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Wednesday October 31 | 2018

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Night time closure of Pembury Road means diversions and disruptions…

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OF TUNBRIDGE WELLS

25,000 poppies pay tribute to the fallen

INSIDE THE SHOW GOES ON £10million hub viability warning ‘ignored’ Page 4

ONE of the busiest roads into Tunbridge Wells will be closed between 8pm and 6am for five nights in November. Kent Highways, a division of the county council, is carrying out patching repair work between the A21 roundabout and Calverley Road. This will begin on Pembury Road around 8pm on Monday, November 12, and is expected to take five nights. It will be open as normal during the day. A diversion has been implemented around the Sherwood ward as Kent Highways remove and replace ‘poor road surface’.

A VERY GOOD DEAL Cripps announces merger with London firm Page 7

Enforce Cllr David Neve, of Tunbridge Wells Borough Council’s opposition Liberal Democrat group, said 8pm is ‘too early’ to enforce the complete closure. “These closures are usually enforced from 10pm to 6am,” said the St James’ ward representative. “It will put a lot of pressure through Sherwood roads as around 8pm there will still be a lot of traffic going to the cinema [at Knights Park estate]. “The work has to be done, but it seems strange for it to be this early.” The 1.2mile section along Pembury Road leads past Dunorlan Park. A spokesman for the county council offered: “It is inevitable residents and businesses near the works will experience some disruption. “We apologise in advance for any inconvenience caused, but we will try to keep this to a minimum.” The diversion in both directions leads along a route encompassing: Longfield Road, Lamberts Road, Liptraps Lane, Birken Road, Sandhurst Road, Upper Grosvenor Road and Calverley Road.

BRANCHING OUT HEROES WELCOME: Thousands of knitters helped create a poppy display, thought to be the largest in the South East Page 4

Chefs help with Tree of Hope charity cook book Page 60

Library and museum to be based in Royal Victoria Place shopping mall By William Mata will@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk MONTHS of speculation have come to an end with the announcement yesterday [Tuesday] that Tunbridge Wells Museum and Library will be temporarily rehomed in Royal Victoria Place. An arrangement has been made with shopping centre owners British Land that will see space made available near its Meadows Road [car park] entrance. The relocation will last for two years from January as the £13million Amelia

Scott Cultural Centre is built to bring library, museum, art gallery and adult education services under one roof in the existing Civic Way site, next to the Town Hall.

‘It is good to put an end to speculation and confirm the location’ Cllr Jane March Cllr Jane March, Tunbridge Wells Borough Council’s portfolio holder for culture, said: “It is good to put an end to speculation and confirm the location. “Whilst we will be offering a service

which is very limited, compared to what’s currently available, it does ensure the museum still has a presence in the town.” Until now the borough council and Kent County Council, who are jointly behind the project, had not confirmed the interim location. There had been speculation services would be housed at The Camden Centre, a council-operated space for hire. More than 330,000 people use the li-

Continued on Page 4

A NOBLE EFFORT Quirky comedian Ross comes to town Page 54


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Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Thousands help create tribute COSTUME DRAMA More exhibits will go on display

SHOPPING CENTRE BOOKED FOR LIBRARY: Continued from page 1 -brary every year, making it Kent’s second busiest behind Margate. It is set to close in the new year and reopen in early 2021 as part of the Amelia Scott Cultural Centre – which will also include tourist information and The Gateway, a centre for residents to enquire about council services. The work of dismantling and putting the existing museum displays into storage has already begun. The last day for public access to the museum and art gallery is expected to be Friday, November 30. Services shall be rehomed next to Muffin Break in the downstairs part of Royal Victoria Place. No library books will be due back during the interim period. The county council is yet to confirm which books and exhibits will make the move. A spokesman added: “We anticipate running all our normal adult education courses without interruption. The only reason for cancelling them would be a lack of numbers for any particular course, which is our normal practice.”

FOUR JOBS AT RISK IN MOVE STAFF at the museum are at risk of losing their job as part of Tunbridge Wells Borough Council’s transfer to their interim service. Current posts are to be restructured and a consultation has started into plans, which will put four posts at risk and proposes the creation of three new positions. A spokesman commented: “The consultation is focused on the best way of working during the interim period and in preparation for the future and the new facility.”

CONTACTS EDITORIAL DIRECTOR RICHARD MOORE richard@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk | 01892 779615 DEPUTY EDITOR EILEEN LEAHY eileen@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk | 01892 576037 CHIEF REPORTER WILLIAM MATA will@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk | 01892 240626 DESIGN/PRODUCTION LEE SMITH lsmith8@markerstudy.com SALES ENQUIRIES GHak@onemediauk.co.uk | 01892 779650 FIND US ONLINE facebook.com/timeslocalnews timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk twitter.com/timeslocalnews

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FALLEN heroes are being remembered on the centenary of the end of the First World War with a ‘wonderful’ display of knitted poppies on the outside wall of Tunbridge Wells Town Hall. An estimated 25,000 of the handcrafted flowers form the message ‘They fell with their faces to the foe, lest we forget 1918-2018’ – taken from Laurence Binyon’s poem For the Fallen. It took contractor DCB 14 hours to place the poppies on the side of Tunbridge Wells Borough Council’s headquarters on Civic Way. Knitters from all over the country contributed to the appeal – with a

presentation of the display on Thursday [October 25] being the culmination of a two year project. It is thought to be the largest display of its kind in the South East. The poppies will remain on the wall for two weeks after Remembrance Sunday, which this year falls on November 11. At the presentation, Mayor Len Horwood thanked the Borough Council, Royal British Legion and Tunbridge Wells Gateway for their work in constructing the tribute. Richard Cast, Chairman of Kent County Royal British Legion, said: “We are extremely grateful, it really means remembrance.”

POPPY STARS: Mayor Len Horwood in between wife Judy and Richard Cast of Kent Royal British Legion with Jacky Hawksbee [far left] and Julie Bryer of Tunbridge Wells Gateway

Trust warns Southborough Hub is ‘not viable’ after downscaling By William Mata will@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk SOUTHBOROUGH Town Council’s leaders have been criticised for ‘completely ignoring’ a warning from the Theatres Trust about the viability of their £10million hub. In a meeting last week, the authority voted to proceed with downscaled designs of the controversial Southborough Hub, which will combine a theatre, council offices and a medical centre. This was despite the Theatres Trust, a national advisory public body for theatres, sending the town council [STC] a highly critical inspection report.

Capping This stated concern in the following areas: n The project is proceeding ‘without a decision on who and how the hub and theatre will be operated’. n Plans for the auditorium have been downscaled to a capacity of 250, possibly capping the potential to cover costs of productions. n Due to dual use as committee rooms and dressing rooms, simultaneous events cannot be held which restricts the revenue potential. n The lack of space for a café. The report stated: ‘There is no provision other than a coffee machine within the library, a grave mistake and will affect the venue’s popularity’. n No offices associated with the theatre. A summary statement read: “It is vital the Southborough Hub is viable in the long-term. Based on the plans that we have seen to date, we do not have confidence that this can be achieved.” Since initial plans were drawn up in 2015, the project has been ‘value engineered’ with its café

CURTAIN RAISED Until Tuesday night - even Southborough Town Councillors had not seen this first look at the hub’s exterior taken out and space inside reduced. The exterior of the building will also no longer have the original eye-catching rounded glass design. Designs were set to be showcased in public for one hour last night [Tuesday], after the Times had gone to press. The hub will replace the now demolished Victoria Hall Theatre and host council meetings. STC is partnering Tunbridge Wells Borough Council and Kent County Council in delivering the hub – which will be partly funded from the sale of land to a housebuilder. During a heated meeting at their temporary base inside a local school last week, STC ‘noted’ the Theatres Trust report but pressed ahead with their timetable. This could see planning permission granted next February, work starting in April with completion 12 months later. Cllr Nick Blackwell, of Southborough Town Council’s opposition Labour group, said the Theatres Trust report was ‘completely ignored’ by the authority’s leaders. “They are looking at our particular situation and

they offered up a tweak on our design, which was rejected by the Conservatives and I find that dispiriting. “We have been here before [when the Hub’s initial designs were value engineered] and I said we should be learning from our mistakes. We have a chance to put things right. “The Theatres Trust has said it will be a really expensive mistake.” The councillor put forward an amendment to ‘pause and consider’ the concerns before proceeding – but this was voted down. Instead, the Tory majority voted through a motion which stated ‘STC approves the designs and delegated authority to Cllr Kinghorn to make any final minor amendments’. Cllr Kinghorn said he was working in ‘close collaboration’ with John-Jackson Almond, Director of The Assembly Hall Theatre, about the delivery of the Southborough Hub. “It was approved that we would go ahead without consultation with the Theatres Trust,” said Cllr Kinghorn. “The hub has a multi-purpose objective. We are still going ahead.”

HERE’S TO MODERN DAY HEROES AS WE REMEMBER THE FALLEN THESE days it’s pretty easy to become a tad cynical with newspapers, magazines and various news platforms pushing negative stories and comment. On this publication we work hard to balance the articles so they reflect all aspects of life, not just those that grab headlines. Most of the time we get it right. This week there are two particular ‘feel good’ stories that make these pages because of that great body of people who so often go unheralded – the volunteers. This Saturday [November 3] some 12,000 people are expected to visit Dunorlan Park for the annual fireworks display. It will be the 61st year that members of Tunbridge Wells Round Table have banded together to organise the event and with luck, and no rain, it should raise £30,000 for local charities.

There’s a phenomenal amount of hard work that has to go into organising the display and all of it is done with good spirit and at no cost. Andrew Mockford, committee member, told us: “We’re committed to giving the people of Tunbridge Wells and beyond a great value evening of entertainment, whilst enabling them to give something back to the local community.” And that’s what it’s about; giving something back to those who share your local world. The second story that highlights the contribution that volunteers make to our town and borough concerns poppies. Twenty five thousand of them in fact. Obviously we are not talking about the real flowers but the knitted ones that today decorate the outside walls of our Town Hall. The handcrafted emblems have been sent in

from across the country to mark the centenary of the ending of the First World War; Remembrance Sunday this year is on November 11. Almost 1,800 service personnel from the borough died in action and the poppies spell out the message: “They fell with their faces to the foe.” At the formal unveiling of the poppies the Mayor Len Horwood said: “Thank you to all of the volunteers… it is a wonderful display and something we should be proud of.” Indeed we should be proud, and we should also say ‘thanks’ to the volunteers everywhere who give up their time and energy to making our lives richer and better in so many ways… Editorial Director, Richard Moore


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

NEWS IN BRIEF

Screening programme will return in two years ORGANISERS of the Kent Breast Screening Programme have said their mobile service shall return to Tunbridge Wells in 2021. For six months until the end of September, women had the opportunity to visit the mobile unit in the car park of Sainsbury’s in Linden Park Road. The NHS-backed operation screened more than 6,000 women. A spokesman said: “The breast screening unit would like to express its thanks to Sainsbury’s for kindly allowing us to screen ladies on the site.”

Bella into the final 12 X FACTOR hopeful Bella Penfold channelled Shirley Bassey and Kanye West as she advanced into the ITV series’ next round. The 19-year-old was given her first opportunity to perform at One Warwick Park Hotel in Tunbridge Wells and now finds herself in the competition’s final 12. Bella sang the chorus of Diamonds Are Forever, which she combined with the rap verse taken from Kanye West’s re-working Diamonds From Sierra Leone. Two finalists will be eliminated in the next round of the X Factor, which is next on our screens on Saturday and Sunday evening [November 3-4].

Sinkhole finally fixed THE A26 Tonbridge Road leading into Maidstone has reopened after six months, and £1million was spent repairing a sinkhole. Early investigations found numerous voids and extensive soft spots on the site. Kent Highways started repair work on the void when it opened up on May 28 and have spent an estimated 8,000 hours on making the busy passage safe.

Green Halloween event THE campaign group Keep River Lawn Green will be holding its second Halloween Protest this evening at River Lawn this evening [October 31]. The family event runs from 5.30-7.30pm and includes pumpkin carving and fancy dress competitions as well as apple bobbing, piñata and spooky music. A pop-up tea room will be providing hot drinks and food, and anyone wishing to attend is invited to bring along cakes, biscuits and sweets.

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‘Fake news’ warning after theatre complaint costs taxpayers £6,500 GRAND STAND Robert Chris took the council to task

By William Mata TAXPAYERS funded a £6,500 ‘forensic investigation’ of the Borough Council’s finances following a complaint from an objector to the Calverley Square project. The council has not named the individual, but a Times search of their records found it to be former Tunbridge Wells Alliance Chair Robert Chris. He took issue with the authority’s 2016/17 expenditure report, relating to the £90million civic complex and theatre and said his concern was with the council claiming the project offered ‘value for money’. “I have never argued against a new theatre, I think it’s a great idea,” said Dr Chris. “But I have seen no evidence that a 1,200 seat auditorium will be anything other than a financial and cultural disaster.” His challenge forced an external auditor to complete a nine month deep search, which did not find the council had done anything wrong. Dr Chris co-founded the Alliance to fight the civic complex. Supporter Brian Ransley recently sought a Judicial Review to examine the process behind the decision making, but was ordered to pay more than £5,000 when the effort failed. Cllr Tracy Moore said the council [TWBC] had been the victim of a ‘fake news campaign’ and warned opponents not to ‘abuse the process’. The Conservative portfolio holder for economic development spoke out in a Cabinet meeting on Thursday [October 25]. She praised the council’s management after auditors Grant Thornton presented a clean external report – the authority’s ninth in a row.

All local authorities are subject to the annual examination of financial statements. Lee Colyer, Director of Finance, said: “The objector [for 2016/17] was most persistent. “Objecting to the statement of accounts is a very serious matter and this triggered an independent forensic style examination.

Dismissed “The process lasted nine months and the auditor completely dismissed the objection – stating it had not identified any significant weaknesses in the council’s decision making arrangements.” Completion of the report into the objection cost the council £6,565 – which was shouldered by the taxpayer. It does not take into account the hours of council officer time used to complete it. Cllr Moore said: “It is right that the public hold

elected representors to account, but it is wrong to abuse the process. “Everybody accepts that Calverley Square has proved more divisive than we could have imagined. This council has gone to extraordinary lengths to make sure the decision making and finances are independently assessed. “It really does feel like a fake news campaign against this council at the moment. Accusations fly about our finances and our competence. “But data, audits and this investigation show time and again this is a well-run council.” Dr Chris had an appeal to Grant Thornton rejected and decided against a Judicial Review. “Technically it’s a victory for the council but I remain of the view they have failed to meet their statutory obligations to deliver value for money in relation to the theatre,” he added.

Cab driver loses licence after altercation over a guide dog A TAXI driver has lost his licence after an argument with a blind man outside Tunbridge Wells railway station. Alun Elder-Brown, who has almost no sight, filmed his disagreement with a cab driver over whether his guide dog could travel in the front seat. It is normal for guide dogs to travel in the well of the front passenger seat. In the video, which has been seen by more than 5,000 on Facebook, the driver can be heard saying: “No, you cannot do that, of course not, what are you doing?” The Borough Council’s licensing department were sent the video and

ONE MAN AND HIS DOG Alun Elder-Brown stood for UKIP in May’s Borough Council elections

decided to revoke the licence of the driver, who has not been named. Mr Elder-Brown, who stood as a UKIP candidate for Broadwater in the borough elections, said he approached the cab around 4.30pm on Tuesday of last week and asked for a ride to the Ramslye area of Tunbridge Wells, where he lives. “I am fed up with being treated like this,” he said after the incident. “There are other guide dog owners who take this on the chin, but I have been taking it on the chin for too long.” Mr Elder-Brown suffered a brain haemorrhage 14 years ago. He said it is usual practice for a

blind passenger and guide dog to sit in the front of a taxi and that drivers are aware of this. Another taxi driver then took him home. A Borough Council statement read: “The council has revoked a taxi driver’s licence following the investigation of a complaint received from a member of the public. “The incident took place outside Tunbridge Wells Station. The Council was shown footage of the incident and considered that there were grounds to revoke the licence. “The driver has the right to appeal to the magistrates within 21 days.”


