Page 1

Cotton Farming ONE GROWER PUBLISHING, LLC

PROFITABLE PRODUCTION STRATEGIES

NOVEMBER 2019

www.cottonfarming.com

Improve Soil Health, Weed Management MY TURN

Forty Years Of Observing Cotton Plants

2020

SEED VARIETY GUIDE

®


Vol. 63 No. 11

Cotton Farming PROFITABLE PRODUCTION STRATEGIES

NOVEMBER 2019

www.cottonfarming.com

F E AT U R E S

15

SOUTHERN PLAINS REPORT

22

GINNING MARKETPLACE

Dr. Gaylon Morgan, who has joined Cotton Incorporated, offers tips on how to achieve soil health and improve weed management.

2020

SEED

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE GINNING INDUSTRY

Dusty Findley, CEO of the Southeastern Cotton Ginners Association, discusses the importance of holding weekly safety meetings.

VARIETY GUIDE

2020 Hybrid Guide

CornSouth ONE GROWER PUBLISHING, LLC

8

Quality Selections

The menu of cotton varieties from which to choose in 2020 includes a host of high-yielding, good quality selections. Check out the roster in Cotton Farming’s Seed Variety Guide. Before placing your order, do your homework and discuss priorities with your consultant and seed representative to match your operation’s needs with outstanding cotton characteristics and traits.

Southern Production & Marketing Strategies

A Supplement to Cotton Farming and The Peanut Grower Magazines

November 2019

SUPPLEMENT Look for Corn South following page 14 in the Mid-South and Southeast editions of Cotton Farming. To have industry news and content delivered directly to your inbox, sign up for the monthly e-newsletter at www.cornsouth.com.

WEB EXCLUSIVE A lawsuit recently filed in the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas challenges the constitutionality of the Texas “Use of Unmanned Aircraft” statute. Texas AgriLife’s Tiffany Dowell Lashmet breaks down all the relevant points regarding the background and lawsuit in her award-winning blog. Go to www.cottonfarming.com for this Web Exclusive report.

D E PA R T M E N T S & C O LU M N S

4 Editor’s Note 6 Cotton’s Agenda

16 Specialists Speaking 26 My Turn

ON THE COVER: Choose your cotton varieties carefully to achieve the right balance between yield and quality. Cover photo by Vicky Boyd.

DIGITAL OFFERINGS Keep up with the latest from Cotton Farming by signing up for the monthly E-News at www.cottonfarming.com. Look for the Cotton Farming E-News sign-up box in the upper right corner of the home page. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cottonfarming Twitter: @CottonFarming.

COTTON FARMING (ISSN 0746-8385) is published monthly January through December by One Grower Publishing LLC, 875 W. Poplar Ave., Suite 23, Box 305, Collierville, TN 38017. Periodicals postage paid at Memphis, Tenn. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Omeda Communications, Customer Service Department, P.O. Box 1388, Northbrook, IL 60065-1388 (Phone: 847-559-7578) (Fax: 847-564-9453). Annual subscriptions are $40. International rates are $55 in Canada/Mexico, $90 in all other countries for air-speeded delivery. Surface delivery not available due to problems in reliability.

TWITTER: @COTTONFARMING

NOVEMBER 2019 | COTTON FARMING

3


Editor’s Note

Cotton Farming

Carroll Smith

EDITORIAL/PRODUCTION Editor Carroll Smith csmith@onegrower.com Managing Editor Vicky Boyd vlboyd@onegrower.com

F

Thankful For The Little Things

or me, Nov. 1 signals the approach of Thanksgiving and brings to mind all the ways in which we are blessed. It’s ironic to be writing this with only a scrap of filtered light coming through the window and a bare minimum of battery power on my computer following the ferocious winds that blew through, causing an electrical outage. But I am thankful to have only suffered minimal damage and for the good supply of peanut butter and jelly in my pantry. It’s the little things…. I also am thankful for agriculture in general and our farmers specifically. In the big picture, they provide a safe, reliable food and fiber source for the world and are instrumental in keeping local, rural economies viable. Farmers not only preserve the land they love but also make it better for future generations. They have a passion for what they do and the work ethic to back it up. We are all certainly thankful for these “big things.” But when Paul Harvey delivered his famous speech — So God Made a Farmer — at the Future Farmers of America convention in 1978, he centered on many of the “little things” that define a farmer as well. Here is an excerpt from his commentary. “It had to be somebody who’d plow deep and straight and not cut corners; somebody to seed, weed, feed, breed and rake and disc and plow and plant and tie the fleece and strain the milk and replenish the self-feeder and finish a hard week’s work with a five-mile drive to church; somebody who would bale a family together with the soft strong bonds of sharing, who would laugh, and then sigh, and then reply, with smiling eyes, when his son says that he wants to spend his life ‘doing what dad does’ so God made a farmer.” The little things that make farmers special for which we are thankful can be seen on social media feeds as well. They don’t have to say how much they love their families or the glow of a sunrise or sunset because it’s evident in the photos they post. Farmers don’t complain about working the night shift. Instead, they share a photo of beautiful white cotton lit up by the lights of the pickers rolling across the field. I also saw a photo of a mom running a harvester with a precious little boy strapped into his baby seat beside her with this comment: “The boss came to work with mama today.” And another of a little girl in her princess dress walking across the field bringing daddy his lunch. It’s moments like these that are so important. Whether you celebrate Thanksgiving around the dinner table or on the turnrow, be thankful for the little things that make up the essence of life.

Carroll If you have comments, please send them to: Cotton Farming Magazine, 7201 Eastern Ave., Germantown, TN, 38138. Contact Carroll Smith via email at csmith@onegrower.com.

4

COTTON FARMING | NOVEMBER 2019

Southeast Editor Amanda Huber ahuber@onegrower.com Art Director Ashley Kumpe ADMINISTRATION Publisher/Vice President Lia Guthrie (901) 497-3689 lguthrie@onegrower.com Associate Publisher Carroll Smith (901) 326-4443 Sales Manager Scott Emerson (386) 462-1532 semerson@onegrower.com Production Manager Kathy Killingsworth (901) 767-4020 kkillingsworth@onegrower.com Audience Services Kate Thomas (847) 559-7514 For circulation changes or change of address, call (847) 559-7578 or email cottonfarming@omeda.com EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD David Burns – North Carolina David Lynch – South Carolina Bob McLendon – Georgia Larkin Martin – Alabama Mike Sturdivant Jr. – Mississippi Charles Parker – Missouri Jimmy Hargett – Tennessee Allen Helms – Arkansas Jay Hardwick – Louisiana Ronnie Hopper – Texas Ron Rayner – Arizona John Pucheu – California

ONE GROWER PUBLISHING, LLC Mike Lamensdorf President/Treasurer Lia Guthrie Publisher/Vice President ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COOPERATION: Cooperating with  COTTON FARMING are various cotton producer organizations across the Cotton Belt. Many representatives of producer organizations serve on COTTON  FARMING’s editorial advisory board. Opinions expressed and conclusions reached by contributors are not necessarily those of the cooperating organizations or the editors. All statements, including product claims, are those of the person or organization making the statement or claim. The publisher does not adopt any such statement or claims as its own and any such statement or claim does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the publisher. Copyright 2019 © ASSOCIATED PUBLICATIONS – One Grower Publishing, LLC also publishes RICE FARMING, THE PEANUT GROWER, SOYBEAN SOUTH and CORN SOUTH.

One Grower Publishing, LLC

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COTTONFARMING.COM


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Enlist, Enlist E3 and the Enlist Logo are trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. The transgenic soybean event in Enlist E3 soybeans is jointly developed and owned by Dow AgroSciences LL and MS Technologies LLC. ©2019 Corteva CE38-444-020 (07/19) BR CAAG9NLST077


Cotton’s Agenda Gary Adams

Making The Right Decisions The National Cotton Council recently conducted educational webinars to help U.S. cotton industry members and other stakeholders better understand the Title 1 seed cotton provisions in the 2018 farm law.

Is the webinar presentation available? n The NCC’s webinar presentation is on the NCC website (www.cotton.org) and a 24-minute video is on the NCC’s YouTube channel. It features Dr. Jody Campiche, the NCC’s vice president of Economics and Policy Analysis discussing the webinar’s major topics: 1) Key Differences in Title 1 Programs: ARC-CO & PLC Programs, Seed Cotton Provisions; 2) Seed Cotton Marketing Year Average (MYA) Price Calculation; 3) Seed Cotton PLC/ARCCO Provisions and Examples; 4) Base Acres, Payment Yield Update, Marketing Loan Provisions, Payment Limits & Eligibility; and 5) ARC/PLC Election & Enrollment, STAX/SCO Eligibility, ARC/PLC, Yield Update, Disaster Assistance, MFP. NCC members also can go to the NCC’s farm bill resources page that is periodically updated and soon will include a 2018 farm law webinar FAQ document.

