of tendinitis, bursitis, stress fractures, and meniscus tears. It’s easier than you think to hurt yourself, so when beginning an exercise plan, slowly build to a sustainable level. And always check with your physician prior to beginning any fitness routine to make certain you are healthy enough to exercise. ) ) )

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what is your skin telling you? WRITTEN BY Leslie Feldman

YOUR SKIN, THE BODY’S LARGEST AND MOST VISIBLE organ, has numerous functions. It protects you from the environment, helps control your temperature and your fluid and electrolyte balance, and is made up of nerve receptors that enable you to feel touch, pain, and pressure. Skin problems are common among the baby boomer population. Some skin conditions are considered a normal part of aging, while others may be a sign of a health problem. If You’ve Had Chickenpox, You Could Get Shingles According to the CDC, approximately one in three people will experience shingles in their lifetime. Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is more prevalent in people 50 years of age or older than in younger people. Many people this age had chickenpox at some time in their life. The virus stays in the body and can cause shingles years later. As we age, our natural immunity doesn’t protect as well. Shingles is also more common in people whose immune systems are weakened because of diseases like cancer or medications like chemotherapy or steroids. “Usual sights of shingles are the face, scalp, and torso, with blisters and redness cropping up in a localized pattern on one side of the affected area. Antiviral medications, internal cortisone, and salves may expedite healing,” explains Richard Herschaft, M.D., a dermatologist with Dermatology Physicians, Inc. in Lancaster. Sarah Matunis, corporate clinical coordinator for Rite Aid, adds, “Shingles is a painful, blistering skin rash that lasts for months. The main symptom is pain, which can be quite severe. Additional symptoms

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can include fever, chills, headache, and an upset stomach. In rare cases, it can lead to pneumonia, hearing problems, blindness, encephalitis, or death. “While shingles often lasts from two to four weeks, for about one in five people, severe pain can last for much longer.” Many people aren’t aware of the shingles vaccine. Zostavax™, given as a single shot, is used to help prevent shingles and is readily available. You can get it at your physician’s office or pop into your local pharmacy and a pharmacist can vaccinate you. “Along with the medical reasons to get vaccinated, on a personal note, I’ve never met someone who had shingles that didn’t wish they could have prevented it,” says Matunis. Why Do I Have Rosy Cheeks? About 16 million Americans have rosacea, according to the National Rosacea Society. This skin condition, characterized by redness on the cheeks, nose, chin, or forehead, is quite prevalent in adults 30 to 60 years of age. Because of its red-faced, acne-like effects on personal appearance, however, it can cause significant psychological, social, and occupational problems if left untreated. There are several treatments, including oral antibiotics, topical antibiotics, and sulfa-based face washes. It is important to seek a physician’s advice before using over-the-counter medications, since they can actually irritate skin that is prone to rosacea.

Richard Herschaft, M.D., a dermatologist with Dermatology Physicians, Inc. in Lancaster.

When Your Immune System Attacks Psoriatic arthritis occurs when your body’s immune system begins to attack healthy cells and tissue. It is a chronic disease characterized by a form of inflammation of the skin (psoriasis) and joints (inflammatory arthritis). Although anyone can develop psoriatic arthritis, it occurs most often in adults between the ages of 40 and 50. A small percentage of people with psoriatic arthritis develop arthritis mutilans, a severe, painful, and disabling form of the disease. Over time, arthritis mutilans destroys the small bones in your hands, especially the fingers, leading to permanent deformity and disability. Treatments for psoriatic arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and immunosuppressant medications. What Are Those Scaly Patches? If it’s worse than a case of dandruff, it is probably seborrhea, another common condition in baby boomers. Marked by reddened, oily scales near the ears, nose, scalp, and brows, seborrhea may be itchy and annoying. Over-the-counter preparations with

cortisone or zinc and special shampoos may be helpful, and sometimes prescription treatments are necessary. The “Signs” of Aging Certain growths are more prevalent with age. These include lentigines, also called “age spots” or “liver spots,” and actinic keratoses, which are precancerous growths and skin cancers. “Growths that appear new, irregular in shape, change in some way, cause symptoms such as itching or soreness, or bleed warrant a physician’s evaluation,” says Herschaft. “Most of these types of lesions are due to years of exposure to the sun and may be prevented by sunscreen use.” Grab the Moisturizer! As we age, the skin loses some of its natural moisture content and becomes drier. This can cause scaling and itchiness of the skin, especially in climates that are windy and cool. “Moisturizing the skin locks in water and may be particularly helpful after bathing," says Herschaft. "Bathing in mild, gentle soaps and using moisturizers with pertrolatum, 12 percent ammonium lactate, and urea may be of benefit. Steroid creams can be used for serious outbreaks." ) ) )

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from fish boils to cheese curds WRITTEN BY Jenna Rose Robbins

BEFORE FINALLY VISITING THIS PAST FALL, DOOR County had been on my short list of American destinations. What I knew about the region before arriving was limited to its football legacy, a historic maritime history, and—it being Wisconsin—a dining tradition dripping with cheese. Door County delivered on all points, but it also held a few surprises, including a rich Scandinavian heritage and a glut of cherries and lighthouses— just a few of the many reasons that Fodor’s recently listed it as one of the country’s top 10 small towns. Sturgeon Bay, the county seat, acts as gateway to the Door beyond and is the last place you’ll spot a chain-store sign before you head into the heart of the county, a verdant peninsula whose inhabitants embrace both long-held traditions and forward-looking ideals. No fewer than 11 lighthouses dot the coastline, a fact that residents are proud to remind you of, and where you don’t find a longstanding cherry or apple farm, you’re bound to find a winery. At the Orchard Country Winery and Market, the Lautenbach family has been producing apples, cherries, and grapes for five generations and inviting the community to take part in events such as wine tastings, cherry harvest festivals (featuring their famous cherry pit-spitting competitions), and pieeating contests. Their numerous wines have won awards across the country and, this being Wisconsin, a wide range of cherry

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Left: Popelka Trenchard Glass; American Folklore Theatre. Below: Door County Maritime Museum.

wine is always on the menu. Sleigh rides in winter and seasonal berrypicking make the Lautenbach farm a year-round destination. But you can’t say you’ve truly visited Door County until you’ve taken part, like it or not, in a fish boil. This method of cooking involves a cauldron of fish over an open fire onto which kerosene is thrown, causing the water to boil over, thus removing the oil and leaving only tender, flaky fish—and possibly a few singed eyebrows. Perhaps due to insurance purposes, the practice is mostly conducted as entertainment for out-of-towners, rather than by the locals. The Old Post Office Restaurant’s fish boil demonstration is one of the more popular, likely due to the colorful tales and corny jokes that precede the sparking of the inferno that gets guests running for cover. A more tranquil setting lends itself to the Hands On Art Studio, a yearround, multi-building enclave where aspiring artists can tap into their inner muse with any number of activities, including ceramics, glass melding, jewelry making, and metalworking.

Friday nights cater to the 21-and-over crowd, featuring adult libations, food, and, on select evenings, live music to awaken your creative spirit. The area’s thriving arts scene also plays out in local theater, whose season peaks in summer and fall when the weather allows for outdoor performances. You’re as likely to find an original local production— Cheeseheads: The Musical and Lombardi were playing during my visit—as you are an old classic, and for an area with so small of a population, the quality of talent to be found is impressive. In Door County, nature plays a starring role all year long, with water

sports in the summer, brilliant fall foliage, cross-country skiing in the winter, and hiking most any season. Kayaking the bay allows paddlers to get close to wildlife, while ziplines, offroad Segway tours, and biking trails provide adventure-seekers with an array of views that will take your breath away. If you want to experience the region’s maritime history, the museum in Sturgeon Bay offers a wealth of exhibits, including the John Purves, a restored tugboat that once sailed the Great Lakes. For a more interactive experience, hop aboard the ferry to Washington Island, which will take you across the

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Clockwise, from top left: Door County Kayak Tours; Rowleys Bay Resort aerial view; Eagle Harbor kayaks; Wilson’s Restaurant and Ice Cream Parlor.