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County council fear government plan will force fracking LEADERS of Kent County Council have opposed a government proposal to bypass the authority when considering a form of fracking. Whitehall wants to use non-hydraulic fracturing [also known as dry fracking] to explore for shale gas. And to speed this process up, Local Government Minister James Brokenshire has launched a consultation on a plan that could see this happen without a need for local planning permission. Fracking is a controversial method of obtaining gas, which critics say creates environmental and health risks. Cllr Mike Whiting, portfolio holder for planning, led the county councils response to the proposal, which he described as ‘confusing and frustrating’ for local communities. He said: “Whilst recognising shale gas development may have the potential to assist in securing energy supplies and delivering economic benefits, it is a contentious form of development that does not lend itself to a permitted development process. “Such development requires decision making at the local level, where the community voice can be properly considered in shaping these proposals and in ultimately determining whether development should go ahead or not.” The proposal states that local authorities would still be involved in planning decisions that affect them. But Cllr Whiting said it was ‘not clear’ how this would work if dry fracking is considered permitted development – and not requiring of planning permission. He added: “There is no clear role for the community voice to be properly considered. “The proposed regime is likely to be confusing and frustrating for local communities which rightly expects full community involvement for this type of development.”

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

How schools Attainment 8 results compared School [town]

JUMP FOR JOY Students at Kent College, Pembury with their results

Tonbridge comes out on top as GCSE tables are announced… NEW style GCSE results have produced a familiar looking ranking table, with local grammar schools again coming out on top. Tonbridge Grammar School, The Judd School and Tunbridge Wells Girls’ Grammar School were shown by Department for Education data to be top of the class. The Skinners’ School and Weald of Kent Grammar School finished in fourth and fifth position, in a rankings pattern familiar to previous years. It is all calculated by the Attainment 8 measure – a method of providing an average grade for a student’s eight subjects, including mathematics and English. Students leaving Year 11 [aged 15 and 16] received their results in August for the GCSEs, which for the first time were graded using the 9-1 measure, instead of A*-G. Details of the results tables, however, have just been released.

And it was Tonbridge Grammar School, in Deakin Leas, that finished with an Attainment 8 average of 77.9 – far above the UK mean of 44.6. Head Teacher Rosemary Joyce said: “When we see students become independent learners, who are driven to make a difference, we feel a sense of accomplishment.” Last year Tonbridge Grammar School was also ranked top with The Judd School, another selective secondary in Tonbridge, second. Bennett Memorial Diocesan School in Tunbridge Wells and Hillview School for Girls in Tonbridge were among the top performing comprehensive secondaries in both towns this time around. A spokesman for Bennett Memorial said: “Clearly, none of this is achieved without the hard work of our students and the dedicated staff team that we have here. “We know too that parents play a pivotal part in encouraging and supporting such achievement.”

Attainment 8 result for 2018 [2017 result]

1. Tonbridge Grammar School

77.9 [77.9]

2. The Judd School [Tonbridge]

75.7 [76.6]

3. Tunbridge Wells Girls’ Grammar School

73.7 [72.1]

4. The Skinners’ School [Tunbridge Wells]

73.2 [71.5]

5. Weald of Kent Grammar School [Tonbridge]

71.0 [67.9]

6. Tunbridge Wells Grammar School for Boys

64.1 [63.3]

7. Bennett Memorial Diocesan School [Tunbridge Wells]

57.7 [57.3]

8. Beacon Academy [Crowborough]

50.5 [no data]

9. Skinners’ Kent Academy [Tunbridge Wells]

47.9 [39.8]

10. Hillview School for Girls [Tonbridge]

47.6 [44.6]

11. St Gregory’s Catholic School [Tunbridge Wells]

47.2 [49.8]

12. Mascalls Academy [Paddock Wood]

42.5 [45.6]

13. The Hayesbrook School [Tonbridge]

39.6 [43.8]

14. Hugh Christie School [Tonbridge]

39.1 [39.2]


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

NEWS IN BRIEF

Planning application for St Peter’s School MUCH discussed proposals to build a primary school in Hawkenbury have been presented in an application for planning permission. Tunbridge Wells Borough Council has received documents requesting St Peter’s Church of England Primary School relocate from Windmill Street. Local education authority Kent County Council wants St Peter’s to reopen as a two-storey primary school in Hawkenbury Road in October 2020. Also in Hawkenbury, the valued One Stop is set to reopen for the first time in months. Environmental health inspectors ordered the closure of the shop in April.

Crescent Road reopens MOTORISTS can again access Crescent Road Car Park in Tunbridge Wells after refurbishment work. The Borough Council has been working on the facility since March and for several months of that time it has been accessible only to permit and season ticket holders. Some areas are still restricted.

Fatal accident on A26 KENT POLICE are appealing for information following a fatal collision on the A26 Tonbridge Road, near Hadlow. At 7.55pm on Thursday [October 25] a blue Vauxhall Vectra left the road and hit a tree. The driver of the car, a man in his 20s, was pronounced dead at the scene. Two women, also in their 20s, were injured. Anyone with information is asked to call Kent Police on 01622 798538.

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Cripps merges with London firm Pemberton to create ‘true force’ LEADING law firm Cripps, one of the largest employers in Tunbridge Wells, is to merge with London practice Pemberton Greenish. Trading under the new name of Cripps Pemberton Greenish, the business will comprise a combined workforce of 465 with £45million in total annual revenue.

Thrilled The merger will be finalised on December 1 with a rebrand set to be completed. There will be no redundancies. Cripps, the larger of the two firms, is locally based in Mount Ephraim and also has offices in Kings Hill and London. Pemberton Greenish’s only office is in the capital. A joint statement from the firms signalled an intent to pursue law relating to real estate. Gavin Tyler, Managing Partner at Cripps, will

NEWS

7

Fewer than one third of Year 6 students passed test for grammar entry

LAW AND ORDER Gavin Tyler, Managing Partner at Cripps

By William Mata

Local News

take over the top role following the merger. He said: “It has been a key strategic objective for a number of years to significantly develop our London business. “By merging with Pemberton Greenish we will be able to take a joint step forward to deliver a broader, deeper, and even more personal service to all our clients. “Being headquartered in Kent however remains a key part of who we are, the clients we want to work with and why Cripps is the firm it is.” Kerry Glanville, Senior Partner of Pemberton Greenish, added: “We’re thrilled to join forces with Cripps. “Our clients will benefit from our muchincreased breadth of service and fully developed infrastructure that modern legal businesses require to be successful. “Together we’ll be a true force.” This combined operation will see Cripps staff make up around 80 per cent of the workforce.

THE ‘narrow structure’ of the eleven plus exam has been criticised after fewer than one third of Kent pupils passed. The county council revealed that 4,641 Year 6 students were found ‘suitable for grammar schools’ from the 16,656 who took the noncompulsory exam, also known as the Kent Test. These students will enjoy priority for the 5,214 places on offer at the selective secondary schools for the 2019/20 intake. Cllr Roger Gough, the county council’s education spokesperson, said: “We understand this can be a stressful time for families. “We try to make the process of deciding on the most appropriate secondary education for their children as straightforward as possible.” Parents had until today [Wednesday] to name up to four potential schools in order of preference. Fewer students were ‘assessed suitable’ for a grammar compared to last year, when 4,650 passed the test, although for 2019 there are more than 100 extra spaces on offer. This could open the door to students who could travel in from outside Kent, and took the eleven plus, or were educated at home. Christine Dickinson, of the Kent National Education Union, said: “It is sad to note that such a high proportion of pupils entered for the Kent Test this year did not achieve the pass mark. “The eleven plus tests a narrow range of tasks on a particular day and does not reflect developing ability in a wider range of skills. “I hope this does not become a defining moment in a child’s life and that they are encouraged by parents, teachers and society to develop their own abilities to the best.” Students will find out on March 1 next year which school they shall be attending from September.


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BUSINESS

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Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Think beyond London or university for success, young people advised By William Mata YOUNG professionals should be looking to local businesses with which to make their first career step as much as firms should be looking to them. That is the view of Ross Jefferies, Mortgage and Protection Adviser at Tunbridge Wells financial company Panoramic Wealth Management. The 23 year old has organised a second Young Professional Networking Event on Thursday, November 8, with charismatic Paralympic sprint champion Liam Malone as guest speaker. Mr Jefferies says the function at Camden Road’s Vittle & Swig, which starts at 6.30pm, is a rare opportunity for those in their 20s and 30s to make connections and talk about their careers. “I did not go to university and started at Panoramic Wealth [the London Road business as examples of two large owned by his father, Gary Jefferies] when I local companies was 19,” Ross Jefferies told the Times. looking to invest “Around 90 per cent of my peers in young [from The Skinners’ School] went talent, and to university, but after around 18 encourages months I realised I had made the his generation right choice. to consider “You used to need a degree to starting locally get through the door, but now rather than so many people have one it is no looking towards longer the be all and end all,” he London. said – pointing to the recent He growth in apprenticeship added: opportunities. “Firms can’t “I was fortunate with wait for all of the my father having the original members of business. But not staff to retire before they everyone has that worry about what they opportunity, and are going to do. They more needs to be need a plan in place done in schools to to replace the babysay that having a boomer generation.” degree is not the GIVING YOUTH A Last year, around 50 only option.” CHANCE people attended the He named Warners Ross Jefferies of first networking event Solicitors and Cripps Panoramic Wealth

LANE BOY: New Zealand sprint sensation Liam Malone (left and above right) and Panoramic Wealth are keen not to ‘drop the buck’ and continue the wellreceived format. This year’s speaker, Liam Malone, won 200m and 400m gold, as well as 100m silver, in the Rio 2016 Paralympics for the T44 category – for athletes with single or [in Liam’s case] double amputations below the knee. Mr Jefferies came into contact with the New Zealander through his podcast, The Bull Sessions, which he presents alongside fellow young financers Tom West and Henry Martin. Of Liam, who has also appeared on the TV series The Last Leg, Mr Jefferies said: “He is a massive character and is very funny, so I asked if he would come down and he was happy to do so.” The event is free and you also receive a free drink on the night, email: ross@panoramicwealth.co.uk

NEWS IN BRIEF

South East firms not ready for regulation AROUND 134,000 VAT-registered businesses in the South East are not prepared for new digital taxation regulations, according to latest analysis. A study by RSM, a leading audit consultancy which is based in Tunbridge Wells, said many companies had ‘an awful lot of work to do’ before the rules change from April 1, 2019. The change comes with the government unrolling its Making Tax Digital [MTD] scheme. With few exceptions, this requires VAT-registered businesses to keep records in a digital format and submit their tax returns using MTD compatible software. HMRC has announced a ‘soft landing’ period from April 2019 to April 2020, during which there will be no financial penalties for record-keeping failures. Tighter regulation is expected to follow.

Heart is in Havana CUBAN cigar shop Maffei Home of Havana could open in Tunbridge Wells if a licence is awarded. Applicant Marco Maffei is looking to turn the former Andrew Morley hair salon in Grosvenor Road into a venue for live music performances and the sale of alcohol. Tunbridge Wells Borough Council has received the application and is set to make a decision soon, although no potential opening date has been confirmed.

One to watch, again A PARTNER at law firm Cripps has been again been named ‘one to watch’ in the highly respected Private Client Global Elite legal directory. Paul Fairbairn has now made the cut for the second year in a row, following his move earlier this year from Withers to Cripps, who have offices in Tunbridge Wells, Kings Hill and London.

Call for firms to vote in ballot to form Improvement District FIRMS are being called to make their mark in an important vote on plans for a local Business Improvement District [BID]. Business group and BID co-ordinators Royal Tunbridge Wells Together have drawn up a town centre map and propose that some firms within it should pay into a levy. If enough firms vote ‘yes’, a five-year plan will be adopted to see events, business support, town promotion and accessibility provided from a £2million kitty. Only one week remains to vote in the ballot, which closes on November 8. The result will be announced the following day. Karen Pengelly, Manager of Royal Tunbridge Wells Together, said: “I am struck by how businesses can inhabit a small area but never communicate with each other. Some have never spoken to their neighbours. A BID gives the business community a strong and connected voice in achieving projects, and also when lobbying for improvements. It helps them connect and converse. “We want

to get the biggest mandate we can. The feedback has been really positive, and I am pleasantly surprised by how some businesses have embraced it.” The levy rate is calculated at 1.23 per cent of the business’s rateable value on April 1 next year. Firms with a rateable value of less than £15,000 will be exempt, and a levy cap will be enforced to ensure no individual business pays more than £5,000. Royal Tunbridge Wells Together need 50 per cent of 640 firms [both in number and in total rateable value] to vote ‘yes’ in the ballot for the BID to be adopted from April 1 next year. Ms Pengelly added: “It’s very exciting and the turnout is looking good, but I don’t get to see how people voted yet – which makes it nerve-wracking!” She said all relevant firms have been contacted about the ballot process and can cast their vote at the Town Hall. For more information, visit tunbridgewells together. co.uk BIDDING FOR A MANDATE Karen Pengelly of Royal Tunbridge Wells Together

ROLL-OUT Sushi is a growing presence in local towns

Two Japanese restaurants to open SUSHI’s new mainstream popularity has led to new restaurants being planned for both Tunbridge Wells and Tonbridge. The new ventures show how the Japanese staple is no longer the exotic rarity it once was, and is proving a lucrative option for restaurateurs as other mid-market eateries close. With a likely opening of early November, Niihaw is set to be the first eatery of the two to serve customers. The takeaway, which will also offer a seating area, will be based in Angel Walk, off Tonbridge High Street, to become one of the brand’s first outlets outside London. Meanwhile, Kitsu Sushi & Noodle Bar is opening a second out-

let in Tunbridge Wells, under the banner Kiko Sushi & Yakitori, this time on London Road, from mid-December. Both owners are excited by the openings, and have described a ‘growing’ popularity for Japanese cuisine. Kai Ng, chef at Kitsu in Victoria Road [opposite Royal Victoria Place car park] said around nine local jobs will be created by their new outlet. “It is a very good time [for sushi],” he told the Times. “I think there are going to be more opening locally and there will be some competition. “We have wanted to open a new restaurant for a while in Tunbridge Wells. It is growing fast, especially in London,

although it is riskier for smaller restaurants to open here.” Kitsu will continue to trade. Mr Ng added: “At Kiko we are going to put on a different menu with more focus on yakitori grill and there will be more seating.” Popular Niihaw items include rice dishes, sushi, dumplings and teriyaki flavours. A spokesman said: “The main reason to open was the area’s outstanding education. “We first visited Tonbridge about five years back. “First we fell in love with Tunbridge Wells, but from a business point of view Tonbridge is more of a commuter town, many people travel to work in London. “These professionals are much more familiar with sushi.”


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Community News

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Sparks will fly, with thousands set to enjoy Dunorlan Park fireworks By William Mata THE annual Dunorlan Park Fireworks display is coming back with a bang, and 12,000 people are expected to attend the 61st event. Organising group Royal Tunbridge Wells Round Table is hoping to raise thousands for good causes with the spectacle, which is to be held on Saturday [November 3]. Committee member Andrew Mockford commented: “We’re committed to giving the people of Tunbridge Wells and beyond a great value evening of entertainment, while enabling them to give something back to the local community.

