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BI MONTHLY

ONE WORKPLACE

Art is a harmony parallel with nature. — Paul Cezanne

INSPIRATION ISSUE

NUMBER 2


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HYGGE

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MINDFULNESS CREATES HARMONY

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SUSAN CAIN QUIET SPACES

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CUP OF TEA

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ALL SUMMER IN A MOMENT

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A TOUCH OF THE HAND

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INTERVIEW WITH TORU

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ONE WORKPLACE EVENTS

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WELCOME TO ONELOOK

GET TO KNOW WHAT’S INSIDE We know you’re going to love what you find inside. Let’s make it easy for you to learn more. Each product has been labeled by name and reference number (NAME / 1). Call us with the reference number and we’ll be better able to help you.


I SSUE 2 Recently a friend shared with me an anecdote about Academy Award Winner Francis Ford Coppola and his approach to film making. Each of his stories are personified by a single unspoken word. A word that serves as the underlying core and theme for every artistic decision captured on screen. I love the beauty and simplicity of this approach. How it filters out noise and sets direction with purpose. How it shapes the materiality around us, allowing the everyday objects we live and work with to tell their own stories and to influence our experience. It reminds us that inspiration is in all of us and in everything, if we seek to find it with intention. For our second issue of ONELOOK Magazine we celebrate the influence of HARMONY, pairing the artistry of fine furnishings and accessories with creative writing, short stories, interesting articles and insightful interviews. We will learn about the Danish approach to “finding magic in the ordinary”, appreciate mindfulness, and seek the quiet places that hold our dearest memories.

It is these little things that touch our senses and emotions that we love about design. It is also what I love about the talented team at One Workplace, their deep appreciation for craft and for storytelling. And so, we are delighted to note that nearly all the creative content you will find on the following pages has been generated by artists and writers from across our diverse team. In curating the collection of furnishings and accessories in this issue of ONELOOK, we sought to apply Coppola’s idea of clarity and purpose in guiding our direction. In the end, we found ourselves changed by the experience and inspired by what we found. Thank you for allowing us to share this inspiration, and we look forward to sharing more again soon!

Chris Good | CID, NCIDQ, ASID, LEED AP Creative Director

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H YGG E CELEBRATING THE ORDINARY AND THE COMMON PLACE Words by Lisa Welty-O’Hare and Ivy Cheuk

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Hygge, pronounced HOO-GA, is a Danish word translating loosely as “cozy” but which carries a deeper meaning in the Danish culture. Hygge is about being alive to the present moment and paying attention to that which makes us feel openhearted and alive. It is about building harmony and community, creating connection and warmth and celebrating the ordinary and the commonplace. From tea in a beautiful cup and candlelight at dinner to heaps of blankets and knit socks on a cold night, hygge is, in the words of Danish/British writer Louisa Thomsen Brits, “a practical way of creating a sanctuary in the middle of very real life, a way of illuminating the dark and inviting the warmth.” How can we bring hygge into our fast-paced lives? Stop, breathe, pay attention to all that surrounds you. Be present to the moment. Create refuges; places of beauty and serenity, which allow you to pause and restore your spirit. Honor your connections, the people and places that deeply inform your experience of being alive. Long considered a part of the Danish national character, hygge helps in “finding the magic in the ordinary.” (Marie Tourell Soderberg). Recognizing and acknowledging an act, moment or feeling when the mundane feels extraordinary. This is, after all, a country where the laundromats are also coffee shops! The word hygge was reportedly first used back in the 18th century and is a derivation from the Norwegian meaning ‘well-being’. It is a positive and enduring quality of a people who have captured the ephemeral essence of what it means to be happy.

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B AL ANC E / 0 2

A R OU N D / 03

P USH / 04

M IN I STAC KED / 05


A RT I C HO K E / 0 6

ST I N G R AY R O C K E R / 0 7

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TO A F R IEN D’ S HOUSE THE ROA D IS N EV ER LO N G .

