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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

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Popular fast food chain to close in shopping centre

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Times OF TUNBRIDGE WELLS

Time to vote for your High Street INSIDE CHEF’S SCAM ESCAPE Rosemary Shrager speaks out about her near miss Page 3

Duncan Audsley KFC is pulling out of Royal Victoria Place [RVP], amid signs the Food Court could be redeveloped. The shopping centre’s management has told the fast food eatery’s franchisee they are looking to turn the downstairs precinct into something ‘different’. In its 1990s and 2000s heyday, the Food Court was home to around a dozen places to eat, with KFC [Kentucky Fried Chicken] *a staple. Their departure next month will leave just McDonald’s, Spud-U-Like and Subway.

Potential A KFC spokesman said: “Our RVP restaurant is closing in November as the shopping centre owners have decided to refurbish the Food Court for a different use. “We’ve had a great run serving our Tunbridge Wells fans and hope to have some good news on a potential new restaurant in the area soon. “For fans who can’t wait for that, our Dowding Way restaurant is only a ten minute drive away.” Their branch in Tonbridge High Street is set to be retained. RVP has seen a host of big name brands depart, including H&M Kids, Cath Kidston and Mothercare. In the past few years the Food Court alone has lost coffee shop Ismail Coffee & Tea, The Nutmeg Tree, Café Giardino and Papa John’s Pizza. Meanwhile, the shopping is set to be undergoing a £70million extension after plans for more shops and a cinema on the Calverley Road / Camden Road

Continued on Page 2

THE TOWN’S TOP 20

Discover the key influencers in our 2018 Powerlist Page 4

STREET ELITE: Greg Clark MP [centre right] has encouraged Tunbridge Wells residents to join him in voting for The Pantiles, the High Street and Chapel Place as a combined entry in this year’s Visa Great British High Street awards. Find out why on Page 2

Survey shows young people are having to pay ‘unaffordable’ rent By William Mata will@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk RENTERS in their 20s are paying more than one third of their salaries to keep a roof above their heads in Tunbridge Wells, according to new research. Ordnance Survey data, analysed and published by the BBC last week, shows on average adults aged 22 to 29 would spend 39 per cent of their income on maintaining a one-bedroom property. And in Tonbridge young people of the same age group would be spending 42 per cent of their salary while in Sevenoaks the figures stands at 46 per cent. Findings also showed the mean rent for one month in Tunbridge Wells to be £722, in Tonbridge it is £788 while in Sevenoaks it is higher still at £857.

The South East average is £700. Many housing organisations regard spending more than a third of income on rent as being ‘unaffordable’. Dan Wilson, Director of pressure group Generation Rent said: “This research is more evidence of how difficult it is to

‘If you work hard you should expect choice in living arrangements’ lead the life you expect. If you work hard, you should expect to have some choice about living arrangements.” Local political groups have raised concern that the figures show young have been hit hardest as house prices have risen 173 per cent since 1997. Bjorn Simpole, Chair of Tunbridge

Wells Labour Party Branch, said: “The younger generation have experienced the sharp end of an austerity programme which has suppressed wage growth and opportunities whilst inflating the price of housing locally beyond the reach of all but high earners. “Never mind owning your own home, in Tunbridge Wells increasingly renting your own home is impossible for many.” A UK-wide map based on the latest data shows that South East renters are paying the most, especially in London where a salary of £51,200 is needed to afford a one-bedroom home. And house sharing, a common modern choice for the under-30s, does not always resolve the problem with 12 per cent of postcode areas in Britain remaining ‘unaffordable’ for two people in their 20s sharing a two-bedroom home.

A LANDMARK DEAL

One Warwick Park Hotel buys beauty business Page 5

FOOD REVOLUTION How to introduce healthy eating to children Page 56


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corner were passed in 2016. The centre was bought by British Land earlier this year, in a deal said to be worth £96million. A spokesman offered: “KFC’s lease has come to a natural end and plans for redevelopment are still being worked through.” British Land has yet to release details of its plans for RVP or the timeframe for any changes.

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Jobs lost and created as library and museum move premises By Duncan Audsley

COULD BHS BE BACK? BRITISH Home Stores [BHS] has been empty in Calverley Road, Tunbridge Wells, since closing in 2016. At this time the chain fell into administration, which led to 160 shops closing nationally. But according to a BHS website, ‘the lights will be back on soon’ with four shops set to reopen. Former rival department store Beales, has announced a deal which will see 15 former BHS shops reopen. The first four have been announced as Mansfield, Skegness, Peterborough and Bournemouth.

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

BEST MADE PLANS An artist’s impression of how the Amelia Scott Cultural Centre will look

FOUR existing staff jobs at Tunbridge Wells Museum are at risk in the transition process to the new Amelia Scott Cultural Centre. However, three new positions will be created. The £13.2million centre will house thousands of artefacts as well as providing a hub for library, art gallery and adult education services when it opens in 2021. While construction is taking place on the building in Civic Way, Tunbridge Wells Borough Council has committed to offering an interim service. And the process could impact on employees as the authority goes through a staff restructuring process.

Transforming A spokesperson for Tunbridge Wells Borough Council said: “The development of the cultural and learning hub means we are planning to deliver an interim museum service while the current building is out of use. “In transforming the service we will have to restructure current posts and so we have begun a consultation with staff. The consultation puts four posts at risk and proposes the creation of three new posts. “The consultation is focused on the best way of

working during the interim period and in preparation for the future and the new facility.” The museum has 77,000 items and the expansion will create more room for these to be exhibited. The council has denied rumours circulating online that some of the items could be sold off as part of the move process. And the authority has also addressed concerns that the Camden Centre will also be negatively impacted – making it clear the popular centre

will not re-house the library. Councillor Jane March, Portfolio Holder for Culture, Leisure & Tourism said: “We are very happy to let people know that that the Camden Centre will remain open. “The council is committed to keeping the centre open as a community venue and Kent County Council is in advanced negotiations with another town centre landlord. “We expect to be able to confirm the location of the interim museum and library service soon.”

Villagers call for Norfolk-based ‘local’ councillor to stand down By William Mata HAWKENBURY residents are calling for the resignation of a Park ward councillor who lives 160 miles away in Holt in North Norfolk. Cllr Peter Bulman is refusing to step down from Tunbridge Wells Borough Council. He still collects his £5,500-a-year allowance and attends some meetings at the Town Hall. Fellow councillors have previously asked him to step aside and now his constituents are also asking the Conservative, elected in 2016, to resign.

Cllr Bulman [pictured right] could potentially continue in the role until May 2020 and ‘remains to serve while certain issues are still active’ – but has not ruled out stepping down before then. He previously said he could respond to residents’ requests via email. Jonathan Hawker, who lives in Whybourne Crest in Hawkenbury, recently contacted him this way to raise concerns about plans for a 12m phone mast in Forest Way – but received a ‘tardy platitude’ in response.

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Prospective He said: “The prospective mast highlighted the issue that Park ward deserves better than an absentee councillor. “Whilst many people believe they can accept a councillor who does not live in a ward, but I’ve not encountered anyone who thinks it’s appropriate or acceptable for a councillor to not live in the town they represent, let alone the county. Our other Park councillors Tracy Moore and Nick Pope have supported us. But what can you expect from someone living in North Norfolk?

“Hawkenbury is undergoing huge change with “He was probably unaware of the risk the housing development and the school. A to the community the phone mast councillor living in Norfolk cannot be actively posed until we contacted him. involved. I feel quite strongly that councillors “In my view Cllr Bulman should should live in the ward they represent. If they resign. He should stand aside for move out, they should vacate their seat.” someone who has enough Cllr Bulman is a critic of the council’s Calverley respect for this community to Square civic complex and theatre. He said he is turn up and do the job properly.” also making a difference in his role and is From April of this year, Cllr representing Hawkenbury residents. Bulman has attended three “I have been very actively lobbing against out of eight meetings, giving the installation of a phone mast and I his apologies on three of the forcefully raised the issue of the two form five occasions he was absent. entry primary school at the recent Dean Kenward, Chairman of Hawkenbury council meeting,” he told the Residents Association, said the councillor Times. should vacate with several issues, “I have protested strongly including a new primary school, pump against the new charges track and housing development, for garden waste facing the village. collection and am “I don’t see how a councillor can applying considerable serve the local community when pressure in reviewing they live in a different county,” he the financial factors told the Times. concerning the new “Even if they attend all the civic centre, which will required meetings, they have UNHAPPY: Jonathan be a heavy burden on very little insight into what is Hawker wants Peter the council taxpayers to happening in the community Bulman to step down come.” they are meant to represent.

Innovation gives shopping area a shot at award THE ability of The Pantiles’ retailers to work together and put on events could be key to its chances of winning a Great British High Street Award. That is the view of Tunbridge Wells MP Greg Clark, who said the shopping district has come a long way in ten years to become ‘one of the most beautiful streets in the country’. He has backed The Pantiles, alongside the High Street and Chapel Place, to win the Champion category in the awards, which are sponsored by Visa. The trio of shopping streets are one of 26 areas on a shortlist for the Great British High Street Award. Judges came to town on Friday [October 5] to have a look around the district for themselves. Mr Clark said: “There are lots of vibrant and innovative parts of Tunbridge Wells that command attention.

“There has been a marked transformation of The Pantiles in recent years as traders have worked together and with local authorities to pull people in,” he added, citing Jazz on The Pantiles as an example.

Enjoyable “The Pantiles is the kind of place where you will find there is not only lots going on, but that it is interesting and enjoyable. It was not always like that, ten years ago it was a quiet place without much sign of life. “It shows what can be done when people come together. I think it is now one of the most beautiful streets in the country.” The Great British High Street Awards will be

presented in a London ceremony on November 15. A public vote counts for 30 per cent of an entry’s score, which will also be shaped by the judge’s results. Mr Clark, who doubles up as Business Secretary, stopped short of saying the areas were his favourite part of Tunbridge Wells, admired The Pantiles’ progression – and said this made it well placed for the future. Tunbridge Wells entered the awards in 2016, when they were last held. High streets are marked on four categories: Community engagement, customer experience, environmental measures and digital transformation. For more information of how to vote, visit thegreatbritishhighstreet.co.uk Votes must be cast before November 1.


Wednesday October 10 | 2018

NEWS IN BRIEF

Man who died in house fire in village is named A 39-year-old man who died in a house fire in Bidborough has been named as Gareth Day. Thirty-five firefighters were at the property in Woodland Way after the blaze began around 10pm on Friday, September 27. Mr Day was a staff member of Tunbridge Wells charity IMAGO and previously attended The Skinners’ School. He shared the home with his father George Day, who is said to be in his 70s. George Day was taken to hospital with smoke inhalation. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Cranbrook fatal collision A MAN in his thirties has died, following a road collision in Cranbrook on Wednesday, October 3. Kent Police said the incident happened around 5.20pm when the man’s white Peugeot Bipper van travelling from Goudhurst towards the A229 left the carriageway and collided with a hedgerow. The driver, said to live near the village in Tunbridge Wells borough, was taken to a London hospital by air ambulance where he later died. Officers from the Serious Collision Investigation Unit are investigating the incident and are appealing for any witnesses to call the appeal line on 01622 798538 quoting DK/DH/142/18. Alternatively they can email sciu.td@kent. pnn.police.uk.