Giveaway “It’s because of their generosity that an event like ours continues from strength to strength.” The fireworks begin at 7pm, but the gates open from 5.30pm with a funfair. Local DJ Andy Walker will be presenting over the loudspeaker. There will also be stalls selling food and drink, including Eat the Farm – a street food vendor made famous on the Channel 4 television programme Sunday Brunch. Nourish Community Foodbank, an organisation which helps prevent families in Tunbridge Wells and south Tonbridge from going hungry, will be among the charities to benefit, with collections to be gathered at the end of the event. Last year more than £30,000 was raised

through ticket sales and donations, which was then shared between 33 good causes. Charities are invited to approach the Round Table for funding for their project, with giveaways set to be presented at a function next year. Round Table Chairman Kim Hartlev said: “Over the past year, we’ve seen a wide range of requests for funding. “We’re extremely grateful for the public’s continuing support to help us fulfil these. “As we approach our 61st fireworks display, we

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

WHEELS ROLL FOR ROUND TABLE SINCE holding the first Dunorlan Park Fireworks display in 1957, Royal Tunbridge Wells Round Table has raised hundreds of thousands of pounds for charities. A recent beneficiary is ten-year-old Fenton Clark-Thomas [pictured below], who has life limiting quadriplegic cerebral palsy and severe refractory epilepsy. But despite his illnesses, he loves being outdoors. His mother, Sharon Clark, approached the Round Table for support earlier this year. The organisation used funds raised in last year’s fireworks display to provide money for a trike – a specialist piece of apparatus to help Fenton explore the countryside. Sharon said: “If it wasn’t for the kind support and donation from the amazing people at the Round Table, the specially adapted trike that my son is now the proud owner of would still be a dream rather than the reality it is.”

continue striving to improve things to ensure the event’s future success.” The fireworks display is being sponsored for the fifth successive year by Tunbridge Wells legal firm Buss Murton Law. Tickets are priced £6 and £4 for adults and children respectively in advance, or £8 and £5 on the day. Tickets are also being sold in Fiveways in the centre of Tunbridge Wells on the day of the event. For more information, visit rtwrt.org

Tonbridge Calling raises funds to help Nourish and RefugEase

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Fred Long with Nourish Foodbank Director Dawn Stanford

THE free music festival Tonbridge Calling has donated £150 each to two local charities from the proceeds of last summer’s event. The organisers also announced that Tonbridge Calling 2019 [TC19] will be held at the Racecourse Sportsground on Saturday, August 10, next year. This year’s beneficiaries are Nourish Community Foodbank, which supports people in financial crisis with food donations in Tunbridge Wells and south Tonbridge, and RefugEase, a charity which provides emergency humanitarian aid, education facilities and field-based aid workers in war-torn countries. RefugEase have a collection coming up this Sunday [November 4] at St John’s School in Sevenoaks to restock the Pembury Road warehouse with supplies

for refugees escaping danger and poverty around the world. Fred Long, one of the festival’s organisers, said: “We believe each of these organisations is perfectly aligned to our ethos of building communities without barriers.

‘There are uncertainties surrounding the council’s plans to charge next year’ “We wish to thank the residents of Tonbridge for their continued support, the bands for performing, the food and drink vendors who contributed to our funds, and the 40 wonderful volunteers who ensured a peaceful fun event.”

In previous years, the proceeds have been split between three charities, but this time just two causes will benefit. This is due to doubts about the festival’s viability to be staged free of charge on Tonbridge’s Racecourse Sportsground. The public space is owned by Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council, which is contemplating imposing a fee for hosting community events. Fred added: “As with the previous Tonbridge Calling events, the organisers were determined that local charities should benefit from any monies left over from the cost of staging the free music festival. “With the uncertainties surrounding the council’s plans to charge next year, we have had to limit our donations to two charities this year.”


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Community News

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Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Bozenna is listed for prestigious home care award

Hospital radio hands over donation to replace patients’ remote controls

BOZENNA ZALEWSKA, a live-in Care Assistant for Bluebird Care Tonbridge & Tunbridge Wells, has been nominated for the award of Home Care Worker of the Year for the South-East at the Great British Care Awards on Saturday [November 3]. Bozenna was the first live-in carer for her customer, and transformed the lady’s life over a three-month period, making her ‘a completely different person’. The carer used her initiative to help her to arrange important appointments, which she had found difficult to do before.

THE charity Hospital Radio Tunbridge Wells [HRTW] and its supporters have donated £2,000 to the Maidstone & Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust. The funds will go towards the replacement of television remote controls at Tunbridge Wells Hospital, Pembury. The money was raised by the Tesco Bags for Help and Aviva Community Fund schemes. HRTW Station Manager Chris Manser presented a cheque to the Trust’s Chief Executive, Miles Scott, when he visited the charity’s studios. Mr Manser explained: “We had received feedback that some patients who wanted to enjoy our radio service were unable to do so as the remote controls had gone missing. The hospital radio is available on channel 705 of the television sets in each room, so we felt we needed to do something to try and help improve the situation.” He added: “Thanks to the public who voted for us in the Aviva Community Fund scheme at the end of last year, and Tesco customers who voted for us in the Bags of Help scheme earlier this year, we are delighted to be able to support the trust with this donation.” HRTW is keen to expand the number of live shows it provides to patients and others who listen online via the charity’s website. It is looking to recruit volunteers, and has launched a Radio Recruitment campaign for this year’s Aviva Community Fund scheme. Phil Kidby, who co-ordinates the volunteer scheme, said: “We need people to vote for us on

Passionate Bozenna said: “I am so happy to have had this opportunity to be a Care Assistant with Bluebird Care. I absolutely love my job, and not only that but my customers as well. “To see a smile on their faces is so lovely. It is the reason I get up in the morning and what helps me sleep well at night.” She added: “I am so happy that I was nominated for this award and cannot believe that I am a finalist. What a privilege, I tend to just do what I do because I love it, and to be recognised in this way is wonderful.” Zoe Furlonger, Care Manager at Bluebird Care, paid tribute to Bozenna: “We have an incredible team of staff and I would like to congratulate Bozenna for her approach, which has led her to be nominated for this prestigious award. “Bozenna is loved by our customers and is an excellent Care Assistant. “She is so bubbly and passionate that you cannot fail to see how much she loves it.

ALL SMILES: Bozenna Zalewska

MUSIC TO OUR EARS: (L-R) HRTW Station Manager Chris Manser, Treasurer Chris Reed, NHS Trust Chief Executive Miles Scott, Secretary Phil Kidby, Chief Engineer Arthur Hosmer and Trustee Claire Backhurst the Aviva Community Fund website to help us get sufficient votes to qualify for £1,000 in funds, which will be used to pay for our phone, broadband, website and general running costs. “All of that enables us to recruit new volunteers to do more shows, and enables our service to be bigger and better.” The projects which receive the most votes in each category receive the funding they have requested from Aviva.

• For information about volunteering, send in your contact details via hrtw.org.uk/join A visit to the studios will be arranged to discuss how you can be involved. • Voting at the Aviva Community Fund is open until November 20. To support HRTW’s application, visit avivacommunityfund.co.uk/voting/ project/view/4-1614

HANGING AROUND: Tonbridge Lions Club have donated £1,000 to Hildenborough Parish Council to buy a piece of equipment called ‘Cheddar Gorge’ for the West Wood Play Area. It was specifically requested by children who use the playground near Stocks Green Primary School. (L-R) Pam Gow, Clerk of the Parish Council, Lions’ immediate past president Gordon Hill, President Tom Simmons, Claire Sheldon, Chair of the Parish Council, and Vice-Chair Margaret Coles


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National News

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Hatton Garden heist chief Reader must still pay back £6.6m

Football club probed for money laundering AT LEAST one professional football club is under investigation for alleged money laundering, it has emerged. Appearing before the Treasury Select Committee yesterday [Tuesday], Security Minister Ben Wallace was asked by Labour MP John Mann: “When it comes to money laundering, how many professional football clubs have been deemed as requiring investigation currently?” Mr Wallace said: “I know of professional football club or clubs under investigation. I couldn’t reveal how many and what they are, for that is an operational matter.” Pressed about the number involved, he replied: “There are live investigations that go on all the time and to expand any more could threaten investigations. “The sports industry is as susceptible as anything else to dirty money being invested or their organisations being used as a way to launder money.” He added that ‘not enough’ information had been provided by the football authorities.

Ticket machines stop taking card payments TICKET machines owned by a major southeastern rail franchise were unable to accept card payments yesterday [Tuesday] due to a fault. Govia Thameslink Railway [GTR] said its card-only machines have been affected by a ‘network-wide issue’. The firm operates Southern, Thameslink and Gatwick Express services in south-east England. GTR said the ‘source of the problem’ is the Mastercard payment portal and the issue is being investigated ‘as a matter of urgency’. A spokesman for Mastercard said it is ‘not experiencing any issues with our network’.

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

CHILL BILL: The first Bewick’s swan has arrived at Slimbridge nature reserve in Gloucestershire, heralding the arrival of winter. The bird, known as Indri, flew 2,500 miles from Russia to escape the Arctic winter

Chancellor’s gamble on public money THE Chancellor has taken a ‘gamble’ with the public finances which could lead to higher borrowing and debt, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies [IFS]. The thinktank said Philip Hammond may have ‘painted himself into a corner’ by using a windfall from revised borrowing forecasts to fund increased spending on the NHS.

Inevitable It warned that tax rises are ‘all but inevitable’ in the longer run to pay for the pressure on the NHS of Britain’s ageing population. Any expectation that Mr Hammond will meet his target of eliminating the deficit by the mid2020s was ‘for the birds’, said Paul Johnson. Despite claims that the economy has ‘turned a corner’ on the way to the end of austerity, Mr Johnson said that Monday’s Budget was ‘no bonanza’ for public services other than the NHS.

While the health service in England is set to benefit from £20.5billion extra funding by 202324, spending on most other departments will be ‘essentially flat’ over the coming five years once inflation is taken into account. Mr Johnson said: “This is no bonanza. Many public services are going to feel squeezed for some time to come. Cuts are not about to be reversed. "If I were a prison governor, a local authority chief executive or a headteacher, I would struggle to find much to celebrate. I would be preparing for more difficult years ahead." He claimed Mr Hammond had taken advantage of last-minute improvements to borrowing forecasts by the Office for Budget Responsibility [OBR] to fund increased spending on the NHS promised by Theresa May earlier this year. “When push comes to shove, it’s not tax rises and it’s not the NHS that Mr Hammond is willing to gamble on, it’s the public finances. Because yesterday’s Budget was a bit of a gamble.”

A KENTISH member of the Hatton Garden jewellery raid gang has lost a challenge against an order that he must pay back more than £6.6million. Brian ‘the Guvernor’ Reader from Dartford, now aged 79, failed to persuade three judges at the Court of Appeal in London that a confiscation order against him was wrongly imposed and should be quashed. Reader, one of the ringleaders, was sentenced to six years and three months in 2016 after he pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit burglary. He was released from Belmarsh prison in July. The Hatton Garden gang carried out the meticulously planned heist over the Easter weekend in 2015. They ransacked 73 boxes at Hatton Garden Safe Deposit after using a drill to bore a hole into the vault wall. In January, Reader and the three other gang members were ordered to pay back various sums after a hearing at Woolwich Crown Court. A judge said they jointly benefited from an estimated £13.69million of cash, gold and gems. They were told that if they failed to comply with the confiscation orders they would face another seven years in jail. Reader, who claims he did not receive anything from the proceeds of the burglary, was ordered to pay £6,644,951. The sum included the sale of his home, valued at £639,800, and development RINGLEADER land worth Brian Reader £533,000.


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Tobacco companies should pay to help smokers give up TOBACCO companies should be forced by law to fund services which help people quit smoking, ministers have been told. Labour’s Sir Kevin Barron, a former shadow health minister, said there are still more than 7million smokers in the UK and claimed more than 200 a day die from smoking-related illnesses which could have been prevented. The Rother Valley MP also acknowledged there has been progress to help people give up the habit but warned that budgets for such services have been cut for local authorities. He has the introduced Tobacco Bill in an attempt to create a new fund designed to boost spending on smoking cessation services and also encourage smokers to switch to products considered less harmful, such as e-cigarettes.

Fortune Sir Kevin told the Commons: “Tobacco companies have made a fortune selling cigarettes and they have got this country into the mess it’s in now, and I believe it’s only right that they get us out of it. “We should and must follow the simple principle of the polluter pays. “They have the resources and customer base to help smoking cessation tools get straight to the people that need them most. “The proposed Tobacco Transitional Fund would work in a similar way to the carbonated drinks industry fund in providing incentives for both individual consumers and the tobacco industry to change their behaviour. “Over the next decade or so, such a fund could raise up to £1billion that would be spent primarily on cessation services in the are as with the highest smoking prevalence.”

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National News

BUSINESS

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McDonnell: Labour to support IVA decrease sees tax cuts for ‘richer households’ insolvencies falling SHADOW Chancellor John McDonnell has backed Philip Hammond’s income-tax cuts for millions of people. Mr McDonnell said yesterday [Tuesday] that the party would respect changes to tax thresholds that would cost £9.5billion in lost revenue in the next six years. Instead, it would focus on creating a ‘fair taxation system’ clamping down on evasion and avoidance and rolling back cuts to corporation tax, he told BBC Radio 4’s Today. The Resolution Foundation thinktank believes the tax cuts would ‘overwhelmingly benefit richer households’ with 45 per cent of them set to target the top 10 per cent of taxpayers. Mr McDonnell said: “We will support the tax cuts at the moment on the basis that it will inject some demand into the economy. “But we put forward in the general election a fairer taxation system so that does mean that we will be asking the top 5 per cent to pay a bit more in income tax, and we will be rolling back many of the corporation tax cuts that have taken place, and we will be cracking down on tax evasion and tax avoidance. “What we’ve said is we will leave those personal allowances at whatever we inherit but our focus will be on a fair taxation system.” The personal allowance and the higher rate

PERSONAL insolvencies fell back from a six-year high in the third quarter of this year. Across England and Wales, 25,151 personal insolvencies were recorded between July and September – a 10.5 per cent fall compared with the previous quarter, when there was the highest quarterly figure since 2012. The figures are made up of bankruptcies; debt relief orders [DROs], which are aimed at people with smaller debts which they have no realistic prospect of paying off; and individual voluntary arrangements [IVAs], whereby money is shared out between creditors. The Insolvency Service said the fall in personal insolvencies was driven by a decrease in IVAs, which reached a record high in the second quarter but fell by 18 per cent in the third.

MAKING ALLOWANCES: John McDonnell says Labour wants to achieve a ‘fair taxation system’ threshold will rise from April in a move that Mr Hammond said would mean ‘a tax cut for 32 million people’. The personal allowance, which is the minimum income someone can earn before paying tax, will rise to £12,500 from £11,850. The higher rate threshold, the income at which someone becomes liable to pay the 40 per cent tax rate, will rise to £50,000 from £46,350 at the same time.

Stores set to close as Evans Cycles is sold HUNDREDS of jobs are under threat at Evans Cycles after the company’s new owner Sports Direct said as many as half the stores could close. The chain, which has 62 shops in the UK, currently employs 1,300 staff. The company, which had been seeking a buyer, went into administration and was then immediately sold in

a process sometimes known as a “pre-pack”. Sports Direct chief executive Mike Ashley said: “We are pleased to have rescued the Evans Cycles brand. However, in order to save the business we only believe we will be able to keep 50 per cent of stores open in the future. Unfortunately some stores will have to close.”