What kind of information was discussed in the webinar? n Key differences in Title 1 programs is a good example of an important topic that was dis-

cussed. Under the 2018 farm law, for example, farms planted entirely to grass or pasture, including cropland that was idle or fallow, from 2009-2017 are no longer eligible for ARC/PLC payments. However, if 1 acre of one covered commodity was planted in any year between 2009-2017, the farm will remain eligible for ARC/PLC payments. Under the 2014 farm bill, producers made a one-time ARC/PLC election by crop and by farm that remained in effect for the 2014-2018 crop years for commodities other than seed cotton. For seed cotton, producers made an ARC/PLC election effective for the 2018 crop year. The ARC/PLC provisions in the 2018 farm law allow producers to make an ARC/PLC election by crop and by farm for the 2019-20 and 2020-21 crop years. Beginning with the 2021-22 crop year, producers will make an annual ARC/PLC election. Several changes were made to the ARC county program in the 2018 farm law. Payment rates now will be based on the county where each farm is physically located compared with the Farm Service Agency administrative county for each farm in the 2014 farm law. For ARC county data sources, FSA will use Risk Management Agency data when available, followed by National Agricultural Statistics Service data and then data from State Committee sources. The criteria for calculating separate ARC county irrigated and non-irrigated yields was revised in the 2018 farm law. The county will qualify if RMA irrigated and non-irrigated yield data are available in three of the five years between 2013 and 2017 or using FSA data from 2013-2017, at least 10% of the acreage was irrigated and 10% non-irrigated and an average of 5,000 acres was planted in every year from 2013-2017. There are also some 2014 and 2018 farm law differences regarding the PLC program along with other helpful information in the NCC webinar presentation and videos. I encourage NCC members and others to access these as they provide important details.

Gary Adams is president/CEO of the National Cotton Council of America. He and other NCC leaders contribute columns on this Cotton Farming page.

6

COTTON FARMING | NOVEMBER 2019

COTTONFARMING.COM


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Stop weeds and reduce drift and volatility. Weeds started this fight. Finish it with the Enlist™ weed control system. Enlist One® herbicide stops tough weeds to help maximize yield potential of Enlist crops. Additional tank-mix flexibility makes it easier to customize your weed control. And 2,4-D choline with Colex-D® technology provides inherent near-zero volatility with reduced physical drift potential. So much for so-called “tough” weeds. Take control at Enlist.com or visit your local retailer. ™® Colex-D, Enlist, Enlist Duo, the Enlist Logo and Enlist One are trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. ®PhytoGen is a trademark of PhytoGen Seed Company, LLC. PhytoGen Seed Company is a joint venture between Mycogen Corporation, an affiliate of Dow AgroSciences LLC, and the J.G. Boswell Company. Enlist Duo® and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Corteva E38-427-003 (06/19) BR CAAG9NLST072

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S:10”

AVAILABLE NOW


2020

SEED VARIETY GUIDE

Yield, Quality And Traits

T

he menu of cotton varieties from which to choose in 2020 includes a host of high-yielding, good quality selections. To help you get started, seed companies from across the Cotton Belt provided information about their headliners on pages 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 14 in the annual Seed Variety Guide

published by Cotton Farming. Discuss priorities with your consultant and seed representative to match your operation’s needs with these outstanding characteristics and traits. And then place your order for the upcoming 2020 season with confidence.

NEXGEN Bollgard 3 XtendFlex Cotton NG 2982 B3XF

early

4.0-4.2

semi-smooth

36-37

31-33

Early, short, compact variety. Packs a tremendous yield punch. Extremely storm proof, easy to manage. Very well adapted for Plains of Texas to Kansas.

NG 3930 B3XF

early-med

4.1-4.5

semi-smooth

37-38

29-30

Widely adapted early-med maturing variety with a great disease package. Excels on most soil types in dryland or limited water scenarios.

NG 3956 B3XF

early-med

4.3-4.7

semi-smooth

36-37

30-31

Early-med stripper cotton ideal for Plains of Texas to Kansas. Unsurpassed storm tolerance and best-in-class seedling vigor!

NG 3994 B3XF

early-med

4.3-4.9

semi-smooth

37-38

30-31

Top-end yield variety well suited across the Belt! Responds well to irrigation and PGRs. Easily managed with extremely high turnout!

NG 4936 B3XF

medium

4.1-4.5

smooth

37-39

28-30

High yield potential, excellent to premium fiber quality, medium maturing variety that travels very well across the Belt!

NG 5711 B3XF

med-full

4.3-4.6

smooth

37-39

30-32

High yield and outstanding fiber quality with best-in-class disease package. Wide adaptability and easy to manage for a growthy plant.

Bollgard II XtendFlex Cotton NG 3406 B2XF

early-med

4.4-4.6

semi-smooth

36-37

29-31

Excellent yield and fiber quality. Extremely widely adapted.

NG 3517 B2XF

early-med

4.0-4.7

smooth

36-37

32-33

High yield potential and excellent fiber quality.

NG 3522 B2XF

early-med

4.4-4.6

smooth

35-36

27-28

Proven performer in Southeast and Delta regions. Extremely tough for maturity class.

NG 3699 B2XF

early-med

4.0-4.7

smooth

37-38

32-33

Top performer in yield and fiber quality.

NG 3729 B2XF

early-med

4.4-4.6

semi-smooth

37-38

30-32

Top-end yield potential for the early-med maturity class, broadly adapted from South Texas to Southwest Oklahoma to the Delta.

NG 3780 B2XF

early-med

4.0-4.7

smooth

37-39

32-33

High yield potential with great fiber quality. Great disease tolerance to bacterial blight and Verticillium wilt.

NG 4545 B2XF

medium

4.0-4.7

smooth

36-37

32-33

Excellent variety for all scenarios across the Belt in medium maturity environments. Excellent vigor and disease tolerance to Verticillium wilt and bacterial blight.

NG 4601 B2XF

medium

4.4-4.8

semi-smooth

36-37

30-31

Very high-yielding picker-type variety suited for the Southeast, Delta and South Texas regions.

NG 4689 B2XF

medium

4.4-4.8

smooth

36-37

32-33

Excellent yield potential and outstanding fiber quality. Top performer from Rolling Plains to High Plains of Texas.

NG 4777 B2XF

medium

4.0-4.7

smooth

37-38

32-34

Widely adapted, high yield and outstanding quality variety with excellent disease package.

NG 5007 B2XF

med-full

4.3-4.6

smooth

36-38

28-30

Excellent yield potential and fiber quality. Outstanding consistent performer across the Belt!

NG 3500 XF

early-med

3.7-4.6

smooth

36-37

31-32

Widely adapted to Texas South Plains, Rolling Plains and Southwest Oklahoma. Proven disease tolerance, yield and quality is why this variety was one of the top-planted varieties the past two years!

NG 3640 XF

early-med

3.9-4.6

smooth

36-37

33-34

Excellent fiber quality in exceptional disease tolerance package in XtendFlex-only technology option.

NG 4792 XF

medium

3.7-4.6

smooth

36-37

32-33

Widely adapted to the South Plains and Rolling Plains of Texas in an indeterminate growing variety. Outstanding disease package.

4.5-4.9

smooth

37-39

36-38

University of Arkansas variety. Exceptional fiber quality with yield potential to match in a conventional variety.

XtendFlex Cotton

Americot Conventional Cotton AM UA48

8

early

COTTON FARMING NOVEMBER 2019

COTTONFARMING.COM


Variety

Maturity

Micronaire Leaf Type

Staple Length

G/Tex

Comments

DG 2425 XF

early-med

4.2-4.5

semi-smooth

1.14-1.16

31-32

Large seed, great vigor. Bacterial blight resistance and very good Verticillium wilt tolerance.

DG 2505 XF

early-med

4.2-4.5

semi-smooth

1.17-1.20

31-32

Broadly adapted to Texas and the Southeast. Good yield with a high quality fiber package. Excellent storm tolerance.

DYNA-GRO XtendFlex Cotton

Bollgard II XtendFlex Cotton DG 3109 B2XF

very early

4.3-4.7

semi-smooth

1.12-1.14

31-33

Best adapted to short-season environments or late planting. Medium plant height. Best fit on moderate to high irrigation.

DG 3385 B2XF

early

4.3-4.7

semi-smooth

1.11-1.15

29-32

Adapted to Texas, Arizona, Mid-South, Upper Southeast and East Coast. Very good storm tolerance and early season vigor. Very good irrigated or dryland. Best performance on silt loams. Manage early with plant growth regulators.

DG 3450 B2XF

medium

4.2-4.7

smooth

1.15-1.20

29-34

Bacterial blight resistance with a good fiber package. Excellent storm tolerance. Best fits West Texas, West Oklahoma and Southwest Kansas.

DG 3526 B2XF

medium

4.2-4.7

semi-smooth

1.09-1.15

27-30

Best fit in mid- to full-season environments in the Mid-South, Southeast and Upper Gulf Coast. Good storm tolerance with high gin turnout. Perfoms well in irrigated and dryland environments.

DG 3544 B2XF

medium

4.5-4.9

smooth

1.15-1.19

30-34

Adapted to Texas and the Southeast. Very good tolerance to Verticillium wilt and bacterial blight. Use in dryland or ample irrigation production systems.

DG 3605 B2XF

med-full

4.1-4.6

smooth

1.18-1.26

29-32

Best in irrigated river valleys of Texas and Mid-South/Delta. Medium to tall plant type. Good fiber length.

DG 3635 B2XF

med-full

4.2-4.6

semi-smooth

1.12-1.16

31-35

Recommended for Texas, Delta and Southeast regions. Medium plant height. May require additional PGR applications under high input scenarios.

DG 3757 B2XF

full

4.6-4.9

semi-smooth

1.12-1.16

27-31

Broadly adapted dryland or irrigated in the Lower Southeast, Lower Mid-South and Upper Gulf Coast. May require additional PGR applications under high irrigation or strong growing conditions.

Bollgard 3 XtendFlex Cotton DG 3317 B3XF

early

4.6-4.8

semi-smooth

1.19-1.21

30-31

Best adapted to the Upper Mid-South and Carolina regions. Medium plant height. Irrigated as well as dryland performance.

DG 3402 B3XF

early-med

4.0-4.4

smooth

1.21-1.23

30-31

Broadly adaptable to Texas and the Southeast. Excellent seedling vigor and fiber quality with bacterial blight resistance. Excellent storm tolerance.