Arrests over cocaine TWO men have been arrested in connection with the supply of cocaine in Tunbridge Wells after police found 30 bags worth in their car on September 28 at 11.55pm. They were subsequently released pending further information.

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Chef warns of scammers after being targeted by bogus callers from ‘BT’ A PIECE OF FAKE Rosemary Shrager was targeted in a scam

400 homes in Hawkhurst HAWKHURST would accommodate 400 extra homes under plans presented to Tunbridge Wells Borough Council. Developer Cedardrive Limited has submitted outline designs for what it describes as a ‘unique opportunity’ and would build on the village’s Golf Club. It could also see a new road created between the A268 in Flimwell and A229 in Cranbrook. A planning application could be submitted later this year after public consultations.

Local News

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By William Mata CELEBRITY chef Rosemary Shrager said she was close to losing thousands of pounds when she was targeted by ‘very convincing’ scammers. Rosemary, who has her own cookery school on The Pantiles in Tunbridge Wells, was called on Monday, October 1, by a man who claimed to represent BT. The 67-year-old, who has appeared in TV series such as I’m a Celebrity… and the Real Marigold Hotel, said she had a lucky escape and is now warning others to be vigilant against suspicious phone calls.

Viruses “It sounded very official,” she told the Times. “They said there was a fault with the BT Hub set-up. “I gave them the Hub number. Using a programme, they logged into the system and said I was at risk from viruses. “I said ‘I don’t know what is going on’ but they said the fault was theirs. They said they wanted to pay me £200 in compensation.”

Millions have Same Love for singer who reaches final 16 BELLA PENFOLD is through to The X Factor’s live shows after singing at Simon Cowell’s LA mansion. Two years after she was given her first opportunity to perform at One Warwick Park Hotel in Tunbridge Wells, the 19-year-old is in the last 16 of the ITV series. On Sunday [October 7] she was watched by 4.7 million as she rapped and sang along to gay-rights anthem Same Love by Macklemore & Ryan Lewis. On this choice, the former St Gregory’s Catholic School pupil said it was an ‘important song’ to her and revealed a new tattoo which read ‘Same Love’. She later told reporters: “I am brave enough to come to terms with who I am, I don’t want to go through a competition being dishonest.” The pre-recorded episode saw the six remaining female contestants sing in front of 50 special guests, including music executives and

songwriters. Viewers were led to believe only three would make it to the live shows and join competitors from the ‘boys’, ‘groups’ and ‘overs’ categories. And for the second successive episode, Cowell brought Bella back from the brink. The judge had advanced three other women and appeared to be about to tell Bella she would take no further part, but instead said: “It is fine because I’m putting four people through and you are in the final. There wasn’t a shadow of a doubt, I believe in you.” Scarlett Lee, Molly Scott and Shan Smile are the other three women to go through to the live shows, which are believed to begin on ITV on Saturday, October 20. Harry Spencer, Operations Manager at One Warwick Park Hotel, congratulated Bella and wished her luck for the finals.

Several members of a scam group were involved in the operation, and Rosemary said the phone was passed around between the ‘BT team’. She was asked to login to her online banking for the £200 to be transferred, but was shocked to see they still had control and were moving the cursor. At this she became suspicious. The caller became aggressive and Rosemary hung-up. The scammers phoned back several times but were unable to take any money from the account. The chef thinks the group accessed her phone number through an NHS record and was later told that she probably only escaped losing money because of security settings on her Mac. The real BT later confirmed it was a scam. “I’m not a gullible person but I was really taken in,” added Rosemary, who has since wiped the data on her computer. “You might think ‘you are an idiot’ but it was very convincing. “If I had not been so suspicious I could have lost thousands. “I was frightened about how easily it was done and how they had access to my whole computer. I felt violated but I think the danger has passed.”

X MARKS THE SPOT Bella with Year 8 students at St Gregory’s Catholic School

BACK TO SCHOOL FOR X FACTOR FINALIST SHE may be through to The X Factor finals, but singer Bella Penfold was still prepared to take time out to visit her old school last week. The 19-year-old sang to an assembly of 400 students aged 11 to 13 at St Gregory’s Catholic School, in Reynolds Lane, where she attended sixth form. Students also asked her

questions about what inspired her to go onto the show and what Simon Cowell is like in person. To this she said ‘he is a lovely man, not scary, and actually shorter in person’. Bella attended the school from 2015 to 2017 and paid tribute to its annual Starlight music showcase which helped her build confidence as a performer.


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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

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OCTOBER 2018

POWER LIST

TUNBRIDGE WELLS

so The 2018 Power List

THE GREAT DEBATE

Is art as important as science?

A TASTE OF SUCCESS

Celebrating Tunbridge Wells’ popular Food Month

WIN A CRUISE FOR TWO

Enter our exclusive competition

Introducing the most influential people in town

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Tunbridge Wells and Tonbridge are going through changing times, with ambitious projects and fluctuating traditions – all driven by individuals. Here’s our guide to some of the most influential people in our towns and the roles they play in shaping our future. By Andy Tong

MARKET VALUE

How to successfully sell your home

DRIVING AMBITION

We take the new BMW i8 for a spin

THE PERFECT COVER UP

Autumn’s coolest coats

inogue Kylie M

2 O N H E R N E W C O U N T R Y A L B U M A N D W H Y I T ’ S FA B U LO U S T O B E F I F T Y 2

SO TW_OCT18_Cover_OptionsFINAL.indd 5

Wells for 30 years, Dr Bob Bowes is at the forefront of modern thinking about the future of the NHS as it marks its 70th anniversary.

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TRACY MOORE Cabinet member, Tunbridge Wells Borough Council Cllr Tracy Moore is the driving force behind the council’s controversial Calverley Square scheme, which will see the construction of a new theatre and town hall costing £90million.

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DAVID JUKES Leader of Tunbridge Wells Borough Council David Jukes remains the driving force behind the council but rather than rest on his laurels, he is pushing forward with the ambitious Calverley Square project, amongst other things.

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NICKY BLANCHARD Centre Manager for Royal Victoria Place Nicky Blanchard is tasked with arguably the most daunting job in Tunbridge Wells – making a success of the town’s shopping centre in uncertain times.

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GREG CLARK MP for Tunbridge Wells As Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Conservative MP is standing right in the middle of the crossroads that Britain now faces over its Brexit future.

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JJ ALMOND Director of the Assembly Hall theatre JJ Almond is the man charged with bringing West End glamour to the town and has embarked on a programme which fits the bill for the council’s redevelopment plans.

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MILES SCOTT Chief Executive, Maidstone & Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust Miles Scott has been entrusted with the task of turning around the fortunes of the local NHS Trust, which runs Tunbridge Wells Hospital and was placed in special financial measures.

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MUMS THE WORD Events company and blog Mums the Word, the brainchild of Tunbridge Wells sisters Natalie Mcilveen and Laura Swann, is rapidly turning into a must-have resource for modern parenting in the town.

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OLGA JOHNSON Co-Founder of Nourish Community Foodbank Olga Johnson is an expert in recruiting the right people to run charities, and also sits at the forefront of the fight against poverty in West Kent.

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PAUL FLEMING Chief Executive of Tek Seating Paul Fleming is an innovator at the cutting edge of industrial technology who has earned plaudits in the global market and especially the defence sector.

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JASON DORMON Co-founder of The Forum Jason Dorman has made The Forum into one of the coolest music venues outside the capital, with a rich back

MARIA HESLOP Cabinet member, Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council Maria Heslop is busy turning Tonbridge and the surrounding area into a

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MICHELE HARRIMAN-SMITH Chief Executive of Childrensalon The luxury childrenswear retail boss stands as a beacon of the successful business model in Tunbridge Wells, while also remaining a champion of those who are less fortunate.

TOP OF THE CLASS Ian Bauckham is head of a growing local schools trust

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WILL BAYLEY Table tennis Paralympian Will Bayley is an inspirational figure who overcame disability to win gold at the Paralympics – and delighted the nation with his rebellious celebrations. CHRISTOPHER NEVILL The Sixth Marquess of Abergavenny The Marquess is from the old order of Tunbridge Wells, a town which boasts a rich historical heritage, and is the owner of Eridge Park and the Lower Pantiles.

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TOM TUGENDHAT MP for Tonbridge & Malling The Chairman of the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee is a rising star in politics both domestically and on the international stage – and is tipped for the very top.

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vibrant hub of activity and entertainment – and she is also the power behind the throne.

SIAN CARR Executive Principal, The Skinners’ Kent Academy Next year will mark a decade since the opening of The Skinners’ Kent Academy in Tunbridge Wells, and Sian Carr has been running the school since day one. REV SIMON BURTON-JONES Bishop of Tonbridge As the new Bishop, Rev Simon BurtonJones has brought a breath of fresh air to the ethical life of West Kent and has a particular concern for the young and needy in the modern era.

DAME KELLY HOLMES Double Olympic gold medallist The athlete is an iconic figure in West Kent and across the UK, who warmed the nation’s hearts with her steely determination and infectious smile. She is our undisputed celebrity.

DR BOB BOWES Chairman of West Kent CCG A GP at Kingswood Surgery in Tunbridge

24/09/2018 16:51

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IAN BAUCKHAM Chief Executive of Tenax Schools Trust Ian Bauckham is a leading educationalist who spent 11 years as Headteacher of Bennett Memorial Diocesan School and is now in charge of the Tenax Schools Trust.

catalogue of stars, and this year it celebrates its 25th anniversary.

The full background of those in the Power List can be found in the current edition of our sister publication So magazine, where it was first published. You can also find details by visiting www. timeslocalnews. co.uk

HIGH NOTES Jason Dormon’s iconic music venue is 25 years old

BOX OFFICE JJ Almond is bringing the West End to Tunbridge Wells


Wednesday October 10 | 2018

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Hotel buys local beauty business in an ‘exciting new venture’…

By Duncan Audsley LUXURY spa Coco Blush will operate inside One Warwick Park Hotel from November, following a landmark deal. The beauty and therapy business, that changed hands this week, will relocate from its current base in London Road to provide six treatment rooms in the central

‘Our attention to detail, stylish interiors and bespoke customer service will be mirrored in the new spa’ Tunbridge Wells location. Harry Spencer [above right], Operations Manager at One Warwick Park Hotel, called the arrival an ‘exciting new venture’. He said yesterday [Tuesday, October 9]: “Our attention to detail, stylish interiors and bespoke customer service will be mirrored in the new spa. “It will be a great addition to our offering at the hotel.” The sale, completed for an undisclosed amount, was announced this week.