Liberty Mutual fined £5.2million by FCA UK INSURER Liberty Mutual Insurance Europe SE has been fined £5.2million over failures with mobile phone insurance claims and the handling of complaints. The Financial Conduct Authority [FCA] said the failures took place between 2010-15 after Liberty entered into a relationship with a third party to enable it to provide mobile phone insurance to UK customers. The third party then undertook the administration of claims and handling of complaints on Liberty’s behalf. But the FCA said Liberty, which retained regulatory responsibility for ensuring that claims and complaints made by customers were handled fairly, did not ensure that adequate systems and controls to oversee the activities of the third party were in place.


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World News

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Call for ‘global deal’ after world wildlife falls by 60 per cent GLOBAL wildlife populations have fallen by 60 per cent since 1970 as we overuse natural resources, drive climate change and pollute the planet. The World Wildlife Fund has called for a ‘global deal’ similar to the international Paris Agreement to tackle climate change, as the conservation charity’s Living Planet Report spelled out the damage being done to the natural world. Only a quarter of the world’s land area is free from the impacts of human activity and by 2050 that will have fallen to just a tenth. The percentage of the world’s seabirds with plastic in their stomach is estimated to have increased from 5 per cent in 1960 to 90 per cent today, and the world has already lost around half its shallow water corals in just 30 years. Tropical areas have seen the worst declines, with an 89 per cent fall in populations monitored in Latin America and the Caribbean since 1970. Species in fresh water habitats, such as frogs and river fish, have fallen by 83 per cent. Overall, populations of more than 4,000 species of mammals, reptiles, birds, fish and amphibians have declined by 60 per cent between 1970 and 2014, the most recent available data.

LIFE SENTENCE Niels Hogel is already convicted of two murders

German nurse admits killing 100 patients – ‘more or less’ A FORMER nurse accused of killing 100 patients at two hospitals in Germany has admitted most of the charges against him. Niels Högel, 41, is already serving a life sentence for murder as his trial began in Oldenburg. When asked by Judge Sebastian Buhrmann if the charges against him were true, he confessed to ‘more or less’ all of them.

Resuscitate

WHAT A WASTE: A loggerhead turtle is trapped in a drifting fishing net in the Mediterranean Sea

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

The murder charges stem from Högel’s time at a hospital in the city between 1999-2002 and at another hospital in nearby Delmenhorst from 2003-05. The alleged victims were aged 34 to 96. Högel was convicted in 2015 of two murders and two attempted murders. He said then he intentionally brought about cardiac crises in some 90

patients in Delmenhorst because he enjoyed the feeling of being able to resuscitate them. He later told investigators that he also killed patients in Oldenburg. Authorities subsequently investigated hundreds of deaths, exhuming bodies of former patients. The Oldenburg state court is conducting the trial in a conference centre to accommodate a large number of co-plaintiffs and public interest. Judge Buhrmann, who called for a minute’s silence at the start to remember the victims, said: “We will make every effort to seek the truth.” Högel told the court that he had a ‘protected’ childhood, free of violence. He said his grandmother and his father, who were both nurses, had been his role models. There are no formal pleas in the German legal system. The trial is scheduled to last until May.

NEWS IN BRIEF

Over 5,000 soldiers sent to tackle migrants in US US DEFENCE chiefs are sending 5,200 troops to the south-west border with Mexico a week before mid-term elections. During campaign rallies, President Donald Trump has placed a sharp focus on Central American migrants moving north in slow-moving caravans which are still hundreds of miles from the US. The number of troops being deployed is more than double the 2,000 who are currently serving in Syria. Mr Trump tweeted: “This is an invasion of our Country and our Military is waiting for you!”

Flying closest to sun NASA has confirmed its Parker Solar Probe is now closer to the sun than any spacecraft has ever been. The probe surpassed the record of 26.6million miles set by Helios-2 in 1976. It will keep getting closer to the sun until it flies through the corona, or outer atmosphere, for the first time next week. Parker will make 24 close approaches to the sun over the next seven years, ultimately coming within just 3.8 million miles.

Ronaldo rules Instagram FOOTBALLER Cristiano Ronaldo has overtaken Selena Gomez to become the most followed user on Instagram. The 33-year-old Juventus player now leads the way on the social media platform with 144.4million, slightly ahead of the American singer and actress. Ronaldo posts images of his gruelling fitness routine as well as pictures of his family and himself on the pitch.


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Letters

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Wednesday October 31 | 2018

And another thing… This is the page where you, the reader, have your chance to express your views or comments on what’s going on in our part of the world. We like to hear from you. You can email us at newsdesk@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk or newsdesk@timesoftonbridge.co.uk or write to the Editor at Runcie Court, Salomons Estate, Tunbridge Wells TN3 0TG High-rise cinema site is not a sign that we’re going up in the world A NEW LOW? Artist’s impression of the proposed nine-storey building on the cinema site

Had Hugh Masters [October 24] been present at the Royal Tunbridge Wells Civic Society’s awards ceremony in the Town Hall on October 11, he would have noticed that my illustrated presentation described why the society objected to the cinema site development. The slide showed the proposed nine-storey edifice bang opposite the Town Hall and completely out of scale with its surroundings. So much so, that the view of the town from the

You missed a window of opportunity The Civic Society did not make an award this year for Best Shopfront. I think they may have missed a trick. They could have awarded one for Best Empty Shopfront – there are enough of them to choose from. Ben Hardy Tunbridge Wells

Get down to the root of the problem I am appalled at your biased comments in the Times [October 17] regarding Calverley Square. Do you really think 5,000 people have a view from the apartments you mention? That is the number of people who have signed the petition. I live a ten-minute walk away. I am merely a resident who cares about the future of Tunbridge Wells and the effects of the cost of this on future generations when it could be achieved at a fraction of the cost by redeveloping the existing Town Hall/theatre/police station site. You make no mention of the trees that would be destroyed, and I quote from the Trees Officer’s report, which says: “The proposal will result in a change of the character of [Calverley Grounds] park in general and in particular to the lower part of the park, from which it will not be possible to fully recover. “It will take probably a generation for significant recovery of the tree scape to take place within the park itself, whilst the presence of the strong tree groups on Mount Pleasant Avenue will probably never be fully recovered, and the landscape will be unalterably and significantly changed by the presence of the

commons will be altered for the worse, forever. Croydon, unfortunately, suffers from such high-rise town centre development. I hope nothing like this is ever proposed for Pembury, where Mr Masters lives, as he would probably be the first to reach for his keyboard. Context is everything, Mr Masters. Dr David Wright Chair, Awards Panel Royal Tunbridge Wells Civic Society underground car park. This change in character will be fundamental and longlasting.” Yes it may only be 2 per cent of the park, but this park is unique and the whole nature of it will change as it will be overlooked by these huge buildings. You also make no mention of the possibility of the town losing Hoopers and the BBC, and maybe other smaller shops that would not survive. Your comments are hardly an independent view, which is surely the stance your paper should be taking? Debbie Croll Via email Editor’s Note: Since the start of the year we have chosen to publish 30 letters about Calverley Square; 25 have been against the scheme, three in favour and two were neutral. We have also published 42 stories; each and every one reflected the views of those against and those in favour.

Unpleasant view of our park’s future Having read the Editor’s comments on inhabitants and ratepayers in Tunbridge Wells being NIMBYs, unable to see past their view of Calverley Grounds being obstructed (parroting Councillor Jukes’ view, in fact), I would like you to take a stroll in the park and count just how many houses have a direct view. Protestors in Langton Green, Rusthall, Southborough? London can refurbish listed buildings keeping the facade. Tunbridge Wells Borough Council has more than enough area around its offices to do the same for less money than the proposed Civic Centre. The entrance could remain, a

wonderful new multi-purpose theatre built and the offices moved to the right. The listed council chamber could be retained or moved, and used for special occasions. Instead, we face a Grade II-listed park being ruined with 70 mature trees counteracting pollution being removed, and three to four years of upheaval. However, councillors will have a magnificent balcony from which to overlook the park, whilst from the well-loved and much used park the view will be of concrete and glass. Perhaps you [like Cllr Jukes] also live in Crowborough and will escape the considerable amount of extra money we ratepayers will have to face for the next 50 years. Please weigh up the facts; even Fame and The Sound of Music did not fill the Assembly Hall (which has fewer seats than the proposed 1,200). Tickets were offered half-price. The theatre will have to be subsidised from day one. Catherine Thomas Tunbridge Wells

Fracking gives us independent energy It seems timely to reignite (sorry) the discussion about fracking. I’ve written before about being in thrall to unsavoury regimes: Saudi Arabia has threatened to push oil prices above $100 per barrel to curb the West’s criticism of it over the Khashoggi affair. UK shale gas will produce 8 per cent less CO2 than Liquefied Natural Gas [LNG], but we import it from Qatar, another dodgy Arab state. The US has, without any market-place rigging, reduced its CO2 emissions by 13 per cent. Shale gas prices have pushed coal out of their domestic market. Germany, trailblazer of the Green movement, is now burning more lignite – the dirtiest of fossil fuels. Political uncertainties, and China’s voracious appetite for energy, have pushed up prices of LNG and other globally-traded gases by 50 per cent this year, and these increases have brought coal back into competitiveness. Putin sits and bides his time. We need to reduce carbon emissions and move to the next generation of energy sources, but we need the cheapest and most readily available ‘bridging fuel’ to get us there, one that leaves us unbeholden to the Putins and sheikhs of this world. The ‘antis’ always win the headlines; quiet commonsense needs to be heard, too. Time to frack on. Edward Baker Tunbridge Wells

Polluting green belt – and children I oppose the plan to build over 400 houses in south-west Tonbridge, between Upper and Lower Haysden Lanes. This green belt land is adjacent to the prize-winning Haysden Country Park, which supports an array of wildlife. It is also adjacent to Haysden hamlet, where the residents’ environment will be greatly affected. Their access to Brook Street via Lower Haysden Lane will be greatly affected. This is a country lane enjoyed by cyclists, joining with the Penshurst cycle path, by runners as part of the route of an annual half marathon, and by

We do our best to publish letters in full. However, the Editor reserves the right to edit any letter. Please ensure that letters do not exceed 250 words

walkers making their way to the country park, some with their dogs. The new homes will generate some 800 more cars which will exit the area via Brook Street joining routes east and west of Tonbridge by the Quarry Hill roundabout. These two roads are already at capacity. This increase of traffic, if permitted, would increase pollution, which is unacceptable given there are two senior schools there, The Judd School and Hayesbrook, where pupils numbers are increasing, the Nexus Special School and West Kent College. Do we wish to expose the young people to this increased pollution? Councillor David Cure Judd Ward, Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council

Western culture has cult figures too Peter Casson [October 17] seems to believe that leadership personality cults are confined to communist and third world dictatorships. He has evidently forgotten, or not been aware of such people as Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini and Francisco Franco, while even the US has not been immune with Presidents John F Kennedy and now Donald Trump as would-be cult figures. The UK has had Margaret Thatcher as a supposedly great Prime Minister, but her divisive policies lie at the root of our present internal tensions over Brexit. It is no accident that in seven general elections since her premiership the Tories have not won a decisive majority. James Robertson Pembury

Putting the dog among the penguins Alan Bullion writes that my dog is in favour of Brexit [October 17]; he’s not, he’s too thick to understand the arguments, but he does understand that the majority vote was to leave – which is entirely different. As for Mr Bullion’s call for a People’s Vote, who does he think voted last time – penguins? Paul Stepto makes the same mistake and writes a dreadful piece of doggerel (sorry) in response. I have tried him (the dog) on Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations For Dummies, but he can’t get his teeth into it. Woof! Woof! Sam Goodenough Tunbridge Wells

Bigger majority if we want to Remain If the government decides to have a People’s Vote, then we need to decide on the definition of a clear majority. For the Remainers, 52 per cent is not high enough. They should therefore need a 55 per cent majority in order for us to remain in the EU – that is twice the majority that the Leavers achieved, and I doubt whether they would want us to leave if there is now an even bigger majority wishing to stay. What I propose is that we leave unless the Remainers get an overwhelming majority to stay. Whatever the result, we should have another vote in 20 years’ time if the fears put forward by the losing side have materialised. Graham Salmon Via email

Calverley has gone walkabout – again


Education News

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Wednesday October 31 | 2018

NEWS

19

EDUCATION Times WITH THE

Using dance as a key learning tool Primary pupils embrace the chance to dance thanks to a unique local performance group THIS Is Us Youth Dance Company is Kent’s only inclusive dance class and it operates from Bishops Down Primary School in Tunbridge Wells. The group has been running classes for both disabled and able bodied children for almost three years in association with Stopgap Dance. The weekly class is for 6-11year olds and runs on Monday evenings from 4.30pm for an hour. The group is hoping to open another one for secondary school pupils aged 11-18years. “Our classes don’t just focus on technique and performance. We are looking at building children’s social skills,” explains co-founder Hannah Rotchell. “The difference in our dancers’ self-esteem since joining is brilliant as we really encourage our dancers to have their own creative voice. “We do many activities that involve turn taking, team work and confidence building. We do lots of improvisation and open language activities as this allows there to be no right or wrong. Many activities are open to interpretation which means each individual can do their best and feel proud of their input into the class. Dance is a wonderful thing to help people express themselves and be open in a group environment.” One of the class’s original members Devon Hills had a very special dance class earlier this month when he was presented with a chair from Danceaid equipment.

“Devon has been dancing with This Is Us Youth Dance Company for over two years,” says Hannah. “Over this time we have seen his confidence in his movements grow. His upper body strength is incredible and he has been working with his walker for the majority of our classes and performances.”

Confidence Devon has a condition called familial hereditary spastic paraparesis (paraplegia), a form of congenital palsy causing physical difficulties in movement and mobility. He has hypertonicity in his legs, causing generalised lower limb weakness and as a consequence of the high tone, he has an intrathcal baclofen pump inserted. “He loves to dance and is very passionate about developing his dancing skills,” continues Hannah. “The sports wheelchair will aid him in moving more freely and quickly - this is the start of a very special journey for him.” Earlier this year This Is Us Youth Dance Company’s other co-founder Jan Cockburn met Danceaid’s Laura Wilson who offered to help young dancer Devon. The Danceaid charity who help and support disadvantaged and disabled children throughout the United Kingdom as well

TEAM WORK: This Is Us Youth Dance Company at Bishops Down School with Devon Hills (centre) as Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. “The speed of the wheelchair will allow Devon to feel that rush of energy that he hasn’t been able to experience yet,” adds Hannah. “He would love to feel the thrill of speed and the range of dynamic qualities when travelling from one side of the room to the other. It would also give him freedom in his arms, as he won’t always need them to support him in a chair. The chair is also

custom made to fit Devon’s needs.” Hannah adds that another big advantage is there is also growing room within the chair so as Devon grows the chair can grow with him. “Although it is early days, the joy he shows when travelling from one side of the room to the other is just wonderful. He loves to spin and travel quickly with his friends. Now they want to be able to keep up with him, which is so fun to see.”