DG 3421 B3XF

early-med

3.9-4.3

semi-smooth

1.19-1.23

29-31

RKN and reniform nematode tolerance. Broadly adapted to Texas and the Southeast. Good fiber quality with excellent storm tolerance.

DG 3427 B3XF

early-med

4.4-4.7

semi-smooth

1.15-1.17

30-31

Responds best in the Delta, Costal Plains and Carolina environments. Medium to tall plant height. Aggressive PGR management recommended.

DG 3470 B3XF

early-med

4.6-4.8

semi-smooth

1.16-1.19

30-31

B3XF version of DG 2570 B2RF. Broadly adaptable across U.S. Southern Cotton Belt. Medium to tall plant height. Very good seedling vigor.

DG 3570 B3XF

medium

4.3-4.6

semi-smooth

1.16-1.19

29-31

B3XF version of DG 2570 B2RF. Broadly adaptable across U.S. Southern Cotton Belt on irrigated as well as dryland acres. Medium to tall plant height. Very good seedling vigor.

DG 3520 B3XF

medium

3.9-4.1

semi-smooth

1.21-1.23

31-32

Fits Lower Carolinas, Delta and Texas areas. Medium plant height with bacterial blight resistance. Excellent storm tolerance.

DG 3530 B3XF

medium

4.7-4.9

semi-smooth

1.21-1.23

30-32

Best placed in Southwest, Mid-South and Upper Southeast growing regions. Very good fiber length and strength. Moderate resistance to Verticillium wilt.

DG 3555 B3XF

medium

3.8-4.2

semi-smooth

1.28-1.30

30-32

Adapted to Texas and the Delta. Excellent Verticillium wilt tolerance and bacterial blight resistance. Excellent fiber quality and seedling vigor.

DG 3615 B3XF

med-full

4.2-4.5

smooth

1.17-1.25

31-33

Excellent seedling vigor and storm tolerance combined with Verticillium wilt tolerance and bacterial blight resistance. Adapted to Texas, Delta and Southeast environments.

DG 3753 B3XF

full

4.0-4.2

smooth

1.20-1.23

30-32

Best grown in Lower Southeast and Delta regions. Tall plant type that should be managed aggressively with PGRs. Very good fiber strength and length.

DG H929 B3XF

early

4.2-4.5

semi-smooth

1.13-1.16

30-31

Enhanced with Halo salt tolerance. Adapted to West Texas and similar environments with saline soil types. Good storm tolerance with bacterial blight resistance and good Verticillium wilt tolerance.

DG H959 B3XF

medium

4.2-4.5

semi-smooth

1.17-1.20

30-32

Enhanced with Halo salt tolerance. Good seedling vigor. Adapted to Southern Cotton Belt and the Carolinas. Good storm tolerance with bacterial blight resistance and good Verticillium wilt tolerance.

GlyTol LibertyLink TwinLink DG 1602 GLT

med-full

4.4-4.8

semi-smooth

1.14-1.18

30-34

Best fit in the Delta and the Southeast. Semi-smooth leaf with medium to medium-tall plant type.

DG 1702 GLT

med-full

4.4-4.8

smooth

1.16-1.20

30-34

Best placed in the Carolinas. Excellent seedling vigor with dryland as well as irrigated performance.

New varieties for 2020 in blue

TWITTER: @COTTONFARMING

NOVEMBER 2019 COTTON FARMING

9


Variety

Maturity

Micronaire Leaf Type

Staple Length

G/Tex

Comments

PHYTOGEN Upland PHY 300 W3FE

early-mid

4.5

semi-smooth

1.15/37

31.4

High-yielding variety featuring the Enlist cotton trait and WideStrike 3 Insect Protection. Early to mid-maturity with excellent seedling vigor.

PHY 312 WRF

early-mid

4.4

light-hairy

1.18/38

31.8

Superior yield potential and seedling vigor in an early to mid-maturing variety with excellent fiber quality. Long staple and lower micronaire.

PHY 320 W3FE

early-mid

4.4

semi-smooth

1.17/37

34.6

Early to mid-maturing variety featuring the Enlist cotton trait, WideStrike 3 Insect Protection, and two-gene root-knot nematode resistance. Superior yield with excellent fiber quality, including lower micronaire and exceptional strength.

PHY 330 W3FE

early-mid

4.4

light-hairy

1.18/38

31.9

High-yielding, broadly adapted variety featuring the Enlist cotton trait and WideStrike 3 Insect Protection. Early to mid-maturity with superb fiber quality, including lower micronaire.

PHY 333 WRF

early-mid

4.4

light-hairy

1/.17/37

31.2

Early to mid-maturing variety with outstanding yield potential. Selected for yield consistency and excellent fiber properties.

PHY 340 W3FE

early-mid

4.5

light-hairy

1.17/37

31.5

Early to mid-maturing variety featuring the Enlist cotton trait and WideStrike 3 Insect Protection. Superior yields with excellent fiber quality, lower micronaire.

PHY 350 W3FE

early-mid

4.6

semi-smooth

1.18/38

31.9

Superior yield potential with excellent fiber quality. Early to mid-maturing variety featuring the Enlist cotton trait and WideStrike 3 Insect Protection. PhytoGen Breeding Traits include two-gene root-knot nematode and bacterial blight resistance. Broadly adapted across the entire Upland production region.

PHY 430 W3FE

mid

4.5

light-hairy

1.14/36

32.6

High-yielding, mid-maturing variety featuring the Enlist cotton trait and WideStrike 3 Insect Protection. PhytoGen Breeding Traits for resistance to bacterial blight.Â

PHY 440 W3FE

mid-full

4.1

smooth

1.22/39

34.6

Mid-maturing variety with the Enlist cotton trait and WideStrike 3 Insect Protection. Industry leading fiber quality package with high-yield potential. PhytoGen Breeding Traits for resistance to bacterial blight and RKN.

PHY 444 WRF

mid-full

4.1

smooth

1.24/40

32.7

Exceptional fiber quality package, including Acala-like staple and lower micronaire. High yield potential in a widely adapted mid- to full-maturing variety.

PHY 480 W3FE

mid

4.4

semi-smooth

1.16/37

32.3

Superior yield potential with excellent fiber quality. Mid-maturing variety featuring the Enlist cotton trait and WideStrike 3 Insect Protection. PhytoGen Breeding Traits include two-gene root-knot nematode and bacterial blight resistance. Broadly adapted across the Mid-South/Southeast.

PHY 530 W3FE

full

4.6

semi-smooth

1.14/36

31

Aggressive growing full-season variety adapted to the lower Southeast. Features the Enlist cotton trait and WideStrike 3 Insect Protection. PhytoGen Breeding Traits include two-gene root-knot nematode and bacterial blight resistance.

PHY 580 W3FE

full

4.5

semi-smooth

1.16/37

31.7

Full-season variety adapted for Deep South. Excellent vigor and high yield potential. Premium fiber quality with high turnout. PhytoGen Breeding Traits for resistance to bacterial blight and RKN.

Southwestern Upland PHY 210 W3FE

early

4.2

smooth

36.8

31.3

Early maturing variety with excellent storm tolerance and excellent tolerance to Verticillium wilt.

PHY 250 W3FE

early

4.1

smooth

37.1

31.1

High yield potential, early maturing W3FE variety selected for the Northern High Plains for its storm tolerance, earliness and consistency. Stable micronaire. Excellent Verticillium wilt tolerance and smooth leaves.

PHY 300 W3FE

early-mid

4.1

semi-smooth

36.5

30.1

Broadly adapted, early to mid-maturing W3FE variety with outstanding yield potential from dryland to good irrigation capacities. Has excellent storm tolerance and semi-smooth leaves.

PHY 320 W3FE

early

4.1

semi-smooth

36.2

30.9

Early mid-maturing, highly root-knot nematode resistant variety with high fiber strength and good Verticillium wilt tolerance.

PHY 330 W3FE

early-mid

4.1

hairy

36.8

30.1

Broadly adapted, early to mid-maturing W3FE variety with outstanding yield potential from dryland to good irrigation capacities.

PHY 340 W3FE

early-mid

4.2

hairy

36.5

29.7

Broadly adapted, early to mid-maturing W3FE variety with outstanding yield potential from dryland to good irrigation capacities.

PHY 350 W3FE

early-mid

4.0

semi-smooth

36.8

30.0

Early mid-maturing, highly root-knot nematode resistant variety with broad adaptation and excellent Verticillium wilt tolerance.

PHY 430 W3FE

mid

4.1

hairy

34.9

29.9

Mid-maturing W3FE with very high yield stability and broad adaptation.

PHY 440 W3FE

mid

3.7

smooth

37.8

32.2

Mid-maturing W3FE with excellent fiber quality and high resistance to root-knot nematode.

PHY 480 W3FE

mid

3.9

semi-smooth

36.5

30.2

Industry leading root-knot nematode resistance in mid-maturing W3FE variety with very good fiber quality and yield stability.

PHY 490 W3FE

mid

4.1

semi-smooth

36.5

31.8

Mid-maturing variety selected for high yield potential and seedling vigor. Adapted to Oklahoma, Rolling Plains and dryland to light irrigation capacity fields on the Southern High Plains.

mid

4.2

semi-smooth

1.21/38

36.5

Broadly adapted Acala variety with exceptional yield potential and staple length. Featuring WideStrike 3 Insect Protection.

Acala PHY 764 WRF

10

COTTON FARMING NOVEMBER | NOVEMBER2019 2019

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Variety

Maturity

PHYTOGEN

(continued)

Micronaire Leaf Type

Staple Length

G/Tex

Comments

Pima PHY 841 RF

mid

4.5

semi-hairy

1.48/48

45.9

High yielding, medium- to full-statured Pima variety for medium soil types. Responds well to high inputs and strong growing environments. Tolerant to Fusarium Race 4.