It is another step the hotel’s management has taken towards providing a comprehensive experience at the venue since its opening in July 2016. Both guests and visitors will be able to use the spa, which will be called Coco Blush at One Warwick Park Hotel and is situated inside its Townhouse section. Clients can expect to enjoy massages, facials and nail treatments as well as other health services. The spa will be supplied products by the skincare and beauty brand Temple Spa. It is a business that has worked with the hotel before, creating a bespoke candle for One Warwick Park Hotel. Mr Spencer said: “We are so excited to be working with Temple Spa, their brand compliments that of ours. “The exclusivity of Temple Spa means we are honoured to be working with them and cannot wait to share these fantastic products and services with our guests.” Coco Blush encourages clients to spend as long as they wish within the spa. It is regarded as one of the leading businesses of its kind operating in Tunbridge Wells. To find out details of how you can win a spa experience with Champagne and truffles, worth £90, visit www.timeslocalnews.co.uk/business

FEEL FOR IT Temple Spa products

HOW THE BEAUTY MARKET IS BLOOMING THE UK’s beauty market is booming with Britons spending a combined £7.6billion last year on treatments, according to a report. Data released by Mintel also found one in three surveyed enjoyed a spa or salon in

2017, a 3 per cent rise from 2015. Last year 14 per cent booked a massage, 13 per cent booked a manicure and 10 per cent had a facial – which were the highest figures on record. And this trend is set to

continue, with experts predicting an £8billion spend in 2021. Mintel Director Roshida Khanom said: “The spa, salon and in-store treatments sector continues to see steady growth.”


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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Award for speed campaigner who created 20mph zones on 50 roads By William Mata

SIGNED UP Adrian Berendt [middle] with [L-R] Sue Diales, Louise Robertson, Paul Mason and Lorna Rennardson in Lansdowne Road - which they want to be 20mph

THE co-ordinator of a road safety scheme aimed at tackling speeding has been named Campaigner of the Year by the group 20 is Plenty for Us. Volunteer Adrian Berendt, 60, has lobbied local councils into implementing a 20mph speed limit on 50 residential streets near the St John’s area in Tunbridge Wells since taking the role in 2014. In that time he has also helped establish 21 campaign groups in Kent. The grassroots organisation provides support to communities and estates wishing to create a 20mph zone. They can do this by providing publicity along with advice on how to approach authorities. Campaigners can also learn about using speed detectors.

Fast times for Sloe Gin World Championships

Delighted Mr Berendt, who lives with wife Louise Robertson in Queen’s Road, Tunbridge Wells, said that research had shown 80 per cent of drivers had complied with the new limit in the St John’s area. Mr Berendt said he was ‘delighted’ to accept the award from Rod King, founder of 20 is Plenty for Us, in a ceremony in Cardiff. He told the Times: “The award is an acknowledgement of the work of all the campaigners in Kent. “We have 21 campaign groups in Kent now and it’s because of them that we are slowly making progress. There are nearly 1,000 streets in Kent that are now 20mph. “However, there is still a long way to go before politicians fully embrace 20mph as the default speed in built up areas.” Around 13,000 have signed a petition in Tunbridge Wells, calling for their respective estate to

TAKING IT SLOE The drinks will be judged by a panel

have a 20mph zone. There is also a Tonbridge setup that has helped establish 20mph zones in streets off Pembury Road. But it has not all been straightforward. Mr Berendt said it took five years to get the zone established in the first place, due to ‘county council resistance’. The group is also looking for more volunteers.

Anna Semlyen, Manager of 20 is Plenty for Us, said Mr Berendt’s ‘perseverance’ was behind the award win. She said: “Adrian both organises in Tunbridge Wells, across Kent and has assisted other countywide campaigns. He fully understands the statistics and is insightful in many ways.”

IT may be the Marmite of the drinks world, but sloe gin has its own World Championships in Frant. The George Inn, in High Street, will stage its tenth annual competition on December 15, which is set to pit 30-40 entries in a World Cup style contest. Pub regular and reigning champion George Shaw said: “It gets bigger every year and we are attracting entries from as far as Vancouver.” Four judges will whittle down the entries before deciding on a winner. Be it the real thing or the sloe variety, it is certainly a popular time for gin – with the market as a whole said to be worth £1.6billion. The Sloe Gin World Championships follows the successful Gin & Jazz Festival in The Pantiles, held earlier this year. There are also categories for other drinks, including damson gin and sloe vodka. Organisers are now looking for a charity for whom proceeds shall be given to. Commercial entries cost £30 and private ones £5. For more information, including details of how charities can get involved, email geo@ avovcadomedia.co.uk


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Challenging job on offer for person with time and the Commons touch By William Mata

OVER THE HILLS: Thousands enjoy Tunbridge Wells and Rusthall Commons every year

will@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk CONSERVATORS are looking for their first new Clerk in three decades to help preserve Tunbridge Wells and Rusthall Commons. The search is now on to replace Rodney Stone, who took the voluntary position in 1990 and is set to step down at the end of this year. He told the Times: “I love the Commons and working with [management group] the Conservators. “I think a bit of country overlapping the town centre brings a lot to Tunbridge Wells. “But I am now in my 70s and have been doing it 28 years, so maybe it is time for the challenge to go to someone younger.”

Energy Mr Stone, who was Chief Executive of Tunbridge Wells Borough Council from 1987 to 2005, told colleagues in his resignation letter that his ‘knowledge was becoming out of date’ and the role would suit someone with ‘new ideas and energy’. Tunbridge Wells and Rusthall Commons Conservators have 12 members and hold open meetings four times a year to take decisions on all aspects of managing the land. The Clerk typically serves 150 hours a year and works to put decided policy into action. During Mr Stone’s tenure, the Conservators appointed their first paid full-time member of staff taking on a warden. Under their revolutionary management plans, the Commons

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

it shows people value it. “The challenges haven’t changed. You have got to strike a balance between standing still and moving too fast.” He added: “There are also tricky issues that come up from time to time, such as broken glass or needles on the Commons – you have to sometimes work with the police.” The Commons is owned by property developer Targetfollow, which has representation on the Conservators board, as do four Tunbridge Wells Borough Council members. Mr Stone described having a ‘good relationship’ with both organisations. He continued: “Targetfollow is a property company and some believe they may have plans in that direction. But planning legislation prevents any significant building. “There have been discussions as to whether Targetfollow could hard-surface the car park but it has not got any further.” For full details of the job advertisement, see Times page 68.

THE IDEAL CANDIDATE… COMMON MAN Rodney Stone is to step down after 28 years became more vegetated and in some areas views opened up. One of their greatest achievements in the past 20 years is perhaps their deal with Kent County Council which saw Fir Tree Road, which cuts through the commons, partially closed and a mini-roundabout built outside The Spa Hotel. Mr Stone continued: “The

Great Storm in 1987 wreaked a fair bit of havoc but cleared some trees that were getting to the end of their life anyway. “It enabled us to open up the view and some were opposed to this layout. They didn’t like change. That is a good thing to some extent as

Tunbridge Wells and Rusthall Commons and Conservators is looking to appoint a Clerk to replace Rodney Stone from the end of the year. Mr Stone said: “It’s too much of a commitment for someone who is working full-time. “It would suit someone with the right sort of background and who has retired early and wants to do something to help the Commons. “People skills, presentation skills and some knowledge of the law is needed.” The Clerk receives an annual honorarium of £3,000, including expenses. For further information please contact the Conservators by email: info@twcommons.org


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BUSINESS

Local News

NEWS IN BRIEF

Bus for business will stop in Tunbridge Wells AS PART of a UK campaign, a Small Business Saturday bus tour will stop off in Tunbridge Wells on Friday, November 23. The government-backed initiative will see the campaign bus exhibit at 30 locations over 25 days this autumn – to help some the UK’s 5.7 million small firms. Members of small businesses are invited to board the coach and speak to experts. And 20 firms can apply to exhibit their trade to the passing public outside the bus, and also be featured on the Small Business Saturday [SBS] social media feeds. It is all in the run-up to Small Business Saturday itself, to be held on December 1. SBS Director Michelle Ovens said: “From Birkenhead to Belfast, Glasgow to Carmarthen, the Small Business Saturday bus will travel the country to celebrate the UK’s fantastic growing businesses and shine a spotlight on their success.” For more information, visit: smallbusinesssaturdayuk.com

Café chain goes green with new coffee cups COFFEE shop company Esquires has phased out single-use cups from its branches and is encouraging customers to recycle. The chain, which has a recently opened unit in Tunbridge Wells, has now introduced a new compostable cup. Managers will be hoping the green approach will help the Mount Pleasant café stand out from its rivals, of which there are many nearby in the town centre. Aiden Keegan, Chief Operating Officer of Esquires, said: “We’re delighted to introduce our brand new compostable coffee cups, as well as our wider range of sustainable packaging. “By 2020, we aim to remove all single use plastic from our business, not just coffee cups.”

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RSM appoints new restructuring director for all Kent operations By William Mata will@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk AUDIT, tax and consulting firm RSM has appointed former PricewaterhouseCoopers [PwC] man Mark Holborow as a director in their Tunbridge Wells branch. The Mount Ephraim-based company has placed him in charge of their restructuring practice for Kent. Mr Holborow will work closely with Matthew Wild,

south region partner for restructuring. Mr Holborow said: “This role is an ideal fit for me. The opportunity to merge my experience with RSM’s existing team and its focus on mid-market clients means we can deliver the highest quality service for local businesses. “I’m excited to contribute to the future growth of the firm across the Kent region and nationally.” Before joining RSM, Mr Holborow had worked at PwC for 12 years, working with a wide WEALTH OF range of businesses EXPERIENCE from mid-market Mark Holborow owner-managed

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

clients through to listed multinational corporates. He also has extensive experience working on both the lender and corporate side of restructurings, turnaround strategies and formal insolvency appointments.

‘Mark joins at an exciting time as we continue to enhance our offering’ Mr Wild said: “It’s great to welcome Mark to RSM. He brings with him a wealth of restructuring experience and his expertise will be invaluable to our clients. “We are committed to investing in talent, and expanding our regional presence further is testimony to the success of our restructuring practice. “Mark joins at an exciting time as we continue to enhance our offering.”

Network Rail’s £12m investment to finally clear leaves from the lines TRAIN operators are hoping a £12million investment will minimise disruption caused by leaves falling on the lines this autumn. Network Rail is partnering with Southeastern and other UK franchise holders in the project, which will see 50 million leaves cleared from the tracks before mid-December. Using specially adapted trains, 183,000 miles of track will be jet-washed and a special gel will also be applied to give carriage wheels greater grip. And Network Rail is also attempting to spread

the message that the problem should be taken seriously with their ‘leaves are no joke’ media campaign. Network Rail South East’s Managing Director John Halsall said: “As leaves fall on the rails they can get compacted under the weight of trains and form a smooth and slippery layer, causing trains to lose grip. Therefore, train drivers, much like when we drive in snow on the roads, need more time to start and stop.” Trains typically take longer to pass through when

HUGE JET WASH Special trains will clear 50 million leaves

leaves fall. This is because they need to slow down to negotiate tricky sections and require more time to speed up. Southeastern is looking to facilitate this by introducing an autumn timetable. Tunbridge Wells and Tonbridge railway passengers will see some service times leaving three minutes earlier. Southeastern Managing Director David Statham said: “Our trains run in all sorts of challenging weather conditions and we’re on the case when it comes to dealing with them. “We don’t take risks when it comes to ensuring the safety of our passengers, which is why we have to change the times of some trains during the daytime in order to keep peak-time trains running punctually.”