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fabled “Death’s Door”—the strait is scattered with shipwrecks—for which the county is named. Once on the island—which, with only 700 residents, claims to have the secondlargest Icelandic population in the world— you’d better get your camera ready. Sodroofed buildings, a medieval-style Norwegian church sporting carved dragonheads, and farm buildings from the 1880s dot the landscape, which can easily be explored by bike or the popular Cherry Train, a guided tram tour. Don’t set sail back for the mainland without first stopping at Nelsen’s Hall and becoming one of the rumored 10,000 new members a year. During Prohibition, the owner kept the establishment open by purchasing a pharmacist’s license in order to serve bitters, a shot of which will earn you entrance into the world-famous Bitters Club. If tippling isn’t on your vacation to-do list, head to Ephraim, a burg of only 200 that is best known for being the only dry municipality in the state of Wisconsin. After visiting the village’s picturesque white buildings, Pioneer Schoolhouse, and Goodleston log cabin, make time for a bite at Wilson’s Restaurant and Ice Cream Parlor, a historic landmark built in 1906 that still has its original old-fashioned soda fountain and that entices visitors with its home-brewed draft root beer. With all that checked off, there’s only one more must-do on your list: sample cheese curds. These little nuggets of deepfried goodness are served on practically every menu in the state, so there’s no excuse not to try them on your visit. And with that last item, you can say you’ve truly done the Door! ) ) )

Visit these helpful websites: • Door County Visitors Bureau – www.doorcounty.com • Orchard Country Winery and Market – www.orchardcountry.com • The Old Post Office Restaurant – www.oldpostoffice-doorcounty.com • Hands On Art Studio – www.handsonartstudio.com • Cherry Train Tours – www.cherrytrain.com • Wilson’s Restaurant and Ice Cream Parlor – www.wilsonsicecream.com

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luxury in anguilla WRITTEN BY SJ Anderson


feature ) ) ) anguilla

LIFE CAN BE HECTIC, CHALLENGING, DEMANDING, or any other descriptor that fits your world. Work life and family life often get out of balance, resulting in stress and pressure from many angles. Somehow we find a way to dig in, work though the item at hand, and envision a positive outcome.

All the while, we look forward to that time when we can put everything aside and get away to recharge and rejuvenate. Some of us turn to the mountains, others take a cruise, many go “down the shore,” and some just get reacquainted with their home. This vacation takes us to the island of Anguilla in the British West Indies. Nestled on the northernmost tip of the Leeward Islands chain, Anguilla is easily accessible via flights through San Juan, Puerto Rico, and St. Maarten. Anguilla is known for its beautiful beaches and broad culinary options. During the early colonial period, Anguilla was administered by the British through Antigua, an island about 114 miles southeast. In 1824, Saint Kitts, about 64 miles south, was granted administrative control. In 1967, the British granted Saint Kitts and nearby Nevis autonomy and also incorporated Anguilla into the new unified dependency. This was not accepted by Anguillans and, following rebellions in 1967 and 1969 as well as a brief period of independence, British authority was fully restored in July 1971. Ultimately, Anguilla seceded from Saint Kitts and Nevis and became a separate British colony. With a tourism strategy taking shape in 1980, the government of the virtually hotel-free island chose to limit commercial development to discreet, small hotels and elegant, upscale resorts. Today, the 16-mile by 3-mile island is well known for its luxurious accommodations and pristine beaches. There are no casinos and no cruise ships nor shopping malls, although a quick ferry

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Above is the entrance to Cap Juluca, an idyllic beachfront retreat located on mile-long Maundays Bay. Pictured top is one of their beautiful, flower-lined walkways.

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ride to St. Martin can fill that void. Cap Juluca is an idyllic beachfront retreat. The glamorous resort is considered by many to have the best beach in the Caribbean. Located on mile-long Maundays Bay, it has continued to raise the bar for luxury since it first opened in 1988. The resort, featuring Greco-Moorish architecture, has recently received millions of dollars’ worth of upgrades, including the reconstruction of the Main House social hub, the addition of 60,000 new flowering plants, modernization of back-of-the-house functions, and changes and revitalization to its four dining venues and posh guest accommodations. Every one of the resort’s 15 villas housing 70 guestrooms is oceanfront, allowing guests to feel gentle Caribbean breezes blowing across their private, covered terrace into their lavish guestroom through louvered plantation shutters. Guestrooms have recently been revitalized with new furnishings, fabrics, and high-end


feature ) ) ) anguilla

linens. Cool, white ceramic floors play off the powder-soft, white-sand beach just beyond the terrace. Cap Juluca’s world-class dining takes place in oceanfront settings where internationally inspired fare is blended with the flavors of the island. The cuisine is enhanced by a garden-totable approach highlighted by the use of resortgrown herbs and spices. Dining options include: Pimms – Overlooking scenic Maundays Bay, this high-end dining venue features a fusion of fine European cuisine with distinctive Caribbean flavors and has an extensive, award-winning wine list. The culinary team is adept at offering guests ideal wine pairings. The private wine room is available for hosting intimate parties highlighted by a special five-course menu. Blue – With its breathtaking panoramic views of St. Maarten and the Caribbean Sea, Blue is the place to enjoy a wide array of

Oceanfront villas line the famous white-sand, turquoise-water beach, where you can take an exercise class.

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Mango’s Seaside Grill is an open-air facility located on Barnes Bay and serves some of the freshest cuisine on the island, including local crayfish.

Pimms restaurant overlooks Maundays Bay and features a fusion of fine European cuisine with distinctive Caribbean flavors.

international cuisine and various dining options, from a complimentary continental buffet breakfast to a full American breakfast buffet to an a la carte breakfast menu. Every Monday from 6 to 7 p.m. is a manager’s cocktail reception known as “Mondays at Maundays,” where guests can meet and mingle with their fellow guests and members of the resort’s management staff as they enjoy complimentary tropical drinks and hors d’oeuvres. There are a number of fantastic dining options across the island as well. With many restaurants to choose from, you’re sure to find something that suits your tastes. From fine dining to casual, roadside barbeques to beachfront

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bistros, Anguilla’s chefs create a fusion of flavors from around the world. A “must visit” restaurant while in Anguilla is Mango’s Seaside Grill, located on Barnes Bay. This is a wellknown, open-air facility that easily fulfills anyone’s fantasies of a beautiful beachfront eatery, and it does so while serving some of the freshest cuisine on the island. The hot, crusty rolls are made fresh daily, and all desserts, including ice cream and sorbet, are made on the premises. David and Kim Coburn, former New Englanders, are veteran Anguilla restaurateurs and have established a strong following with their wonderful entrees and world-class wines. When there, remember to save room for their

amazing desserts. Mango’s Seaside Grill is certainly a place for an evening of pure magic. Whether at Mango’s or any other establishment, one of the finest meals on the island is the local crayfish. This isn’t the freshwater shrimp-like crawdad crustacean, that the name may conjure up in your mind. Rather, saltwater crayfish is a catch-all name for any of the species of spiny lobster that do not have the large claws like our wellknown “Maine” lobster. The Anguillan crayfish refers to the spotted spiny lobster, typically 5-8 inches long, that is found throughout the Caribbean. Some of the finest beaches in the world are in Anguilla. Cap Juluca prides


feature

itself on its famous white-sand, turquoise-water beach and its beach services and amenities. From customdesigned chaise lounges with extra-large umbrellas, chaise-side beverages, and meal service to complimentary chilled towels and afternoon sorbet, the resort leaves nothing to chance and awaits your command. Cap Juluca is ideally situated to offer a varied menu of water-sport options as well as other extraordinary outdoor pursuits. Director of Activities Cardigan Connor, former English first-class cricketer and native Anguillan, is highly credentialed to oversee the resort’s sports, fitness, and recreational programs. Complimentary water sports include swimming in the Caribbean or in the 1,800-square-foot pool, scuba-diving excursions, waterskiing on Maundays Bay, wakeboarding (if you like snowboarding, you’ll love this), kayaking, windsurfing, paddle boarding, and Sunfish and Hobie Cat catamaran sailing. There are some good snorkeling spots to check out the marine life in the beautiful, clear waters of Anguilla, and sunset and island cruises as well as private boat excursions can be arranged. Guests are welcome at the nearby championship golf course. The resort’s Tennis Centre offers weekly tennis clinics and has a tennis pro and pro shop. In the Wellness Centre, there’s a well-equipped cardio fitness room, weight room, and private personaltraining opportunities. Also, guests may take part in bocce, croquet, yoga, cardio

sculpting, Pilates, and Caribbean dance lessons. For those who enjoy the outdoors but on dry land, there is an herb garden walking trail, a jogging loop along Maundays Bay and Cove Bay beaches, and bike rentals. Even horseback riding and bicycle tours of Anguilla can be set up. Yes, life can be hectic, challenging, and demanding at times. There’s something about digging your toes in the sand or floating on a raft in the gentle Caribbean surf that makes everything OK. The stress and pressure dissolves in the Caribbean surf, and the 3 p.m. sorbet

) ) ) anguilla

Anguilla is a British overseas territory in the Caribbean, lying east of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands and directly north of Saint Martin.

on the beach seems the only schedule worth following. The rejuvenation process is in full swing, and nothing but positive outcomes lie ahead. ) ) ) helpful websites: www.ivisitanguilla.com www.capjuluca.com www.mangosseasidegrill.com

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not of his own doing WRITTEN BY Lynda Hudzick

SOMETIMES LITTLE THINGS HAPPEN that lead our lives in a direction that we may never have expected. That’s exactly what happened to Bill Johnson, the owner of Iron Nature – Artistic Metalwork for His Glory. This married father of three has been a teacher in the Hempfield School District for 26 years, and he has always had an interest in metalwork. “I have a great appreciation for the old craftsman hand techniques of metalworking. I love to be creative, to make things, and especially make things from recycled and disposed materials.” Today, he is the artist and owner of his own metalworking company, creating one-of-a-kind metal crosses and other pieces. Many of his pieces include messages and Biblical quotes that reflect his strong faith and that of the individuals or groups who have commissioned his work. Johnson’s journey, or “divine appointment” as he refers to it, began back in 2001 when his church was going through a building campaign.

