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SHABBAT X PASSOVER A ONETABLE GUIDE “ T H I S I S   T R U E   F R E E D O M :   O U R   A B I L I T Y   T O   S H A P E   R E A L I T Y .   W E   H A V E   T H E   P O W E R   T O   I N I T I A T E ,   C R E A T E   A N D   C H A N G E   R E A L I T Y   R A T H E R   T H A N   O N L Y   R E A C T   A N D   S U R V I V E   I T . "   –   Y A A C O V   C O H E N


PASSOVER

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SHABBAT

SHABBAT

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SEDER

We here at OneTable can barely contain ourselves, our four cups of wine runneth over. When Passover begins on Friday night, you get two celebrations in one. The Haggadah of your choice will lead you through the seder, but with the simple addition of candles and wine, you and your guests can welcome Shabbat at the beginning of the Friday night seder, or bid Shabbat adieu at the beginning of the Saturday night seder. This supplement is a special addition for the weekend, a guide to help you integrate Shabbat and Passover into a single special celebration.

1 O N E T A B L E . O R G


BUT WHAT

IS

FIRST‌ PASSOVER?

In a word, freedom. In the narrative of the Torah, the Exodus is the peak, the denouement, the event that turns the descendants of Abraham into a nation. For millennia the Jewish people have gathered at the dinner table to tell this story. Using symbolic food and a lot of wine, we remember, as God commands us to do, just where we came from before we became the People of the Book. We reflect, we discuss, we celebrate. We invite guests to our table. We share who we are and what we have. Passover is an inheritance, yes, but it is also a gift we give — to each other and to ourselves.

2 O N E T A B L E . O R G


FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHT Just as Shabbat begins with the creation of light, Passover begins when you light the festival candles. On Friday night, your festival candles and your Shabbat candles are two and the same.  Kindling light is an opportunity to take a deep breath and just be before your guests arrive; it can also be a beautiful way to welcome your guests by gathering everyone around the table to light together.  Light, then bless: ‫הָ ע לָ ם אֲשֶׁ ר ִק ְדּשָׁ נוּ ְבּ ִמ ְצ תָ יו וְ ִצוָּנוּ ְלהַ ְד ִליק‬

ֶ‫א הֵ ינוּ מֶ ל‬ ֱ ָ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬

‫בָּ רוּ‬

‫נֵר שֶׁ ל שַׁ בָּ ת ושֶׁ ל י ם ט ב‬ Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam asher kidshanu b’mitzvotav vitzivanu l’hadlik ner shel Shabbat v’shel yom tov. Blessed is the One whose mitzvot sanctify our lives, and who commands us to kindle the light of Shabbat and this holy day.