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NEWS

Weekly Comment

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Martin Betts Labour Party local campaign co-ordinator

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Labour Party member Martin Betts lives in Southborough and has long been active in local politics. He retired after a long career in the Civil Service, where his last job at the Department for Work and Pensions was in communications. He qualified at Leicester University in human resources and training and development. The Times also publishes regular opinions from Conservatives, Lib Dems and members of The Green Party

Celebrating 100 years of Labour in Tunbridge Wells ON MONDAY, November 12, Labour members and supporters will be celebrating the centenary of the birth of the party in Tunbridge Wells. The day after Armistice Day brought an end to the horrors of the First World War, Tunbridge Wells Councillor HT Berwick convened a meeting at the Town Hall to discuss forming a new branch of Labour. He said it was not the time to go back to the unemployment, reckless profiteering, and exploitation of workers that existed before the war, and the country needed to provide a better future for the servicemen and their families who had endured four years of terrible suffering. Others speakers talked about the injustice of poor wages, unemployed and disabled people having to rely on the dole and ‘hand-outs’ to live, and the many families living in dwellings that ‘were not houses but rabbit hutches’. From this meeting, the Tunbridge Wells Labour Party was formed to challenge injustice and fight for a better deal for working people. For one hundred years it has been a constant crusading presence in the town. Local Labour has supported unemployed workers and opposed fascism. It has campaigned for social housing, the NHS, supported striking miners, opposed the Poll Tax and championed equality of opportunity. It has been a consistent

critic of the selective education system. Labour women have camped at Greenham Common to stop the deployment of cruise missiles and have campaigned against domestic abuse. Labour councillors have represented council wards covering Sherwood, Ramslye, Oak Road, St James’, Southborough & High Brooms and Rusthall. A number have played their parts in the civic life of the town as respected mayors and aldermen.

Battles In a knife-edge by-election at the time of the Suez Crisis in 1956, Labour candidate Len Fagg came close to winning the then Tonbridge Constituency and reduced the Conservative majority to an unprecedented 1,602. Today, with the help of Labour governments much has changed for the good, but many of the old battles still remain. Working people and their families have better health, incomes, and homes to live in and their children have higher standards of education. But for many people life is still a struggle on low pay or on zero hours contracts, rents are too high, and buying a house is often an unattainable dream. Mental health problems

WELL RED Labour supporters in Tunbridge Wells are massive. Schools are strapped for cash, more are in poverty and trapped in a failing benefit system. Tunbridge Wells Labour retains its campaigning zeal and will continue to oppose the extravagant spending of over £90million on a new Civic Centre. Instead, we will continue to push for more affordable houses, reduced poverty, help for businesses, less road

congestion and a better-quality environment. We will be celebrating our centenary with the launch of a new book ‘Revolutionary Tunbridge Wells’ by Julian Wilson, together with a speaker panel and birthday cake at the Royal Wells Hotel, 59 Mount Ephraim, on Monday, November 12 at 7.30pm for 8pm. Please join us. For more information, go to tunbridgewellslabour.org.uk


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

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Move Times INSPIRATION FOR MOVING AND IMPROVING timeslocalnews.co.uk

Pond life

but not as you know it…

AVAILABLE EVER Y WEDNESDAY – A MUST-READ

ULTIMATE GUIDE TO PROPERTY, INTERIORS & BEST BUYS

22

Page 23

MAKING A STAINED GLASS STATEMENT

35

RESTORED TO EDWARDIAN SPLENDOUR

45

NEW HOMES: A WOODLAND WONDERLAND

Moody blues

47

Page 38

RETIREMENT GEM IN THE WILDERNESSE

Warm up for winter on a bargain budget


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FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk Best For...

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Best property buys for... We all love to see homes with the ‘wow’ factor – which could apply to the kitchen, reception room, garden or something else. Here we home in on specific aspects that make these particular properties well worth a look A charming, link-detached, 3-bedroom Grade II listed house understood to date from the late 17th or early 18th century, with features including timbers and beams, terracotta floor tiles and decorative, cottage-style ceramic insets. The property is located in a tucked away yet convenient conservation area in this beautiful chocolate-box-style country town, with off-road parking as well as planning to extend.

The TILED BATHROOM…

MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST n Conservation area

Cornhall House High Street Cranbrook

Guide price

£595,000

CONTACT • Savills, Cranbrook • 01580 720161 •savills.co.uk

Broadwater Down Tunbridge Wells

The PORCH…

£1,495,000 CONTACT

• Hamptons, Tunbridge Wells • 01892 516611 • hamptons.co.uk The major front part of a fine Victorian villa with its own delightful large gardens, and located in a popular, tree-lined road. With 5 bedrooms, the spacious interior provides elegant, well proportioned family accommodation and includes many period features. MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST n Entrance porch with Gothic-style double doors and pretty, floral stained glass window n Impressive reception hall with parquet floor, fine staircase and double-height ceiling n Drawing room with fireplace and doors to terrace n Sitting room with fireplace and doors to terrace n Dining room with marble fireplace n Kitchen with butler sink and archway to dining room

n Principal bedroom with feature marble surround fireplace and adjoining bathroom with roll-top bath n West-facing garden of about 0.4 of an acre featuring a wide terrace with stone balustrading and a child’s garden house n Garage

n Cranbrook School catchment area n 24ft-sitting room with wood-burning stove n Dining room n Kitchen n 3 bedrooms n Bathroom with roof window and pretty ceramic tiles n Shower room n Attractive part-walled garden n Garden/log store n Right of way over a private drive


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Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Best For...

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The PRICE…

The DINING ROOM…

Park Road

Southborough

Guide price

£325,000-£350,000

CONTACT

• Hunni Homes, Tunbridge Wells • 01892 888333 • hunnihomes.co.uk

Pittsgate

Lamberhurst

Guide price £895,000 CONTACT

• Jackson-Stops, Tunbridge Wells • 01892 521700 • jackson-stops.co.uk

A large, listed, 6-bedroom 17th-century farmhouse with beautifully presented accommodation and a detached, listed tithe barn – all set in just under 3 acres on the outskirts of the village.

An exceptional 2-bedroom top floor apartment in a Victorian conversion with a wealth of character in every room. Plus the bonus of a share of freehold and no onward chain.

MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST n Drawing room with magnificent inglenook fireplace

n Master bedroom with fireplace

n Dining room with arch to kitchen

n 2 bathrooms with roll-top baths

n Kitchen/breakfast room with pretty windows in arched recesses

n 4-bay barn with 2 loose boxes plus 2 garages

MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST

n Family room with inglenook

n Garden with terraces, pond and orchard plus 2 paddocks

n Kitchen/diner

n Downstairs shower room

n 5 further bedrooms, including one en-suite

n Living room n 2 double bedrooms n Private garden n Off-road parking

The LAKE…

Brewer Street, Lamberhurst

Guide price £350,000 CONTACT

• Firefly Properties, Paddock Wood • 01892 838363 • fireflyproperties.co.uk

Willow Lodge Warberry Park Gardens Tunbridge Wells

Guide price

£775,000

CONTACT

• Savills, Tunbridge Wells • 01892 507000 • savills.co.uk

A light, spacious upper ground floor 3-bedroom apartment within a prestigious gated development. Warberry Park Gardens is notable for its beautiful communal grounds, including a large, tranquil lake. The apartment enjoys good ceiling heights, expansive windows and French doors to 2 decked balconies.

MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST n Sitting room with a balcony offering views of lake n Dining room with French doors to a balcony

A fabulous, sympathetically refurbished, 3-bedroom end-of-terrace character cottage nestled in the heart of the village with excellent decor, oak latch doors and a 75ft-plus garden. MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST

n Kitchen/breakfast room

n Sitting/dining room with wood-burning stove inset into a brick fireplace

n Master suite with dressing room and door to a balcony

n First floor bathroom with pretty painted tongue and groove panelling

n Secure parking

n Garage and off-road parking

n Communal gardens of just under 3.5 acres

n Large, secluded rear garden with sunken patio area


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

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Green Road

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AT A GLANCE

LOWER GREEN ROAD RUSTHALL n A detached Edwardian house with many period features, including cast iron and tiled fireplaces n Porch with stained glass windows n Entrance hall with elegant staircase n Superb sitting room with two oriel windows and doors to conservatory n Impressive dining room n Study with oriel bay window

Restored Edwardian home enjoys eye-catching character features

n Amdega conservatory with decorative tiled flooring and underfloor heating n Snug/family room with doors to conservatory n Kitchen n Architect-designed principal bedroom suite with sitting area and en suite n 4/5 further bedrooms, one with en-suite option n 2 bathrooms with claw foot baths n Established gardens with terrace n Summerhouse n Garage

ASKING PRICE

£1,295,000

CONTACT • Hamptons, Tunbridge Wells • 01892 516611 • hamptons.co.uk


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InteriorsFOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Finishing touch: Transform rooms with stylish additions that won’t break the bank

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Create a chic corner

Deep blues not only make a room feel calm and peaceful but will also add depth and drama. Create your own intimate space by switching light cottons for velvet and faux fur to conjure a cosseting, cocooning effect. Add a comfy chair (refresh an old one with a throw) and treat yourself to a new lamp, which has the power to transform a space – then sit back and snuggle.

DECOR TIP: This season’s all about

natural materials and textures – wool, mohair and cashmere feel gorgeously snug and improve with age. And don’t forget to ‘green it up’ around the home with house plants, real or faux.

Home Blue Easy Fit Shade £22, Sainsbury’s

Dream up a beautiful boudoir

Warm shades, such as terracotta, burnt orange and mustard yellows, mimic the richness of autumn landscapes and are the perfect, easyon-the-eye palette for bedrooms. Opt for a pale, neutral backdrop and floor, and darken the mood, for a sleep-inducing atmosphere, by wallpapering the wall behind the bed. Up the style stakes by layering the bed with throws, and accessorise with cushions in harmonising colours. For luscious lustre, add copper lights, vases or photo frames.

DECOR TIP: Adding pops of pattern

will add interest to a scheme. Embrace a modern retro-feel with geometric designs, keep it classic with a chevron pattern in monochrome, or keep it simple with a touch of a stripe or spots. Home Wooden Side Table £38, Sainsbury’s

Home Macrame Cushion £18, Boudoir Sainsbury’s

S

HOW your space some decor TLC with this season’s bargain buys. Here, Gabrielle Fagan reveals her top finds. Great style doesn’t have to be super-expensive. After all, it’s those fabulous finishing touches that really give a room personality and make it special. There’s a brilliant array of affordable homeware available on the high street right now, and you could even load up your trolley with on-trend accessories while doing your supermarket shop. Asda’s George Home range and the Sainsbury’s Home collection are both rightly renowned for their fashionable, purse-friendly items. Whether you want to transform a living room or just a corner, or beautify a bedroom – take your pick from these brilliant buys to help turn rooms into stylish sanctuaries…

Show a living space some love A pale colour palette will make a room feel more

spacious and it can still feel cosy if it’s grounded by dark flooring or carpet. Curate your collection of accessories and rotate them using only a few at a time. That pared-back approach will let the details sing. George Home’s bang-up-to date range has all the ingredients for a luxe living space. Top picks include space-saving seating, such as their Glynn Two-Seater Sofa, £350, and Knitted Pouffe, £39. Check out the range’s divine details, too: We love the Copper-Toned Glass Terrarium Lantern, £20, Pink and Grey Chunky Throw, £18, and cushions, from £6 each.

Copper-Toned Glass Shade £20, George Home

Medium Ficus Tree £69, Marks & Spencer

DECOR TIP: A relaxed setting should

never be cluttered. If you can’t fit in bulky storage, use baskets and boxes. Paint surrounding walls the same shade as fitted cupboards so they recede and don’t dominate a room.

Gingham Checked Cube £60, Next


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Wednesday October 31 | 2018

New Homes

Property Focus

N EW HO MES

How a woodland wonder has been created alongside country homes By Sarah Bond sarah.bond@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk

W

ITH greater weather extremes and other worries about pollution and the environment, more and more property developers are becoming conscious of the need to make places even better to live by helping to bring extra benefits to the areas surrounding their developments.

Rye Wood

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Truly a sweet Hunni deal Hunni Homes of Tunbridge Wells are selling a highly desirable building plot in the heart of High Brooms, within easy reach of the mainline station and other local amenities. The plans for the 3-bedroom end-of-terrace property, which has full planning permission, include off-road parking and gardens. The owner is also willing to sell the nearby main house, a semi-detached home which will become a mid-terrace, also with 3 bedrooms, and perfect for someone to live in while building the new house. The house and building plot are priced at £450,000. The plot is priced at £150,000.

Some have built parks, some playgrounds and some other community facilities. Now, Berkeley Homes has spent £40,000 to restore a beautiful area of natural woodland at Rye Wood, near Sevenoaks, in their only current project of this kind. They have added controlled footpaths and identified protected species.

Sculptures The wood is located opposite their awardwinning development, aptly named Ryewood, which is surrounded by lakes and greenery. The new community spaces that have been created include landscaped grounds, children’s play areas and other open land. With a rural backdrop, Ryewood also provides well-connected country homes for commuters. Residents benefit from easy access into London from Dunton Green railway station, just a few minutes’ walk away. “This is the only project of its kind at Berkeley Homes at the moment,” said a spokeswoman. “They have unveiled a wonderful space in this ancient woodland for the public to enjoy.” Here in Tunbridge Wells, a series of artistic rock sculptures in Grosvenor & Hilbert Park

The Ryewood development costing £17,500 made the headlines earlier this year. They were funded by Fairview New Homes through a Section 106 agreement, which sees developers make a contribution to community projects through the local council It was part of their ‘sweetener’ deal with Tunbridge Wells Borough Council to build 94 homes in Jackwood Way. Money can also be paid for projects through

the Community Infrastructure Levies (CILs), although there is some controversy over the success of both that scheme and Section 106. The new Ryewood development and its wood sound idyllic, both for humans and for wildlife. The public are sure to want to see more of the same kinds of actions from developers with the thousands of new homes the government now wants built to fix the broken housing market.


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

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Retirement

Property Focus

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RET IREM EN T

Sales balloon at Emerson Park retirement village following a lively launch ceremony By Sarah Bond sarah.bond@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk

N

EW retirement village Emerson Park recently welcomed over 100 VIPs to its official opening, and 50 per cent of the properties have already been snapped up. Visitors also viewed the development’s care home, Emerson Grange. The ribbon-cutting ceremony at the luxury development, which is at Hextable in the Sevenoaks district, was officiated by the Chairman of Sevenoaks District Council, Cllr Pat Bosley, and the Rev Johnny Douglas of the village’s St Peter’s Church. Guests enjoyed a celebratory atmosphere as

they toured the bespoke facilities for the 47 luxurious retirement apartments – including a club room, bar, exercise studio, cinema and hair salon. VIPs also visited the on-site luxury care home, which provides state-of-the-art facilities in welcoming surroundings for residents, nursing, dementia care and respite stays. Game councillor Pat Bosley even had fun trying out a boxing session in the gym with Emerson Park’s Resident Services Advisor, Aadil Baig.

Vibrant Of the development, which is part of the Cinnamon Care Collection, General Manager Paul Hart said: “There is such a need for highend, luxury retirement living throughout the UK, highlighted by the fact that we have already sold so many our retirement apartments. “Residents are purchasing properties for all sorts of reasons, from couples looking to downsize and perhaps free up finances to enjoy hobbies and travel, to single people, widowers and widows who are keen to benefit from the extensive range of activities and support provided by our on-site staff. “And our care home, Emerson Grange, has

Wildernesse House Seal, Nr Sevenoaks PRICES FROM

£649,950 CONTACT:

• Savills, Sevenoaks • 01732 789740 • savills.co.uk

THE GLOVES ARE ON! Cllr Bosley boxes Aadil Baig been designed and built to the very highest of standards.” When asked what makes Emerson Park different to other care and retirement living developments, Mr Hart added: “It would be easy to say the wonderful apartments, facilities and finish of the care home. “However, I believe it is the team here at Emerson who will really make the difference. “We have recruited a truly extraordinary team, and such outstanding staff will make Emerson Park a warm, vibrant, lively environment for our residents.” For further information, visit cinnamoncc.com/emersonpark

An historic collection of elegant PegasusLife retirement apartments and mews houses in a stately 24-acre setting, exclusively for the over-60s. MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST

n Historic Grade II-listed Georgian mansion n 23 apartments with 1 or 2 bedrooms n 8 mews houses with 2 bedrooms n Social space with honesty bar and library n 24-hour concierge n Restaurant with café, open kitchen, private dining and outdoor seating n Guest suites for family and friends n Wellness suite and spa with lap pool n Tennis courts


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Life&Times

ARTS & CULTURE LIFE & STYLE FOOD & DRINK MOTORING SPORT and MORE...