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A work of art from beginning to end.

“We were seeking to build a building on our property. As a church, we adopted a prayer focus activity that involved nails. Each family was asked to bring home a small bag of nails. They were asked to remove one nail a day and pray over the new church and the construction process.” The nails were then returned to the church, and after a while, they began to build up in the pastor’s office. “A lady in our church knew that I did metalwork and asked me if I would like to create something with the nails that would commemorate the building project,” Johnson said. “I was thrilled to be asked but really had no idea of what I might do with the nails.” After several weeks of prayer and

meditation, the answer came to him. “The idea was to construct a cross from the nails. This entire form of the cross would be made from nails and from a distance, it would be very visible as the shape of a cross. But when the viewer would draw nearer to the cross, he would notice that there is something written on it.” Johnson fashioned carefully selected words from the nails, and they were welded onto the surface so they could only be seen if an individual were to approach the cross up close. These words reflected many of the basic principles that are the foundation of his faith, including forgiveness, truth, love, peace, victory, hope, and joy. “I believe this is symbolic of our

lives,” Johnson said. “A person can walk past the cross and not give it attention. He can also choose to walk closer to the cross … one doesn’t receive anything unless he makes an effort to draw near. And the really neat thing about the cross in our lobby is that it is made up of over 2,000 nails, and each represents a prayer from someone who was in our church at the time.” After completing the project, Johnson received an enormous amount of encouragement to continue with his artistic endeavors and said that “a new journey and direction in life was placed before me.” Up until this time, Johnson had never used his metalworking skills in a spiritual sense.

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“The two interests became unified after I answered the call to create the piece for my church,” he said. “I was a skilled metalworker, but never thought of applying it in a form of Christian artwork. After reading Rick Warren’s book, The Purpose Driven Life, I quickly realized a unique way to portray my faith was by using metal as the medium.” And from there, Iron Nature was born. “On a typical day, [when not teaching students] I am under the welding hood, grinding, welding, assembling parts, and finishing the

products that we make. I do enjoy creating new pieces and going to shows where I meet people and share testimonies. I also enjoy interacting with churches as they install pieces into the worship setting.” And how do the clients feel about the finished products? “There are numerous stories of unimaginable events. I would have to say that this is the most exciting aspect of what I do. It gives me inspiration, solidifies my faith, and continues to show me the intimate nature of our God. I have countless stories that have amazed me beyond description and

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have truly transformed my faith. There is something mysterious that happens behind the ministry of these metal crosses. In one case, a boy’s life was spared from suicide because of a small cross that was given to him.” Always up for a challenge, Johnson described his current piece that was recently installed in the Lebanon Area Evangelical Free Church. “The request was to design a ‘crown of thorns’ chandelier that could be installed in the welcome center of the church,” he said. “The piece was intended to look like a crown of thorns and be 6 feet in diameter. The piece would then be lit with red LED lights that are cast upon the thorns. The project is unique and is mounted in the center of the room. “Just off to the side is a large holy names cross, containing 23 names of God. The combination of the two pieces of artwork provide for a very different experience for the viewer.” Johnson also feels strongly about investing in his local community. “We invest in the opportunity to help teach others about the Christian faith,” he said. “We support ministries and missions related to this.” Although most of Johnson’s work is Christian based, he does design other works of art. Johnson advises that no one should be afraid to pursue a dream. “Step out in faith and there will be new doors that will open for you … In my own strength, I could have never foreseen an opportunity like this. It means so much to me because it wasn’t of my own doing.” ) ) )


Please, Join Us! Third Annual

Premiere

Lancaster County

omen’s Expo

E March 22, 2014 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Hershey Lodge 325 University Dr. Hershey

May 17, 2014 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Spooky Nook Sports 2913 Spooky Nook Rd. Manheim

The premiere Dauphin County women’s expo and the third annual Lancaster County women’s expo will be held this spring. These fun-filled and information-packed events feature fashion shows, demonstrations, free spa treatments, and a wide variety of exhibitors. It is a day to connect, chat, relax, and rejuvenate.

Beauty Home Health Shopping Fashion Finance Technology Nutrition

aGreatWayToSpendMyDay.com FREE Online Guest Registration! ($5 at the door)

717.285.1350


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photos courtesy of Fernhill Landscapes

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WRITTEN BY Lori M. Myers

SPRING IS NOT LONG OFF, AND MANY OF US ARE EAGERLY AWAITING ITS arrival. We’ll soon see buds peeking out from our trees or up from the ground.

Outdoor living space designed for enjoyment and relaxation.

It’s bad enough being cooped up all winter, but why would you want to stay inside in spring and summer and not enjoy Mother Nature? Why not make your outdoor space as welcoming and beautiful as your home? “The possibilities of life outside the home are only limited by the imagination,” says Doug Myers, owner/designer of Fernhill Landscapes in Strasburg. Myers, whose businesses serves southcentral and southeastern Pennsylvania, admits he’s not afraid of being innovative and, in fact, many of his clientele frequently ask him to step outside the box and think creatively, beyond simple plants and flowers. “Through the years, I started expanding into an abundance of other trades,” Myers says, “and now when I speak with our clients about projects, we are looking at building walls and pools, patios and pergolas, pool houses and water features, lighting, and really almost anything you can do outside.” Fernhill’s projects range from simply planting a tree to projects that are complex in their design and nature but sublime and peaceful in their result. Most projects can take two weeks to several months to design because real thought, creativity, and a lot of problem solving are needed to come up with great design. Too many homeowners, Myers says, have devices or elements such as outdoor kitchens, fireplaces, and water features that are both functionally and aesthetically dislocated from their site. These types of issues, where design and taste come into

play, can change the look and feel of one’s backyard. One such space is located in Camp Hill with a courtyard area that originally had no relationship to the mid-century home. “It was filled with some type of stamped concrete and a collection of shrubs that did not relate to each other, let alone the home,” Myers says. “The result [of Myers’s redesign] became this elegant, modern space with striking visuals and a range of rich textures.” In Stevens, a water feature and a new, romantic planting style were used to establish a theme for its creative homeowners, who worked from their home and needed a garden that would stimulate them visually yet provide refuge. Myers added a water feature and a romantic planting style amid a historic farmhouse and barn/studio already on the property. The result was a space that was influenced by history but related to the present. At a home in Hershey, a stone wall and a water feature with a copper scupper were installed as focal points, along with a contemporary planting style with hedge composed of fountain grass and more traditional boxwood. While cost is many times a big consideration, Myers advises homeowners to think in terms of having a project completed in steps rather than all in one time. “We encourage clients that know what they want but find the total cost beyond their initial budget to wait and install their plan in phases,” Myers says. “The outcome almost always results in a more satisfied

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creating beautiful living space outdoors

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feature photos courtesy of Igneous Rock Gallery

Simple lava rock creates focal points of art.

client. Too often, builders and homeowners want to rush the process, and then both end up with a project that does not succeed on all the levels they had hoped. It is much better to wait on an excellent product than to rush and get a mediocre product.” Sometimes a fountain can appear to have a life of its own—through shape, color, and history. The materials that Robert Wertz, owner of Igneous Rock

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Gallery in Mechanicsburg, works with every day have such attributes and, in turn, homeowners reap the benefits of this material’s beauty. Wertz offers design options for homeowners in the realm of these unique fountains—from candleholders to outdoor torches to memory candle urns—using a highly colored lava rock called Beaver Canyon andesite. “My artistic intention is to alter this

natural material as minimally as possible while accentuating its appeal by focusing on the composition and presentation of the columns,” Wertz says. “I don’t know how mere mortals could create something as beautiful as this ancient stone.” According to Wertz, this rock formed into columns approximately 50 million years ago when lava breached the Earth’s crust and cooled. Long, narrow


feature

clients have remarked on the naturalness of these unique sculptural fountains as well as their beauty and ability to provide a sense of calm. These fountains become a work of outdoor art, much like a most-loved canvas hanging above the fireplace. Once a fountain is chosen, Wertz can offer design services in the vicinity of the fountain, thus completing the “picture.” While Wertz always has six fountains of various configurations and price points on display and ready to install, he does consider the scale of the space, the budget, and which style of fountain “speaks” to each client.