3 O N E T A B L E . O R G


FRIDAY NIGHT WINE No matter the Haggadah, seder begins with wine, a ritual symbol that sanctifies time. On Friday night, your first cup of wine welcomes the festival of Passover and the holiness of Shabbat. Depending on your comfort level, you may choose to try out the full recitation of the Shabbat Festival Kiddush, Option A below; we are also including an abbreviated version, Option B. A. Full Shabbat Festival Kiddush .‫הַ ִשּׁ ִשּׁי‬ ‫י ם‬ ‫בקֶ ר‬ ֹ  ‫וַיְ ִהי‬ ‫עֶ ֶרב‬ ‫וַיְ ִהי‬ .‫צבָ אָ ם‬ ‫ל‬ ְ ָ‫וְ כ‬ ‫וְ הָ אָ ֶרץ‬ ‫הַ שָּׁ מַ יִ ם‬ ‫וַיְ כֻ לּוּ‬ ‫עָ שָׂ ה‬ ‫אֲשֶׁ ר‬  ‫אכתּ‬ ְ ַ‫מל‬ ‫יעי‬ ְ ‫הַ ְשּׁ ִב‬ ‫בַּ י ם‬ ‫א קים‬ ֱ  ‫וַיְ כַ ל‬ .‫עָ שָׂ ה‬ ‫אֲשֶׁ ר‬  ‫אכתּ‬ ְ ַ‫מל‬ ‫ל‬ ְ ָ‫מכּ‬ ‫יעי‬ ִ ‫הַ ְשּׁ ִב‬ ‫בַּ יּ ם‬ ‫בּת‬ ֹ ‫וַיִ ְשׁ‬ ‫ ֹאת‬ ‫וַיְ קַ ֵדּשׁ‬ ‫הַ ְשּׁ ִביעי‬ ‫י ם‬ ‫אֶ ת‬ ‫א קים‬ ֱ   ‫וַיְ בָ ֶר‬ .‫לַ עֲשׂ ת‬ ‫א קים‬ ֱ  ‫בָּ ָרא‬ ‫אֲשֶׁ ר‬  ‫אכתּ‬ ְ ַ‫מל‬ ‫ל‬ ְ ָ‫מכּ‬ ‫ת‬ ִ ַ‫שָׁ ב‬  ‫ב‬ ‫ִכּי‬ ‫חַ בֵ ַרי‬ ‫סַ ְב ִרי‬ .‫הַ גָּפֶ ן‬ ‫פּ ִרי‬ ‫א‬ ְ ‫בּ ֵר‬ ‫הָ ע לָ ם‬  ֶ‫מֶ ל‬ ‫א הֵ ינוּ‬ ֱ  ָ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬ .‫לָ שׁ ן‬ ‫מכָּ ל‬ ‫ור ממָ נווּ‬ ‫עָ ם‬ ‫מכָּ ל‬ ‫בָּ נוּ‬ ‫בָּ חר‬ ‫אֲשֶׁ ר‬ ‫הָ ע לָ ם‬  ֶ‫מֶ ל‬ ‫א הֵ ינוּ‬ ֱ  ָ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬  ‫הבָ ה שַׁ בָ ת ת ִל ְמנוּחָ ה וּמ עַ ִדים ְל ִשׂ ְמחָ ה חַ גִּ ים וּזְ מַ נִּ ים‬ ֲ ַ‫א הֵ ינוּ ְבּא‬ ֱ ‫ו ִַתּתֶּ ן לָ נוּ יְ ָי‬ ‫הבָ ה ִמ ְק ָרא‬ ֲ ַ‫ְלשָׂ שׂ ן אֶ ת י ם השָּׁ בָּ ת הַ זֶּה וְ אֶ ת י ם חַ ג הַ מַּ צּ ת הַ זֶּה זְ מַ ן חֵ רוּתֵ נוּ ְבּא‬ ‫ ִכּי בָ נוּ בָ חַ ְרתָּ וְ א תָ נוּ ְק ַדּ ְשׁתָּ ִמכָּ ל הָ עַ ִמּים וְ שַׁ בָּ ת‬.‫יציאַ ת ִמ ְצ ָריִ ם‬ ִ ‫ק ֶדשׁ זֵכֶ ר ִל‬ ֹ ‫וּבשָׂ שׂון ִהנְ חַ ְלתָּ נוּ‬ ְ ‫וּב ָרצ ן ְב ִשׂ ְמחָ ה‬ ְ ‫הבָ ה‬ ֲ ַ‫ְבּא‬

ֶ‫וּמ עַ ֵדי קָ ְדשׁ‬

.‫אַ תָּ ה יְ ָי ְמקַ ֵדּשׁ הַ שַּׁ בָּ ת וְ יִ ְשׂ ָראֵ ל וְ הַ זְּ מַ נִּ ים‬

‫בָּ רוּ‬

PRO I T

I S

C U S T O M A R Y

C O N C L U S I O N A M E N

I S

C O M P L E T E S

A

O F

4

S A Y

* A M E N *

B L E S S I N G .

C O N F I R M A T I O N ;

T H E I T S

O N E T A B L E . O R G

T O A

TIP

B L E S S I N G , R I T U A L

I N

A T

T H E

H E B R E W ,

S A Y I N G

I T

A C K N O W L E D G I N G

I M P A C T .


FRIDAY NIGHT WINE Va’yihi erev va’yihi voker yom ha’shishi Va’yichulu ha’shamayim va’ha’aretz v’chol tziva’am. Va’yichol Elohim ba’yom ha’shivi’i milachto asher asah va’yishbot ba’yom ha’shivi’i mi’kol milachto asher asah. Va’yivarech Elohim et yom ha’shivi’i va’yikadesh oto ki vo shavat mi’kol melachto asher bara Elohim la’asot. Savri chaverai: Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam borei p’ri ha’gafen. Amen. Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam asher bachar banu mi’kol am v’rom’manu mi’kol lashon v’kidshanu b’mitzvotav. Va’titen lanu Adonai Eloheinu b’ahavah Shabbatot limnucha u’moadim l’simchah chagim uz’manim li’sason et yom ha’Shabbat ha’zeh v’et yom Chag ha’Matzot ha’zeh zman cheiruteinu b’ahavah mikra kodesh zecher litziat Mitzrayim ki vanu vacharta v’otanu kidashta mi’kol ha’amim v’Shabbat u’moadei kodshecha b’ahavah uv’ratzon b’simchah uv’sason hin’chaltanu.  Baruch Atah Adonai mikadesh ha’Shabbat v’Yisrael v’ha’zmanim. Amen. There was evening and there was morning, the sixth day. And the heavens and earth and all their components were completed. God completed by the seventh day the work that God had done, and God rested on the seventh day from all of the work that God had done. God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, for on it God rested from all of the work that God had done. Attention, my friends: Blessed is the creator of the fruit of the vine. Amen. Blessed is the One who has lifted us up by deed and by language and whose mitzvot sanctify our lives. You have given us in love, Shabbat as a day of rest, appointed times for celebration, joyful feasts and festive seasons, this Shabbat and the festival of matzot, the season of our freedom, in love as a holy gathering and as a living reminder of our exodus from Egypt. For You have lifted us up and given us as a heritage Shabbat and Your holy festivals in love and favor, in joy and gladness. Blessed is the One who sanctifies Shabbat, the people Israel, and the festive seasons. Amen. Conclude with Shechecheyanu on page 6 5 O N E T A B L E . O R G