Landlord Fair offers networking and talks to those in ‘lonely’ job By Andy Tong andy@timesoftonbridge.co.uk LANDLORDS and property agents in West Kent are invited to attend a free event tomorrow [October 11] to find out about the latest issues facing the sector. The West Kent Landlord Fair at Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council’s offices in Kings Hill will run from 4pm-8.30pm. Topics include: ■ Houses in Multiple Occupation [HMO] Legislation and antisocial behaviour/neighbour disputes by Andrew Lavender of Kent County Council – a legislative update, including HMO licensing and good practice. ■ Organised crime by Rob Slade of Kent Police – with advice regarding private rented properties that may be used for criminal activities such as drugs, illegal migration, modern slavery and sex workers, and possible links to international organised crime and trafficking. ■ Where do we go from here? Strategies

WELL GELLED The yellow substance provides greater grip

MONEY MATTERS Marion Money, National Landlords Association

to cope in 2018 by Marion Money of the National Landlords Association – outlining the substantial changes landlords are facing, including financing and regulation. There will also be workshops on: Universal Credit by Andrew Holmes from Maidstone Jobcentre; Home Energy Improvements by Samantha Simmons of Kent County Council; and Working Together – in which local authorities will outline their approach to working with private landlords. Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council organised the fair in partnership with the councils in Tunbridge Wells and Sevenoaks. The Cabinet Member for Housing, Cllr Piers Montague, said: “With excellent speakers, this West Kent Landlord Fair will provide landlords with key information on all the latest business and property issues. “I’d urge anyone interested to come along and take advantage of this free event.” Marion Money, Kent representative for the National Landlords Association, added: “Being a landlord can be quite a lonely experience, and events such as this allow local landlords to meet and network with their fellow professionals and share their knowledge and understanding.” To book in advance, call 01732 876067 or email: privatesectorhousing@tmbc.gov.uk


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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

AU CINEMA Digitom Founder and Creative Director Tom Chown

Grant gives cinema-quality boost to production company VIDEO production company Digitom is now able to shoot cinema-ready films following receipt of a £15,000 grant. The Tunbridge Wells firm’s managers say they are looking to move forward in times of economic uncertainty, and have invested in 4K camera and editing technology to provide a picture worthy of the big screen. The £15,000 match-funded grant was from the European Union-backed European Regional Development Fund. Digitom produces advertising films for companies such as AXA, Sainsbury’s and Savills, as well as the NHS. Founder and Creative Director Tom Chown has been trying

out the new equipment, which was recently delivered. He said: “With Sony releasing bigger and better cameras each year, I’ve made a conscious decision to invest in our own equipment and lenses to deliver the best cinematic quality films.

Flexibility “This means we’re capturing even higher resolution images at source, giving greater flexibility in post-production and also future-proofing productions.” The company has also switched its entire production workflow to DaVinci Resolve Studio editing and grading

software, as used for finishing Hollywood feature films, TV programmes and ads. Mr Chown continued: “During times of political uncertainty, the first budget to be reviewed is often marketing. “It’s important for us to continue to invest and innovate to attract new clients, and this grant has enabled us to do just that. “I established the business in 2010, during the height of the banking crisis and recession,” he added. “Being able to work flexibly with resources, and call on a pool of talented broadcast professionals, has enabled us to be agile and responsive to clients’ briefs.”

Solicitors to bike to Paris to help 26 year old fight cancer A YOUNG man undergoing vital treatment for brain cancer is to benefit from a Tunbridge Wells firm’s fundraising efforts. CooperBurnett solicitors, based in Mount Ephraim Road, are looking for support in reaching their £15,000 goal to support Oli Hilsdon. The 26 year old, who now lives in central London, was diagnosed with an aggressive brain tumour after he graduated from the University of Cambridge in 2014. Doctors gave him 12 to 18 months to live. He proved doctors wrong and went on to fundraise for brain tumour research. His efforts included running the London Marathon in 2016. However, last year further tests showed the tumour had returned, and he has recently undergone brain surgery and chemotherapy treatment. CooperBurnett are supporting him because his cousin, Katie Hilsdon, is an Associate Solicitor with the firm, and because Oli’s story has inspired the practice’s fundraising. The £15,000 would go towards funding a vaccine which would fight the tumour to try and stop it returning, and is not available on the NHS, as well as other medical expenses. Ms Hilsdon said: “We will be taking part in a charity challenge next year, which will be a bike ride from London to Paris in 24 hours. “We will be drawing up a training plan ahead of the ride in May and there will be a lot of support available for anyone who, like me, is less than confident on the road.

MARATHON MAN Oli Hilsdon has raised money for cancer research himself “Those team members who don’t feel up to the road trip to Paris are being given the opportunity to take part in a relay race on a static bike in the CooperBurnett office to see which team gets to Paris first.” To sponsor the teams, or find out more, visit justgiving.com/crowdfunding/olisfund

Local News

BUSINESS

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Community News

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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Christmas cards initiative ensures charities benefit THE Cards For Good Causes charity Christmas shop will open its doors again at the United Reformed Church Hall in Grosvenor Road, Tunbridge Wells, from Saturday [October 13]. Opening times are from 10am to 4.30pm on Monday to Saturday until December 18. Local MP Greg Clark will officially start the festive campaign on October 26. Cards For Good Causes is a not-for-profit organisation, so chosen charities will receive a minimum of 70p out of every £1. The shop is staffed by volunteers, and shop manager Karen Bryant said: “Buying charity Christmas cards is one of the simplest ways to support good causes this festive season. “We have over 300 temporary shops nationwide, so there is sure to be one near you. Alternatively, you can order them from our online shop at cardsforcharity.co.uk “We are always on the lookout for new volunteers, so if you get a couple of hours spare and would like to get involved we’d love to hear from you. Please get in touch via our website.”

WINTER WARMER: Cards for Good Causes makes sure at least 70p out of every £1 goes to charities

ME HEARTIES Markerstudy staff dress up at Salomons Estate

Markerstudy raises the flag for charities THE Markerstudy Group has donated a treasure chest of more than £10,000 to charities following pirate-themed staff activities on its annual Markerstudy Day. The proceeds will go to a number of different causes, including The Fire Fighters Charity, The Dogs Trust, MIND and Ashgate Hospicecare. Over 100 of the company’s staff in Tunbridge Wells undertook a variety of challenges, such as ‘walk the plank’ and a pedalo ‘sea’ test on the lake of Salomons Estate. At other locations around the country, there

were raffles, cake sales, bingo and a silent auction. Prizes included a two-night luxury break and a £500 Red Letter Day voucher.

Fundraising Lizzie Smith-Foreman, Director of Group Marketing and Communications for Markerstudy, said: “It was great to see our shipmates in Tunbridge Wells putting the ‘fun’ into fundraising, and raising an incredible amount for charities close to many people’s hearts.”

She added: “Our annual event is the perfect way to reward our staff for their hard work and raise money for good causes at the same time.” Markerstudy has donated millions of pounds to charitable causes since it was founded in 2001. Benefactors of the funds include the Pickering Cancer Drop in Centre in Tunbridge Wells, Prostate Cancer UK and Operation Christmas Child. Employees are also encouraged to volunteer for a paid ‘charity day’ annually and may take up to five days unpaid leave to work for a charitable cause.


Wednesday October 10 | 2018

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Community News

NEWS

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Wish comes true as George turns into superhero for day A SIX-YEAR-OLD boy from Tunbridge Wells with a life-threatening condition had the chance to become a superhero for the day with children’s charity Make-A-Wish. George Tappenden has spinal muscular atrophy type 2, a condition where the muscles progressively waste away, and has been using a wheelchair since he was one. He is a big fan of superheroes and was granted his One True Wish – to meet and then become his favourite caped crusader, Green Lantern, with sister Evie as his sidekick.

Rescue TREASURE HUNT: Tonbridge Lions President Tom Simmons presents the prizes at the town’s library

Children get up to mischief and win Summer Reading Challenge MORE THAN 1,800 children took part in the Summer Reading Challenge, entitled ‘Mischief Makers’, across the borough of Tonbridge & Malling. In total, 1,828 children read six books and were entered into a draw to win prizes donated by Tonbridge’s Lions Club and local businesses. The Summer Reading Challenge is a national campaign run by the Reading Agency, a charity which encourages people to read in order to develop empathy and build relationships with fellow readers. It is held every year during the summer holidays and this year’s competition was based upon the Beano cartoon strip with Dennis the Menace and his pet dog Gnasher.

Entrants received a map of Beanotown, and for each of the six books they read they collected stickers to put on the map. Once they had collected all of them, they could locate the treasure and win a prize. One parent described the challenge as ‘a great idea – giving them goals to achieve, so therefore a focus. They added: “It also gets the family into the library so they can encourage other family members to choose a book or two.” Another said: “Ayukt really enjoyed the challenge and has developed good reading skills over this summer. He now ensures that he reads at least one book every day.”

Make-A-Wish picked George and his family up in a limousine and drove them to London to attend a top-secret ‘superhero training base’ called Bunker 51. George helped Green Lantern to rescue his superhero friends Spiderman, Batman and Batgirl, who had been captured by two villains, Joker and Bane. The mission was a success, and George was initiated as a Green Lantern himself and received a certificate of membership. George said: “It feels amazing to be a Green Lantern.” As a final farewell, the superhero gave George his special power ring, which gives the wearers

incredible powers fuelled by willpower. His mother, Lucy Frost, said: “George’s condition most definitely doesn’t affect the mind. He’s an extremely bright and very, very happy, confident little boy. “George was once able to crawl and he can’t crawl anymore. The only time he stood, I caught it on camera. I’ll treasure that photo forever.” She added: “Every memory is so important for us because you don’t know what’s around the corner. You have to make every day as magical as possible and you have to lock those memories inside your head. It’s been absolutely amazing.” Make-A-Wish UK grants life-changing wishes to children with critical illnesses. Dan O’Reilly, George’s Wishgranter, said: “We were lucky to have so many superheroes join George on his wish to help make this a day to remember. “The families that we work with have to deal with so much, and we really believe that a wish can give a family quality time together, away from the daily realities of living with a life-threatening condition, giving children hope for the future and resilience to fight – whatever the future may hold.” To make a donation to help a child fulfil their One True Wish, call 01276 405070 or visit make-awish.org.uk BEHIND THE MASK George Tappenden meets the Green Lantern at Bunker 51


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NEWS

National News

May wins award for tackling trafficking THERESA MAY was hailed as a ‘global force for good’ as she was named the first winner of an award in memory of the late US Republican senator John McCain. The Prime Minister is being honoured in recognition of the ‘character and leadership’ she has shown in tackling human trafficking. Mrs May introduced laws to tackle the problem while she was home secretary and also appointed the first independent anti-slavery commissioner. The In the Arena award was created to recognise those that act rather than speak on issues, the McCain Institute said.