“I watch clients’ reactions to the various flowing fountains on exhibit in our showroom,” he says. “In part, my creativity is inspired by what moves the client. When they admire certain features, it helps me engage in the process of creating a custom arrangement they will value long term. I also enjoy sharing my own inclinations and preferences along the way.” So consider the time you took to create just the right look on the inside of your home. Now put that same care into creating something beautiful on the outside. The choices are endless and “are only limited by your imagination.” ) ) )

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spires developed, making this material unique not only due to the dramatic width-to-height ratio, but also because of its diverse color palette and curvy formation. Yet, the vibrant color is only on the surface. “If you cut through a cross section of the rock, you will see the darker color of the parent magma,” Wertz says. “But after millions of years, highly mineralized water found access through the crevices and oxidized and altered the outer surface.” This act of nature makes homeowners the victors. Along with the fountain being a conversation piece, Wertz’s

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home

will your roof pass the tests of seasons? WRITTEN BY Lori M. Myers

AS BABY BOOMERS GO ABOUT THEIR BUSY WEEKDAYS AND WEEKENDS, it’s always good to stop a minute, gaze above us, and take a long, hard look at the roof. Yes, the roof! Our home is our most important investment, and a good, intact roof prevents the outside elements from seeping in and protects our most cherished possessions. While some boomers may have decided to start fresh with a newer move-right-in home or downsized to an established neighborhood, many others have owned their homes for decades. No matter what your situation, a strong roof can help you feel secure and increase your home’s value.

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But, like anything else, there are options for the types of roofing that are out there for purchase. Asphalt is one such choice homeowners can make. Asphalt roofing shingles are probably the most commonly used covering for residential housing. Asphalt’s purpose is primarily to serve as a waterproofing agent. It stays flexible and will not dry out or become hard or brittle for the life of the shingle. Categories within asphalt roofing shingles include strip asphalt


home ) ) ) will your roof pass the test?

Tim Krimmel doing asphalt shingle repair due to wind damage (above), and working on a rubber roof patch repair where the seams overlap (below).

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roofing shingles or three-tab shingles, which are single-layered. Strip shingles with more than one layer of tabs are called dimensional shingles, which provide a thicker and richer appearance on the roof and are heavier in weight than strip asphalt shingles, or laminated shingles with dozens of designer styles and colors that mimic natural slate or natural

Paying a small fee to inspect your roof can save you thousands of dollars by doing preventive maintenance.

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shake roofing shingles. “The average 20- or 25-year threetab shingle that we are replacing is only 15 to 20 years old,” says Howie Zeager of Zimmerman Exteriors in Lancaster. “So if you have three-tab shingles and you know how long it’s been on your roof, you will want to keep a closer eye on it starting year 15. For architectural or dimensional shingles it’s around year 20.” There are obvious signs to look for when you’re trying to decide whether a roof replacement or fix is warranted. That’s when you begin hearing or seeing the drip-drip of water entering a room’s interior. “But generally you don’t want to wait until then,” Zeager warns. “If you keep an eye on your roof, there are a couple of things to look for from the ground, such as shingles missing, shingles lifting when it is very windy, shingles being pushed up by nails. If you can safely climb onto your roof you can look for excessive cracks in your shingles or nail heads wearing through the shingles.” Another type of roof and one that is a great system for low-slope roof applications is rubber roofing. This type is very durable, low maintenance, and can last a long time. Tim Krimmel, president of Krimmel Construction in Lancaster, is a certified Versico rubber installer, along with performing all types of other interior and exterior home improvements. “Rubber roofs will last 20-plus years if properly installed,” Krimmel

says. “They cost approximately $5.50 to $8.50 per square foot depending on the size of the roof, rubber thickness, penetrations or obstructions on the roof, insulating board thickness, layers of old roofing to tear off, etc.” Rubber roof installation usually takes one to two days for the average residential home, according to Krimmel. Homeowners can also choose to go green by using natural cedar shake materials for their roof. Cedar shakes are made by carefully cutting down and splitting pieces of cedar, which is a soft wood that grows in many regions of the world. The look of a cedar roof tends to be more rustic and can mix in well with a wide variety of architectural styles. It’s also environmentally friendly. Durability is another big plus for cedar shakes roofing. It resists insects and UV damage naturally and also withstands hail and heavy storms if installed properly. While it’s easy to take for granted that your roof will hold up through the heat of summer, the rains of spring, and the snows of winter, it’s best to be proactive. “I would recommend a roof inspection every three to five years on all types of roofs,” Krimmel says. “Paying a small fee to inspect your roof can save you thousands of dollars by doing preventive maintenance. Your home is usually your biggest asset and needs to be maintained just like your car.” And if you spot trouble, it’s best not


to give the job to someone who just shows up at your door and will do the job for less. It is important for homeowners to always get an honest assessment from a roofer you trust because there may be instances where a repair is all that is needed, making a total replacement unnecessary. With that in mind, there are particular credentials to request. Krimmel recommends that homeowners only use a certified roofing contractor for these types of projects. “It is also a good idea to make sure the contractor is licensed in Pennsylvania and insured, and ask for references before you pick a contractor,” he says. Zeager instructs homeowners to look for a contractor that is listed with the Better Business Bureau and has at least an A grade. They should also have a Pennsylvania contractor’s license and have roofing job referrals available. “To take it even farther, there are specific certifications for asphalt shingles, cedar shingles, and rubber,” Zeager says. “If you are looking for cedar or rubber roofing, then the certification is much more important because those types of roofing require a more trained installer.” So if you’re a boomer who plans on many more years in their home or even one who is considering a move, pay attention to that protective covering above you. Make sure it’s intact and doesn’t allow in any unwanted elements. And if you should have any doubts, hire a trained and certified roofer to offer you the best advice to make your home not only strong, but also beautiful. ) ) )

Howard B. Melnick, MD • John J. Moffitt, MD Glen J. Mesaros, MD • Donald Short, M.A., FAAA • Sharon K. Hughes, M.S., CCC-A spring 2014 |

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lifestyle

is living longer affecting marriages? Bikin WRITTEN BY Lynne Gold-B

A NUMBER OF YEARS AGO, I WAS ASKED TO PRESENT A PROGRAM ON what divorce would be like in 2020. In light of our nation’s increasingly long lifespan, with Willard Scott saying “happy birthday” to a whole lot of 100-year-olds on the Today show, we are seeing people easily live into their 90s and beyond. In exploring what divorce might be like in 2020, we obviously have to consider the idea that people could get married in their 20s and then, conceivably, remain married for 80 years. Are most people able to stay in a relationship for that length of time? In today’s modern times, the answer is

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probably not. In the program I presented on divorce in 2020, we even talked about the concept of “renewable” marriages. Should we say that every 25 years a couple has the right to decide whether or not they want to stay married, remarry, or just walk away entirely? Divorce attorneys are now seeing a large number of what are being called “gray divorces,” or divorces in which couples who have been married for 30 years or more are deciding to end their marriages. This marks a major change in the marriage and divorce landscape. A spouse is deciding— perhaps after 10 years of dissatisfaction with their situation—that it is time to move on. One of the impacts of our longer lifespan is the fact that people in their 60s and 70s today are much healthier than seniors were 20 and 30 years ago. That factor alone results in some couples no longer embracing the status quo, which used to be, “Well, I am old, and I might as well stay where I am.” Many unhappy folks are most likely going to say, “This marriage is clearly no longer working. I still have a lot of years of potential happiness, so I will get out and look for someone who will make me happy.”

That is not to say that we don’t see many couples celebrating their 50th, 60th, and 70th wedding anniversaries. It is to say, however, that fewer men are remaining in unhappy situations and more are deciding to trade in their 60+-year-old spouses for a younger model. These “gray divorces” present a number of new challenges for attorneys, as there are many problems unique to these older, long-term married couples. For women who have been the traditional stay-at-home spouse, the impact of this trend is destructive. To be “abandoned” after so many years of staying at home to support their working spouse can result in serious depression, anger, and fear of the new, strange, and unknown. For women who are either the breadwinners in the family or who are otherwise financially secure, they may be the one leaving the marriage and moving on. As for the legal considerations and challenges involved in ending long-term marriages, one of the major issues, of course, is alimony for the spouse who earns less. After many years out of the job market, especially for more traditional women, expecting them to go back and find a job, especially in this economy, is not as easy as it might have once been. And what kind of earning capacity would there be for someone who has


lifestyle

of their own, whichever amount is higher. It is very difficult to live on that. In addition, the longer the marriage, the more assets there usually are. However, these assets may be illiquid. Perhaps there is a vacation home, or the monies are all tied up in a business. A pension or 401(k) may be divided and turned into an annuity, but even that income stream may be an insufficient amount for the dependent spouse. Finally, as people get older, there may be the issue of long-term medical care or some kind of illness that makes people need special care. Can the divorced spouse afford needed nursing care? Assisted living? And yes, there are many cases where the healthy spouse leaves a seriously ill partner after many years. Will many of these divorced spouses be able to afford medical insurance, or will they be on Medicare? In most cases, the spouse with the job and the medical insurance is not obligated to continue providing medical insurance for the ex-wife or ex-husband, and COBRA, if available, may be the responsibility of the unemployed partner. And at this point, it is not clear what benefits, if any, the Affordable Care Act will produce in the long run. Perhaps as people stay younger longer, the average age of retirement will no longer be 65. In gray divorces, however, the issue of how both parties will live on the income that once supported an intact

marriage remains a hotly contended one. The concept of “gray divorce” presents many unique issues. Competent counsel is required, and there are now lawyers who position themselves as having a subspecialty in “elder law.” This is a good place for those looking to end a long-term marriage to start when choosing a lawyer for this inevitably complex process. ) ) )