FRIDAY NIGHT WINE B. Abbreviated Shabbat Festival Kiddush .‫הַ גָּפֶ ן‬ ‫פּ ִרי‬ ‫א‬ ְ ‫בּ ֵר‬ ‫הָ ע לָ ם‬  ֶ‫מֶ ל‬ ‫א הֵ ינוּ‬ ֱ  ָ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬ .‫וְ הַ זְּ מַ נִּ ים‬ ‫וְ יִ ְשׂ ָראֵ ל‬ ‫הַ שַּׁ בָּ ת‬ ‫מקַ ֵדּשׁ‬ ָ ְ ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬   Blessed is the creator of the fruit of the vine. Blessed is the One who sanctifies Shabbat, the people Israel, and the festive seasons. Conclude with Shechecheyanu: .‫הַ זֶּה‬ ‫לַ זְּ מַ ן‬ ‫וְ ִהגִּ יעָ נוּ‬ ‫וְ ִקיְּ מָ נוּ‬ ‫חיָנוּ‬ ֱ ֶ‫שֶׁ ה‬ ‫הָ ע לָ ם‬  ֶ‫מֶ ל‬ ‫א הֵ ינוּ‬ ֱ  ָ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬ Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam shehecheyanu v’kiyamanu v’higianu lazman ha’zeh. Blessed are You, Infinite One, who sustains us, lifts us up, and enables us to reach this season. From here, the seder continues at your own pace. The unleavened matzah, which is uncovered and blessed during motzi, replaces challah at your table.

PRO

TIP

T H E S H E H E C H E Y A N U   I S   R E C I T E D   W H E N   Y O U

E X P E R I E N C E S O M E T H I N G   F O R

T H E F I R S T

T I M E E A C H   Y E A R   A N D

W A N T T O   G I V E   T H A N K S F O R   T H E   M O M E N T .

6 O N E T A B L E . O R G


SATURDAY NIGHT LIGHT If you are celebrating a second seder on Saturday night, the beginning of your meal coincides with the end of Shabbat. In Jewish tradition, the end of Shabbat is marked by a brief ceremony called havdalah (Hebrew for separation) that creates a literal separation in time between kodesh, the holiness of Shabbat, and chol, the everyday weekday, using a special set of  sensory-engaging rituals involving wine, sweet spices, and candlelight. Fri-yay, extended. But on a holiday like Passover, even though Shabbat is ending, we are still  on “festival time.” Havdalah is modified, incorporated into the opening Kadesh section of the Saturday night seder, and used to help us transition from the kodesh of Shabbat to another kind of holiness, the kodesh of the second night of Passover. Before your seder begins, when you are ready to bring in the second night  of Passover, you light festival candles, which will later serve as your light for havdalah.  With the same intention as on the first night of Passover, kindling light can  be an opportunity to take a deep breath and just be before your guests arrive, or it can be a beautiful way to welcome your guests by gathering everyone around the table to light together after they arrive.  Light, then bless: ‫הָ ע לָ ם אֲשֶׁ ר ִק ְדּשָׁ נוּ ְבּ ִמ ְצ תָ יו וְ ִצוָּנוּ‬

ֶ‫א הֵ ינוּ מֶ ל‬ ֱ ‫אַ תָּ ה יְ ָי‬

‫בָּ רוּ‬

.‫ְלהַ ְד ִליק נֵר שֶׁ ל שַׁ בָּ ת ושֶׁ ל י ם ט ב‬

Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam asher kidshanu b’mitzvotav vitzivanu l’hadlik ner shel yom tov. Blessed is the One whose mitzvot sanctify our lives, and who commands us to kindle the light of Shabbat and this holy day. PRO

TIP

T R A D I T I O N A L L Y , Y O U   W O U L D   L I G H T T H E S E   C A N D L E S   A F T E R   N I G H T F A L L , 7 O N E T A B L E . O R G

O N C E

Y O U C A N   C O U N T   T H R E E   S T A R S I N   T H E   S K Y .