IN PRINT AND ONLINE SEVEN DAYS A WEEK timeslocalnews.co.uk

56

In tune

The week’s best gigs Page 58

Driving force We reveal the new BMW 4x4 Page 66

SEE SCHEHERAZADE

60

RECIPE FOR CHEFS’ SUCCESS

64

Hair raising comedy

HISTORICAL GOTHENBURG

71

See Ross Noble’s hilarious show

Page 54

LADIES ROCK THE STONES


Life&Times

arts

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Arts & CultureFOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

‘Stand-up can teach you everything

you need to know about life…’ Geordie comic Ross Noble, who lives in Kent, is coming to Tunbridge Wells with his new tour, El Hablador. Ben Williams talks to him about Christmas albums, giant skulls and working with Mel Brooks in the musical Young Frankenstein

THE ART OF BEING NOBLE Ross is still full of big surprises on stage

T

HIS is your 16th UK tour, with 68 dates. After 20 years on the road, do you still enjoy all the travelling? It would be hard work if I didn’t! But, yeah, I do still love it. The great thing about stand-up is you’re face-to-face with real people.

You said when you started touring you ‘didn’t really live in the real world’. Has that changed? In the beginning all I did was tour. I’ve got more of a balanced life now, but I can still retain the essence of being in the moment. I realised quite early on that stand-up can teach you everything you need to know about life, which is: Have one eye on the future and one eye on the past, but live in the present.

How would describe your stand-up act now, compared to your early days? ‘When I started out, people said I was ‘surreal’, and that’s a bit of a lazy description, because it sort of implies that anyone could do it. Now, I think I take the building blocks of the real world and then stretch and manipulate them. It’s more like ‘magic realism’ than ‘surrealism’ – that’s the way I see it… And that’s the most pretentious thing I’ve ever said!

You recently recorded a spoof magazine show for Radio 4. How did you find writing that? I enjoyed the discipline, and creating something that is incredibly detailed and precise. Some people get writer’s block, whereas once I get an idea of something I want to do, I just go for it.

In your Dave TV show ‘Ross Noble: Off Road’, you put yourself and your motorbike through the gruelling Scottish Six Days Trial. Did you take much convincing to do it? That was something that I was doing anyway! We went to the channel and said: “We’re doing this, shall we film it?” and they went: “Definitely!” Hopefully we can do another series. I’d like to, but we can only really do it if we can up the ante.

And you recently showcased your singing talents as Igor in the musical version of the Mel Brooks’ comedy classic ‘Young Frankenstein’? And my dancing! I was Olivier nominated, you know! But I don’t like to talk about it, he laughs.


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

How did you find working with comic legend Mel Brooks? Mel was phenomenal. He constantly tinkers with everything, changing punchlines around, cutting entire scenes.

He’s 92 now. Did he show any sign of approaching retirement? Not at all. The last time I spoke to him he was talking about projects that he passionately wants to do, even though he’s got this incredible body of work – and he’s aware of that, because he keeps reminding you that he’s a living legend! He’s not hung up on the big picture, he’s all about the detail. He’s just as bothered about the nuance of it all.

After singing and dancing, how have you found transitioning back to solo stand-up? It is nice to be doing it again because I feel like I’m exercising different muscles – still comedy muscles, but different types of comedy muscles. On stage, the transition’s been fine, but off stage it’s been a bit weird.

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk What do you have in store for the audience? I’ve got a giant inflatable skull on stage: Its mouth fills up with smoke and I walk out of it!

Outlandish inflatable sets have become a trademark of your stand-up shows. How did they start? The sets have always been a bit Spinal Tap, there’s no need for them, it’s just funny to have these big, over-the-top creations on stage. People turn up and go: “Woah!” and then I don’t really mention it.

Can you see yourself still working at 92, like Mel Brooks? Having spent time working with Mel, I can, actually. Sure, he’s had more success than any other comic on the planet, so you could say: “Of course he’d still be going!” But I do look at him and think there really is no reason to slow down.

Because you’re no longer part of an ensemble? Yeah, but not just an ensemble, a real worldclass team. Going back to being just me, making all the decisions… in one way it’s the ultimate freedom, but sometimes giving yourself a restriction can be quite liberating in itself.

After a What’s On Stage Award and an Olivier nomination, have you thought about incorporating any songs into your other work? What, like releasing a Christmas album? I’d like to do more musicals if the right thing came along – I enjoy it. But just because you enjoy singing doesn’t necessarily mean you should do it. Though I do have a couple of ideas for things that are not quite musicals, but sort of musicals, which I’m working on. But I won’t say what because it’ll jinx it or something!

That sounds wise. Something you can talk about, then, is your new tour, El Hablador.

Ross Noble: El Hablador comes to the Assembly Hall on Wednesday, November 7, at 8pm. Tickets cost £25 from assemblyhalltheatre.co.uk

Arts & Culture

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Going Out

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goingout 7 days of activities

WEDNESDAY

Johnny English Strikes Again is still showing at The Hop Farm’s Moonlight Drive-In Cinema tonight and tomorrow (timings vary). Starring Rowan Atkinson as the hapless special agent, this is one of the funniest film releases of the year so far. Tickets cost £25 per vehicle and can be booked via moonlightcinema.com Mixing it Up is the latest exhibition at Trinity Theatre Gallery, and features the work of three local artists specialising in various artistic mediums, including painting and sculpture.

By Eileen Leahy

THURSDAY There’s plenty of entertainment to be enjoyed this evening in both our towns. Kicking things off is a talk by artist Jeanette Barnes at the OBS gallery at Tonbridge School from 7.30pm entitled Site Specific. For more details, see emtheatre.com Over at the Assembly Hall in Tunbridge Wells you can catch the stars of the smash-hit movies Street Dance 3D 1 & 2, and Flawless, two-time winners of the World Dance Championships, strut their stuff. They came to public attention on Britain’s Got Talent and have never looked DREAM TICKET Scheherazade and 1001 Nights at Trinity

THAT’S FUNNY: Carrott and McGowan come to town back. Expect mesmerising and measured dance routines that will leave you feeling exhilarated. Tickets cost £25 pp from assemblyhall.co.uk While at Trinity Theatre, there’s a reworking of Ibsen’s classic An Enemy of the People by Flintlock Theatre. Following critically-acclaimed national tours of The Government Inspector and Don Q, they return with this reimagined classic which employs their signature highenergy storytelling, music and live digital interaction. This time round, the dramatic pace focuses on a ‘searing examination of fake news, whistleblowing and who really wields power in contemporary Britain’.’Tickets cost £19 per person and are available from trinitytheatre.net

FRIDAY

It’s National Stress Awareness Day, and from 3.30pm to 5.30pm you can pop into the Hub at Grosvenor and Hilbert Park to pick up some tips and tricks on how to stay calm in a stressed out world. There will be some calming activities available, such as drawing and painting, and you can learn some easy mindfulness techniques to take out with you into the woods (or wherever you like). The event is free to attend and suitable for 5+ years, with a suggested donation of £1 pp. There will be a fireworks display at Brenchley cricket ground this evening. The sparkling action starts at 5.30pm and runs until 8pm.

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

Simply turn up and pay on arrival. The village of Pembury will also be hosting a fireworks extravaganza ahead of Guy Fawkes night from 7.30pm, and there will also be a collection for local charities. The Matchbox Opera will be performing Puccini’s La Boheme at St John’s Church in Penshurst this evening from 7.30pm. The company, which is based in Tunbridge Wells, presents fully staged operas sung in English in local venues – typically churches – but is venturing for the first time this year into Salomons Estate’s Victorian Theatre on November 9 and Burrswood the following evening. Matchbox’s statement of purpose is to perform ‘Intimate Opera in Interesting Settings’, which sums up the unique audience experience that comes from sitting so close to the performers. According to Matchbox, even seasoned opera-goers used to grand staging and international voices have commented that a Matchbox presentation brings ‘a fresh and uniquely enjoyable experience’. Further information is available at matchboxopera.net You can also catch Company of Dreams’ final I SPY: performance of Scheherazade Even hapless and 1001 nights at Trinity Johnny English Theatre from 8pm (£19 can’t retire per person). The tale of these days. Scheherazade, who tells Catch him at stories every night in order The Hop Farm to avoid being killed by a


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Wednesday October 31 | 2018

person from thehopfarm.co.uk A drama group working with the Dementia Cafe in Eynsford and Sevenoaks District Council to raise awareness of the illness will perform two plays on the topic of dementia entitled Chocolate Muffins at The Stag Theatre in Sevenoaks today. See stagsevenoaks.co.uk QI and 8 Out of Ten Cats Does Countdown star and comedian Joe Lycett brings his new show, I’m About To Lose Control and I…, to the stage at the Assembly Hall this evening at 7.30pm. Tickets cost £20 to see this funny fellow, who’s managed to capture the zeitgeist of 21st-century life to a tee. There are more fireworks to be enjoyed this evening, and this time it’s the turn of the Roundtable putting on their annual and hugely popular event at Dunorlan Park. Gates open at 5.30pm and tickets cost £6. For further details, see rtwrt.org

Going Out

PICK OF THE WEEK: NT Live presents ALLELUJAH!

Thursday, November 1, at 7pm EM Forster Theatre, Tonbridge

Alan Bennett’s sharp and hilarious new play, filmed live at London’s Bridge Theatre during its limited run, will be screened at the EM Forster Theatre in Tonbridge this Thursday. The Beth, an old-fashioned cradle-to-grave hospital serving a town on the edge of The

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Pennines, is threatened with closure as part of an efficiency drive. A documentary crew, eager to capture its fight for survival, follows the daily struggle to find beds on the Dusty Springfield Geriatric Ward, and the triumphs of the old people’s choir. Allelujah! is a new play from Bennett, one of Britain’s best-loved writers, who is known for his stinging wit and wry comedy. His celebrated plays include The History Boys, The Lady in the Van and The Madness of George III. Tickets: £14 or £12 concessions (Under 16 and over 65 years). Visit emftheatre.com

SUNDAY A WINTER’S TALE: Shakespeare for children

Time to remember, time to give thanks takes

jealous king, has enjoyed rave reviews after its sell-out Sadler’s Wells shows. And if you want to find out more about this amazing production, then make sure you go along early to hear the Q&A at 7.30pm with Charlotte Desorgher, producer and choreographer. trinitytheatre.net

SATURDAY

Penshurst Vintage Christmas Fair is on today from 10am until 4pm. Showcasing vintage homewares, clothes, jewellery, furniture and gifts, this is a must for all lovers of the original and quirky. You can also enjoy live music from past decades brought to you by Miss Vintage, and delicious delights in the pop-up tea room by Dolly’s Diner. Entry is £2, with donations to Hospice in the Weald. For further information, please visit the Cherish Vintage Fairs on Facebook or email: cherishvintagefairs@gmail.com The Kent Mind, Body and Spirit Festival will be on at The Hop Farm this weekend. So if you want to discover a more holistic and healthy approach to life then why not go along? Tickets cost £10 per

LAUGH-ALONG-A-LYCETT Comic Joe is at The Assembly Hall

place at St Peter & St Paul, Church Lane Tonbridge today. This is the church’s annual Service of Remembrance for anyone you have lost. All are welcome to this quiet service, with the chance to light a candle. There will be refreshments afterwards. The Support Local Pop-Up collective are hosting their Christmas show at One Warwick Park Hotel today from 10am. Make sure you go along to show your support for all those fledging independent businesses making their mark in the creative world. At 2.30pm at Trinity Theatre, the Cat’s Grin Theatre Company puts on three of Shakespeare’s plays – A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Macbeth and The Winter’s Tale – in a truncated 20-minute form, making them accessible and enjoyable for all the amily. Tickets cost £7. See trinitytheatre.net

MONDAY

The popular children’s animation Smallfoot, which focuses on the story of a bright young yeti finding something he thought didn’t exist – a human – continues every night until Wednesday this week at the Moonlight Drive-In Cinema at The Hop Farm. News of this ‘smallfoot’ throws the

simple yeti community into an uproar over what else might be out there in the big world beyond their snowy village. Screenings are at 6.30pm and tickets cost £25 per vehicle.

TUESDAY

Hever Castle’s Autumn Colour event is now in full swing and will run throughout the season. Visitors can enjoy striking autumnal floral and fauna displays, learn how to plant a winter hanging basket and stock up on spring bulbs. This year there will also be a new self-guided trail around the lake incorporating points of interest, including World War II Pillboxes, the newly opened Smugglers Walk and waterfall, the impressive Japanese Teahouse, and a tickbox list of autumn-coloured trees. For further information, visit hevercastle.co.uk At 7.30pm, two comedy legends – Jasper Carrott and Alistair McGowan – ‘split the bill and your sides’ with a night of comedy standup and impressions at the Assembly Hall Theatre. The duo will draw on their wealth of experience as they present a show of laughter and entertainment. Tickets cost £26 from assemblyhalltheatre.co.uk


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Going Out

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk THE GREY LADY MUSIC LOUNGE The Pantiles. Doors 7.15pm, entry £6/£7 Websites pdag.co.uk & thegreylady.co.uk Wednesday Jennie Worthley, Joanne Louise Parker, James McMaster Friday Jazz Club Night with Bob Bernard and special guest Bob Haddrell on piano Saturday Over The Edge Sunday The Breretons, Frances Yonge, Nick Lawrence, Jennifer Lee Ridley

live music With Paul Dunton

T

HIS evening [Wednesday], The Forum’s Stable showcase features a rocking line-up with local bands Black Gabanza, Hava, Silence Falls and Zombie Met Girl all performing. On Friday night, iconic folk group Show of Hands return to The Assembly Hall. And Alan Beechey’s Bright Stars of Jazz are performing at The Masonic Hall. Fans of Elvis can enjoy renowned tribute act Nicky Hart at The Bedford pub, while The Royal Oak hosts an acoustic night with Anna Howie, Peter Taylor and Billy Page all performing. On Saturday evening, the local scene is full of gigs, including Over The Edge at The Grey Lady, Mick Mepham at The Beau Nash Tavern,

The must-read guide to what’s on musically for the week ahead… paulduntonandguests.com

The Lyrae duo at The Trading Post, Route 66 at The Bedford and The Heartbeats at Royal Oak. I also highly recommend the Freddie Forever concert at The Somerhill, performed by local vocalist Phil Copping. This performance ties in rather neatly with the global release of the new Queen biopic, Bohemian Rhapsody. Close out the weekend in style this Sunday with local acts The Breretons, Frances Yonge, Nick Lawrence and Jennifer Lee Ridley at The Grey Lady. On Monday, the Tonbridge Folk Club returns to The Flying Dutchman in Hildenborough with special guests Two’s Company, and on Tuesday, The Sally Ironmonger Trio are at The Punch & Judy in Tonbridge.