PHY 881 RF

early-mid

4.5

semi-hairy

1.49/48

46.2

Broadly adapted medium- to full-statured Pima variety. Provides high yield potential with the ability to yield up to 9% higher than PHY 805. Tolerant to Fusarium Race 4.

PHY 888 RF

full

4.8

semi-hairy

1.49/48

46.5

Full-season, full-statured, Pima variety that provides improved yield potential on marginal or tough soil types. Roundup Ready and tolerant to Fusarium Race 4.

SEED SOURCE GENETICS Conventional Cotton SSG UA 107

early

4.5-4.9

smooth

35-39

30-33

Tall plant, widely adapted. Disease resistance: bacterial blight, Fusarium wilt. Tolerant to Verticillium wilt and tarnished plant bugs. Good supply in 2020.

SSG UA 114

early

4.5-4.9

medium-hairy

35-39

30-33

Widely adapted. Disease resistance: bacterial blight, Fusarium wilt. Tolerant to Verticillium wilt and tarnished plant bugs. Good supply in 2020.

SSG HQ210CT

mid-early

4.5-4.8

smooth

35-37

28-30

Smooth-leaf picker type.

SSG UA 222

mid-early

4.0-4.5

semi-smooth

36-39

29-33

Widely adapted, high yielding picker type. Disease resistance: bacterial blight, Fusarium wilt. Tolerant to Verticillium wilt and tarnished plant bugs.

FM 1320GL

very early

3.5

semi-smooth

1.15

30.6

Fits in the Far Northern High Plains and other short-season areas. Good replant option. Typically delivers micronaire high enough to stay out of the discount range. Loads bolls over a short season. Good fiber potential, high gin turnout.

FM 1621GL

early

4.2

semi-hairy

1.17

32.1

Fits High Plains areas. Excellent yield, high gin turnout. Root-knot nematode tolerance, bacterial blight resistance.

FM 2011GT

early

3.8

semi-smooth

1.13

30.6

One of the most popular varieties in the FiberMax herbicide trait lineup. Good tolerance to Fusarium wilt, very good tolerance to Verticillium wilt, resistance to bacterial blight and tolerance to root-knot nematodes. Excellent storm tolerance, very strong yield and fiber quality potential.

FM 1830GLT

early-med

4.0

smooth

1.21

31.6

Consistent high performance in the Western Cotton Belt. Excellent disease package delivers very good Verticillium wilt tolerance and resistance to bacterial blight. Excellent yield potential, high gin turnout, outstanding fiber package.

FM 1888GL

early-med

3.6

semi-smooth

1.18

30.7

High-yield option with only the herbicide traits growers need. Resists bacterial blight. Tolerates storms to deliver outstanding yield potential, high gin turnout.

FM 1911GLT

early-med

3.7

semi-smooth

1.18

30.1

Surpasses parent FM 2011GT with a broad-spectrum disease package. Bacterial blight resistance. Very good tolerance to root-knot nematode, Fusarium wilt and Verticillium wilt. Flexible in-season weed control and worm protection.

FM 1953GLTP

early-med

4.1

semi-smooth

1.17

30.4

Consistently delivers excellent yield potential and fiber quality, regardless of the environment. Bred for harsh conditions. Shows good early season vigor, excellent heat tolerance and resistance to bacterial blight.

FM 2007GLT

early-med

4.0

semi-smooth

1.18

30.7

Bred specifically for the harsh dryland environments of the Rolling Plains and South Texas. Excellent yield and high fiber quality. With excellent water-use efficiency and storm tolerance, this variety is bred to thrive under pressure.

FM 2322GL

medium

3.9

semi-smooth

1.17

31.3

High yield and excellent fiber quality potential on irrigated or dryland even under pressure from Verticillium wilt. With outstanding tolerance to drought and to Verticillium wilt, FM 2322GL is a go-to variety throughout the Southwest.

FM 2334GLT

medium

4.1

smooth

1.20

30.9

Dryland variety. Performs well under disease pressure. Similar to FM 1830GLT with slightly longer maturity, resistance to bacterial blight and very good tolerance to Verticillium wilt. Good tolerance to Fusarium Race 4 in California and the El Paso Valley.

FM 2398GLTP

medium

4.4

semi-smooth

1.15

30.2

Excellent yield and great fiber quality potential. Bacterial blight resistance, very good tolerance to Verticillium wilt.

FM 2498GLT

medium

4.4

semi-smooth

1.16

29.7

Excellent yield potential, bacterial blight resistance, very good tolerance to Verticillium wilt and very good fiber quality potential. Adapted to the High Plains, Rolling Plains, Oklahoma, South Texas and East Texas.

FM 2574GLT

mid-full

4.1

smooth

1.19

30.3

Fits dryland production on the Rolling Plains. Outstanding fiber potential, excellent yield potential, bacterial blight resistance and very good Verticillium wilt tolerance. Offers high gin turnout.

FIBERMAX FiberMax Cotton

New varieties for 2020 in blue

TWITTER: @COTTONFARMING

NOVEMBER 2019 COTTON FARMING

11


Variety

Maturity

Micronaire Leaf Type

Staple Length

G/Tex

Comments

STONEVILLE Stoneville Cotton ST 4747GLB2

early-med

3.6

semi-smooth

1.17

28.3

Large-seeded, early season variety. Early seedling vigor, exceptional yield potential. Fits best in irrigated fields. Plant early to harvest first or late following a winter crop.

ST 4848GLT

early-med

4.7

hairy

1.15

30.8

Fits dryland or irrigated fields. Comes out of the ground strong. Exceptional yield potential, high gin turnout, very good fiber quality. Easy to manage, moderately aggressive growth habits.

ST 4946GLB2

early-med

4.4

semi-smooth

1.15

31.6

Excellent choice for fields with root-knot nematode pressure. Consistently performs well across the Cotton Belt. Exceptional yield potential for high returns.

ST 4480B3XF

early-med

4.04

semi-smooth

1.20

31.4

Adapted to Oklahoma, Kansas, all of West Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. Excellent performance on all kinds of acres. Good seed size, storm tolerance and a very good fiber package.

ST 4550GLTP

early-med

4.5

hairy

1.18

32.5

A strong option for the Mid-Atlantic, Southeast and the Delta for superior yield and performance. Exceptional fiber package and high gin turnout.

ST 4990B3XF

early-med

4.14

semi-smooth

1.19

30.6

Adapted to the eastern Cotton Belt, East and South Texas, the Rolling Plains, Oklahoma, the Southern High Plains, New Mexico and Arizona. Hardy, early season vigor, strong emergence and a good fiber package.

ST 5471GLTP

medium

4.4

smooth

1.17

31.5

Outstanding yield, exceptional quality potential from South Texas to Virginia. Three-gene protection of TwinLink Plus. Resistance to bacterial blight and very good tolerance to Verticillium wilt.

ST 5600B2XF

mid-full

4.7

semi-smooth

1.17

32.0

Adapted to the Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, Delta, South Texas, West Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico. Great yield potential, good fiber package. Root-knot nematode resistance.

ST 5610B3XF

mid-full

4.19

semi-smooth

1.15

30.9

Fits non-irrigated and irrigated production areas across the eastern Cotton Belt, East and South Texas, Rolling Plains, Oklahoma, Southern High Plains, New Mexico and Arizona.

ST 5707B2XF

mid-full

4.2

semi-smooth

1.17

32.8

Fits West Texas and Eastern New Mexico dryland and limited irrigation production. Rugged early season vigor, bacterial blight resistance.

ST 5818GLT

mid-full

4.4

smooth

1.18

31.4

Excellent yield potential, exceptional quality. Very good early season vigor. Fits irrigated and dryland. Adapted to Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, South Delta and South Texas.

ST 6182GLT

full

4.6

smooth

1.15

29.5

Excellent performance in many situations. On dryland or under irrigation, it delivers excellent yield and good fiber quality potential in varied soil types.

CROPLAN Bollgard 3 XtendFlex Cotton CP9178B3XF

early

4.1-4.6

smooth

36-38

30-32

Best adapted to Mid-South and Upper Southeast. Medium-stature plant type that fruits earlier than average. May require light PGR management in most environments. Open boll type. Average seed size: 4,700 seeds per pound.

CP9598B3XF

mid

4.3-4.7

smooth

37-39

31-34

Well adapted to West Texas and Oklahoma. Compact growth habit. Excellent late-season plant health. May require moderate PGR management in short-season environments. Well adapted across different yield environments from top end to stress acres. Average seed size: 5,100 seeds per pound.

CP9608B3XF

mid

4.5-4.6

semi-smooth

36-38

29-32

Medium maturity with high yield potential. Adapted to the Southeast, MidSouth, and South Texas. Attractive intermediate plant type. Use moderate levels of PGR. Broadly adapted across soil types and yield levels but best suited to loams and heavier soils. Average seed size: 5,400 seeds per pound.

Bollgard II XtendFlex Cotton CP3475B2XF

early

4.5-4.8

semi-smooth

37-39

29-30

Widely adapted to short-season environments on both dryland and irrigated acres. Intermediate plant type with excellent seedling emergence and early-season vigor. May require PGRs in short-season environments. Better suited for acres without high levels of Verticillium wilt. Average seed size: 4,700 seeds per pound.

CP3527B2XF

early

4.4-4.8

semi-smooth

36-38

29-31

Best adapted to Northern Cotton Belt. Late-season tolerance to Verticillium wilt. May require PGRs in short-season environments. Best positioned on highly managed, highly productive fields. Average seed size: 5,600 seeds per pound.