SATURDAY NIGHT WINE The order of the seder begins with Kadesh. Wine becomes a ritual symbol,  a conduit to sanctify time. On Saturday night, Kadesh also includes the blessings of havdalah, the separation between the holiness of Shabbat and  the sanctity of the Passover festival. Depending on your comfort level, you may choose to try out the full recitation of the Havdalah Festival Kiddush, Option A below; we are also including an abbreviated version, Option B. Both versions conclude with the one-line Shehecheyanu blessing, in honor of the Passover holiday and all of the celebratory mitzvot included in the seder. A. Full Havdalah Festival Kiddush ‫סַ ְב ִרי חַ בֵ ַרי‬ .‫הָ ע לָ ם בּ ֵרא ְפּ ִרי הַ גָּפֶ ן‬

ֶ‫א הֵ ינוּ מֶ ל‬ ֱ ‫אַ תָּ ה יְ ָי‬

‫הָ ע לָ ם אֲשֶׁ ר בָּ חר בָּ נוּ מכָּ ל עָ ם ור ממָ נווּ מכָּ ל לָ שׁ ן‬

‫בָּ רוּ‬

ֶ‫א קינוּ מֶ ל‬ ֱ ‫אַ תָּ ה ה׳‬

‫בָּ רוּ‬

‫וק ְדּשָׁ נוּ ְבּ ִמ ְצ תָ יו‬ ִ ‫הבָ ה מ עַ ִדים ְל ִשׂ ְמחָ ה חַ גִּ ים וּזְ מַ נִּ ים ְלשָׂ שׂ ן אֶ ת י ם חַ ג‬ ֲ ַ‫א הֵ ינוּ ְבּא‬ ֱ ‫ו ִַתּתֶּ ן לָ נוּ יְ ָי‬ ‫ ִכּי בָ נוּ בָ חַ ְרתָּ וְ א תָ נוּ‬.‫יציאַ ת ִמ ְצ ָריִ ם‬ ִ ‫ק ֶדשׁ זֵכֶ ר ִל‬ ֹ ‫הַ מַּ צּ ת הַ זֶּה זְ מַ ן חֵ רוּתֵ נוּ ִמ ְק ָרא‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה ה׳‬

‫ בָּ רוּ‬.‫וּבשָׂ שׂון ִהנְ חַ ְלתָּ נוּ‬ ְ ‫ְבּ ִשׂ ְמחָ ה‬

ֶ‫ְק ַדּ ְשׁתָּ ִמכָּ ל הָ עַ ִמּים וּמ עַ ֵדי קָ ְדשׁ‬

‫ְמקַ ֵדּשׁ יִ ְשׂ ָראֵ ל וְ הַ זְּ מַ נִּ ים‬ .‫הָ ע לָ ם בּ ֵרא ְמא ֵרי הָ אֵ שׁ‬ ‫בֵּ ין‬

ֶ‫א הֵ ינוּ מֶ ל‬ ֱ ‫אַ תָּ ה יְ ָי‬

ֶ‫ק ֶדשׁ ְלח ל בֵּ ין א ר ְלחשׁ‬ ֹ ‫הָ ע לָ ם הַ מַּ ְב ִדּיל בֵּ ין‬

‫בָּ רוּ‬

ֶ‫א הֵ ינוּ מֶ ל‬ ֱ ‫אַ תָּ ה יְ ָי‬

‫בָּ רוּ‬

‫יעי ְלשֵׁ שֶׁ ת יְ מֵ י הַ מַּ עֲשֶׂ ה בֵּ ין ְק ֻדשַּ ת שַׁ בָּ ת ִל ְק ֻדשַּׁ ת י ם‬ ִ ‫יִ ְשׂ ָראֵ ל לָ עַ ִמּים בֵּ ין י ם הַ ְשּׁ ִב‬ ‫יעי ִמשֵּׁ שֶׁ ת יְ מֵ י הַ מַּ עַ שֶׂ ה ִק ַדּ ְשׁתָּ ִה ְב ַדּ ְלתָּ וְ ִק ַדּ ְשׁתָּ אֶ ת‬ ִ ‫ט ב ִה ְב ַדּ ְלתָּ וְ אֶ ת י ם הַ ְשּ ִב‬ ֶ‫יִ ְשׂ ָראֵ ל ִבּ ְק ֻדשָּׂ ת‬