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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Body parts waste firm has all NHS contracts cancelled

TIME SENSITIVE Concerns about HES emerged on July 31

A CLINICAL waste disposal firm has been stripped of NHS contracts after allowing body parts to pile up at its facilities. Healthcare Environment Services [HES] had ‘failed to demonstrate that they were operating within their contractual limits’, according to NHS Improvement [NHSI]. Health Minister Stephen Barclay told MPs that 15 NHS trusts had served termination notices to HES, with the work being taken over by Mitie. He told Parliament: “I can confirm that NHS services continue to operate as normal. “We are ensuring that there are contingency plans in place in case of any disruption, and that there is absolutely no risk to the health of patients or the wider public.” Mr Barclay revealed the Government was first made aware of concerns on July 31. He said: “The Environment Agency notified central Government of an issue concerning clinical waste collection and disposal for hospitals and other public services provided by the company, Healthcare Environmental Services.

“In this instance, the primary concern was that too much waste was being held in a number of waste storage and treatment sites by a contractor, Healthcare Environment Services. “While the waste was stored securely, it was not being processed and disposed of within the correct regulatory timescales. “At no point has there been an impact on public health or any delay to the ability of the NHS to carry out operations.” He said that following the Environment Agency’s issuing of a partial closure to HES’s Normanton site, NHSI had issued a letter to HES and gave the firm 48 hours to provide evidence that they ‘were operating within legal and contractual parameters and set out a number of threshold levels’. He said: “NHSI concluded that HES failed to demonstrate that they were operating within their contractual limits. “Consequently 15 NHS Trusts served termination notices to HES formally to terminate their contracts at 4pm on Sunday, October 7.”

NEWS IN BRIEF

Speeding driver tried to blame dead brother A DRIVER who tried to dodge a speeding fine by pretending to be his dead brother has been jailed for three months. Silburn Campbell, who has never passed his driving test, was clocked driving his mother’s Mercedes at 37mph in a 30mph zone in Epping in 2014. A letter was sent to the vehicle’s registered keeper asking for the identity of the person behind the wheel. Essex Police were told the driver was Kenneth Campbell, who it later emerged had died in 2001.

Bizarre ‘bomb’ artwork AN ‘IRRESPONSIBLE’ student who caused a bomb scare by hiding a bizarre piece of art on a city centre bridge rang police the next day to ask for it back. The High Level Bridge between Newcastle and Gateshead was shut to cars, trains and pedestrians after Thomas Ellison left a package comprising a transparent lunchbox fitted with wires, a circuit board and a doll behind one of its pillars. The bomb disposal unit was called to safely remove the installation in August. It was established that it was not a bomb two hours after the bridge had been closed.

Fuel prices keep rising MOTORISTS have been hit with a 14th consecutive week of fuel price rises. The average cost of a litre of diesel in the UK has risen to £1.36, according to the latest Government figures. Prices have increased each week since July 2, representing the longest consecutive streak of rises in more than two years.


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National News

VERY SPECIAL Nikki Haley

Trump critic stands down as his United Nations ambassador DONALD TRUMP has announced that his UN ambassador Nikki Haley will leave his administration ‘at the end of the year’. The President spoke as he and Ms Haley met in the Oval Office, shortly after it emerged that she was going to resign. He called her a ‘very special’ person, adding that she told him six months ago that she might want to take some time off. Mr Trump said that together they had ‘solved a lot of problems’. It is the latest shake-up in the turbulent Trump administration, weeks before the November midterm elections. No reason for the resignation was immediately provided. Ms Haley, who is speculated to hold aspirations for higher office, said at the White House: “No, I’m not running in 2020.” Ms Haley, 46, was appointed to the UN post in November 2016 and last month co-ordinated Mr Trump’s second trip to the UN, including his first time chairing the Security Council. Last month she wrote in the Washington Post: “I proudly serve in this administration, and I enthusiastically support most of its decisions and the direction it is taking the country. But I don’t agree with the President on everything.”

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Second Salisbury suspect was EU must act fast to handed ‘hero’ award by Putin avoid ‘disruption’ THE second suspect in the Salisbury nerve agent attack was also a highly decorated officer in Russian military intelligence, it has been claimed. Alexander Mishkin, a military doctor in the GRU intelligence agency, received the award of Hero of the Russian Federation from President Vladimir Putin, according to the website Bellingcat. Its investigator Cristo Grozev said the Russian website The Insider had managed to reach Mishkin’s home village of Loyga, where they spoke to seven people who confirmed his identity.

Famous “They confirmed that their homeboy Alexander Mishkin was the person who moved on to military school and then became a famous military doctor and who received the award of Hero of the Russian Federation personally from President Putin,” he said. “His grandmother, with whom he grew up who happens to be a medical professional, has a pho-

tograph, in her own words, that has been seen by everybody in the village, of President Putin shaking Mishkin’s hand and giving him the award.” Prior to the attempted assassination of ex-Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in Salisbury in March, he was said to have taken part in numerous undercover operations in Ukraine and Transnistria. He is believed to have received the award of Hero of the Russian Federation either for his role in the annexation of Crimea in 2014 or the exfiltration of the pro-Moscow former president of Ukraine, Viktor Yanukovych. He said the reporters who visited Loyga in the remote Arkhangelsk district had drawn a blank when they tried to speak to Mishkin’s grandmother. “Interestingly we have not seen her because the moment we announced this press conference today, the grandmother was asked to visit her children - Mr Mishkin’s father and mother - in another town so she vanished from the village three days ago,” he said. SPY HUNTERS Founder of Bellingcat Eliot Higgins (left) with investigator Christo Grozev outside Parliament

THE Bank of England has warned that the need for action is now ‘pressing’ to ward off risks to trillions of pounds of financial products from a cliff-edge Brexit. Following its Financial Policy Committee [FPC] meeting last week, the Bank said ‘timely action’ is needed from the EU to protect against disruption to derivatives, insurance contracts and the transfer of personal data. Without this, the measures needed to mitigate threats will be ‘disruptive and costly’, it warned. The FPC said: “There has been considerable progress in the UK to address these risks, but only limited progress in the EU. “In the limited time remaining, it is not possible for companies on their own to mitigate fully the risks of disruption to cross-border financial services. “The need for authorities to complete mitigating actions is now pressing.”

Pioneering treatment for childhood cancer DOCTORS in the UK are to take part in a worldfirst trial of a new three-part treatment for one of the most common childhood cancers. The study, involving doctors and cancer scientists in Southampton, America and Germany, will look at boosting the body’s immune system with the aim of killing off neuroblastoma. A University of Southampton spokesman said: “Neuroblastoma affects about 100 children, mostly under the age of five, in the UK every year. “Immunotherapy known as anti-GD2, which uses antibodies to lock on to cancer cells so the immune system can find, fight and destroy them, has shown the potential to improve survival rates.”


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BUSINESS

National News

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Morrisons faces Murdoch Jnr steps down after massive payout Comcast takes control of Sky over data leaks SUPERMARKET giant Morrisons faces a potentially ‘vast’ compensation payout over a leak of staff data on the internet despite being innocent of any wrongdoing. A lawyer representing the company told the Court of Appeal it is challenging a ruling that it is ‘vicariously liable’ for the ‘criminal online disclosure of significant quantities of payroll data effected by a rogue employee’. Anya Proops QC said at a hearing in London – the first data leak class action in the UK – that if the decision of a High Court judge last year was allowed to stand Morrisons was exposed to ‘compensation claims on a potentially vast scale’. Litigation was launched after a security breach in 2014 when Andrew Skelton, an internal auditor at the retailer’s Bradford headquarters, leaked the payroll data of around 100,000 employees.

Watchdog probes UK’s audit sector THE competition watchdog has launched an investigation into Britain’s auditors after a series of scandals and concerns over conflict of interest. The Competition and Markets Authority [CMA] said it will examine concerns that the sector ‘is not working well for the economy or investors’. As part of the review, the CMA will investigate whether it is ‘competitive and resilient enough to maintain high quality standards’. The CMA pointed to the failure of Carillion and the criticism of those charged with reviewing the construction firm’s collapse, as well as recent poor results from audit quality reviews.

BULLETIN BOARD Comcast will ensure Sky News’ future

NEWS IN BRIEF

Facebook’s new tax bill is ‘outrageous’ FACEBOOK’S UK tax bill has been branded ‘outrageous’ after accounts revealed it had to pay just £7.4million for 2017. The technology giant’s bill rose to £15.8million but it will get an immediate cut by claiming tax credit. The latest UK tax bill is triple the £5.1million paid in 2016. But the net charge for 2017 comes to £7.4million, following tax relief of £8.45million for granting employees shares in the firm.

BrewDog ready to float

SKY chairman James Murdoch has resigned from the broadcaster as US cable giant Comcast took control of the British firm. Comcast said yesterday [Tuesday] that it has acquired more than 75 per cent of Sky after snapping up the 39 per cent stake that belonged to Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox. Comcast boss Brian Roberts said: “We are pleased today to be the majority owner of Sky. “Led by [Sky’s Chief Executive] Jeremy Darroch and his superb team, now together with Comcast, our combined global leadership in technology and content paves the way for us to accelerate investment and growth in Sky’s brand and premier platforms. “We are also fully committed to ensuring Sky News’ future, maintaining its editorial independence, and preserving its strong track record for trusted, high quality, impartial news.” Comcast emerged victorious in the takeover for the pay TV giant last month after beating 21st

Century Fox, controlled by the Murdoch family, in a long running takeover battle. The group tabled a £30billion bid for Sky, dwarfing Fox’s bid by a distance. It means the Murdochs have relinquished their holding in Sky, having twice failed to take full control of the broadcaster.

CRAFT brewery BrewDog has said a stock market debut remains firmly on the cards despite recent flotation woes. Co-founder James Watts has said plans for an initial public offering [IPO] were still on track for 2020. The independent Scottish brewer, which was valued at £1billion last year after selling a 22 per cent stake to private equity, is considering an IPO in either the UK or the US, though Mr Watts said London was the firm’s preference at this stage.

Growth

Greggs is topping sales

Mr Darroch said: “Comcast have committed to investment in Sky, including our Osterley and European headquarters and we very much look forward to working with Brian and the Comcast team to achieve further growth and development of Sky’s business. “Separately, Sky News will benefit greatly from Comcast’s funding commitments over the coming years and the arrangements that will be put in place to preserve and enhance its editorial independence.”

FOCACCIA-style pizzas and a summer drinks range helped bakery chain Greggs serve up a rise in sales despite unpredictable trading during the heatwave. The group - which has 1,912 shops across the UK - said like-for-like sales lifted 3.2 per cent across its own-managed shops during the 13 weeks to September 29, while total sales rose 7.3 per cent. This marks a pick-up since its first half, when sales edged 1.5 per cent higher.