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MINDF U LNESS CREATES HA RM ON Y LETTING YOUR HEART AND MIND COLLIDE Words by Amber Joseph

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It is taking a leap of faith to fulfill a life’s dream.

sense of awareness and understanding, a deep

It is the sound of waves rushing to shore as you

knowing that we possess the power to shape

bathe in the sun. It is the moment of relaxation

our existence. It is strengthened when we put

after a long day of work. It is not letting your

intentional care into ourselves and seek out

mind convince you that what your heart feels

moments of calm, peace and mindfulness.

is untrue. It is finding peace in your existence. It is harmony.

Immerse yourself in your life and all that is around you. Let go of your expectations of self

True harmony can only be achieved when we

and the expectations of others by simply being.

are aware of the space where our hearts and

Stop living to control life’s outcomes and let

minds collide. At times, we let our minds rule.

things unfold divinely. Be open to people,

Our logic determines our path while ignoring

experiences and situations from a place of

our heart’s desires. Other times the heart

curiosity. Release the need to pre-judge,

compels us in directions our wiser selves

overthink or make assumptions. Work hard and

might avoid. Our need to control and

enjoy the life you want while making time to

manipulate these two forces dissociates us

be purposefully mindful. Bring your focus to

from the rhythm and flow of life. It creates an

where you are, who you’re with and what you’re

imbalance and disharmony within our lives.

presently engaged in. Live in the moment. Let

Cultivating a healthy balance between the heart

your heart and your mind respond. Choose to be

and mind is an essential component to finding

present. Choose mindfulness. Choose to create a

harmony within ourselves and with the world

world filled with harmony.

around us. Finding this balance begins with a

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L I VI N G STO N E S / 0 8

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C H OO S E TO B E P R E SE NT. C H OO S E M IN D F U LNE SS. C H OO S E A W O R LD FI L L E D WI T H HA R M O N Y.

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DUNE / 09


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S USAN CAI N QUI ET SPAC E S FIVE DIVERSE WAYS TO EMPOWER INTROVERTS AT WORK Words by Steelcase

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In her bestselling book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, Susan Cain suggests workers are often left dealing with the stimulation of their workplace with little opportunity to tailor their environment based on their mood or need for privacy and focus. Susan Cain Quiet Spaces by Steelcase offer five diverse ways to empower introverts at work. Each space supports specific postures, work modes, and expectations for quiet and privacy supported by a carefully chosen range of architecture, furniture, materials and technology. Every quiet space is designed with V.I.A. which provides superior acoustic performance and offers an atmosphere where introverts can work their best. DESIGN PRINCIPLES Permission to be alone. Private, quiet spaces free from interruption support focus and innovation, providing a respite from an otherwise highly stimulating workplace. Making these spaces available to introverts signals that the organization understands and respects their need to work differently. Control over the environment. Introverts are more sensitive to stimulation and have a greater need for control over their environment. They also have a lower tolerance for external forces such as noise and light, so it’s important for them to be able to control these elements in the workspace. Sensory balance. Contrary to what one might expect, introverts seek sensory stimulation, but often in the form of warm, calming influences, such as natural woods and other organic materials. Psychologically safe. Introverts often feel like they’re perpetually on stage, as if all eyes are on them. At times they need spaces where they can choose to be unseen, and where they can’t see others, for either rejuvenation or focus.

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BE ME A warm and receptive destination that offers introverts permission to be alone and be themselves. A space free from the gaze and interruption of others, encouraging vitality by lounging, working or even closing your eyes for a few moments.

“‘Restorative niche’ is Professor Little’s term for the place you go when you want to return to your true self. It can be a physical place, like the path beside the Richelieu River, or a temporal one, like the quiet breaks you plan between sales calls.” — Susan Cain

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FLO W A place free from visual and audible distraction or interruption for deep focus, strategic thinking and getting into flow. This focus setting for one supports ergonomic task posture for concentration over a long period of time.

“Introverts are more alive to the subtleties in their environment. It also means they are more easier overwhelmed, reacting to what’s going on around them.” — Susan Cain

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STUDI O An active environment where individuals can escape and rejuvenate through activity and stretching while also recharging. The open floor space allows users the opportunity to stretch, meditate and reset. Control of the space is in the hands of the user.