‫עַ ְמּ‬

.‫ק ֶדשׁ‬ ֹ ‫ק ֶדשׁ ְל‬ ֹ ‫אַ תָּ ה יְ ָי הַ מַ ְב ִדּיל בֵּ ין‬

8 O N E T A B L E . O R G

‫בָּ רוּ‬


SATURDAY NIGHT WINE Savri chaverai: Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam borei p’ri ha’gafen. Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam asher bachar banu mi’kol am v’rom’manu mi’kol lashon v’kidshanu b’mitzvotav. Va’titen lanu Adonai Eloheinu b’ahavah moadim l’simchah chagim uz’manim et yom Chag ha’Matzot ha’zeh zman cheiruteinu mikra kodesh zecher litziat Mitzrayim ki vanu vacharta v’otanu kidashta mi’kol ha’amim u’moadei kodshecha b’simchah uv’sason hin’chaltanu. Baruch Atah Adonai mikadesh Yisrael v’ha’zmanim. Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam borei m’orei ha’eish. Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam hamavdil bein kodesh l’chol bein or l’chosech bein Yisrael la’amim bein yom ha’shvi’i l’sheshet y’mei ha’ma’aseh bein kidushat Shabbat lik’dushat yom tov hivdalta v’et yom ha’shvi’i mi’sheshet y’mei ha’ma’aseh kidashta hivdalta v’kidashta et amcha Yisrael bik’dushatecha.  Baruch Atah Adonai hamavdil bein kodesh l’kodesh. Attention, my friends: Blessed is the creator of the fruit of the vine. Blessed is the One who has lifted us up by deed and by language and whose mitzvot sanctify our lives. You have given us in love, Shabbat as a day of rest, appointed times for celebration, joyful feasts and festive seasons, this Shabbat and the festival of matzot, the season of our freedom, in love as a holy gathering and as a living reminder of our exodus from Egypt. For You have lifted us up and given us as a heritage Shabbat and Your holy festivals in love and favor, in joy and gladness. Blessed is the One who sanctifies the people Israel, and the festive seasons. Blessed is the One who creates the light of fire. Blessed is the One who separates between the holy and the everyday, between light and darkness, between the people Israel and the nations of the world, between the seventh day and six days of work. You have made a distinction between the holiness of Shabbat and the holiness of a festival, and you have sanctified the seventh day above the six days of work. You have distinguished us as a people and made the people Israel holy with your own holiness. Blessed is the One who makes a distinction between the holiness of Shabbat and the holiness of Passover. Conclude with Shechecheyanu on page 10

9 O N E T A B L E . O R G


SATURDAY NIGHT WINE B. Abbreviated Havdalah Festival Kiddush .‫הַ גָּפֶ ן‬ ‫פּ ִרי‬ ‫א‬ ְ ‫בּ ֵר‬ ‫הָ ע לָ ם‬  ֶ‫מֶ ל‬ ‫א הֵ ינוּ‬ ֱ  ָ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬ .‫וְ הַ זְּ מַ נִּ ים‬ ‫וְ יִ ְשׂ ָראֵ ל‬ ‫הַ שַּׁ בָּ ת‬ ‫מקַ ֵדּשׁ‬ ָ ְ ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬ .‫הָ אֵ שׁ‬ ‫מא ֵרי‬ ‫א‬ ְ ‫בּ ֵר‬ ‫הָ ע לָ ם‬  ֶ‫מֶ ל‬ ‫א הֵ ינוּ‬ ֱ  ָ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬ .‫ק ֶדשׁ‬ ֹ ‫ל‬ ‫שׁ‬ ְ ‫ק ֶד‬ ֹ  ‫בֵּ ין‬ ‫הַ מַ ְב ִדּיל‬ ָ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬ Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam borei p’ri ha’gafen.  Baruch Atah Adonai mikadesh ha’Shabbat v’Yisrael v’ha’zmanim. Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam borei m’orei ha’eish. Baruch Atah Adonai hamavdil bein kodesh l’kodesh. Blessed is the creator of the fruit of the vine. Blessed is the One who sanctifies Shabbat, the people Israel, and the festive seasons. Blessed is the One who creates the light of fire. Blessed is the One who makes a distinction between the holiness of Shabbat and the holiness of Passover. Conclude with Shechecheyanu: .‫הַ זֶּה‬ ‫לַ זְּ מַ ן‬ ‫וְ ִהגִּ יעָ נוּ‬ ‫וְ ִקיְּ מָ נוּ‬ ‫חיָנוּ‬ ֱ ֶ‫שֶׁ ה‬ ‫הָ ע לָ ם‬  ֶ‫מֶ ל‬ ‫א הֵ ינוּ‬ ֱ  ָ‫יְ י‬ ‫אַ תָּ ה‬  ‫בָּ רוּ‬ Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech ha’olam shehecheyanu v’kiyamanu v’higianu lazman ha’zeh. Blessed is the One who sustains us, lifts us up, and enables us to reach this season. From here, the seder continues at your own pace. The unleavened matzah, which is uncovered and blessed during motzi, replaces challah at your table.