CP3885B2XF

mid-full

4.3-4.5

smooth

36-38

29-30

Broadly adapted to full-season environments. Vigorous in good growing conditions. Typically requires moderate to aggressive PGR management. Best adapted to lighter and mixed soils. Average seed size: 5,600 seeds per pound.

New varieties for 2020 in blue Variety listings continued on page 14

12

COTTON FARMING NOVEMBER 2019

COTTONFARMING.COM


S:6.75"

A great cotton season calls for strength — in you and your crop. When you plant Stoneville, our science delivers early-season vigor, exceptional seed quality and high yield potential. Stoneville varieties now offer more choices for weed and insect control including B2XF and B3XF traits. Next season, combine our science with your art for a strong start. Learn more at Stoneville.com

Stoneville. Our Science for Your Art.

Always read and follow label directions. Stoneville is a registered trademark of BASF. Always follow IRM, grain marketing and all other stewardship practices and pesticide label directions. Roundup Ready technology contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate, an active ingredient in Roundup brand agricultural herbicides. Agricultural herbicides containing glyphosate will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. IT IS A VIOLATION OF FEDERAL AND STATE LAW to use any pesticide product other than in accordance with its labeling. NOT ALL formulations of dicamba or glyphosate are approved for in-crop use with cotton with XtendFlex Technology. ONLY USE FORMULATIONS THAT ARE SPECIFICALLY LABELED FOR SUCH USES AND APPROVED FOR SUCH USE IN THE STATE OF APPLICATION. Contact the U.S. EPA and your state pesticide regulatory agency with any questions about the approval status of dicamba herbicide products for in-crop use with cotton with XtendFlex Technology. B.t. products may not yet be registered in all states. Check with your seed representative for the registration status in your state. Cotton with XtendFlex Technology contains genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate, dicamba and glufosinate. Glyphosate will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Dicamba will kill crops that are not tolerant to dicamba. Glufosinate will kill crops that are not tolerant to glufosinate. Insect control technology provided by Vip3A is utilized under license from Syngenta Crop Protection AG. Bollgard II, Bollgard and XtendFlex are registered trademarks of Bayer Group. Agrisure Viptera is a registered trademark of Syngenta. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © 2019 BASF Corporation. All rights reserved. APN 19-COT-0023 ®

®

®

®

COT201900055 Stoneville Inner Strength Campaign Adjustment CY20_Print.indd 1

10/11/19 12:13 PM

T:10"

S:9.75"

It takes an inner strength to make it through the season. Get a strong start with Stoneville.


Continued from page 12

Variety

Maturity

Micronaire Leaf Type

Staple Length

G/Tex

Comments

Variety data is based on Beltwide testing except for Pima varieties, which are based on testing in California and Arizona. Ratings are based on 2016 to 2018 Deltapine research.

DELTAPINE XtendFlex Cotton DP 1909 XF

early

3.6

smooth

38.2

31.3

Good emergence, excellent fiber package, open-boll type plant with resistance to bacterial blight for the Texas Panhandle.

DP 1822 XF

early-mid

4.3

semi-smooth

38.0

30.4

Good tough-acre performance potential with excellent fiber properties and resistance to bacterial blight. Best fit in Texas.

Bollgard 3 XtendFlex Cotton DP 1908 B3XF

early

3.4

smooth

38.4

31.6

Excellent fiber length and good fiber length, above-average emergence with resistance to bacterial blight for the Texas Panhandle.

DP 1916 B3XF

early-mid

4.5

smooth

37.5

30.9

Open-boll type plant adapted for the Upper Mid-South and Southeast regions, with good vigor and fiber qualities.

DP 1948 B3XF

mid-full

4.2

semi-smooth

39.0

31.2

Yield potential on par with DP 1646 B2XF with an excellent fiber package adapted to the South Texas and South Rolling Plains regions.

DP 1820 B3XF

early-mid

4.0-4.5

semi-smooth

39.0

30.6-32.7

Excellent fiber length, micronaire and strength, plus resistance to bacterial blight. Best fit in West Texas, Upper Mid-South and Southeast.

DP 1835 B3XF

mid

4.4-4.5

semi-smooth

36.5-38.3

29.8-30.7

Potential fiber length improvement over DP 1725 B2XF. Best fit in South Texas, Lower Mid-South, Carolinas and Lower Southeast.

DP 1840 B3XF

mid-full

4.0

smooth

39.0-39.2

30.7

Comparable to DP 1538 B2XF, with potential fiber quality advantage over DP 1725 B2XF and bacterial blight resistance. Best fit in the Southeast and Carolinas.

DP 1845 B3XF

mid-full

3.8-4.2

semi-smooth

39.5-40.4

30.1-32.4

Yield potential similar (in Texas) to DP 1646 B2XF and fiber length equal to DP 1646 B2XF. Best fit for Texas and the Lower Mid-South.

DP 1851 B3XF

full

4.6

smooth

38.4

31.8

Excellent combination of yield and fiber quality potential. Best fit in the Lower MidSouth, Carolinas and Southeast.

Bollgard II XtendFlex Cotton DP 1823NR B2XF

early-mid

4.1

semi-smooth

37.8

30.1

Root-knot nematode-resistant variety with excellent fiber quality, staple and strength, as well as low micronaire. Best fit for the Upper Mid-South.

DP 1725 B2XF

early-mid

4.1-4.5

semi-smooth

35.5-39.9

29.1-30.9

Early-mid maturity with a broad fit in the Mid-South, Southeast and South Texas. Easy to manage with PGRs. Lower micronaire to avoid high-micronaire discounts.

DP 1747NR B2XF

full

4.0-4.7

semi-smooth

35.7-36.3

29.7-32.0

First root-knot nematode-resistant variety with XtendFlex trait technology. Mid-full maturity with excellent yield potential.

DP 1612 B2XF

early

4.3-4.6

light-hairy

36.3-37.5

30.3-33.1

Early maturity variety that fits management practices of early season, high-yielding environments. Has excellent yield and fiber quality potential.

DP 1614 B2XF

early

4.8-5.0

semi-smooth

36.3-39.7

29.7-31.8

Early maturity variety that fits management practices of early season, high-yielding environments. Has excellent yield and fiber quality potential.

DP 1639 B2XF

mid

4.3-4.9

semi-smooth

35.5-37.7

30.0-33.7

Mid-maturity variety with excellent fiber properties. Has shown improved fiber length compared to DP 1538 B2XF.

DP 1646 B2XF

mid-full

4.1-4.5

smooth

37.7-39.4

29.2-31.1

Mid-full maturity variety with a broad fit across full-season environments, excellent yield potential and fiber properties.

DP 1518 B2XF

early

4.0-4.3

light-hairy

36.6-37.1

28.6-30.6

Early maturity variety that is adapted to high-yield, short-season environments. Responds to irrigation, high-end management and PGR applications.

DP 1522 B2XF

early-mid

4.3-4.9

semi-smooth

35.5-37.2

29.8-32.2

Early-mid maturity variety with good yield and fiber quality potential. Aggressive growth will require timely PGR management.

DP 1538 B2XF

mid

4.6

smooth

30.5-35.7

28.8-30.5

Mid-maturity variety with good performance on dryland fields. Good fit for mid- to full-season markets. Aggressive growth may require timely PGR management.

DP 1549 B2XF

full

3.9-4.4

semi-smooth

35.1-36.7

29.5-31.4

Full-season variety with performance potential on par with DP 1044 B2RF, especially on dryland and fields with limited water for irrigation.

DP 1553 B2XF

full

4.5

smooth

36.2-37.5

29.5-32.7

Full-season maturity variety with great yield and fiber quality potential. May require timely PGR management under vigorous growing conditions.

Bollgard II with Roundup Ready Flex Cotton DP 1555 B2RF

full

3.0-4.5

semi-smooth

35.7-37.5

30.2-32.4

Full-maturity variety with excellent yield potential. Has improved fiber length, micronaire and fiber strength compared to DP 1252 B2RF.

mid-full

4.2

hairy

48.0

42.8

Roundup Ready Flex Pima variety with a great combination of yield potential and excellent tolerance to Fusarium Race 4.

Pima Cotton DP 348 RF Pima

New varieties for 2020 in blue

14

COTTON FARMING NOVEMBER 2019

COTTONFARMING.COM


TRAIT STEWARDSHIP RESPONSIBILITIES NOTICE TO FARMERS

SOUTHERN PLAINS REPORT

Improve Soil Health, Weed Management

BETH LUEDEKER/TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE

I

n June of this year, Dr. Gaylon Morgan joined the Agricultural & Environment Research Division at Cotton Incorporated. His area of expertise includes weed management, soil health, nutrient research and producer outreach. The addition of Morgan’s knowledge and experience is a win for U.S. cotton producers as weed pressure is an ever-present concern and future herbicide options are uncertain. Before joining Cotton Incorporated, Morgan was a professor in the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences at the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension. He has a master of science in agronomy from Texas A&M and holds a doctorate of philosophy in horticulture/ plant pathology from the University of Wisconsin. Texas producers know him well as their former state Extension cotton specialist. While he will often have his boots in Texas soil in his new role, Morgan will expand his depth and breadth of knowledge to support cotton producers across the Cotton Belt. He will also manage the State Support Committees for Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. I had the privilege of traveling for four days through Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas with Morgan as he was starting his new position. We talked a lot about farming. Looking forward to the 2020 crop year, Morgan provided information on what cotton producers can focus on to address soil health and weed management.