) ) ) marriage & divorce

been out of the job market for a number of years, who is now in their 50s or 60s, and who is expected to go to work with no or outdated marketable skills? Consequently, unless there are a lot of assets producing a lot of income, alimony becomes a major issue in a gray divorce. In most states, the longer you are married, the more alimony you receive. Additionally, even in bigger liquid estates, today’s interest rates are so low that even giving someone a $3 million payout might only produce $60,000 per year, as opposed to when that same amount might have produced $210,000 per year in interest income when rates were in the 7 percent range. While that may seem to be a lot of money, when the lifestyle was based on $500,000, the end of the marriage becomes a total life-changing event. This might put an additional burden on the higher-earning spouse. The flip side of this equation is that some “breadwinner” spouses choose to retire earlier and then say, “I have no income on which to pay alimony.” Where does that leave the dependent boomer spouses of long-term marriages? Even Social Security may offer little help to the dependent spouse because, for many of these partners, especially women, they have been either out of the job market or worked fewer years and often at lower-wage positions and have much less, little, or no Social Security paid into the system. These women are only entitled, after age 65, to collect one-half of what their male counterpart gets, or 100 percent

Lynne Gold-Bikin is a renowned family law authority. She frequently comments on family law in the media. Gold-Bikin has published numerous articles, journals, and books, including Divorce Practice Handbook and her most recent publication, The Divorce Trial Manual. www.wglaw.com

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financial

protecting your credit score during a gray divorce WRITTEN BY Tracy Achen

WHILE THE DIVORCE RATE FOR THE POPULATION IN GENERAL HAS decreased somewhat over the years, there is an increasing trend for couples reaching the empty-nest stage of their lives. According to statistics from the National Center for Family & Marriage Research, the rate of divorce for people over the age of 50 has doubled since 1990. And the divorce rate for people 65 and older has risen even more. This trend is now referred to as “gray divorce,” and these divorces are initiated 66 percent of the time by women, according to a survey conducted by AARP in 2004. Unfortunately, there is a greater impact on the long-term financial stability for a person divorcing in later life than for someone who divorces at a younger age. For people approaching midlife and beyond, there is the reality of having less time to rebuild their financial footing in the years following the divorce. Dealing with reduced household income and increased expenses often means a person’s lifestyle will need to be downsized and retirement may even

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need to be delayed. If you are facing the prospect of splitting up after many years of marriage, there are some proactive steps you can take to help weather the financial changes ahead. And this includes protecting your credit score to help ease your transition after your divorce. Why You Should Worry about Your Credit Score Credit scores are not just important when you’re trying to buy a house. They are also used by banks and lending institutions in determining interest rates on car loans, credit cards, and personal loans. Most people don’t realize that they are also used by the insurance industry

when offering coverage options and rates, as well as by utility companies in setting the deposit for services. Landlords often use credit scores when screening tenant applications and potential employers frequently do the same during the hiring process. As a result, a lower credit score often makes it more difficult to qualify for and afford various services and can reduce future employment opportunities. For this reason, it’s very important to try to maintain a good credit standing both during and after your divorce. Steps to Protecting Your Credit Whenn Getting Divorced First of all, you need to start building a separate financial identity


financial ) ) ) protecting your credit score

from your spouse. If you have never had credit solely in your own name, now is the time to get it established. You can start out by applying for a credit card just in your name. Doing so will begin building up your individual credit history and allow you to maintain an account without worrying about your spouse misusing it. It’s also important to open a bank account in your own name. It is common to freeze joint accounts during a divorce, and being cut off from your funds can wreck your credit if you are unable to pay the bills. You also need to make sure that your name is removed from the various utilities, services, and other contracts you may have held with your spouse. It can come as quite a shock to get a collection notice on a delinquent account if your ex fails to pay it after your divorce. Don’t Forget Your Debts When you are going through a divorce, you also need to take steps to disentangle your debt obligations from your spouse’s. For many long-term marriages, most of the marital debt is listed in both spouses’ names. This means that creditors will hold both spouses equally responsible for paying off the debt. To get an idea of where you stand, you can start by making a list of all your current jointly held credit cards, loans, mortgages, etc. Then get a copy of your credit report to see if there are any other accounts you may have overlooked or are unaware of.

If you are facing the prospect of splitting up after many years of marriage, there are some proactive steps you can take to help weather the financial changes ahead.

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Paying Off Joint Debts It is crucial that you take care of as many of these joint debts as possible, as you will have no control over your spouse’s financial responsibility after the divorce. For this reason, you should consider using liquid assets from the marital estate to pay down or eliminate joint debts. Liquid assets include savings accounts, stocks, bonds, etc. You can also get the money to pay down these debts by selling off recreational vehicles and other items you won’t need to rebuild your life. Pennsylvania is an equitable distribution state. Under the law, all property acquired during marriage, regardless of whose name it is in, is part of the marital estate and is subject to equitable distribution upon divorce. It is the court that determines a fair and equitable division of assets. Dividing the Remaining Debts Once you have paid off as many debts as possible with the available liquid assets, you can then concentrate on any remaining debts. You’ll need to work on getting these accounts listed solely in the person’s name that will be responsible for paying the debt after divorce.

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This can be accomplished through loan assumptions, refinancing, or taking out a personal loan to pay off the joint debt. If you are an authorized signer on your spouse’s credit card, call the creditor to remove your name and liability from the account. If you don’t, the debt will show up on your credit report and lower your credit score by raising your overall debt ratio. If the creditor refuses your request, ask for a copy of the original contract to verify whether your signature is on it. The presence or absence of your signature will prove whether you are liable for the account. If your soon-to-be ex will be keeping the house, the loan will need to be refinanced (or assumed) so that it is solely in his or her name. Doing so will remove your liability for the mortgage and increase your odds of qualifying for a home loan in the future. It is important to note that you shouldn’t sign a quitclaim deed on the property if your name is still on the mortgage—you will be held responsible for the payment if your ex defaults, yet have no ownership claim to the property. It is common to add a clause in the settlement agreement requiring the spouse who is awarded the house to refinance or assume the loan. After you have done everything you can to separate your debt liabilities, it is also a good idea to add an indemnity clause in your divorce decree. A properly worded indemnity clause will allow you to enforce your divorce agreement in court and be

compensated for any money you have to pay as a result of your ex’s default on a loan. An indemnity clause can also help in removing your ex’s debt liabilities from your credit report. You should discuss this with your attorney before you sign the final divorce papers. After Your Divorce If you move out after the divorce, be sure to put in a change-of-address form with the post office. This way you will continue to receive your mail, especially any important financial documents and statements. It is also wise to check your credit report after your divorce is finalized. Make note of any accounts that are still showing as open accounts. If some of these were closed during your divorce, contact the creditors to have them reported as closed to the credit bureaus. Check to see if any of your ex’s accounts are still showing up on your credit report and ask that they be removed if they were solely assumed by your ex. Also verify that your current address is on file and report any addresses that are appearing for your ex as an error. Once your credit identity is separate from your ex’s, you should periodically check your credit report for any future errors that may crop up. Getting divorced means starting a whole new chapter in your life, one in which you play the leading character. The best way to have a happy ending is to make sure you maintain a good credit score. By exercising restraint


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and paying down your remaining debts, you will continue to improve your financial standing. ) ) )

Surgical Tracy Achen is the author of Divorce 101: A Woman’s Guide and editor of WomansDivorce.com, the premier divorce site committed to helping women overcome the challenges of divorce. If you’re just thinking about divorce, are currently dealing with the legal aspects of a separation or divorce, or are in the process of rebuilding your life as a single woman, we offer the support you need each step of the way.

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caregiving caregiver agreements: a two-way street

WRITTEN BY James J. Ruggiero Jr., Esq., AEPÂŽ

FAMILY CAREGIVERS PLAY A MAJOR ROLE IN MAXIMIZING THE HEALTH and quality of life of individuals with acute and chronic illness in the United States. Recipients of care depend on family caregivers for assistance with daily activities, managing complex care, navigating the overwhelming health and health insurance systems, and communicating with healthcare professionals. Family caregivers provide valuable care out of love and often necessity, but the role of caregiver is an extremely demanding job.