1 0 O N E T A B L E . O R G


FOUR

QUESTIONS SHABBAT

FOR

YOUR

TABLE:

On Passover there are four questions, usually asked by the youngest child. Here are four questions for your Shabbat table - make the millennial who doesn’t remember Rugrats ask them. 1. We eat matzah to remember that the Jews had no time to bake their bread before rushing to leave Egypt. What do you carry with you? What are you too rushed to do?  2. We eat bitter herbs to remind us of the bitter life the Jewish people experienced as slaves in Egypt. What’s a challenge you faced this year? What’s the greatest thing you learned from it? 3. We dip the parsley into salt water. The vegetables remind us of spring and new life. The salt water reminds us of the tears of the Jewish slaves. When we dip we remember the pain of the past and the hope of a new future simultaneously. How do you remember the past? What are you doing to change the future?  4. On all nights we eat sitting upright or reclining, and on this night we all recline. What makes you feel comfortable? When are you free to relax and recline?

1 1 O N E T A B L E . O R G


MA

NISHTANAH

Passover is all about asking questions; here are two in honor of Shabbat: 1) I get that Passover is a holiday. Does Shabbat count as a holiday too?  Like, every week? Yes. Shabbat is a holiday every week and we’re not kidding. In fact, our modern English word 'holiday' comes from an Old English blend of holy and day, and in Jewish tradition Shabbat is the holiest day of the year every week.  More holy than… Yom Kippur? While it’s true that Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are holy AF and the three pilgrimage festivals of Passover, Shavuot, and Sukkot are also strong  contenders, if you want to go for the gold, it’s Shabbat all the way. Its frequency doesn’t diminish its importance, which is pretty radical when you think about it. Shabbat is a weekly act of recreation, and creation is our foundation as a people and as a faith. Shabbat asks us to recall the narrative of a world created in an evolution of seven days, the seventh of which is set aside as  a sacred “other,” a day of rest, reflection, and recalibration. In our modern l ives, Shabbat inspires us to be the ongoing co-creators of a better world by embracing a cycle of work and rest in our own lives. As such, no other holiday in the Jewish calendar, including Yom Kippur and  Passover, supersedes Shabbat. 2) Wait, so if Passover is seven days long, and Shabbat is every seven days, does this mean Passover ends on Shabbat too? Yes. Well, sort of, depending on when Passover ends for you. Some follow the Reform practice of ending the holiday with one festival day of yom tov,  others follow the tradition of ending with two festival days. So, depending  on your practice, the last full day of breadlessness for Passover 2019 might  be Friday, April 26th or Saturday, April 27th.  Whether you’re celebrating the end of Passover or the almost-end, Shabbat dinner is a perfect opportunity to gather the friends you missed during first or second seder and eat one last matzah pizza… or order the real deal.

1 2 O N E T A B L E . O R G


photo by Jake Cohen

PASSOVER RECIPES ON PASSOVER WHETHER YOU REACH FOR DATES OR APPLES, CHRAIME OR GEFILTE FISH, RICE OR MATZAH BALLS, WE WANT TO HELP YOU FEEL CONFIDENT IN THE KITCHEN AND GIVE YOU A TASTE FOR THE MANY WAYS JEWS AROUND THE WORLD CELEBRATE THROUGH FOOD. WE'VE COLLECTED SOME RECIPES FROM OUR COMMUNITY AND PARTNERS TO COOK UP FOR YOUR PASSOVER X SHABBAT SEDER!


photo by Staci Valentine

APPLE

CHAROSET Serves 12

What you'll need: 3 large tart apples (Granny Smith work great!) peeled, cored, and chopped 3/4 cup chopped walnuts 1/2 tsp powdered cinnamon 1 tbsp honey (if you like it sweeter) 3 tbsp sweet red wine — this is the perfect time to break out the Manishevitz! Directions: Mix together all the ingredients. Add more wine by the tablespoon to adjust towards towards more mortar/paste texture. Best if made a day ahead and kept in the refrigerator! IRAQI

CHAROSET

Recipe from The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen © 2015 by Amelia Saltsman | Serves 12

What you'll need: 3/4 cup pecans, toasted 3/4 cup silan (date syrup) Directions: Chop the nuts into about 1/4-inch (6-millimeter) pieces, chopping some almost to “dust.” Put the silan in a small bowl and stir in the nuts and dust. You should have a thick honey-like spread. It can be made 1 day ahead and stored, covered, at room temperature. 1 4 O N E T A B L E . O R G