ROI And Nitrogen Managing soil to provide the best return on investment is critical for short-term and long-term financial sustainability. Morgan says the best method for determining available soil nutrients is through sampling and analysis. Beltwide Nitrogen Research: https://bit.ly/2B5d4wX

*

Twitter: @CottonFarming

Monsanto Company is a member of Excellence Through Stewardship® (ETS). Monsanto products are commercialized in accordance with ETS Product Launch Stewardship Guidance, and in compliance with Monsanto’s Policy for Commercialization of Biotechnology-Derived Plant Products in Commodity Crops. This product has been approved for import into key export markets with functioning regulatory systems. Any crop or material produced from this product can only be exported to, or used, processed or sold in countries where all necessary regulatory approvals have been granted. It is a violation of national and international law to move material containing biotech traits across boundaries into nations where import is not permitted. Growers should talk to their grain handler or product purchaser to confirm their buying position for this product. B.t. products may not yet be registered in all states. Check with your representative for the registration status in your state. Insect control technology provided by Vip3A is utilized under license from Syngenta Crop Protection AG.

BY SHELLEY HEINRICH SLATON, TEXAS

“Unpredictable weather over the years has caused highly variable crop yields,” he says. “It is critical for producers to understand the soil nutrient levels in their fields to maximize ROI. Nitrogen is one of the biggest expenses, and yet it is very common for applied nitrogen to exceed the actual nitrogen needs of the cotton or rotational crop. “Prior research across Texas and the Cotton Belt showed the application of nitrogen (40-120 pounds per acre) did not increase yields at over half of the locations.* Cotton is a perennial plant and is really good at reallocating nutrients from the leaves to the fruit at the end of the season. As a result, excessively green cotton plants at the end of the season mean too much money was spent on nitrogen and additional money will likely need to be spent on harvest-aid and regrowth suppression.” Residue And Tillage Another soil management approach recommended by Morgan is increasing crop residue with reduced post-harvest tillage and the use of cover crops. Both practices are complex and depend on soil type, machinery and growers’ production practices. However, the many benefits to increasing surface residue include protecting young cotton seedlings in the spring, improving soil water infiltration, reducing soil water loss and possibly suppressing weeds. Continued on page 21

ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW DIRECTIONS FOR USE ON PESTICIDE LABELING. IT IS A VIOLATION OF FEDERAL AND STATE LAW to use any pesticide product other than in accordance with its labeling. NOT ALL formulations of dicamba or glyphosate are approved for in-crop use with cotton with XtendFlex® Technology. ONLY USE FORMULATIONS THAT ARE SPECIFICALLY LABELED FOR SUCH USES AND APPROVED FOR SUCH USE IN THE STATE OF APPLICATION. Contact the U.S. EPA and your state pesticide regulatory agency with any questions about the approval status of dicamba herbicide products for in-crop use with cotton with XtendFlex® Technology. Cotton with XtendFlex® Technology contains genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate, dicamba and glufosinate. Glyphosate will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Dicamba will kill crops that are not tolerant to dicamba. Glufosinate will kill crops that are not tolerant to glufosinate. Contact your dealer or refer to the Technology Use Guide for recommended weed control programs. Bollgard®, Respect the Refuge and Cotton Design®, and XtendFlex® are trademarks of Bayer Group. LibertyLink® and the Water Droplet Design® are registered trademarks of BASF. Agrisure Viptera® is a trademark of a Syngenta Group Company. Excellence Through Stewardship® is a registered trademark of Excellence Through Stewardship. All other products, company names and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Before opening a bag of seed, be sure to read, understand, and accept the stewardship requirements, including applicable refuge requirements for insect resistance management, for the biotechnology traits expressed in the seed as set forth in the Technology/Stewardship Agreement that you sign. By opening and using a bag of seed, you are reaffirming your obligation to comply with the most recent stewardship requirements. NOVEMBER 2019 | COTTON FARMING

15


Specialists Speaking 2019 Harvest Progress Snapshot ALABAMA Steve M. Brown In October, scientists from universities, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, seed companies, Cotton Incorporated and the National Cotton Council convened to discuss the knowns and unknowns about cotton leaf roll disease. Considerable information has been generated over the past year or so. Still, there is much to be determined. This viral disease was first identified from cotton in east central Alabama in 2017, was seen again in the Gulf Coast region in 2018 and has been widely detected in the Southeast this year. While this virus is now biologically well established in Alabama and adjacent states, CLRD has also been identified in plots or fields from North Carolina to Texas in 2019. The virus is transmitted by cotton aphid and causes a range of symptoms in cotton, including leaf malformation, fruit loss and possibly wilting. Related viruses have caused significant cotton losses in Africa and Brazil dating back to the 1940s and 1980s, respectively. Does this virus pose a serious threat to U.S. cotton? That’s still unclear. In Alabama and Georgia, there have been a few fields with severe yield loss. But most fields in which the virus has been confirmed appear minimally affected in regard to final yield. In some fields, dramatic plant responses have been observed; not so in others. The specific

response triggers remain elusive. Historically, host plant resistance is the solution to viral diseases. This involves plant breeding, which, of course, is a long-term enterprise. Research from multiple disciplines is on-going and information is being readily shared from programs across the Belt and beyond. Hopefully, our collective activities will provide useful information for dealing with this threat in future years. cottonbrown@auburn.edu

ARIZONA Randy Norton As you review the results from the 2019 season, one area that is always good to evaluate is your fertility program. Fertilizers can represent a significant portion of the crop production budget. With cotton prices where they currently are, it is important to make sure every crop input is resulting in a positive return on investment. In evaluating the 2019 season and preparing for the 2020 season, now is a good time to asses soil fertility status. This is best done through a systematic and consistent soil testing program. Basing decisions related to a fertilizer program on actual soil test nutrient levels will help increase the efficiency of your fertility management plan and your overall operation. Soil test critical levels associated with major nutrients for cotton

B E CON FIDE NT YOU R PL ANTE R IS S ET RIG HT. FURROW MOISTURE

SOIL TEMPERATURE

Contact a dealer and get the conďŹ dence you deserve at precisionplanting.com 16

COTTON FARMING | NOVEMBER 2019

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Specialists Speaking production in the low desert have been validated and verified. These values have been published in Extension publications and can be found at cals.arizona.edu/crops. These values have been calibrated and correlated with soil tests that are conducted with methods and techniques designed for high pH, arid desert soils. It is important to remember when sending soil samples that you know the laboratory is using soil analysis techniques associated with desert high pH soils. This will provide the best results in making fertilizer decisions for the upcoming season. rnorton@cals.arizona.edu

FLORIDA David Wright

MISSOURI Calvin Meeks As I write this in October, the Missouri cotton crop is progressing well with the dry weather as of late. Overall, the 2019 crop yield potential is good and predicted to be another 1,200-plus pound year. The weather has been warm with 75 degrees Fahrenheit and above nights, allowing for good defoliation conditions. However, it looks like cooler weather is here to stay after the warm September we have had with some rainfall forecast. Because of our wet spring, there will be some late-picked cotton as well due to delayed plantings. Hopefully, we won’t have the rainfall that was present toward the end of the 2018 picking season. With the recent increases in defoliant prices, be sure to apply sufficient defoliant rates to late-planted cotton to ensure that when a picking window opens, the cotton crop is still adequately defoliated and not covered in regrowth. After harvest would also be an excellent time to collect soil samples to ensure accurate fertility applications for 2020. Pulling samples this fall would also help guarantee results are returned in a timely manner since the soil lab has closed at the Fisher Delta Research Center. Harvest will be wrapping up soon for 2019, and it will be time to start planning for next year. Results from the Missouri official variety

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Every year brings different weather patterns and challenges, and 2019 was no different. Cotton yields have been better than expected with some areas going through major droughts while other areas had too much rain. Overall, a dry fall resulted in good harvest weather for most of the crop. Now is the time to consider what’s in the soil for next year’s crop for both pests and fertility. Soil samples should be pulled for nematodes as well as fertility. Areas in the field that did not perform as well as expected are fresh in your mind from harvest. These “zones” should be sampled separately to determine what caused the zone effect so those areas can be managed next year. Cover crops should be considered as microbial populations thrive where cover crops are planted. Cover mixes can be altered based on the crop that will be grown in 2020. Legume cover crops, in most cases, should not precede legume row crops. But legumes

should be part of the cover where cotton will be planted. Early planting of cover crops aids in growth for increasing organic matter and reducing erosion, which can impact water needs in cotton next year. wright@ufl.edu

Twitter: @CottonFarming

NOVEMBER 2019 | COTTON FARMING

17


Specialists Speaking trials will be posted soon at https://mizzoucotton.wordpress.com. At the time of this writing, the first OVT had been picked and the preliminary results should be available to view. meeksc@missouri.edu

OKLAHOMA Seth Byrd Harvest started for some areas of Oklahoma by early October. However, an unexpected freeze affected almost all the acres in the state Oct. 10-12. These conditions caught many acres prior to harvest aid applications and others within a week of having received an application. This freeze will undoubtedly affect the production and quality of many cotton acres in the state. Overall, there is still general optimism about the 2019 crop as harvest cranks up. It will be interesting to see the effects of the October weather on the crop. After harvest is an excellent time to soil sample to determine nutrient needs for the following year. For more information about soil sampling, contact your county Extension office or visit the Oklahoma State soil testing lab’s website at http://soiltesting.okstate.edu. seth.byrd@okstate.edu