Frances Yonge

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

THE BEAU NASH TAVERN Mount Ephraim. Open all day, free entry Music from 8.30pm till late Saturday Mick Mepham Sunday Open Mic Night

THE TRADING POST 5 Culverden Down. Open all day, free entry, music from 8pm until late Saturday Lyrae duo

THE TUNBRIDGE WELLS FORUM

THE SOMERHILL

The Common Event information at twforum.co.uk Wednesday Black Gabanza, Hava, Silence Falls, Zombie Met Girl Thursday Zebrahead, Suburban Legends

Pembury Road, Tonbridge Free entry, music from 8.30pm Saturday Freddie Forever (tribute act performing Queen’s iconic 1986 Wembley Stadium concert)

CASSIDY’S BAR Castle Street. Open all day, free entry Music from 8.30pm until late Thursday Open Jam Session

THE ASSEMBLY HALL THEATRE Crescent Road All show details and tickets available at assemblyhalltheatre.co.uk Friday Show of Hands Sunday RTWSO: World War I Commemoration: Soloist: Annette Wardell (soprano) Conductor: Roderick Dunk

THE BEDFORD PUB 2 High Street. Open all day, free entry Music from 8.30pm until late Friday Nicky Hart is Elvis! Saturday Route 66

THE MASONIC HALL St John’s Road. All concert details and tickets available at twjazzclub.co.uk Friday Alan Beechey’s Bright Stars of Jazz

THE GEORGE PUB Mount Ephraim. Open all day, free entry Music from 8pm until late Monday TWUNTS Ukulele Jam Session

TONBRIDGE FOLK CLUB The Flying Dutchman, Hildenborough Monday Two’s Company

THE PUNCH & JUDY 11 St Stephen’s Street, Tonbridge Open all day, free entry, music from 8pm Tuesday Sally Ironmonger Trio

THE SUSSEX ARMS Sussex Mews Event information at twforum.co.uk Friday Sisteray, Bugeye, Alibi Sunday Chuggaboom

THE ROYAL OAK Prospect Road Open all day, free entry Music from 8.30pm until late Friday Acoustic Night Billy Page, Anna Howie, Peter Taylor Saturday The Heartbeats

Show of Hands


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food

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W

Food & Drink FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

West Kent cookbook bringing

hope to children

Food writer Bruce McMichael, an artisan producer of citrusflavoured sauces and marmalades at The Lemon Grove, is one of the contributors to a new cookbook being published to raise funds for local charity Tree of Hope. Launched this week, the book is a celebration of the region’s fantastic food, drink and hospitality

EST KENT is getting its own new regional cookbook, celebrating the abundance of amazing food and drink found on our doorsteps while raising much-needed funds for a local charity – Tonbridge-based Tree of Hope. Packed with recipes created by local foodies, producers, bakers and chefs, the cookbook will be published on November 1, in good time for Christmas. Money raised from sales will go directly to Tree of Hope, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. Entitled ‘The Cook Book (Sevenoaks, Tonbridge, Tunbridge Wells), it’s a collaboration between the charity and Caroline Kings from the Eat Around Tonbridge blog, local food photographer Severien Vits and events organiser Charlotte Rogers. Each chapter will focus on a particular producer, pub or café, for example, and will include a profile of a chef or cook who’ll share their stories and secrets of their kitchens. Recipes will make up a chunk of the book,

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

showcasing local seasonal produce and menus. Jane Beedle, popular baker and finalist of the 2016 The Great British Bake Off, contributed three recipes, including a rather delicious Apricot Bakewell. While Tonbridge-based restaurant Ghurkha Planet offered the spicy dish of Nava Ratna Chargrilled Prawn, a meal that fuses Nepalese flavours with European ingredients. By taking the step of partnering with a book publishing company to produce this book, Tree of Hope is encouraging local businesses, including popular restaurants and bars Vittle and Swig, Rendezvous, Fuggles and Sankey’s, to showcase their culinary offerings through a behind-the-scenes insight into their working foodie lives. Each chapter includes recipes and a story about the chef, restaurant or producer, and some luscious photography of ingredients, finished dishes and a day in the life of the people featured.

Innovative

RECIPE FOR SUCCESS: (L-R) Will Devlin (The Small Holding), Brian Hammond (Whiting & Hammond), Ben Sulston (Sulston’s Kitchen), Doug White (Fuggles Beer Café), Russell Goad (Rustled Up), Kate Bourne, Tree of Hope Fundraising Manager, Bruce McMichael (The Lemon Grove), Julie Docherty (Papermakers Arms), LouLou Hamilton (Cocolicious), Severien Vits, food photographer and blogger

Kent-born celebrity chef Michel Roux Jr contributed the foreword to the book and wrote: “I might be biased, but I believe that it is food that brings people together in a way few other things can… Each recipe and story in the book lovingly threads together a community and all in order to raise money for a vital cause.” He also contributed a gorgeously sweet recipe for Ice Red Berry Soufflé, which he says: “Always impresses and is well worth the effort.” Focusing on the towns and villages around Tunbridge Wells, Tonbridge and Sevenoaks, and down to villages such as Cranbrook and Kilndown, the book will showcase exciting and innovative food and drink businesses and people making the most of this corner of the Garden of England. Julie Docherty of Papermakers Arms gastropub in Plaxtol, enjoyed the whole experience of working with the Tree of Hope team and can’t wait to see the final result. Other outlets with their own chapters in the book include The Warren and The Beacon, both


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

in Tunbridge Wells; The Hare at Langton Green and Basil Wholefoods, which has outlets in Tunbridge Wells, Tonbridge and Penshurst. Local food photographer Severien provided images of the chefs and producers contributing to the book – either working in their home or commercial kitchens or behind their famers’ market stalls – alongside more abstract photographs of a recipe or a vital favoured ingredient. The full colour, softback cookbook showcases the best that the area has to offer from its thriving community of independent artisanal food lovers. There are thousands of charities and good causes registered across the country, and fundraising is a major issue for them all. Government grants and voluntary donations are needed to cover the costs of running the charity and providing their much needed community services. In a nutshell, Tree of Hope is a ‘crowdfunding charity that helps children and young people with a disability or illness by supporting their families to raise the money they need to pay for specialist care that is not freely available through the UK healthcare system’. Keen baker Loulou Hamilton, who owns the popular Cocolicious café in the centre of Cranbrook, says: “Not only is Cocolicious delighted to be a contributor to the Kent cookbook, but we are more than thrilled and happy to be supporting the amazing and rewarding work of Tree of Hope.” Inspired by memories of her

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk homeland, Australia, Loulou’s recipe of Salted Caramel Lamingtons will surely become popular in kitchens across the county. Commenting on why the charity wanted to get involved with this particular project, Chief Executive Gill Gibb says the book is ‘a celebration of the wonderful food within the local area, and we’re also keen to celebrate a real sense of community…’. He continued: “We are great food lovers at Tree of Hope, and from talking to people in the area we believe there are many more that are going to appreciate this book.”

Proud Copies will be available from local bookshops and from the all the people and businesses featured through their restaurants, cafés, pubs, market stalls and websites. Doug White, co-owner of Fuggles Beer Café, which has outlets in Tunbridge Wells and Tonbridge, says: “We believe that pubs still hold a place at the heart of a community, and communities are all about supporting each other. “We are hugely proud to be working alongside Tree of Hope and helping them bring support to those who need it the most.” For more information, visit treeofhope.org.uk Tree of Hope’s The Cook Book is priced at £20 + P&P and can be ordered through the website treeofhope.org.uk Next week we will feature some of The Cook Book’s delicious recipes from top chefs in the area, and you can hear more about Michel Roux Jr’s welcome support of the Tree of Hope charity venture

Food & Drink

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travel

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ALL THE FUN OF THE FESTIVE FAIR At Liseberg amusement park

Travel

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

The Christmas glitter

of Gothenburg

The Swedish city is a delight during the festive period. Sarah Marshall visits the markets and funfairs, and finds a much more appealing way to go trolling…

A

Scandi stallholder strokes a wooden troll’s silky-soft beard – which he proudly claims is made from the wool of prized Gotland sheep – and says: “You must be prepared to give him porridge every day!” The fairy-tale creature is believed to keep houses safe and is often found peering from candlelit windows, or resting on mantelpieces above crackling fires, at this time of year. More fluff than face, these particular trolls started life in the Ompen HB Konsthantverk workshop, and the proprietor, Peter, likes to know where each one ends up. “They’re like my children,” he coos, preening my purchase from Liseberg’s vast Christmas market. “So I need to keep track of what they get up to. You can always keep me posted on Facebook if you like.” Quirky Christmas presents are easy to pick up in Gothenburg, a Swedish destination famous for its offbeat

MEET THE VIKINGS! A stallholder in Liseberg Medieval Village

approach to the season, and the troll is one of many finds I take home. Here, the run-up to Christmas is just as much fun as the final event, and residents of the west coast city go to great lengths to ensure their celebrations really stand out.

For example, from November 29 to December 22, a singing Christmas tree bellows carols through the city centre, while on various dates throughout Advent, Scandinavia’s most elaborate candlelit Lucia parades are held. Lights play an important role at

HIGH NOTES: Gothenburg’s Lucia choir Liseberg, a charming 95-year-old amusement park which twinkles with 5,000,000 illuminations in the long, dark season. I struggle to count them all as I wander around the sprawling site, having arrived on a Paddan boat tour armed with blankets, gingerbread and mulled wine. The journey along Gothenburg’s canals is an adventure that takes you under bridges and over locks, and it’s the ideal way to beat Liseberg’s inevitable queues. Fireworks explode at the grand finale of a ballet performance on ice, giant teacups swirl in a winter forest ride, and sweet shops spill open with candy sticks and golden chocolate coins. And along with the usual gifting fare, market stalls here also have something different to offer. In a Medieval Village, gruff, hairy Vikings sell plastic swords and Celtic amulets from counters made of hay – although on this occasion I’m reluctant to part with my cash for them. “I’ve already found my porridge-eating talisman,” I tell a grumbling salesman with a smile. “And I think you’ll find he’s sporting a far finer beard than yours.” WHERE ELSE TO SHOP The Haga district The city’s oldest district is arguably the most atmospheric place to shop – whatever the time of year. From November 24 to December 16, festive stalls are set up selling traditional sheepskin slippers, rugs and preserves – but


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Travel

even the year-round shops have excellent displays. Pick up antique necklaces or brooches in the vintage stores, or stylish Scandi homeware from independent boutiques.

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TAKE THE WATER WAY Gothenburg is known for its Dutch-style canals

Kronhuset and Kronhusbodarna A fire-red brick building with a pea-green roof, Kronhuset is one of Gothenburg’s oldest buildings, circa 1654, and the setting for a traditional Christmas market. Handicrafts are original and often one of a kind, with producers on hand to explain how they were made. Also, explore the cottages set around a cobbled square in Kronhusbodarna, selling pottery, artwork and artisan chocolates. FESTIVE FARE The julbord

WHERE TO EAT Sjomagasinet, Adolf Edelsvards Gata 5 Julbords are a family favourite during Advent, and one of the best festive spreads is served at this Michelin-starred restaurant by the sea.

Cured fish, seafood dishes and decadent desserts are set on a sharing table that’s several notches above the standard buffet. Gregarious chef Ulf Wagner runs proceedings, and invites guests into the rustic, wood-panelled restaurant, where laughter and chinking glasses create a celebratory atmosphere. From £63pp, excluding drinks. Visit sjomagasinet.se

ON GUARD Men dressed as soldiers outside Kronhuset, the city’s oldest building

Cafe Husaren, Haga Nygata 28 The cinnamon bun, or kanelbulle, is a Swedish institution, and there’s a constant battle to produce not only the best but also the biggest sweet pastry in town. The title currently sits with Cafe Husaren, an old-fashioned tea and coffee house in the Haga district, where windows are filled with enormous coils of the sugary delights. Expect to pay around £6 for a Hagabulle the size of a dinner plate. Visit cafehusaren.se

WHERE TO STAY Clarion Hotel Post, Drottningtorget 10 Once operating as Gothenburg’s central post office, this hotel with a modern design sits in the thick of the action a short walk from main thoroughfare, Avenyn. A popular choice for Christmas concerts and office parties, it’s always lively – particularly on a Saturday night when local revellers fill the bar. Rooms from £134 with breakfast. Visit nordicchoicehotels.com HOW TO GET THERE • Norwegian flies to Gothenburg from Manchester and London. Flights from £70 return in December. See norwegian.com • A Paddan Christmas tour, with entrance to Liseberg, costs from £23pp. Visit stromma.se • For more information on Gothenburg, visit goteborg.com


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Motoring

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Motoring News

A look at what’s happening in and around the world of motoring

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

BMW goes large with a rival to Range Rover

Dealership goes the extra mile for children on their way to operations

Going Dutch on opening doors to protect cyclists MOTORISTS could soon be encouraged to use the ‘Dutch Reach’ when opening their door to protect cyclists from injury – or worse. The technique – praised by road safety organisations – sees drivers use their opposite hand to open their vehicle door. This forces them to twist their bodies, making them look behind before they open the door and get out. The move gets its name from the Netherlands, where it is included in the driving test. Now the Department for Transport is reviewing the UK Highway Code, looking to reduce

casualties from so-called ‘dooring’. Neil Worth, Road Safety Officer for Gem Motoring Assist, said: “Cyclists are vulnerable and we welcome this move to provide them with better protection. For drivers and passengers it’s a small and simple change.” The RAC’s Head of Roads Policy, Nicholas Lyes, also agrees with the change, adding: “We support the introduction of the ‘Dutch Reach’ principle to the Highway Code – a small change every motorist can make when exiting their vehicle that can make a huge difference to the safety of cyclists.”

CHILDREN’S journeys to surgery in one UK hospital have become a lot more fun, thanks to a car dealership which hand-delivered five childsized electric ride-on cars for the young patients to travel in. The distinctive vehicles were a Fiat 500, Alfa Romeo 4C, Volvo XC90, Jaguar F-Type and Range Rover, plus a remote-control Land Rover. They were given to The Children’s Hospital theatres at Leicester Royal Infirmary by Sturgess Motor Group. Matron Julie Clerc said: “Surgery can be an extremely daunting time for most people, let alone a child… “Sometimes the experience can unnerve the most confident person.

“We wanted to think of ways that would make the trip more enjoyable for the younger children.” Theatre practitioner Helen Shaw said: “As a team, we decided instead of doing Secret Santa we would all chip in and buy our patients a ride-on car to take them from reception to the operating theatre. This is something that was done in the past but, like a lot of things, once the car broke there wasn’t money to replace it.” The motor group was asked if it could help with the venture. Chairman Chris Sturgess said: “This was our way we felt that we could give back.”

AFTER several teasers and concepts, BMW has lifted the lid on its new X7 SUV – the largest car the brand has ever built. The colossal X7 takes aim at the likes of the Range Rover and Mercedes GLS, looking to inject some of BMW’s sporting heritage into the sector with a rear-biased four-wheel-drive set-up and powerful engines. The X7 is longer than a Range Rover but slightly lower and weighs more than 2.4 tonnes in its lightest form. Styling is an evolution of the X7 concept and it is striking. The front features the largest iteration of BMW’s ‘kidney’ grilles, while standard LED head and tail lights add a sharp edge. All models get a panoramic glass roof and wheel sizes go up to a massive 22 inches. BMW has also given the X7 a selection of beefy engines. In Europe there’s an xDrive 40i petrol on offer – a straight-six turbocharged engine with 335bhp on tap. Two diesels flank this – badged xDrive 30d and xDrive M50d. The former offers 262bhp and marks the entry point to the range, while the latter tops the current line-up with 395bhp. The xDrive name signifies that all X7s are equipped with four-wheel drive. Surprisingly, there’s no hybrid option – but there’s a possibility the brand will introduce one in the future. Sales begin in April 2019, with prices starting from £72,155.