MATZO A

LA

BALL

SOUP

MEXICANA

Recipe by Fany Gerson, The New York Times

What you'll need for the chicken broth: 2 chickens (2 1/2 to 3 pounds each), or 1 chicken (4 to 5 pounds), plus 8 whole chicken wings 4 large carrots, peeled and cut into chunks 3 celery stalks, cut into chunks 1 ½ medium white onions, peeled and quartered 1 to 2 Serrano peppers, sliced lengthwise 1 leek, split lengthwise and cut into chunks 1 large garlic clove, peeled 8 sprigs cilantro 8 sprigs flat-leaf parsley 2 bay leaves About 6 black peppercorns Kosher salt, to taste What you'll need for the matzah balls: 1 ¼ cups matzo meal 2 ½ tsp kosher salt er ieg r K l ½ tsp baking powder nie Da y ½ tsp baking soda ob hot p ¼ tsp black pepper 5 large eggs, 3 of them separated ⅓ cup grated white onion, squeezed in a dish towel to remove excess liquid ¼ cup rendered chicken or duck fat, or use vegetable oil 3 tbsp finely minced herbs, such as dill, flatleaf parsley or chives, or a combination What you'll need for serving: 1 small white onion, peeled and finely chopped 2 Serrano peppers (or 1 jalapeño pepper), seeded and finely chopped 1 cup chopped cilantro leaves and tender stems 1 to 2 avocados, diced 3 to 4 limes, cut into wedges 1 sprig fresh epazote Continued on following page 1 5 O N E T A B L E . O R G


MATZO A

LA

BALL

SOUP

MEXICANA continued

1. Prepare the broth: Place all the ingredients except the salt in a large soup pot and fill with cold water to cover by 1 inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to medium-low. Skim off any foam, add salt and simmer, partially covered, until the chickens have fully cooked, about 45 to 50 minutes. 2. Carefully remove one of the chickens from the broth and transfer to a bowl. When cool enough to handle, shred chicken and reserve meat, ladling a small amount of broth over it to keep it from drying out, then cover and set aside. Discard the skin and return the bones to the pot. Continue cooking the broth at a high simmer for about 2 hours, adding more water if needed to replenish. Turn off the heat and let cool. Strain and discard vegetables and bones, reserving the second chicken for another preparation (such as shredding it to use in enchiladas). 3. About an hour before the broth is done, make the matzo balls: In a large bowl, combine the matzo meal, salt, baking powder, baking soda and black pepper. In a medium bowl, whisk the 2 whole eggs with the 3 yolks, the grated onion, the chicken fat and the minced herbs. In another medium bowl, beat the 3 egg whites by hand or with an electric hand mixer until stiff peaks form. Stir the egg-yolk mixture into the dry ingredients, then add one-third of the beaten egg whites and mix until incorporated. Gently fold in the remaining whites until no streaks remain. Press a sheet of plastic wrap directly onto the surface of the batter and refrigerate until firm, 20 to 30 minutes. 4. Line a baking sheet with plastic wrap. Fill a small bowl with water and set aside. Scoop mounds of the matzo batter (about 1 tablespoon each) onto the baking sheet. Using the water to keep your hands moist, as needed, roll each scoop of batter into a ball, handling as gently as possible. 5. Return the chicken broth to a simmer and season with salt, if needed. Add the matzo balls as gently as possible and cook over moderate heat, turning them a few times, until they are plump and cooked through, about 25 to 30 minutes. Stir the shredded chicken into the soup and cook just until the meat is warmed through, about 2 minutes. 6. Serve soup with onions, chiles, cilantro, epazote, avocado and lime wedges on the side, so everyone can garnish as they like. 1 6 O N E T A B L E . O R G


WEST

AFRICAN

BRISKET

Recipe by Michael Twitty, shared by Be’chol Lashon

What you'll need: 1 tsp of ground ginger 1 tbsp of sweet paprika 1 tsp of coarse black pepper 1 tsp of cinnamon 1 tsp of chili powder 1 tsp of cayenne pepper 1 tbsp of kosher salt 5 lbs Brisket or 5-7 lbs of Flanken 4 garlic cloves, peeled and minced 1 large piece of ginger, peeled and minced 4 tbsp of extra virgin olive oil

3 onions, peeled and diced 3 bell peppers-green, red and yellow, seeded and diced 1 small hot chili or more to taste 10 oz can of diced tomatoes 1-2 tbsp of brown sugar 1 tbsp of prepared horseradish (chrain/red preferred) 2 cups of chicken, beef or vegetable stock 2 bay leaves 1 sprig of fresh thyme or a tsp of dried thyme 2 large red onions, cut into rings