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NEWS

Letters

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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

And another thing… This is the page where you, the reader, have your chance to express your views or comments on what’s going on in our part of the world. We like to hear from you. You can email us at newsdesk@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk or newsdesk@timesoftonbridge.co.uk or write to the Editor at Runcie Court, Salomons Estate, Tunbridge Wells TN3 0TG Let’s not be idle: Save our children’s brains from pollution before it’s too late EXHAUSTED Idling cars are often to be found around schools

Whilst the extra storage area behind the barrier is welcomed, that being a 95mm increase in height, the one big question remains: Exactly how much rain is going to fall? Tonbridge, Hildenborough and other villages have all been built over the years well within the River Medway flood plain. The hard fact is that we will never be truly safe from flooding, and even greater resistance is required for those planning applications which fall within the mapped area of the flood plain. Cllr Mark Rhodes Hildenborough

Democracy has to work both ways

Tonbridge needs a ‘car club’ as well

Alcohol-free could be just the tonic

I was interested to read that Tunbridge Wells Borough Council have introduced a car club as well as electric charging points [September 26]. This is something that I have always thought should be introduced in Tonbridge, because it seems like such a practical solution to cut down the need for individual car ownership. Car ownership is expensive, and creates the added problem of public roadsides being used as car parks. Those of us who need a car only occasionally could save money by belonging to a car club, and the roads would be less clogged up with parked vehicles. My daughter lives in London, where she is able to get around mainly on public transport or bike. However, on the occasions that they need to transport heavy equipment or visit an inaccessible wedding venue in the country, she and her partner are able to use a car club. Their personal experience demonstrates to me how these schemes work well in practice. Furthermore, I was interested to read that the council originally used Section 106 funding provided by developers to fund the scheme, which is now self-funding. Whenever new developments are suggested in Tonbridge, local people worry about parking spaces. Come on Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council! In addition to improving cycle routes, if you want to improve the air quality and cut congestion, copy your neighbouring borough and start a car club. Fran Long Tonbridge

It was interesting to read Eva Charrington’s letter about the West Kent Alcohol Reduction Campaign and Club Soda Alcohol-Free Festivals [September 26]. The inaugural Tunbridge Wells Beer Weekend last month was organised in a very short time by a group of passionate local brewers and retailers in order to highlight a local craft from the Garden of England. It would be super if Ms Charrington organised a similar event to show that attractive alcoholfree drinks are available, because they are often overlooked by many outlets, and not everyone wants to spend an evening drinking cola. As we attempt to find a USP for Tunbridge Wells, a town based on the drink of chalybeate water, I’m sure health and wellbeing is just as important as being a ‘beer town’. Carolyn Gray Tunbridge Wells

It was interesting to read in your paper that Councillor Jukes’ objections to the proposed constituency changes include his statement that they ‘would impact adversely on democratic representation’ [September 26]. By issuing a Compulsory Purchase Order [CPO] to acquire a whole range of property rights in and around Hoopers store, his councillors have themselves impacted most severely on democracy by dealing a hammer blow against that store and other organisations and individuals. The CPO has been issued with complete disregard to ‘democratic representation’, imposing significant harm on the recipients, justified only by the council’s unwanted and extravagant theatre project. Your newspaper reports the Conservative motion on the boundary changes include the words ‘failed to take account of the views of… local people’ and ‘to seek revisions that better reflect the views of local people’. How much more apt those words would be if the council would take its own advice and listen to the views of local people on the theatre project and its resulting CPO. Whilst the proposed theatre obviously has some supporters, the vast majority of those people that the Tunbridge Wells Alliance party have met and been contacted by are implacably opposed to this unwanted, unneeded, and unaffordable project. ‘Local people’, as described by the council, have huge concerns about the proposed theatre’s financial viability and cost, and its suitability, location and contingent damage. Why then won’t the council listen to them? Is this a case of double standards? Bob Atwood Chair of Tunbridge Wells Alliance

Rising tide of planning applications

No longer living beyond boundary

Yes, of course l am pleased that funding is available for both the Leigh Flood Storage Area and the future ‘Bund’ for Hildenborough, but ‘Home and Dry?’ [Times of Tonbridge, September 26] – definitely not. The Leigh barrier was constructed in response to the 1968 floods. Rainfall during Christmas 2013 exceeded the storage area’s capacity, unfortunately resulting in the flooding of many homes in Hildenborough and beyond because of the release of water at around 160 cubic metres per second.

You would not think that Tunbridge Wells Borough Council Leader David Jukes would object to proposed boundary changes that would put his private dwelling within the Tunbridge Wells constituency rather than Wealden, where he resides. Cllr Jukes lives in a different county authority too – East Sussex – which makes his position as the Leader of a borough council in Kent even more odd. John Ward Moorhouse Tunbridge Wells

Tunbridge Wells Green Party will respond to the borough council’s Air Quality Consultation [September 26], but meanwhile may we suggest that the proposal to possibly introduce enforcement of no idling by cars in 2019-21 is too modest? It has been illegal to wantonly idle for 30 years, and the 2002 Road Traffic Act introduced fines of £20 (rising to £40) if an initial polite request by an agent produces no response. We have two bodies of staff on the streets who could be directed to act, at no cost – traffic wardens and the contractors who look

out for dropped cigarette ends. Parking and littering don’t kill, but cars and coaches idling (sadly, from local observation, prevalent around schools) are storing up longterm damage. Developing the underlying consensus over time is indeed best, but implementing a ‘no idling’ campaign by this winter could be a quick win for our children’s brains, and help kickstart the new Air Quality Action Plan’s implementation. Trevor Bisdee Tunbridge Wells Green Party

We do our best to publish letters in full. However, the Editor reserves the right to edit any letter. Please ensure that letters do not exceed 250 words

Calverley

Observations on life and more important things

CALVERLEY is in mourning this week – for the letter ‘T’. Sad to report, but it seems to be fast disappearing from spoken English. One only has to listen to presenters, commentators and so-called ‘celebrities’ on television and radio to spot the trend. And that includes the BBC stations. For example, on time checks it is often ‘twenny’ past the hour. With cricket it’s sometimes ‘twenny twenny’ when referring to that form of competition. Or ‘twenny’ million pounds in a news report. That’s before you get to the likes of ‘ea(t)ing’… ‘be(tt)er’… ‘ma(tt)er’… bu(tt)er… ‘pho(t)o’… and ‘ci(t)y’. ’Tis enough to make Himself weep. TRIPADVISOR has much to answer for. Enjoying an evening meal at a local hostelry, Calverley’s attention was drawn to a nearby table. Three young couples had just finished their meals when one of them suddenly pointed to a chicken nugget on her plate. They had not ordered chicken nuggets. Obviously the kitchen had ‘screwed up’ and managed to put a leftover from an old meal on the plate. Outrage. No way were they going to pay for the food and drink. The owner eventually agreed not to present a bill and they walked out. Later he explained that he ‘did not want to be bad-mouthed on TripAdvisor’ so it was easier to ‘let them win’. Most observers thought they knew exactly where the chicken nugget had come from – a handbag under the table. Sadly, the CCTV did not, as it later transpired, pick it up. No doubt the diners will now try the same trick at another restaurant.

HOW EMBARRASSING. Scaffolding had been erected at a block of flats that needed redecorating. Residents had been warned in advance. One particular woman clean forgot and also neglected to draw her curtains at night. In the morning, she bounced into the lounge, naked as the day she was born, to see the grinning faces of two young painters peering through the window.

THOUGHT for the day – and this is not connected to the above tale: You never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory. Chin Chin, readers


Education

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NEWS

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EDUCATION Times WITH THE

How the digital world is supporting dyslexia Tunbridge Wells-based linguist Liz Hawker is an expert in dyslexia. Following a special awareness week, she talks about the computer technology that’s proving an assistive boon to dyslexic children and adults everywhere… SOMETHING incredible happened last week. Dyslexia Awareness Week introduced the concept of 21st-century dyslexia. It’s not a disability. It’s not a disadvantage. It’s creative, good at problem solving, entrepreneurial, visual and (wait for it) enabled by technology. This year the British Dyslexia Association’s 2018 campaign has two bold themes: Dyslexic strengths and how mainstream technology can now remove dyslexic disadvantage. Ever type something quickly and get irritated by the number of squiggly red lines beneath the words? Well, hold fire… Behind the frustrating red pen of spellcheck lies a whole new world of support for those with dyslexia and other difficulties. Now is the time to get friendly with this ‘assistive’ computer technology, which is transforming classrooms and workplaces worldwide. Let’s start with spelling and grammar: Can’t work out why the squiggly red or blue error lines are there? Well, the ‘Read Aloud’ function will now say correct alternatives out loud, so you don’t feel overwhelmed by too many choices and

can understand where the grammar went wrong. And if reading is the main pressure point, then the ‘Read Aloud’ function will convert someone else’s writing into speech for you, or read back your own writing to you so you can review it.

Interpreting Visual stress or visual processing difficulties are often features of dyslexia. By changing a few settings, you can now change column width, page colour, cursor size or font spacing to make it easier to read any text, including symbols and numbers. You can also see syllable breaks within words, have parts of speech underlined, and replace key words with pictures. If you find it hard to ‘track’ text with your eyes, ‘Line Focus’ enables you to have one, three or five lines of text to guide you through without getting lost. These are brilliant adaptations, without the need to buy expensive coloured paper, edit, enlarge or adapt text. And it’s not all about words. If you have difficulty

interpreting non-textual visual material, you can even experience maps in 3D sound. Memory is also hampered for some dyslexics. Need to remember an important explanation, or hold on to what’s been said in a lecture? Use Windows ‘Voice Recorder’, or similar, to capture it in audio and listen back. This is a powerful revision tool. Then there’s ‘Dictate’. If you struggle to write, software will now type your text for you while you dictate. It’s a secretary and learning support rolled into one neat package. And the best of it? This assistive technology is

truly inclusive as it is embedded like any other feature in everyday, mainstream software, such as Word and Outlook. To quote Dr Neelam Parmar, Director of E-learning at Ashford School: “This is a whole new world enabling dyslexic children and adults to access language with digital tools, promoting independence and supporting progress.” And for the one in ten dyslexics in our classrooms, that’s real progress. For more information on dyslexia, visit The British Dyslexia Association at bdadyslexia.org.uk


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NEWS

Weekly Comment

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Tom Tugendhat MP for Tonbridge & Malling

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Tom Tugendhat, MBE, left the British Army in July 2013 after a career in which he served on operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and as the military assistant to the Chief of the Defence Staff. As a Territorial Army officer, he worked on everything from those ops to establishing the Armed Forces Muslim Association, and also worked for the Foreign Office. He was first elected as a Member of Parliament in 2015, and was elected Chair of Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee in July 2017

How your views can shape the Local Plan Last week, the most important local consultation in years opened. It’s all about the Tonbridge and Malling Local Plan. This will decide where our future houses will go and shape our town for generations. It will identify the infrastructure that needs upgrading and improving so that we can get to work, school and the doctor when we want. It will shape the way we live. There is no doubt we need more homes. Every time I hold a surgery, families and young people come and ask me why they can’t afford somewhere to live, to raise a family and to start a life of their own. They remind me that we need to build more for everyone in our community. The question is: Where? Whether you agree or not with the proposals that Tonbridge and Malling Borough Council have suggested, now is your chance to comment on them. All the responses are sent to a Planning Inspector, who will assess the quality of the arguments. So it’s crucial that as many people as possible have their say before 4pm on Monday November 12. You can write to the council or email: localplan @tmbc.gov.uk to make your views heard. There will be drop-in sessions on October 15 at the Tonbridge and Malling Borough Council offices in Kings Hill, and October 17 at Tonbridge Cas-

tle, where you can view the plans in more detail. It’s also important to be clear which proposals you agree with. I’m sure many in north Tonbridge will welcome that development towards Hadlow will not be included, and we need to show the Planning Inspector that we care about this important suggestion. But, if you feel that there are too many homes on Brook Street, or anywhere else, then make sure your views are heard, too. I’m sure you will.