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Recruitment

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WITH THE

FIND YOUR PERFECT JOB TODAY – A MUST-READ FOR THOSE LOOKING FOR WORK LOCALLY

OF TUNBRIDGE WELLS AND TONBRIDGE


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Recruitment

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Wednesday October 31 | 2018


CODEWORD 4

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Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Above the grid is the key with two letters solved. Try to complete the first few words to give you more letters, or look for a frequent number that might reveal a common letter. As you find letters, enter them in the key and into the grid. Cross off the letters in the A to Z list.

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2 4 7

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Codeword:

To complete Sudoku, fill the board by entering numbers 1 to 9 so that each row, column and 3x3 box contains every number uniquely.

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© 2016 Syndicated Puzzles, Inc.

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DIFFICULTY RATING:★★★★

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© 2016 Syndicated Puzzles

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LAST WEEK’S SOLUTIONS

SUDOKU & JIGSAW SUDOKU

DIFFICULTY RATING: ★✩✩✩

CLASSIFIEDS

Life&Times

Puzzles

In this Sudoku, the normal 3x3 boxes are now strangely odd shapes – but all the rules and logic of normal Sudoku apply. Fill the board by entering numbers 1 to 9 so that each row, column and box contains every number uniquely.

Puzzle solutions will be published in a forthcoming issue

C K O M S M A O N D J O S C H G A O

J A T R E A N H E R T I A S H I N G E W H E Y E A R S S R K E D S U R S A B O T B O U T A B R S T R O B Y E T S

P G RM I T O V F L E X I T A V E A P A S S R C I Q U E Z L E L AW D R

Sudoku:

6 2 9 5 1 4 3 7 8

4 1 5 8 3 7 9 2 6

8 7 3 9 6 2 4 1 5

3 9 1 2 4 6 5 8 7

7 8 2 1 5 3 6 4 9

5 4 6 7 9 8 1 3 2

9 5 8 4 2 1 7 6 3

5 8 7 9 4 2 6 3 1

2 4 6 8 1 3 5 9 7

1 7 8 5 3 4 9 6 2

2 6 4 3 7 5 8 9 1

1 3 7 6 8 9 2 5 4

Jigsaw Sudoku:

8 3 1 2 9 7 4 5 6

4 9 5 1 2 6 3 7 8

9 6 4 7 5 8 2 1 3

3 1 2 6 8 5 7 4 9

7 5 9 3 6 1 8 2 4

6 2 3 4 7 9 1 8 5

© 2016 Syndicated Puzzles

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Reynolds leads charge as Wells show spirit in brutal encounter Tunbridge Wells 20 Tring 14

PHOTO: Bruce Elliott

By Roger Clarke

BIG BROTHER Nick Doherty fed his sibling Mike for a try

RUGBY: TUNBRIDGE WELLS kept their revival going by toppling third-placed Tring, but it was to prove no easy task against highly physical opponents with a strong defence. Fly-half Frank Reynolds kicked a penalty to put the hosts in front after seven minutes but Ben Criddal replied in kind after a quarter of an hour. Tring began to dominate possession, aided by Wells’ indiscipline which saw them concede a flurry of penalties for offences in the loose and Criddal put Tring ahead on the half-hour. Then it was the turn of the visitors to lose their composure, one of their back-row forwards earning a yellow card, which allowed Wells to score a try a minute before half-time. From the ensuing penalty No 8 Nick

Doherty picked up a bouncing ball, committed the opposition and fed his brother Mike for the try. The try was not converted but it gave the home side a slender lead of 8-6 at half-time. After the interval they held a higher position and gained a greater share of ball, with dominance continuing in the scrum and Stuart Nicholls hitting his jumpers in the lineout in tricky conditions.

Discipline Tring’s discipline snapped again as a further player was sent to the sinbin after three minutes of the second half, leaving them with five minutes to survive with two players down. Wells kicked the penalty to touch, won the lineout and from the ensuing maul Josh Hawkins catapulted forward and reached the line for an unconverted try, making it 13-6. Tring’s need for extra defending began to tell and Wells were able to maintain a high field position as they produced a series of turnovers in a seriously physical encounter. On 62 minutes Tom Newton reduced the points difference with a third Tring penalty, and within a minute the

Wednesday October 31 | 2018

hosts’ Christian Earle received a yellow for a deliberate knockdown. Rather than struggle, though, Wells came charging back upfield, Reynolds ricocheting like a pinball to go over from 20 metres and converted his own try on 69 minutes. With Earle back on the pitch and the penalty count going up again, Wells spent most of the last ten minutes defending tenaciously. Backs and loose forwards put in a high tackle count as Tring applied pressure, but they finally broke through at the right corner through centre Noah Jarvis after Wells failed to hit touch from a clearance kick. At 20-14 with a minute left of normal time, there were nerves as Wells sustained another second yellow card to Mike Hathaway, but they held out in injury time to secure the win. It was one of the most hard-fought and high-quality victories since Tunbridge Wells joined London & South-East Premier Division, and they showed they are back to something approaching last year’s form. Wells, who are in tenth place, now visit Bedford Athletic on Saturday [November 3, kick-off 2.30pm] before taking a weekend off.

Galloping winger Watson keeps TJs’ noses in front Tonbridge Juddians 26 Guernsey Raiders 20

another series of phases and Rory McHugh scored with a strong drive to the line from 20 metres out after TJs had gone through the hands, Robinson adding the extras. Watson added a fourth as the winger adeptly controlled the bouncing ball from another crossfield kick, Robinson having provided it and then converting.

TONBRIDGE JUDDIANS returned to winning ways against the Islanders after suffering back-to-back defeats in National Two South. They knew they would need to make an early impression against a powerful Guernsey squad looking to kickstart their own season after a tough start. TJs did indeed start brightly and Will Robinson chipped, gathered, scored and converted his own try to give TJs a 7-0 lead in the opening minutes. Guernsey hit back to make it 7-5 but Hugo Watson on the run caught an inch perfect cross kick from Robinson to go over for an unconverted try. Then TJs broke through again from

Tackles So Tonbridge had the try bonus point secured as they headed into the break with an impressive 26-5 lead, but they had not really gone through the gears. Guernsey were much stronger after the break and dominated possession despite TJs having the wind at their backs. The home side were required to make tackle after tackle to keep the visitors at bay but there was no way they could do so for 40 minutes.

PHOTO: Adam Hookway

By Adam Hookway

DRIVING FORCE Rory McHugh powers over to score

TJs kept forcing the play when eating up the clock might have been a more prudent approach, and Guernsey managed three unconverted tries.

The Islanders earned a try bonus point but were left to rue those extras as TJs were relieved to have hung on for the win.

TJs, in sixth place in the table, take on Bristol side Old Redcliffians at The Slade on Saturday [November 3, kick-off 2.30pm].

Seeley runs show but Ladies denied at end Woodcock secures deserved Bishop’s Stortford 3 point as Brom-Becks lose rag Tunbridge Wells Ladies 3

Tunbridge Wells Men 2 Bromley & Beckenham 2

HOCKEY: TUNBRIDGE WELLS Ladies

By Francis Bridgeman

PHOTO: Jo Wilson

were denied victory by a late equaliser and had to settle for a draw despite taking a two-goal lead in East Region Division One South. The visitors got off to a strong start and broke the deadlock with Poppy Seeley’s fine strike from a well-worked short corner routine. Wells extended their lead when a clinical pass from Annie Wilson found Harriet Alexander at the far post to finish clinically. The hosts became more dominant on the ball as the half wore on, however, and pulled a goal back ten minutes before the break. Bishop’s Stortford came out fighting in the second half and managed to notch another goal to level the scores. Player of the match Seeley then capped a fine all-round performance with a deserved goal after a fine lay-off from Wilson.

ALEXANDER THE GREAT Harriet Alexander scored Wells’ second goal So it came as a disappointment to the Ladies when the home side snatched a point at the end from a well worked move.

They will hope to carry their form into the next game against East London at Kent College, Pembury on Saturday [November 3, 1pm start].

HOCKEY: TUNBRIDGE WELLS Men are finding life tough in the South Premier League Division One and were held to their second successive hard-fought draw in a row at Tonbridge School. The first half started slowly for Wells as their fellow Kent club piled on pressure from the start. They were rewarded with a penalty stroke after breaking into the circle following a turnover in midfield. The goal seemed to settle the home side and the contest became more even. But it was the visitors who scored again, doubling their lead from a short corner. Brom-Becks looked to apply further pressure but overstretched themselves, and after a swift counterattacking move involving Jack French

and Sam Clarke-Knowles, Ben Allberry slotted the ball into the net to reduce the deficit before the interval. Wells came out of the blocks fast after half-time and managed to exert sustained pressure on the visitors. But it was not all one-way traffic, and only an outstanding save by James Harris kept Wells in the contest. The visitors’ discipline deteriorated as the game wore on, and Brom Becks saw two of their players subject to a temporary suspension. Wells capitalised, and a well worked high press on the visitors’ defence saw the ball picked up in the air by Clarke-Knowles. After a swift move through the forwards, Oli Woodcock slid the ball into an empty net to level the scores and earn a well deserved point. Wells, in eighth place with just one win, now pay a visit to Oxford University at Iffley Road on Saturday [November 3, 12.30pm start].


Wednesday October 31 | 2018

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Mackley runs Maidstone ragged amid controversy Tonbridge Angels Ladies 4 Maidstone United 1

PHOTO: David Couldridge

DOUBLE TROUBLE Becky Janes closes in on her second goal

FOOTBALL: TONBRIDGE ANGELS Ladies moved back into the top three in Division One East of the South East Counties League with a convincing 4-1 win at home to rivals Maidstone United. The Stones came out on top in all four meetings last season as they completed the treble. They were runners-up at this level last year and arrived at Hadlow unbeaten in the league. However, the Angels showed how far they have progressed since then with a display of strength and pace which quickly dismantled the visitors. Becky Mackley set the tone when she hit the post early on. She made amends in the 10th minute with a cool finish into the bottom corner. Mackley caused all sorts of problems for the visitors and on 13 minutes Lauryn Underhill on the right wing crossed for Mackley to head home and leave a shell-shocked Maidstone 2-0 down.

Tonbridge Angels 2 Whyteleafe 1 By Jim Rowe FOOTBALL: TONBRIDGE ANGELS left it late to reach the next round of the FA Trophy in a match that was packed with incident, including three red cards and two penalty awards. After just 12 minutes Angels’ centre-back Sonny Miles was shown a straight red for violent play. With home skipper Tom Parkinson forced to drop to the back line Tonbridge lost some of their creativity in the centre. That allowed Whyteleafe, from a tier below Angels in the Bostik League South-East division, to gradually take control of proceedings. Most of the visitors’ best moves were coming through Daniel Hector and it was no surprise when he stepped up to fire a 20-yard shot past Angels keeper Jonny Henly in the 36th minute. The visitors retained the lead until half-time,

and then Eddie-Louis DSane went close for Whyteleafe three minutes after the interval. But the home side came more into the game as the second half progressed with Craig Stone and Alex Read going close. Then Whyteleafe went a man down after Matthew O’Donoghue handled the ball on his goalline in the 80th minute. Though Read’s penalty was saved, he scored from the follow-up to equalise. Angels’ Liam King was tripped by Harrison Carnegie in the area in the 90th minute when through on goal and Joe Turner converted the home side’s second spot-kick. So Angels secured their place in the next round, and Carnegie became the third man to receive his marching orders, though it had not been a dirty game. The Tonbridge side return to Bostik League Premier action at home to Whitehawk on Saturday [November 3, kick-off 3pm].

PHOTO: David Couldridge

Three red cards as Angels sneak through

sport, playing, coaching and officiating. Kent pace bowler Harry Podmore and umpire Neil Bainton spoke about how the sport has enriched their lives and helped their careers. The Young Leaders in Cricket programme for 14 to 16-year-olds offers an introduction to umpiring and scoring, a course in groundsmanship and training in basic First Aid. It also offers a chance to do 20 hours of volunteering in a school, club or community to help develop cricketing opportunities in the local area. The Mayor of Tonbridge & Malling, Pam Bates,

Rusthall pay price for not converting Rusthall 0 K Sports 1 By Joe Croker

SPOT ON: Joe Turner celebrates his winner

Future cricket leaders are lords for a day CRICKET: TWELVE young cricketers from Tonbridge & Malling went up to Lord’s Cricket Ground to be presented with their Young Leaders in Cricket awards this month. After a guided tour of the stadium 200 youths from across the South-East received the accolade, which is provided locally by the borough council. Paul Downton, former England and Kent wicketkeeper, and Nick Pryde, Head of National Programmes for the England and Wales Cricket Board, described how the course is proving to be a valuable tool in keeping young people in the

As half-time approached, Mackley played in Janes whose flicked effort was seemingly parried into the net by the visiting goalkeeper. The referee did not award a goal, even after the Maidstone linesman had confirmed that the ball crossed the line. Just before the whistle blew, Gemma Sullivan shrugged off a challenge from Sharon Lyons and put the ball past Sam Wright to reduce arrears. Tonbridge kept up the pressure in the second half and Janes finally found the net on the hour. Underhill supplied another perfect cross from the right and Janes made no mistake. She doubled her tally on 77 minutes, scoring from a one-on-one after a good through ball from Mackley, to wrap up a fine win for the Angels. But there was room for more controversy when the referee awarded a penalty in injury time. Visiting captain Beth Kemp stepped up to take the spot kick but it was well saved by Wright. Tonbridge now visit Ashford in the League Cup on Sunday [November 4, kick-off 1.30pm].

said: “I thoroughly enjoyed my day at Lord’s Cricket Ground. It was a pleasure to meet all the young cricketers who have received an award this year, congratulations to them all. “I’m sure they will go on to inspire other young people to take up cricket, not only in the sport itself but in coaching and the organisational side of things – there are many opportunities available.” For more information about Young Leaders in Cricket, contact leisure.services@tmbc.gov.uk or call 01732 876166.

PACE SETTERS: Young Cricket Leaders with Cllr Pam Bates and (l-r) Sky Sports’ Matt Floyd, umpire Neil Bainton, Nick Pryde and Kent fast bowler Harry Podmore

FOOTBALL: THE defeat to K Sports at Jockey Farm stadium was another contest that Rusthall should have won comfortably. The home side were set up in a more attacking formation and K Sports FC were confined to defensive duties for most of the match. The Rustics’ midfield pairing of Joe Fuller and John Phillips controlled the game and their accurate passing allowed Regan Corke and Steve Camacho to attack down the wings. With Tom Cameron returning, the defence was solid throughout the match and K Sports created no real chances in the opening period. The second half continued in the same pattern with Rusthall dominating but not finding the net, and then the inevitable happened. Rusthall were launching yet another attack but seemingly pushed too many men forward as the ball was cleared and sent upfield. The Rustics were outnumbered at the back and despite keeper Joe Cullip’s efforts, Matt Gething scored the only goal in the 68th minute. Rusthall kept pressing with K Sports dropping deeper and deeper but the goal would not come for the home side. They are at home again for their next match against Beckenham FC at Jockey Stadium on Saturday [November 3, kick-off 3pm].


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Times of Tunbridge Wells 31st October 2018  

Times of Tunbridge Wells 31st October 2018  

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