“Introverts recharge their batteries by being alone; extroverts need to recharge when they don’t socialize enough.” — Susan Cain

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GREEN RO O M An informal destination to connect, share and build trust before, during or after a meeting. The sectional creates a relaxed, comfortable environment for one or two to share without intruding on one another’s personal space.

“They (introverts) have difficulty when being observed (at work, say, or performing at a music recital) or judged for general worthiness (dating, job interviews). The pressure to entertain, to sell ourselves, and never to be visibly anxious keeps ratcheting up.” — Susan Cain

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MI ND SHARE A space for conversation with a colleague where they can display and discuss content quickly and easily. A safe space to build trust, where information and ideas can quickly and easily be shared and remain confidential all at the same time.

“They (introverts) have difficulty when being observed (at work, say, or performing at a music recital) or judged for general worthiness (dating, job interviews). — Susan Cain

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CUP O F TEA BRINGING MY MIND TO COHERENCE AND PEACE Words by Maggie Fishbaugh

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A cup of tea in my Peet’s “Berkeley” mug. It’s always the inspiration and the solution that I need to untangle my crazily woven thoughts and bring my mind to coherence and peace. If I’ve had an overwhelming day or if my brain is about to burst from a frenzied fit of thoughts, my comforting 16 oz bath of black tea awaits to balance me out like an equation. Tea produces nostalgia. When it rains, it makes me want to dig my violin out and begin creating those dark rich tones, a song to match the swirls of steam gently wafting off the top of my mug. Nostalgic to be back on the couch in that dark dorm room writing those millions of papers all over again, tea mug on the windowsill beside me, staring out the single window at the overcast skies and the trees blowing in the wind. Gazing at that mug almost pauses the world. I can sit still, watch and admire the beauty outside, yearn to be outdoors and understand, a little bit more, the old English poets who wrote about Nature. I harbor feelings of peace and harmony when I find myself sitting in this world, acknowledging that I am but one small part of it. Just like the tree branches, my thoughts remain free to float and dance in the wind. To collect and ground them I sip, hoping that they will flow back in through my brain and out through my fingers, tapping the keys with a talent like Gene Kelley’s feet. And just like that… my mind is at ease and my thoughts are expressed.

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WIT H A C U P O F T EA IN YO U R H A N D, A N Y T H IN G IS P O S S IB LE.

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ALL SUMMER I N A MOM E N T PERFECT PEACE & JOY Words by Darcy Craig

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When I think of Harmony, I think of moments

With my arm around him, we found a hidden

when the universe aligns, moments defined by

hammock in a clearing not too far away.

perfect peace and joy. I can’t speak for others but I imagine these harmonic moments are

We laid down together in the hammock and

rare and should be treasured when they occur.

the sun started to warm my son’s body. Rocking together slowly in the warm breeze

I have experienced this feeling of harmony

I looked down at my little boy and felt perfect

with the world only three times. One of these

peace. Nothing was out of place and in that

times was perfect; a moment when space, time,

moment, we were given the gift of harmony. I

and nature aligned and granted me a temporary

knew it wouldn’t last because what rare treasure

escape from the chaotic world we live in.

lasts? I was lucky to be aware of this moment and wise enough to slow down and experience

Our friends lived in a house by a river and every

it with perfect clarity.

summer they would host a large family BBQ; a chance to enjoy good company, to eat, drink, and The breeze, the sun, the shadows of the tree swim. The day of the BBQ was one of those days

leaves dancing on my son’s body, still

when nature wanted to be extra beautiful. The

glistening with diamond droplets from the

sun, the breeze, the smell in the air. Everything

river. The sound of the other children playing,

was lazy and peaceful.

the lazy river, fragments of conversations above at the house. The smell of summer grass and

The water was so cold! The children dared each

warm earth. And an old rope hammock, hidden

other to swim and slowly the air began to fill

from the world, swinging languidly, holding a

with shrieks and laughter. I broke off from the

father and son together in a perfect moment

other adults and wandered around the banks

in time.

of the river enjoying the sun and sounds of children swimming. The sound of soft crunching That moment passed but the short perfect footsteps behind me stirred me out of my haze

time in a hammock, by a river, with my son, has

and, turning around, I saw my little boy walking

imprinted itself on my memory for all time.

towards me, body shivering and teeth chattering.