MISSISSIPPI Darrin Dodds Harvest was rolling along nicely until mid-October when rain slowed its progress. Yield reports from our earliest planted cotton have ranged from average to unbelievable. While many were ready for the heat to relent once we reached October, temperatures above 90 degrees Fahrenheit throughout September and into October undoubtedly helped mature the later planted cotton. With much of our crop planted after May 20, the prolonged heat was needed to finish this crop out. If rains move out in a timely manner, harvest will likely near completion by mid- to late November. Everyone will breathe a collective sigh of relief and take a well-deserved rest once this crop is in the books. As we enter the winter months, spend as much time as possible evaluating return on investment for inputs used. Our growers have produced outstanding yields once again, but the price of cotton is not overly favorable at this point. Evaluating where capital invested produced a viable return will be paramount to maximizing profitability heading into 2020. Speaking of 2020, weren’t we just worried about Y2K a couple of years ago? Time flies when you’re having fun…. dmd76@pss.msstate.edu

ARKANSAS Bill Robertson Cotton harvest as projected by the National Agricultural Statistics Service was about half completed into the second week of October. At this point, we are on track to achieve the most current NASS yield projection of 1,157 pounds per harvested acre for the state of Arkansas. This would be our second highest yield on record behind the 1,177 pounds harvested in 2017 and 33 pounds above our five-year average. Producers expect to harvest 610,000 acres. There are still a great number of challenges we must be prepared to address as this crop season comes to an end. We all look forward to seeing how it wraps up. Most farmers are well into planning for 2020. Soil samples for fertility as well as nematodes will be pulled in great numbers after harvest and stalk destruction are complete. Get cover crops on your radar if they are not part of your current plan. Look to the University

18

COTTON FARMING | NOVEMBER 2019

In 2019, Arkansas may experience its second highest yield on record.

of Arkansas Variety Testing webpage at its new address, https://arkansas-variety-testing.uark.edu/, for cotton variety testing results from county and the official variety trials. County production meetings are being scheduled at this time. Contact your local county Extension agent for dates and locations for one near you. brobertson@uaex.edu

TENNESSEE Tyson Raper With few exceptions, cotton yields in West Tennessee have been incredible. We are likely sitting on another record crop if the late-planted acres don’t pull the average backwards too much. No doubt, yield numbers will likely decline as we move into the laterplanted acres. This trend — decreasing yields as planting dates move from late April or early May to mid- and late May — has been consistent for us in Tennessee. Planting conditions need to be right: warm soil temperatures, adequate moisture and a favorable forecast. We can’t just arbitrarily plant May 1. But those who are able to pull the trigger typically are rewarded. It’s true that ideal planting conditions rarely develop for us during late April. Still, we are often able to bend the rules — plant in cooler soils or sneak acres in before a heavy rain — if we have vigorous, high-quality seed. Obtaining high-quality seed was a challenge in 2019 due to several late-season weather conditions, which struck seed-producing regions during 2018. Rest assured, there have been countless conversations across the Belt concerning seed quality at all levels of production. Based on changes many companies are making, I do not believe you will see this issue at the 2018 level again. Still, now is the time to begin the conversation with your sales rep about 2020 cultivar selection. I suggest bringing up seed quality to learn more about the changes they are making to protect all of us against the 2018 seed production issues. I believe you will be impressed. traper@utk.edu

LOUISIANA Dan Fromme Cotton defoliation across the state is nearing completion as we approach the middle of October. About 70% of the crop has been harvested. Weather conditions were ideal during September and the first half of October. However, rain and cooler temperatures are in the forecast, which will hinder boll opening and defoliation on the remaining 30% of the crop that has not been harvested. About 85% of this year’s crop can be considered in the fair to good Continued on page 20 COTTONFARMING.COM


THRIVING IN COTTON

Yield and Quality: Perfect Pairing Maximizes ROI

P

hytoGen® brand varieties highlight a shared relationship between yield potential and fiber quality. The goal of this prevailing pattern is a positive return on investment for cotton farmers. PhytoGen breeders take pride in bringing top-of-the-line Pima, Acala and Upland cottonseeds to the marketplace. This thriving legacy continues to grow more robust from year to year. Improved Yield Potential “Yield is absolutely paramount at PhytoGen. It always has been and always will be,” says Joel Faircloth, U.S. portfolio manager for PhytoGen. “We know this is what makes cotton growers thrive. Over time, we have also incorporated many traits that will allow farmers to protect that yield.” Some of these traits include herbicide technology, such as resistance to glyphosate, glufosinate and Enlist™ herbicides in the Enlist weed control system. “We also have a suite of native PhytoGen Breeding Traits,” Faircloth says. “These include bacterial blight resistance, root-knot-nematode resistance, verticillium wilt tolerance and — in 2020 — reniform nematode resistance.” Why Is Quality Important? But to make the most of every acre, cotton farmers should also consider fiber quality. This piece of the equation influences loan value, which is driven by staple length — preferably 36 or greater. Fiber properties matter because they affect textile manufacturing processes and both intermediate and end products. Therefore, mills have preferences for specific characteristics. Staple refers to fiber length and is the average length of the longest 50% of the fibers in a sample — referred to as the upper half mean length. Longer fiber improves yarn strength, consistency, fineness and spinning efficiency. “When making product choices for the upcoming season, remember that the PhytoGen brand varieties usually command a 36 or higher staple length,” Faircloth says. To provide a consistent, quantifiable description of every bale of cotton grown in the United States, the U.S. Department of Agriculture classes 12 million to 18 million bales annually across the Cotton Belt. In addition to staple, it analyzes color grade, micronaire, strength, uniformity, leaf grade and trash, using precision equipment known as high-volume instrumentation or HVI. Human classers also inspect for extraneous matter and other unwanted conditions. For producers, the goal is to earn a premium price for above-average fiber quality or, at a minimum, avoid discounts.

Byler Engelking examines his dryland field of PhytoGen® brand PHY 480 W3FE in Agua Dulce, Texas, and says, “PhytoGen’s quality and yield have been above all other brands of cottonseed. We can’t get results like this with anybody else.”

Performs in a Challenging Year Byler Engelking, who produces cotton around Robstown, Texas, says Skip Row Farms experienced extremely wet planting conditions this year and he had to replant most of his cotton several times. “It was a very cool spring, so we got off to a hard start,” Engelking says. “Once the cotton came up, it got considerably drier, and we didn’t get the timely rains we needed on our dryland acres. But our PhytoGen 480 W3FE performed really well given the fact it was drier later in the season. Through the years, with high yields and good grades, we’ve been very successful with PhytoGen.” The Texas farmer says 2019 was his first year to commercially spray Enlist One® herbicide. “I planted PHY 480 W3FE and PHY 340 W3FE, and both of these varieties did well under extreme conditions,” Engelking says. “Enlist One plus glufosinate also did a good job of controlling resistant pigweed, which is our biggest problem. I highly recommend the Enlist weed control system.” As you plan for the upcoming growing season, PhytoGen cotton development specialists and territory managers are available to review your gin report and help evaluate where you would like to improve. It’s important to choose varieties known for high yield and excellent fiber quality and manage them for optimum return on investment. University Extension variety testing data are a good source for evaluating these criteria as well.

™ ® PhytoGen, PhytoGen Breeding Traits and the PhytoGen Logo are trademarks of PhytoGen Seed Company, LLC. ™ ® Enlist, Enlist One and the Enlist logo are trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. The Enlist weed control system is owned and developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC. PhytoGen Seed Company is a joint venture between Mycogen Corporation, an affiliate of Dow AgroSciences LLC, and the J.G. Boswell Company.


Specialists Speaking TEXAS Murilo Maeda

Continued from page 18

range with state yields expected to be 950-1,000 pounds lint per acre. Following harvest, consider soil fertility needs for the 2020 crop. Basically, soil tests serve two functions by indicating the nutrient levels in the soil and where to start in developing a fertilizer/lime program. A sound program can be prescribed by combining this information and cropping history with the overall soil productivity potential of the field. Also, soil tests can be used on a regular basis to monitor the production system and to measure trends and changes, which helps to maintain the overall fertility program on the same level with other production inputs. Soil test levels will change during the year, depending on temperature and soil moisture. It’s important to take samples at the same time each year so results can be compared year to year. Generally, nutrient levels will be lower during summer and fall compared to winter and spring. The best time to sample is one to six months prior to planting. The earlier the better if lime is needed, because lime requires several months to fully react and neutralize soil acidity. Fertilizer should be applied closer to the time the crop needs it. Use the same lab each time you have your soil tested because there are no set standards followed by all testing labs. They use different chemical methods to determine the soil’s nutrient levels, which lead to different test results. dfromme@agcenter.lsu.edu

NORTH CAROLINA Guy Collins Defoliation and harvest began noticeably earlier than normal in North Carolina this year. Our 2019 crop maturity was accelerated due to heat and dry conditions during the summer months. As I write this on Oct. 7, we’ve had some of the best defoliation and harvest weather we’ve had in many years so far. Warm, dry, sunny days since Hurricane Dorian have allowed us to fully open, retain and harvest a higher percentage of the harvestable bolls this year compared to several recent years that were plagued with September/October winds, heavy rain, boll rot, hardlock, etc. As predicted, the crop is North Carolina is more variable than we’ve seen in several years. This is primarily due to excessive heat and drought throughout late June and July and spotty rains during this time. August rains allowed for development of a good top crop in places, which improves our expected yields. Depending on summer rainfall patterns, much of our crop falls between the 700- to 800pound range and 1,100- to 1,300-pound range on the upper end. Hopefully, ideal harvest conditions will continue, although we are currently on the cusp of cooling down noticeably, at least for the meantime. So far, this year clearly illustrates how much the weather during September and October can influence yields and quality. Although current conditions are relatively dry, growers should take advantage of any rainfall that does occur during the fall with regard to cover crop establishment. Planting date and seeding rate for winter cover crops often play a major role in stand establishment and biomass accumulation throughout the winter and early spring. Delaying cover crop establishment until the late fall or winter months can result in less-than-ideal ground cover for next year’s crop. Variety decisions usually begin in late November and into December. The results of the North Carolina On-Farm Cotton Variety Evaluation Program and NCSU OVT will be posted on the NCSU Cotton Portal Website, https://cotton.ces.ncsu.edu/, and in the NCSU Cotton Variety Performance Calculator, https://trials.ces.ncsu.edu/cotton/. guy_collins@ncsu.edu