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According to the National Alliance for Caregiving, 37 percent of caregivers spend more than 40 hours a week providing care and another 30 percent spend 20-39 hours assisting with needs. Caregivers cope with physical, emotional, spiritual, and financial challenges brought about by the demands of the job and the need to reduce or forgo employment to care for


a loved one. These challenges affect the caregiver’s health and quality of life as well as the recipient’s. Long-term caregiving has significant financial consequences for caregivers, particularly for women. Caregivers face the loss of their own income, loss of employer-based benefits, shrinking of savings in order to pay for caregiving costs, and a threat to their retirement income due to fewer contributions to retirement vehicles. One way to compensate an adult child willing to devote so much of his or her time to caring for an ailing or aging family member is through a caregiver agreement. The agreement is essentially an employment contract between the caregiver and the recipient of care. The family member and the caregiver stipulate a caregiver’s tasks, the hours spent caregiving, and financial compensation. Often, it is hard to accept that a caregiver may want or need to be compensated for services rendered. But because love doesn’t pay the mortgage or buy groceries, having a binding legal contract in effect can protect both parties down the road. Here are five important ways a caregiver agreement can help your family.

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Caregivers Get Paid for the Job They Do It offers a great way to support the person for their time and effort in caring. This may be a caregiver’s sole source of income or a second job. How much to pay a caregiver is up to the family. A good place to start is to look at how much a home health agency

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would charge. Current rates in the Susquehanna and Delaware valleys are around $18-25 per hour. These rates often come with minimum requirements and vary based on needs and time, etc. After research and discussion, set a salary and establish a schedule for payment.

Keep Peace among Family Members Having a caregiver agreement in place helps minimize the conflict between family members over the handling of care. The existence of a contract helps elevate the validity of the arrangement and values the services provided by the caregiver.

Define the Caregiver Relationship A detailed caregiver agreement sets boundaries. It makes clear the extent of the services being provided and the amount of money the caregiver is getting paid.

Clear the Way for Medicaid With regard to Medicaid eligibility, payments made to a caregiver under contract can reduce the care recipient’s countable assets, which in turn may accelerate Medicaid eligibility. Absent an agreement in writing, the money a recipient pays a caregiver may be deemed a gift by Medicaid. This triggering event may cause a period of delay where the recipient may not qualify due to the current five-year Medicaid look-back period. At the time of Medicaid application, Medicaid will total all payments made to the caregiver for the past 60 months and divide that by the average monthly cost of a semi-private room at a nursing home in the state. This quotient is the penalty period, which equals the number of months Medicaid will not pay for nursing-home care. The monetary and emotional cost to the family for the delay in Medicaid far outweighs the time and cost to properly execute a caregiver agreement.

According to the National Alliance for Caregiving, 37 percent of caregivers spend more than 40 hours a week providing care and another 30 percent spend 20-39 hours assisting with needs.

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Keep Care and Money in the Family Many recipients find comfort in having care from a devoted family member over a stranger, and the money the family pays for care stays in the family.

Caregiving is a journey. The journey changes daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly. The caregiver agreement sets the stage for the journey and makes the pathway to caregiving a two-way street. It fosters open communication amongst caregiver, recipient, and family members. It begins a relationship with an elder law attorney and may also be an opportunity to review, update, or prepare legal documents, including authorization to release healthcare information, healthcare power of attorney, living will, general durable power of attorney, will, and trust(s). It paves the way for Medicaid planning, if necessary. The elder law attorney initiates the formation of a support team for the caregiver, which includes professionals such as a financial advisor, banker, CPA, trust officer, insurance agent, and local resources such as department of aging, religious organizations, hospitals, and support groups. With the understanding of the caregiver role, organization of legal documents, and establishment of a support team, the caregiver relationship is on track for success. Having a detailed, written caregiver agreement allows a caregiver to be compassionate, alert to current needs, resourceful, and energetic in their care for a loved one. ) ) )

James J. Ruggiero Jr. is the managing partner of Ruggiero Law Offices LLC with offices in Paoli and Center Valley, Pa. Ruggiero Law Offices LLC focuses on estate planning, elder law, and business law. www.paolilaw.com


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ideal living when downsizing isn’t enough AS PEOPLE AGE, THERE’S A GOOD CHANCE THAT AT SOME POINT THEIR home will no longer suit their lifestyle or their needs. In some cases, a retirement home may be the best choice. Retirement residences are privatepay, wellness-oriented facilities that enable active seniors to maintain or improve their independence, health, and overall quality of life. Reasons for Moving The following are common reasons for choosing a retirement home. Freedom – To reduce responsibilities associated with home ownership, particularly property maintenance and keeping track of a multitude of bills, and to allow more time for preferred activities. Independence – To offload other responsibilities of daily living in order to continue to live independently in spite of decreased physical abilities.

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WRITTEN BY Lisa M. Petsche

People in this situation may wish to

safety and accessibility are beyond their

eliminate not only property-maintenance

means or are not wise investments from

tasks, but also housecleaning,

a real-estate market perspective,

laundering, grocery shopping, and meal

moving to a retirement community may

preparation, as the community may

be an option.

provide these services.

Peace of mind – To ensure help is

Accessibility – To increase the

available if needed, providing them, as

accessibility of their living space;

well as their family, with reassurance.

specifically, to make it easier and safer to enter and exit, to be able to access

Socialization – To increase social

all areas, and to use rooms for their

contact. Opportunities to make new

intended purpose.

friends are everywhere, from the dining

Finances – To reduce the expenses associated with home ownership, particularly if they live in an older home

room and lounge areas to activity rooms and outdoor spaces. Recreation – To engage in new and

that is not energy efficient or requires

previously enjoyed activities that are

extensive repairs.

stimulating and pleasurable and provide

If home adaptations to improve

satisfaction or entertainment.


ideal living

victimization. For example, those who are anxious about answering the door,

frequently accessed amenities or to

personal-care packages for residents

public transportation may be a priority.

who need help with the latter.

Some retirement homes offer a

leaving their home unattended, or

shuttle service to medical appointments,

coming home to an empty house may

shopping, and community events.

experience increased peace of mind living in a residence with a security desk and locked mailboxes. Community Access – To improve

Health – To ensure ongoing healthcare needs are met, beginning with the basics: nutritiously balanced

Lifestyle – To enjoy an all-inclusive lifestyle. Seniors who have the financial means and wish to enjoy life to the fullest may seek a setting that simulates a resort atmosphere. Amenities may include elegant

meals and opportunities to stay

spaces, fine dining, a cocktail lounge or

access to shopping and other businesses,

physically active and mentally

pub, fitness center, swimming pool,

medical resources, places of worship,

stimulated.

library, beauty salon, spa, café, Internet

and other amenities. For those who don’t drive, or who

Other needs may include medication management, a special diet, and

anticipate being unable to drive in the

assistance with activities of daily living

near future, easy walking distance to

(ADL). Many retirement homes offer

) ) ) when downsizing isn’t enough

Security – To reduce the risk of

lounge, convenience store, greenhouse, putting green, and more. Retirement homes vary considerably in terms of price, size, amenities, and

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Lisa M. Petsche is a social worker and a freelance writer specializing in boomer and senior issues.


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ideal living

how a geriatric care manager can help WRITTEN BY Kathleen C. Wall

FROM HOME AND WORK, JOAN CHECKS IN WITH HER 85-Y YEAR-O OLD MOTHER daily. Joan visits her mother in Harrisburg and takes her to doctor appointments.

Each month, Joan sees her mother moving a little more slowly and hesitantly due to her arthritis, complications from foot surgery, and heart disease. Stairs are almost impossible for her mother to maneuver. A home care aide is helping with grocery shopping, laundry, and light housekeeping. Her mother has stopped going out in the evening because she is not comfortable driving at night. While her mother has some savings, Joan sees her mother’s assets dwindling

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and worries her mother may outlive her resources. Lastly, Joan has discovered her mother is frequently incontinent and often forgets to turn off the oven. Joan wants to help her mother stay safe and functioning as well as possible at home but has found it difficult to discuss the subject with her mother. She wishes she had a better sense of what her mother needs or could use as well as an understanding of the available options for her in the community.


ideal living

comprehensive assessment included a review of the mother’s medical history, medications and symptoms, her nutrition and physical activity, a cognitive screen for dementia, and a conversation to understand family and friends in her life, her occupational history, hobbies and interests, and her spiritual life. Joan’s mother disclosed an estimate of her income, assets, and resources so the care manager could outline the

Could you benefit from the service of a geriatric care manager?

mother’s options and identify programs for which she may be eligible. A tour of the home and an assessment of the mother’s risk of falling helped the geriatric care manager determine the feasibility of the mother’s remaining at home and what environmental changes (such as lighting, rugs, and handrails) or adaptive equipment (such as a raised toilet seat) would keep the mother safe and able to maneuver more easily in the bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen. Together, Joan, her mother, and the geriatric care manager developed a short-term plan to keep the mother functioning at home, as well as a longer-term plan to accommodate the mother’s physical and cognitive needs. Frequently, families become

splintered over caregiving issues: adult children disagreeing with parents and themselves over what parents need. Joan and her brother had become alienated over a difference of opinion about their mother. With her mother’s permission, the geriatric care manager also helped facilitate a conversation between Joan and her brother. Both siblings relied on the geriatric care manager for an objective, neutral opinion about their mother. As her mother’s needs changed, Joan consulted the geriatric care manager periodically to update the care plan. Eventually, the care manager gave the siblings a short list of nursing homes that would fit the mother’s needs and criteria. She toured the homes with them, pointing out characteristics that would help them make a decision. When Joan’s mother did move to a nursing home, the geriatric care manager helped her adjust emotionally through the transition. Geriatric care managers usually offer a complimentary phone consultation to explain about their guidance and advocacy services and to discuss how their services may benefit a person’s situation. Could you benefit from their service? ) ) )