BLUE SKY THINKING Take part in the council consultation

Protect This isn’t just about places, the total number of houses is higher than many think are necessary, and we need to make sure the government isn’t asking us to do too much. I’m challenging the government to make sure we get the homes we need, and protect the community we love. I’m also speaking to the government about how we make sure that infrastructure improvements are actually delivered, in advance of the housing being built. Government policy states that green belt land can only be developed in exceptional circumstances and, as the plan stands, it is clear the planners thinks exceptional circumstances apply down Brook Street. I know many don’t agree. That’s why we need technical planning ar-

guments presented in this consultation to counter this proposal, if you think they’re wrong. It’s clear this consultation matters. It will shape our future and the future of Tonbridge and Malling. Please take the time to read the document and have your say. At the end, I’ll bring together the arguments our

community has made and present them to the Planning Inspector. The Planning Inspector is an arm of government, and as your representative in Westminster it’s crucial I argue your views properly. That’s why I need you to write to me, too. After all, I can only do my job for you if you let me know what you think.


Wednesday October 10 | 2018

WITH THE

Move Times

AVAILABLE EVER Y WEDNESDAY – A MUST-READ

ULTIMATE GUIDE

INSPIRATION FOR MOVING AND IMPROVING timeslocalnews.co.uk

TO PROPERTY AND GARDENING

Courting a garden that’s easy to maintain

26

Page 26

NEW RELEASE ON TOP OF THE WORLD

27

COLONIAL LIVING GEORGIAN STYLE

42

AN ISLAND IN THE CREAM

A whiter shade of pale

on Langton Green Page 35

45

DIG INTO THE WINTER GARDENING


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Times

Best for...FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Best property buys for... We all love to see homes with the ‘wow’ factor, which could apply to the kitchen, reception room, garden or something else. Here we home in on specific aspects that make these particular properties for sale stand out The COURTYARD GARDEN…

Regency House

Cambridge Gardens Tunbridge Wells

central location on the south side of town, it also benefits from two parking permits, two visitors’ permits and a garage.

OFFERS IN THE REGION OF

MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST

£620,000 Contact

• Jackson-Stops, Tunbridge Wells • 01892 521700 • jackson-stops.co.uk A surprisingly spacious, 3-bedroom Regency-style mews house with a delightful courtyard garden. Enjoying a quiet yet very convenient

Regent House

Knights Wood, Knights Way Tunbridge Wells PRICES FROM

£305,000

Contact

• The Marketing Suite, Tunbridge Wells • 01892 800580 • knightswood.co.uk For the first time, 12 new, 2-bedroom apartments are now available for sale at Dandara’s Knights Wood development, including two stunning penthouses with amazing views of the area. MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST: n Open-plan living areas n Private balconies n Integrated kitchen appliances n Two contemporary bathrooms n Allocated parking space

The LIVING ROOM…

n Sitting/dining room with a travertine marble fireplace and two sets of double French doors leading to a garden room n Kitchen with bamboo flooring n Garden room spanning the width of the property, with two sets of patio doors to the garden n Galleried landing with roof lantern n Low-maintenance garden


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The CONSERVATORY…

Silverdale Road Tunbridge Wells PRICE RANGE

£400,000-£425,000 Contact

• Bracketts, Tunbridge Wells • 01892 533733 • bracketts.co.uk A refurbished 3-bedroom house convenient for a mainline station, Grosvenor & Hilbert Park and St John’s schools. MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST: n Kitchen with a butcher’s block worktop and doors to patio. Open-plan to dining room

Larkins Farm

Hampkins Hill Road Chiddingstone GUIDE PRICE

The Grange, Knockholt Nr Sevenoaks GUIDE PRICE

£895,000

MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST:

(LEASEHOLD)

n Staircase with large arch window

Contact

• Savills, Sevenoaks • 01732 789700 • savills.co.uk

n Sitting room with balcony

n Master bedroom with en suite n Double garage n Verandah

table that can be lowered into the floor, and doors to terrace with views over sunken garden

£2,350,000 Contact

n Sitting room with wood-burner

Located in a National Trust village, this is an exceptional Grade II-listed 7-bedroom house with panoramic views and an attached cottage. An elegant, refurbished 3-bedroom property forming part of a Grade II-listed Georgian house, and set amidst wonderful communal grounds.

n Conservatory with a fitted oak

n Inglenook fireplaces

• Savills, Sevenoaks • 01732 789700 • savills.co.uk

Balcony House

MAIN POINTS OF INTEREST:

The BEDROOM…

n Drawing room with library area

n Kitchen/breakfast room n Master bedroom with en suite n 2-bedroom cottage n Stable block, paddocks, ponds and orchard n In total about 17 acres

n 2 reception rooms with chimney breasts

(one with log burner) n Landing with study area n First floor bathroom n Principal rooms have USB charging sockets

The KITCHEN…


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Cheyne House

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AT A GLANCE CHEYNE HOUSE LANGTON GREEN NR TUNBRIDGE WELLS n A superbly appointed house that has been updated and extended and is spread across three floors n Entrance hall n Drawing room with wide bay window n Sitting room with open fireplace n Study n Neptune bespoke kitchen with gas-fired Aga, Harvey Jones dresser unit and underfloor heating. Open to breakfast room n Peter Edmondson conservatory with French doors to terrace n Utility room n Cloakroom n Principal bedroom with dressing room and en-suite bathroom n 4 further bedrooms (2 with en-suite facilities) n Family bathroom n Detached double garage

Charming, much improved 1920s family home that boasts a heated pool and English country garden

n Park-like landscaped gardens in English country style n Heated outdoor swimming pool n In all about 1 acre

£1,850,000 Contact • Hamptons • Tunbridge Wells • 01892 516611 • hamptons.co.uk


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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

AT A GLANCE

NINEWEST HUNGERSHALL PARK TUNBRIDGE WELLS n A substantial portion of an elegant, refurbished Victorian villa n Arranged over four floors n Classical period features include tall sash windows and white marble fireplaces with ornately carved detail n Underfloor heating to some rooms n Approximately one mile from Tunbridge Wells mainline station LOWER GROUND FLOOR:

Impressive attached Victorian villa overlooking a private park, yet just a short distance from The Pantiles

n Sitting room n Study n Gym n Utility room & WC n Work/storeroom n Wine cellar GROUND FLOOR: n Drawing room with French oak floor n Dining room n Kitchen, with ovens including a Miele steam oven. Open to breakfast room n Bespoke Peter Edmondson conservatory n Cloakroom FIRST FLOOR: n Large Palladian window on split-level landing n 3 bedrooms (2 en suite) n Family bathroom SECOND FLOOR: n 2 further bedrooms n Dressing/sitting room n Family bathroom OUTSIDE: n Integral garage n Orangery with light and power n Well-maintained, south-facing, partially-walled garden with terrace n In all about 0.43 acres

£2,300,000 Contact • Knight Frank • Tunbridge Wells • 01892 515035 • knightfrank.co.uk


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Gardening

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Winter is coming – get ready by tackling vital garden jobs Autumn is firmly with us now and the weather will soon grow colder, so it’s time to tackle some much-needed cold weather garden maintenance…

1 2

Hints of frost are already with us, so protect half-hardy plants from the cold with fleece, or bring them into a frost-free greenhouse.

Lift dahlia tubers, begonia tubers and gladiolus corms to store dry over the winter months. Remove the dead foliage before storing them. Plant daffodil bulbs, tulip bulbs and allium bulbs for a glorious spring display. Dot them through borders or naturalise them in grass.

3 4

Plant spring bedding such as wallflowers, bellis, primulas and winter pansies for a fantastic spring display.

Prune climbing roses and rambling roses once they’ve finished flowering and tie in the stems before autumn winds cause damage. Clear up fallen rose leaves to prevent diseases such as black spot from over-wintering – don’t compost the leaves.

5

Cut back perennial plants that have died down, or alternatively leave the dead foliage in place for over-wintering wildlife. Lift and divide any overcrowded herbaceous perennials while the soil is still warm.

6

Collect leaves up for making leaf mould as a soil conditioner. Oak, alder and hornbeam will rot down in a year, but beech, sycamore, horse chestnut and sweet chestnut will take a couple of years to compost.

7

Start preparing a bonfire with twigs and prunings – cover them with plastic so they remain dry for better burning later. (And make sure you check for hedgehogs before lighting your bonfire!)

8 9 10

After tidying borders, mulch with bark chips, well rotted manure, leaf mould or spent mushroom compost to insulate plant roots for winter and keep weed growth in check. Clean out water butts and let the autumn rains refill them. Install a new water butt ready for next year. Once plants are dormant, it is a good time to lift and relocate any plant that you want to move.

11 12

Raise pots off the ground for the winter by using bricks or ‘pot feet’ to prevent waterlogging.

As you go about your maintenance, why not keep a photo diary of your garden with pictures taken each week? Reflect on what grew well, what failed miserably, and what changes you will make next year. You will be surprised at how useful these visual notes can be when you start ordering seeds and plants for next Year!


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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Life&Times

ARTS & CULTURE LIFE & STYLE FOOD & DRINK MOTORING SPORT and MORE...

IN PRINT AND ONLINE SEVEN DAYS A WEEK timeslocalnews.co.uk

Seasonal style

50

Autumn’s must have bags Page 60

A FAMILY AFFAIR

52

Page turners

This week’s top reads Page 62

AWESOME FOURSOME

64

BLUES FOR YOU

70

Food for thought

Feed The Brood’s Alex Thurman on the perfect recipe for children’s healthy eating

Page 56

TJ’S CELEBRATE VICTORY


Life&Times

‘MARIA’ The middle sister is played by Bridget Collins

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From Russia with love Trinity Theatre Club puts on its production of Anton Chekhov’s classic play Three Sisters next week. Here, Director Kirrie Wratten tells the Times why she was drawn to this story of life, love and loss WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO DO THREE SISTERS AS YOUR NEXT PRODUCTION? It was for the Russian playwright’s Anton Chekhov’s writing. Not so long ago, a newspaper poll of leading directors from all over the world concluded that his play The Cherry Orchard was the greatest one ever written. I’m sure many actors would agree that Chekhov has provided some of the most wonderful roles in the theatrical canon; indeed the numbers who came to the Trinity Theatre Club [TTC] auditions for Three Sisters can attest to this.