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TO TOUC H TH E EA RT H IS TO H AV E H A RM O N Y WITH NAT U RE .

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A TO UCH O F THE HA N D A REAWAKENING OF THE HANDMADE OBJECT Words by Lisa Welty-O’Hare

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There is a reawakening of craft as seen in the resurgence of the handmade, artisanal and maker movements. This can be seen as a direct counter response to our increasingly digital world; a reaction to the sterility of the machine made aesthetic. “The sense of being touched by the hand, lends products an aura of warmth and authenticity”. (Epstein, 2017) There are a variety of reasons for the demand for handmade products; they are more personalized, customized and individualized. Unique, limited, with stories to tell, they can contribute to developing brand identities for businesses and clients as well as lending an eclectic, curated quality to interior spaces. Natural textural materials are the foundation of craft; wood, glass, wool, leather and metals are some that bring the richness and variety of the natural world to the objects they fashion. The sustainable aspect of natural materials provides a bonus to many handmade pieces. In fact, “sustainability is now a virtually mandatory aspect of brand development-a quality abundant in the craftsmanship associated with handmade design.” (Cre-ative Blog Staff, 2013) Original pieces are timeless; unconstrained by the boundaries of different interior design styles, eras and trends. This attribute makes handmade a particularly good investment. In our increasingly high-tech, fast-paced world, the handmade honors time, artistry and skill. The artisan culture can teach us to respect that which will endure. In a time when our landfills are overflowing, items that last have a personal as well as a global impact. Our lives and our planet will be the better for it.

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TASH A / 13

LO O P / 15

U N D ER C U T / 14

WA N ELO / 16

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P LO U M / 1 7


GEO / 18

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TO RU AN INTERVIEW WITH SPANISH DESIGNER JORDI RIBAUDI Interview by Chloe Hughes and Ivy Cheuk

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Founder Jordi RibaudĂ­

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YOUR FAMILY RAN A LEATHER FACTORY VERY CLOSE TO YOUR PRODUCT DESIGN STUDIO. WERE THEY PART OF YOUR INSPIRATION BEHIND DEVELOPING TORU?

My grandfather and my great grandfather owned tanneries. They played a major part in instilling in me the desire to create TORU. I have always felt emotionally attached to my grandfather and his many stories from around the world. The leather, and specifically the tannery district along with its people, have made a very strong imprint on my city. Building relationships is significant to our business. Toru is a mythical point of convergence; the end of the rural world and the birth of the industrial revolution. My great grandfather started his company during the first World War when all of Europe was in a crazy mess. The war required a lot of boots, jackets, helmets; all needing leather. This lead to a great opportunity for growth during those years. Thus began the story of my family’s business here in Igualada. CAN YOU TALK ABOUT WHAT IT IS LIKE WORKING WITH LOCAL ARTISANS WHO HANDCRAFT ALL OF YOUR PRODUCTS AND HOW YOU SELECT THEM?

I am very lucky to have set up my studio in the district of Rec in Igualada, just 40 minutes from

Barcelona. Thanks to the work I, and others, have done to preserve the neighborhood, many doors to many tanneries have been opened for me. This is what I consider to be the differential point of my work. The friendships that I share with these artisans go back many generations. Right now, I am still learning and will continue to learn all there is to know about the wild, primitive and exciting leather industry. WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THE NAME TORU?

The TORU name has two meanings. The first refers to the word for bull in Spanish. Many things in our culture come from the bull. The second meaning refers to an incredible man I met when I lived in/visited Japan. His name was Toru. It means working with organic materials and appreciating the imperfections, using them in resourceful and expressive ways.