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COTTON FARMING | NOVEMBER 2019

As of Oct. 11, South Texas is all done with cotton harvest, and some areas in West Texas have already seen a first freeze. Dr. Josh McGinty in Corpus Christi reports average yields around 2 bales in the Coastal Bend (better than average) and a little short of 2 bales on the Upper Gulf Coast (lower than average). About 200,000 bales have come through the classing office at Corpus Christi with no fiber quality issues so far. Stalk destruction is next on the list to keep the boll weevil in check. In the Rolling Plains, the irrigated cotton looks great, but heat units will be in short supply to finish up some of the late-planted cotton, reports Dr. Emi Kimura in Vernon. Dryland cotton fields are variable, and very few acres have been harvested in the region as of this writing. In West Texas, the crop condition is fairly variable as well due to excessive rainfall early, followed by plenty of hailstorms. The weather turned hot and dry in July, August and the better part of September. Late September and early October brought heavy rainfall for good portions of the region. This was too late to do any good for the dryland crop, but it did delay harvest aid applications in some cases. According to the West Texas Mesonet, most of the regions north of Plainview saw temperatures from around 30 degrees Fahrenheit to as low as 18 F in the northern Panhandle. Dr. Jourdan Bell in Amarillo reports that research plots have been damaged by heavy rainfall the first week of October. First position bolls that have been open for a while are strung out, and top bolls are still immature in many varieties. With clear weather, we are starting to see harvest activity pick up in and around Lubbock. By the time this issue of Cotton Farming reaches you, harvest will probably be in full swing across the region. mmaeda@ag.tamu.edu

VIRGINIA Hunter Frame Cotton harvest started early this year with pickers running in late September. Some growers may be finished by the time this issue reaches the reader. The 2019 season has been the earliest harvest season for the Tidewater region of Virginia since I have been the state cotton specialist. It is not uncommon to be harvesting cotton up to Thanksgiving. A dry September led to little hardlock/boll rot issues, and producers were able to harvest a percentage of the crop with little to no picker losses. Yields reported in early October have been impressive, but we will wait and see how bale numbers come in. The current October yield for Virginia in the last USDA NASS report is 1,015 pounds of lint per acre. However, I believe this number is lower than what the state will average in 2019. Turning from harvest to looking at next year, producers and/or their crop consultants need to focus on fall soil sampling. I prefer to sample during early fall as the soil has not cooled, thus giving more reliable measurements on soil chemical parameters such as pH. A common question/problem we routinely see in the coastal plain of Virginia is soil samples pulled in January/February have elevated pH and no lime recommendation. This is a product of wet, cool soils with little to no soil buffering capacity (low CEC soils), thus diluting a small pool of soil acidity and resulting in higher soil pHs. When the soil warms up from April to June and starts drying, the soil pH will drop. This affects crop growth as low pH spots in fields will appear stunted, yellow and/or have multiple nutrient deficiencies. To avoid this situation, soil sample in early fall (September to early November) to capture an accurate snapshot of the soil chemical properties. whframe@vt.edu COTTONFARMING.COM


Continued from page 15

Still, changing to higher residue systems could present some challenges. “Before diving into the higher residue systems, please seek advice from fellow successful farmers, read and watch videos on this topic, and attend conferences focused on reduced tillage and cover crop systems,” Morgan says. Weed Management Weeds continue to be one of the biggest challenges and economic threats in cotton. However, with the quick development of herbicide resistance, Morgan says he believes we cannot afford to be complacent or become overly dependent on single herbicides. We must use multiple herbicides with different modes of action to extend the life of these technologies. “In diseases and insects, we are constantly talking about breaking the life cycle of these pests,” he says. “However, we typically do not apply the same concept to weeds. Lateseason weed management is critically important. “In many cases, any weeds still in the field late season have survived

multiple herbicide applications. They are the most likely to be resistant to herbicides and contribute to herbicide-resistant seeds in fields. In this situation, destroying those weeds before they can produce more seeds can be a great investment for a producer’s bottom line.” Source For More Information As you look forward to the 2020 crop year, opportunities and decisions such as cover crops, nitrogen and weeds can be vast and overwhelming. Cotton Incorporated and its experts, such as Morgan, invest in production research on your behalf to guide your production decisions. Check out the website — https:// cottoncultivated.cottoninc.com — for topics and research. You’ll be amazed at the research and information available on production practices throughout the season. As we say around our place, “Make good decisions,” and I’ll see you in the field! Shelley Heinrich is the Cotton Board Southern Plains regional communication manager. Contact her via email at sheinrich@cottonboard.org

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figuring out a focus for your meeting, contact your ginners’ association or insurance company for more items to cover. There are also safety videos that could be reviewed as well. When you come up with a main topic, list a few bullet points and emphasize the highlights. Remember this in-season safety meeting doesn’t have to be super elaborate. What you’re really going for is to raise and maintain safety awareness. Please use an interpreter if necessary to make sure everyone understands the importance of this meeting. When should you hold the meetings? Any time is fine, but many people like to bring the crew in one-half hour early for shift change. You could cover the safety topic then — whatever works for your gin’s schedule. Here is one more thing. Don’t forget to document the meeting. Create a sign-in sheet and have everyone confirm they attended. Remember, if it didn’t happen on paper, it didn’t happen. Have your interpreter sign in as well. As always, have a safe, smooth and profitable season. Dusty Findley, CEO of the Southeastern Cotton Ginners Association, contributed this article. Contact him at 706-344-1212 or dusty@southern-southeastern.org.

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My Turn Forty Years Of Observing Cotton Plants

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our decades ago, cotton seedling disease control and the use of Dual Dr. Raymond She- as a pre and over-the-top herbicide. When no-till perd and I were acres grew in the late ’80s, these products helped standing in Field protect the cotton plant and keep it on schedule. I came back to the Tennessee Valley in 1994 when 10 in one of his cotton nurseries at the Auburn Tilt was introduced to the peanut market. Roundup Plant Breeding Unit. I Ready came to the cotton market in the mid ’90s. was a young experiment Monsanto’s position for Roundup was, “The only station superintendent, thing you need with Roundup is more Roundup.” and I fussed about how But we found that Dual could help this herbicide. short the cotton was. Even 25 years later, Dual and Roundup were used Larry Sheperd was the U.S. post on my cotton back home at Shady Grove. With the ’90s came mergers. Ciba-Geigy became Department of Agriculture Walker cotton breeder at Auburn Ciba Crop Protection, which became Novartis, which and was developing root- became Syngenta. I “merger” retired in 2001 and knot resistant cotton lines. He told me, “If you’ll began a crop consulting business. My Greenville, look — really look at a cotton plant — it will tell you Mississippi, neighbor, Dr. Gordon Snodgrass, was a USDA cotton entomologist who wrote several everything it needs.” My dad and granddad had taught me how to papers about cotton scouting methods using various sampling techniques. work in cotton fields from the mid 1950s through “If you look, a cotton plant will For the first time since my plant breeding unit 1964. In ’64, a miracle tell you everything it needs.” days, I had a sweep net, happened at the Shady which was as critical as Grove Farm — cotton was picked with a Ben Pearson cotton picker! A my four-wheeler. I’ve had the opportunity to fight few years earlier, Karmex DL was applied as a pre- Roundup-resistant weeds, grow cotton in the presemerge herbicide for grass and weed control. It came ence of neonic-resistant thrips, shoot for top yields in a 1 gallon paint can from DuPont, and I read with higher nitrogen rates and current varieties using Pix, and prepare a quality crop for harvest everything on that label. While my experiences at Shady Grove were “up using Prep. I wish it was that simple. At cotton pickin’ time, I still remember those peoclose and personal” with hoeing and picking cotton, Dr. Sheperd taught me what a cotton plant really ple who could pick a lot of pounds per day — Carroll was — its physiology and schedule. During my five Campbell and P Nut Taylor in my younger days and seasons as superintendent at the plant breeding Charlie Burmeister and Patrick Shepard from when unit, I managed the cotton variety test and used they were young. These were cotton picking dudes, new technology, including Pix and pyrethroids. Pix but I was just a dude who picked cotton. I am thankful to have helped quite a few prohelped with the cotton’s schedule, and the pyrethroids kept out worms and weevils, especially late ducers these past 18 seasons. I’ve been around and listened to some smart professionals, and more than season. We could actually make a top crop. I went to work for Ciba-Geigy in ’84 in sales a few times, they tolerated me. We got to “think and later as a product development specialist in outside the box,” and I was able to see this informaMississippi and Louisiana. Ciba-Geigy had some tion “put on the ground.” From a grateful heart, let old standards in the cotton market — Cotoran and me say thanks. My great wife of 49 years, Maxine Caparol — and was developing Dual and Ridomil. I LaRue Walker, has been through all of this with me. worked with Dr. Will McCarty, who was the young John Bradley was right — I married up! Mississippi cotton specialist following Dr. George — Larry Walker Mullendore. By this time, DD 60s were being Flintville, Tennessee tracked and more emphasis was being placed on llwcotton@att.net when peak bloom occurred. I introduced Ridomil for

Cotton Farming’s back page is devoted to telling unusual “farm tales” or timely stories from across the Cotton Belt. Now it’s your turn. If you’ve got an interesting story to tell, send a short summary to csmith@onegrower.com. We look forward to hearing from you.

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Cotton Farming November 2019  

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