) ) ) geriatric care managers

Joan has looked online at the various caregiving websites, but they are not customized for her situation. From talking with several healthcare professionals in the area, she feels she is getting valuable pieces of information but that she is still missing the whole, big picture. Just as Joan has used a tour guide when traveling in Europe, she wishes there was a guide to help with the unfamiliar terrain of caregiving. Joan soon learns that there are nurses and social workers specializing in gerontology who do individualized assessments in person, looking at the home for safety and at all aspects of the person (physical, mental, financial) in order to determine what level of care the person needs and to make recommendations for arranging the care. After locating the website for the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers (www.caremanager.org), Joan enters her mother’s zip code and identifies several “geriatric care managers” in the area. The geriatric care manager whom Joan hires on a private, fee-for-service basis introduced herself to Joan’s mother in a non-threatening manner. The care manager built trust with the mother, making it clear that she was there as her advocate, to keep her best interests in mind and to help her plan for her future. They moved on to discuss what was most important to Joan’s mother (for example, privacy or living close to Joan). The geriatric care manager’s

Kathleen Wall, LCSW, C-ASWCM, is a geriatric care manager and the owner of Senior Caregiving Solutions. She guides and advises family caregivers on aging issues and concerns, specializing in dementia care. www.seniorcaregive.com

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ideal living

paying for nursinghome care: can children be held responsible? WRITTEN BY Marielle Hazen, Esq., CELA

THE COSTS OF NURSIN NG-H HOME CARE CAN BE FINANCIALLY DEVASTATING. Many people mistakenly believe that Medicare will cover nursing-home expenses, but coverage for nursing-home care is actually very limited. Medicare Part A benefits cover nursing-home costs under the following limited conditions: There must have been a three-day hospital stay within 30 days of being admitted into the nursing home, and you must require skilled care, which means you need skilled nursing or rehabilitation staff to treat, manage, observe, and evaluate your care. If you meet the criteria for Medicare coverage of your nursinghome stay, the benefits will be limited to 100 days of coverage. After exhausting any Medicare and private insurance benefits, you are required to

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pay privately from your income and resources until you qualify for Medicaid. Unlike Medicare, Medicaid is a state and federal program that will pay nursing-home costs for people with limited income and assets. For single individuals, financially qualifying for Medicaid means assets have been depleted to between $2,000 and $8,000. For married couples, the financial qualification rules are more complicated. The spouse of a nursing-home resident is entitled to keep certain excluded resources, including the

residence, one automobile, tangible personal property, and his or her qualified retirement accounts. Most other resources are considered available resources. In addition to the excluded resources, the community spouse is entitled to keep one-half of the available resources, provided onehalf doesn’t exceed a maximum number, as of Jan. 1, 2014, is $117,240. Under Pennsylvania’s filial support law, children can be held responsible to care for and maintain or financially assist their parents. This means children can be held responsible for


ideal living

benefit, gifts and transfers made within the five years prior to the requested eligibility date for benefits may result in benefits being denied. This can result in a period of time in which benefits are not available and the nursing-home resident does not have the resources to pay for care. In these situations, children may be sued for their parents’ care expenses. There are exceptions to the transfer penalty rule that can prevent benefits from being denied. Depending on the circumstances, there may also be planning options available to reduce or

eliminate any period of ineligibility. Getting advice from an experienced elder law attorney as early in the process as possible is crucial to avoiding costly mistakes and protecting your rights and the financial security of your family. ) ) )

) ) ) paying for nursing home care

parents’ nursing home expenses. Nursing homes may use this law to sue children for the costs of services provided to their parents. In May of 2012, the Pennsylvania Superior Court found a son responsible for his mother’s $93,000 nursing-home debt. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court declined to hear the case, making the ruling final. The son’s liability was not based on wrongdoing or an allegation that he took money from his mother or received gifts from her. Rather, he was held liable based on the filial support law. Nursing homes in Pennsylvania are able to use the support law to sue children when Medicare and Medicaid benefits are not available and the resident does not have the resources to pay privately. In the 2012 case described above, an application for Medicaid benefits had been filed, but the supporting financial records required in the application process were incomplete, so benefits were denied. Medicaid denials based on incomplete applications and supporting documentation are common. It is very important to file an appeal in these cases and to provide the missing documentation. Failing to handle the application and/or appeal process properly can result in liability for children, no matter where the fault of the mistake lies. A common reason for Medicaid benefits to be denied is that disqualifying gifts have been made. Because Medicaid is a means-tested

Marielle Hazen is a Certified Elder Law Attorney and owner of Hazen Elder Law, an estate planning, elder law, and specialneeds planning law firm in Harrisburg, Pa. www.HazenElderLaw.com © 2014 Hazen Elder Law

Your key to choosing the right living and care options for you or a loved one. 18th Edition Now Available!

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veteran JAY SNYDER SMILES AT AN IRONY about his days of service in the Vietnam War. “We were winning when I left!” It’s a sentiment shared by many who fought in the early days of the conflict. Victory over the forces of Communism seemed possible, and stateside, American citizens either voiced support for the war or didn’t even know where Vietnam was. It was only in the later years of the conflict that Vietnam became a dividing point. That wasn’t the case with Snyder, of Harrisburg, who is now 71. He volunteered for his service, in the 1st

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WRITTEN BY Stephen Kopfinger

Battalion, 12th Calvary Regiment, of the United States Army. The unit won accolades for participating in 12 campaigns. Snyder himself would go on to jumping out of aircraft and seeing jungle combat, before marrying—the war played a part in that chapter of his life—and enjoying an executive career. Snyder ultimately served in Pennsylvania state government and later umpired tennis at three Olympic Games. All that was a long way off for a

green kid born in rural Virginia, though Snyder was in his early 20s when he joined up. “My first assignment was supposed to be basic training at Fort Dix,” the New Jersey-based military camp, Snyder recalls. “I even bought a convertible, because I was going to the Jersey Shore! Wrong!” It wasn’t long before Snyder found himself on a troop transport, the USNS Geiger. It was no luxury cruise, though Snyder remembers pleasant memories


veteran ) ) ) they were soldiers once

of multiple showings of the 1962 war epic The Longest Day. The movie, about the World War II landing in France, proved a kind of introduction to Vietnam for Snyder and his shipmates. But when the guys hit Southeast Asia, they found reporters, rather than enemies, waiting. And that was after the troops scrambled down cargo nets, not knowing what to expect. That was as easy as it would get. Vietnam proved as formidable a challenge as World War II, but with different rules. “There was no such thing as a front,” Snyder sums up. Ground was taken, but not held. American forces were up against a people who knew their territory. Before long, you were back in the same place. “It was guerrilla warfare, with an enemy that didn’t sit still,” Snyder says. Helicopters helped. Though choppers played a role in the Korean War of the 1950s, Vietnam was the first real helicopter conflict. “You had a whole mobile army,” notes Snyder. “You just hop on a helicopter and move to another zone.” Helicopters proved a lifeline, but that didn’t make things smooth. “Losing my first two guys … That’s one that will haunt me forever,” says Snyder. He remembers a radio operator shot through the heart and another soldier killed by a grenade that was held too long before it went off. Friendships could be fleeting; Snyder admits that it could be difficult to bond with a buddy, lest he be lost. But there are happier memories for

From top: Jay Snyder with the base mascot, Boom Boom the dog. Snyder with a piece of Army ordnance. Snyder with Charlie Monkey, another unit mascot.

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) ) ) they were soldiers once

veteran

Top, left: A dapper young Jay Snyder is shown on leave during his Vietnam years. Top, right: This photo from Jay Snyder shows a helicopter full of captured enemy radio equipment. Helicopters were a lifeline in Vietnam, used in combat, surveillance, and medical evacuations.

Snyder ponders a map during his service in Vietnam.