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C LO P / 1 9

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E XP LO R E, E XP ER IM EN T A N D F IN A LLY C R EAT E WIT H L EAT H ER . A M IXT U R E O F I DEA S A N D SEN S AT IO N S TU R N ED IN TO O B J ECT S . 49


PONY / 20

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BABU / 21


DESCRIBE WHAT YOUR DESIGN PROCESS IS LIKE.

The world of design, as linked to industry, is very focused on rational decisions. I look for my pieces to elicit feelings. I do not pretend to do intellectual work. I try to reach the sensitive part of people, whether that is through memories, ideas, and images or through the senses. My design process is guided by my most irrational and sensitive part. For example, when designing the pony stool, I wanted to produce an object with an “idea of furniture” or a product with an “idea of leather”, the history, the memories, the feelings, and at the same time I wanted to produce an object that explores an atypical use or meaning. The pony stool is not only to be used in the typical way we sit on a stool. When you sit on a stool your stomach is closed. The way I propose to sit on the stool is with your feet on the floor. It is more like support and less like a seat. There is also another story, about the archetypes of men and animal and leather. The pony stool is a symbol of a half man, half horse. WHAT DETERMINES WHEN A PRODUCT SHOULD STAY UNIQUE OR BE PRODUCED IN A LIMITED SERIES?

We define our company as a producer of small series or unique pieces because we want to have the freedom to design pieces that are intricate and unable to be replicated. WHAT DO YOU THINK SETS YOU APART FROM OTHER UNIQUE BRANDS?

I think that starting a project from an emotional perspective can produce unique results. Approaching the materials in a non-conformist way, re-thinking the way an object can be, often generates changes that produce simple but distinct forms. WHAT DOES THE FUTURE OF TORU LOOK LIKE?

Each person lives one life but if you are open to change and new ideas you may discover new perspectives. The idea of TORU is that it presents the opportunity to make a change in your way of living. I want people to live with my pieces and to discover the creative possibilities that live inside them. HOW DO YOU KEEP UP WITH CONSISTENT CHANGES IN OUR INDUSTRY? WHAT IS YOUR BEST ADVICE AS A DESIGNER TO BE UNSTUCK CREATIVELY?

I believe the best way to adapt to the changes in our industry, is to be ourselves. The formula to be a disruptor is to detest monotony and look for opportunities to reinvent ourselves. As I did when I created TORU.

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WAVES O F I MPACT SA NTA CRUZ & H A LF MO O N BAY

AU G UST 1 9 - 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 One Workplace is proud to welcome back to the beaches of Northern California, Waves of Impact. Waves of Impact exists to show individuals facing exceptional challenges the thrill of riding waves, but also focus on building and rebuilding conďŹ dence in those who need it most. These camps are provided at no cost to the participants. www.wavesofimpact.com

O NEder 2017

SANTA CLARA & SAN FRA NCISCO SH O WRO O MS

S E PT E M B E R 1 8 - 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 ONEder is a multi-day event hosted by One Workplace that showcases the future of design and creativity in the workplace. The event will highlight a unique collection of ancillary products sourced from a rtisans and manufacturers from across Europe and the Bay Area. Guests will have the o  pportunity to visit both showrooms as well as attend speaking sessions by industry leaders.

P I CK YO UR P OTI ON SA N FRA NCISCO SH O WRO O M

O CTO B E R 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 A Seasonal Craft Cocktail Contest brought to you by One Workplace + Steelcase San Francisco. Teams of 4 from each design firm will create and present a qnique specialty cocktail . Prizes Will Be Awarded. All proceeds from the event tickets will be donated to winning firms charity of choice!

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oneworkplace.com

ONELOOK Issue 2  

Welcome to the second issue of One Workplace's ONELOOK magazine. In this issue, we celebrate the influence of HARMONY, pairing the artistry...

ONELOOK Issue 2  

Welcome to the second issue of One Workplace's ONELOOK magazine. In this issue, we celebrate the influence of HARMONY, pairing the artistry...