Directions: 1. Combine the spices and salt. Save about two teaspoons for the vegetables. Rub in the minced garlic and ginger, then sprinkle with the remainder of the spice mixture. Heat three tablespoons of olive oil in a large Dutch oven or pot. Sear the beef all around, or about 3-5 minutes on each side to an even brown. Remove from the Dutch oven and set aside. 2. Add the onion, bell pepper and hot chili to the oil in the pan. Season with the remaining seasoning. Saute until the onion is translucent and add the tomatoes and mix together and cook for about five minutes. 3. Add the sugar and stock, horseradish, bay leaves and thyme. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. 4. Place the onion rings at the bottom of the pan and sprinkled with the remaining tablespoon of olive oil. Place the brisket on top of them. Cover with the vegetables and stock. 5. Cover tightly and bake in the preheated oven for 3.5 hours until the brisket is fork tender. 6. Remove the brisket. If you wish to serve hot from the oven, allow 15-30 minutes to rest and absorb liquid, then remove and carve against the grain. If you are planning on serving it later in the day or the next day, cool and refrigerate. Once the brisket is chilled, you can remove excess fat and slice—always against the grain. You can then use the sauce to cover in a pan or pot and heat gently for a half an hour or more until heated through. 1 7 O N E T A B L E . O R G


EGGPLANT

INVOLTINI

PISTACHIOS

AND

WITH

CURRANTS

Recipe by Sarit Wishnevski, herringandpotatoes.com

What you'll need: 2 cups of tomato sauce (either store bought or make your own) 1-2 medium sized eggplants 2 tbsp olive oil Kosher salt 2 cloves garlic 1/4 cup matzo meal 3 tbsp pistachios, toasted 1 tsp lemon zest

8 oz part skim ricotta cheese 1 egg 2 tbsp dried currants (optional, you can leave them off and the dish will still be delicious) ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese, divided ¾ cup basil leaves, thinly sliced Mozzarella to top (optional)

Directions: 1. If you're making your sauce set it aside and let it cool while you prepare the involtini. 2. Set broiler to high. 3. Slice your eggplant lengthwise to about ¼ inch thickness. Try to get 8 -10 slices. 4. Sprinkle with kosher salt and let sit for 10 minutes. Place on an aluminum foillined pan and brush olive oil on both sides. Place in broiler and cook 5 minutes on each side but make sure the eggplant doesn't burn or get too browned. After the eggplant is cooked, set aside and let cool. 5. Place garlic in food processor and process until it's in small pieces. Add matzo meal and toasted pistachios to the garlic and run the machine till you have coarse and well-blended crumbs. Then add the zest, ricotta, and egg and process until smooth. 6. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and stir in the currants (if you're using), basil, and ¼ cup of Parmesan cheese. Salt and pepper to taste. 7. Preheat oven to 375° F 8. Take a pie or baking dish and pour 1½ cups of sauce into the bottom of the dish. 9. Take a slice of eggplant and spread 2 heaping tablespoons of the cheese mixture over one side of the eggplant. Roll up the eggplant and place, seam side down, into the sauce. Repeat for remaining eggplant. 10. When finished rolling up your involtini, pour the remaining sauce on top and sprinkle ¼ cup of Parmesan cheese and (if you're using) some mozzarella slices. Bake 20-30 minutes until cheese is lightly browned and sauce is bubbling. Serve hot! 1 8 O N E T A B L E . O R G


COCONUT

HALVA

MACARONS Recipe by Jake Cohen, wakeandjake.com

What you'll need: One 14-ounce bag sweetened shredded coconut One 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk 2 tablespoons coconut flour or matzo meal 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom 2 eggs, separated 1/2 cup halva crumbles Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 325° and line 2 sheet pans with parchment paper. 2. In a large bowl, mix the coconut, condensed milk, coconut flour, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt, the cinnamon, cardamom and the egg yolks until smooth. 3. In a separate medium bowl, using an electric hand mixer, beat the egg whites with the remaining 1/4 teaspoon of salt to stiff peaks. Fold into the coconut mixture, followed by the halva. 4. Scoop 2 tablespoons mounds of the mixture on the sheet pans, 2-inches apart. Bake for 15 minutes, then remove from the oven. 5. With a small bowl of water, dip a 3-inch ring cutter in the water, then one at a time, roll around the edges to bring in the melted halva into a tighter mound. 6. Return to the oven and continue to bake until golden brown, another 15 to 20 minutes more. Remove from the oven and repeat rolling with the ring cutter to make a perfectly round macaroons. Let cool completely, then serve.

photo by Jake Cohen

1 9 O N E T A B L E . O R G

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