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Snyder. Namely, Vietnam led to his marriage. Jeanne Carson was a young woman attending Millersville University, then Millersville State College, in the early 1960s. “She was my sister’s roommate,” Snyder says. In those days before the war became controversial, there was a kind of “adopt-a-soldier” mentality on college campuses. Young women wrote to young men, even if those women weren’t sure where the guys were serving. “We had to look up Vietnam!” notes Carson, who went on to a three-decade career in teaching. “I wrote an introductory letter. I signed it ‘love and kisses.’” It was a kind of joke. But it became real over time. Snyder was wounded by a mortar round at one point in Vietnam,

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veteran

remembers with gratitude the parade that was held on Independence Avenue. It marked the homecoming many Vietnam vets never had. Snyder’s postwar life took him into state government, where, among his many titles, he served as state commissioner for the blind. He then dove into the world of tennis, taking up an avocation as professional umpire. In the course of his career, Snyder rubbed elbows with the likes of Pete Sampras and John McEnroe. Snyder would work three Olympic venues and still does sports consulting. Vietnam, however, continues to form a foundation for Snyder. Younger generations think of the war as a distant historical conflict, but Snyder is quick to recommend a movie that tells it like it is, We Were Soldiers Once … And Young. The 2002 film, starring Mel Gibson, centers on a pivotal battle in the war. Snyder is still active in veterans’ reunions. Vietnam is something that forged him. In the end, Snyder says, “You’re not fighting for God and country; you’re fighting for your guys.” ) ) )

) ) ) they were soldiers once

You’re not fighting for God and country; you’re fighting for your guys.

but he recovered and was sent back into combat. As it turned out, an infection ultimately sent Snyder back to the States in August of 1966. Carson came to visit him when he was hospitalized in Valley Forge. They have been married since 1967. And there’s another very personal connection to Vietnam for the couple. “We adopted a Vietnamese son,” Snyder says with pride. Thinh SnyderPham, now close to 50, works with the Senate staff in Washington, D.C. His wife is named Hoa, and there are three grandchildren to make Jay and Jeanne’s house happier: Jeanne, Jay, and Carson. Snyder has been back to Vietnam on two trips. He recalls visiting a museum in Ho Chi Minh City, the former Saigon. The museum used to bear a name condemning what were called American “atrocities.” Snyder was stunned to see pictures of his platoon on a wall. “That was an out-of-body experience,” he says. Revisiting Vietnam was cathartic, but so was a special trip to Washington, when the Vietnam Veterans Memorial wall was dedicated in 1982. Snyder

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people

vintage minis spark collector’s passion WRITTEN BY Rochelle A. Shenk

1961 Mini Cooper Woody, affectionately named Wilbur.

JOE WHITELEY HAS A PASSION FOR CARS. THE 61-Y YEAR-O OLD HAS turned that passion into a career with Whiteley’s Auto Services in Windsor, Pa. (York County), but it is also seen in his personal car collection that features several Minis.

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Minis are pretty popular now, but Whiteley’s affinity for the brand began in his teens. “They’re fun to drive. When I was 16, a Mini was the most fun thing you could buy for the money—it was more fun than a go-cart,” he says with a smile. His first Mini was a ’61 that was a daily driver for a while. “It wasn’t in great shape when I bought it, but I fixed it up,” he says.


people ) ) ) vintage minis

1965 Austin Mini Moke

After a few years, he started using it as an autocross racer. Autocross is a timed competition through a defined course on either a paved or unpaved surface in which there is only one vehicle on the course at a time. Drivers race against a clock rather than one another. “I had a lot of fun with that car, but after racing it for a while, I sold it. But somehow it seems to find me—I’ve sold that Mini and bought it back about five times,” he chuckled. Whiteley explains that Minis are

what set him on the path to a career servicing cars. “Minis are what got me started in the car business. I had two choices: learn how to fix it myself or earn enough money to pay someone to repair and restore it,” he says. He works with a lot of British cars in his business but says that he can work with mostly any vehicle. He explains that the current generation of Minis is made by BMW, and these cars are a lot different than the Minis that captured his heart.

When I was 16, a Mini was the most fun thing you could buy for the money—it was more fun than a go-cart.

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people ) ) ) vintage minis

Produced by Austin and British Motor Corporation (and its successors, including British Leyland and Rover) from 1959 to 2000, the Mini is an economy car, and like The Beatles and that other mini—mini skirt or dress with its hemline well above the knee—it is a British icon of the ’60s. These fun little cars had a very practical beginning. They were the fuelefficient response to fuel shortages in the U.K. and other countries in the mid1950s due to a crisis in the Gulf of Suez. The Mini made its debut in 1959 and was the first car to have a transversely placed engine (the crankshaft sits on the chassis from right to left rather than the traditional front-to-rear placement— transverse engines are common in today’s front-wheel drive cars). This engine placement allowed for more passenger area given the size of the vehicle. “Vintage Minis are pretty basic; they didn’t even have a great heater,” Whiteley recalls. He currently owns three of those fun rides—a ’61 Mini Woody, a ’63 Mini, and a ’64 or ’65 Mini Moke—and each has its own story. Each of his cars has a name. “They give you better service if they have a name,” he says. Whiteley says that the ’61 Mini Woody wagon, one of his favorites, is named Wilbur. It is not totally restored but has “nice paint.” “It’s the Mini that I have that’s in the best condition. That car just makes people smile when they see it,” he says. He adds that Wilbur was purchased from a friend that went into the service.

Like the Mini Woody, the ’63 Mini also has a personal connection. Whiteley purchased that vehicle from an aunt, who bought it while she was living in Paris with her husband, a foreign correspondent for a Washington, D.C., newspaper. The couple kept the Mini sedan at their home in Maine for a while. “They had to find someone to repair it, and they did. They knew that I liked Minis, so eventually it ended up here with me,” he explains. The Austin Mini Moke may be the most exotic looking of Whiteley’s Minis. It shares an engine, transmission, and suspension parts with the regular Mini,

but there are no doors per se, and there’s a convertible roof. For those who haven’t seen this utility-type vehicle before, he describes it as closely resembling Volkswagen’s Thing. It’s also been described as a “beach buggy.” “I really enjoy playing with this one,” he says. Whiteley does drive his Minis periodically. “But not as much as I should. I’ll often take the Woody wagon to car cruises,” he says. So if you see Whiteley and his Minis at any car shows or cruises, be sure to say hello. ) ) )

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good vibrations ( meet a fellow boomer )))

((

Laurie Kolanko ))) Age: 57 ))) Resides in: Spring Grove, Pa. ))) Profession: Owner of Totelly Unique, a home business specializing in designing and crafting handmade tote bags and keepsake pieces. I am also the caregiver of my mother.

Laurie at age 4.

Laurie at age 6. Laurie at age 14.

Laurie and husband Bob with daughters Kelly and Megan, 1994.

WHAT IS THE BEST MEMORY YOU HAVE FROM YOUR CHILDHOOD? I was born and raised in New Jersey, about an hour from the shore. I have wonderful memories of being woken up early on a Saturday morning to go fishing for the day on the Manasquan River. The best part was that my family would be all together in a little wooden rowboat for the whole day. As the youngest of the family and a very sensitive child, I felt sorry for the cute, little, live minnows that we used for bait so I would pick one out, put it in a Dixie cup, play with it all day, and then let it go free. WHAT IS YOUR FONDEST MEMORY FROM ELEMENTARY SCHOOL? One summer, all of the neighborhood kids got together and worked for weeks to put together a play on our neighbor’s porch. It was called The Princess and the Rose-Colored Glasses. We had a curtain, props, and costumes and memorized our lines. We charged admission to all the neighborhood parents, gave the money we raised to the JFK Library, and even got our picture in the paper. WHAT DID YOU DO ON A HOT SUMMER DAY? We lived to be outside. We played everything a kid could play outside. There was always a game of kickball, dodgeball, baseball, or hide-and-seek going on somewhere in the neighborhood. We built forts and treehouses in the woods. In the afternoon we would take our 10 cents and wait for the Good Humor Man. WHAT POSTER DID YOU HAVE ON YOUR BEDROOM WALL? I was helplessly and completely in love with Illya Kuryakin (David MacCallum) from The Man from U.N.C.L.E. I think I had all the ones I needed to complete the puzzle on the back.

Laurie and Bob with their favorite toy.

Recent photo of Laurie and Bob.

) ))

WHAT DID YOU HAVE AS A KID THAT YOU WISH YOU HAD TODAY? This is an easy one. I wish I had my dad. He was killed in an industrial accident in 1988. We will always miss him terribly. IF YOU HAD MADE A TIME CAPSULE WHEN YOU WERE A KID, YOU WOULD OPEN IT NOW AND FIND (WHAT) INSIDE? In my time capsule would be trolls, and lots of them, with homemade clothing made out of felt. There would be books of handwritten, silly poems; notes to and from friends; and joke books. There would be patent-leather purses and shoes and bell-bottoms, hip-huggers, and go-go boots. There would be records, the kind that slip down the pole onto the record player, and stuffed animals won on the boardwalk. Most of all, there would be lots of laughter, joy, and love for which I am very, very thankful.

What memories would you share? To be considered for a future good vibrations column, please visit www.bmagazinepa.com.


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b Magazine Spring 2014  

Find out what Shirley Jones is up to! Plus music, travel, health, financial, and much more for today's baby boomer generation.

b Magazine Spring 2014  

Find out what Shirley Jones is up to! Plus music, travel, health, financial, and much more for today's baby boomer generation.

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