Three Sisters is the third of Chekhov’s plays that I have directed; the first, at Trinity in 1999, was The Cherry Orchard. Since I spend a huge amount of time working with the text of any play that I direct, it’s important to me to find an affinity with the playwright. TELL US ABOUT THE PLAY Of all the themes the play encompasses, I think the desire for a happier life for ourselves, and the need to contribute to a better future for others, is at the heart of Three Sisters. It is about time slipping away from us imperceptibly. Chekhov had only three years to live when Three Sisters was first performed; he was very aware that he had not much time left. The future may not live up to the hopes and dreams of the sisters that we witness at the beginning of the play, but they have to find the courage to go on, no matter what has happened. WHAT APPEALS TO YOU ABOUT THE PLAY AND WHY DO YOU THINK IT’S RELEVANT? I love the characters, their relationships with each other – the fights, the love affairs, the highs and lows of life; all these things are essentially unchanging. Chekhov reflects the human condition with such affection and humour. We recognise these people – the schoolteacher who is not as bright as he thinks he is; the beautiful, idealistic young

PHOTOS: Symon Hamer

arts

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audiences food for thought, but I am sure it will give them a good night out.

‘OLGA’ The eldest sister (Fiona Young) woman who believes if only she can return to the Moscow of her childhood, all will be well in her life; the men who think they can change the world by talking about it. Chekhov’s plays will be relevant for as long as people are human. HOW DOES THIS NEW ADAPTATION BY SARAH RUHL DIFFER FROM OTHERS? The choice of Sarah Ruhl’s version was, perhaps, a controversial decision; so many well-known playwrights have done their own versions of Chekhov’s plays. I did consider many versions before settling on Sarah Ruhl’s. She is a distinguished, multiaward-winning playwright and professor, currently on the faculty at Yale School of Drama. Her version of Three Sisters was highly praised when it was first performed in 2009. As one review described it: “She lets the play breathe with a simple, unmannered approach to the drama that

makes it seem shockingly contemporary.”

and almost all of them have lots of stage experience.

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THE ACTORS YOU’VE CAST? It’s a very strong cast of 15. TTC audiences will recognise some faces, but there are also actors who are new to the club. Several of the cast have professional training and or experience,

WHAT DO YOU THINK AUDIENCES WILL ENJOY MOST? I suspect audiences will be surprised by the comedy elements to the play. I think they will love the juxtaposition of the comedic with the serious. Chekhov has sometimes been

Three Sisters will be performed at Trinity Theatre in Tunbridge Wells from Tuesday, October 16, to Saturday, October 20. Tickets, which cost £15, can be obtained via the Box Office on 01892 678678 or at trinitytheatre.net More information on TTC can be found via ttctw.com

bracketed with Ibsen as serious drama, with an implication of solemnity and gloom. Three Sisters is neither solemn nor gloomy. Bad stuff happens in the play, as in life, but the characters do not disappear in a welter of despair – they carry on, as we all do, in the face of adversity. I believe it will give

DESIGN: Charles Birchwood

‘IRINA’ The youngest sister (Louise Knapp)

HOW DID YOU END UP DIRECTING? A writer I worked with used to say that actors need to be seen, writers need to be heard, and directors need to control – and there is perhaps more than an element of truth in that! Yet what I love about directing is that the self-expression which is at the heart of all artistic endeavour is achieved through collaboration with a whole team of other artists, who all shape the finished production that you will see. So you could say it’s control with benefits. It’s taking a script, imagining those people in those situations in real life, and with the help of all the other creative people involved in the process, making that flat page come alive for hundreds of people sitting in the audience. Being part of that enabling process is hugely rewarding.


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Going Out

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goingout 7 days of activities

be a fascinating talk. Tickets cost £22.50 from assemblyhalltheatre.co.uk Flamenco Express presents another spectacle of ‘raw, heart-wrenching flamenco art’ on the stage at Trinity Theatre this evening, courtesy of soloist La Joaquina, guitar virtuoso Chris Clavo and ‘flamenco guardian’ Antonio el Pola. The group also welcomes the return of Alejandro Molinero, a prize-winning choreographer hot from the Festival de Jerez. The action starts at 8pm and tickets cost £18 per person.

By Eileen Leahy

FRIDAY

PHOTO: Robin Savage

HOWZCAT! Tabby McTat comes to life at the EM Forster Theatre

WEDNESDAY Today you can catch three screenings of the acclaimed film The Children Act at 11am, 2pm and 8pm at Trinity Theatre. It has been adapted from Ian McEwan’s novel, and Emma Thompson stars in the leading role of High Court Judge Fiona Maye. The eminent lawyer’s marriage to Jack (played by Stanley Tucci) is at breaking point. She also has a very difficult decision to make regarding a ground – and heart – breaking case. Tickets cost from £8 and are available from trinity.net

THURSDAY Those interested in buying, selling, improving or

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

investing in property should head on over to The Hop Farm today, where the South East Property Expo is taking place. Free to attend, it will offer plenty of expert advice from the housing industry as well as guest speakers, including Escape to the Chateau’s Dick Strawbridge. For further information, see sepropertyexpo.co.uk Tonight you can see historian, archaeologist and TV presenter Neil Oliver at the Assembly Hall with his new tour entitled The Story of Britain in 100 Places. The first half of the evening will be a thesis on the history of the British Isles, then Neil will welcome questions from the audience during the second half of what promises to

’Tis the season for foraging for fungi and this weekend, there are a couple of local events to choose from, today and tomorrow. First is the one at Bedgebury Pinetum with Bryan Bullen of the Kent Wildlife Trust. He will lead an informative tour of these centuries’ old organisms around this spectacular spot just off the A21. For more information, visit kentwildlifetrust.org.uk The Big Draw – on from 3.30pm-5.30pm – returns to Grosvenor and Hilbert Park today, and this year’s theme is ‘Play’. So why not join the organisers in the Hub after school when keen young artists can draw their favourite way to play in the park? The event is suitable for all ages but all children must be accompanied by an adult. Tickets cost £1 and there’s no need to book. World-renowned psychic, television and theatre star and the UK’s favourite award-winning medium Sally Morgan is back! And she’s better than ever with her phenomenal interactive 10year anniversary show at the Assembly Hall from 7.30pm. Tickets cost £24 and can be booked via assemblyhalltheatre.co.uk The Moonlight Drive-In Cinema at The Hop Farm starts its run of the comedy horror flick The House with a Clock in its Walls tonight. Showing every evening until Thursday, October 18, it stars Jack Black and Cate Blanchett. moonlightcinema.com Britain’s ultimate pop star, Sir Cliff Richard, is celebrating 60 years in the music industry, and he wants you to join in the party of the year courtesy of a two live screenings of his celebratory concerts ‘Cliff Richard Live: 60th

Anniversary Tour’ tonight at 8pm and tomorrow at 3pm at the Odeon cinema. For more details, visit odeon.co.uk

SATURDAY

The second of this week’s fungal forays is happening over at Dunorlan Park from 2.30pm. Expert Keith Palmer will lead the tour and talk. Simply meet at the Halls Hole Road car park and dress appropriately for the weather. Organisers say that every year the tour results in some ‘fascinating finds’, and children will get a lot of out of it, so what are you waiting for? Pippins Farm will be hosting their annual Apple Day from 11am until 5pm. If you go along to the farm, located on Stonecourt Lane at Pembury, you’ll have the chance to learn about how English


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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

repertory, and it’s being streamed into Trinity Theatre this afternoon at 2pm. Described as being haunting and emotional, with one of the most demanding roles ever created for a male dancer, this really is a must-see for all ballet fans.

FIERY PERFORMANCES Catch the Flamenco Express at Trinity

Going Out

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PICK OF THE WEEK: Matt Syms Exhibition

On at Trinity Theatre Gallery until 1pm Sunday, October 21 Open from 10am. Closing times vary. Please see website

TUESDAY

apples are grown, see fresh juice being made and enjoy refreshments in the old Kent Barn. Entrance costs £4 for adults and proceeds will be donated to the Hospice in the Weald. The EM Forster Theatre in Tonbridge presents the heartwarming tale of Tabby McTat today. The original story, by Julia Donaldson, is one of friendship and loyalty, and now audiences can enjoy seeing it come to life in this charming stage production. Tickets cost £12 and performances are at 2pm and 4pm. For more information, see emtheatre.com At King Charles the Martyr Church Hall there will be another monthly Tunbridge Wells Collectors’ Fair on from 10am until 4pm. You can expect to browse and buy a wide range of antiques and collectibles, including china, glass, brass, militaria, books, postcards and ephemera. There’s lots going on elsewhere in the area today, including a Wedding Fair at Bewl Water and later the Grosvenor Orchestra holds its annual concert in aid of local disability charity Compaid. The musical action starts at 7.30pm at St Philip’s Church on Birken Road. Entrance

is free but a donation to Compaid on the evening will be most welcome.

SUNDAY

The popular Wheels Around the Weald cycling event is back and will be starting from Hospice in the Weald in Pembury. Choose between a 20, 40 or 80-mile route around Kent’s most scenic countryside, while raising money for your local hospice. For more information, visit hospiceintheweald.org.uk The musical group CODA welcomes Jane Gordon (violinist) and Jan Rautio (pianist) to play a recital, including the music of Debussy, Brahms and Mozart, today at 3pm at Rose Hill School in Coniston Avenue. Tickets cost £15, or £12 for CODA members. See codatw.co.uk There will be another Comedy Tapas happening in The Sussex Arms Basement in Sussex Mews from 7.30pm this evening. Tonight’s bill includes Joe Wells, Barry Ferns and Sue Firth. Tickets cost £6 from wegottickets.com

MONDAY

Mayerling is a classic of the Royal Ballet

Bring Your Own Baby Comedy is the UK’s premier baby-friendly comedy club, and it’s coming to the Hotel Mercure in Pembury this morning from 11.30am. These informal shows feature the funniest comedy stars from the circuit and are a chance for parents to bring along their little ones and let them play while the grown-ups enjoy a stand-up set. For more information, visit byobcomedy.com Kent & Sussex Poetry welcomes George Szirtes to its meeting in the Camden Centre this evening from 8pm. For more information, visit kentandsussexpoetry.com Trinity Theatre Club starts its run of Chekhov’s Three Sisters tonight. See our special feature on page 50 for details. TOUGH JUDGMENT Emma Thompson in The Children Act at Trinity

Trinity Theatre Gallery’s current exhibition is by its talented Associate Artist, Matt Syms, who goes back in time to 1984 to redesign posters from some of that year’s most favourite films. From The Karate Kid to The Terminator, Ghostbusters to Footloose, Spinal Tap to Friday the 13th – there will be something for everyone in this, his third solo exhibition, to enjoy. See trinitytheatre.net


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Going Out

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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

THE GREY LADY MUSIC LOUNGE The Pantiles Doors 7.15pm, entry £6/£7 Website: thegreylady.co.uk Wednesday Cryano, Suncharmer, Steffan James Friday Soul Avenue Sunday Chasing Shadows, Nick Lawrence, James Medhurst

THE TUNBRIDGE WELLS FORUM Event information at twforum.co.uk Thursday Under-18s Open Mic (5pm start) Saturday Boogie Nights

TRINITY THEATRE

live music With Paul Dunton

T

ONIGHT [Wednesday], local rockers Cryano return to The Grey Lady with great support from Suncharmer and Steffan James. For up-and-coming young musicians, there is an U18 open mic at The Forum on Thursday, and for fans of classical music, the excellent Frisson Ensemble are at King Charles the Martyr Church on Friday night. On Saturday there are plenty of superb gigs and concerts, with Matt Bridle at The Beau Nash Tavern, Super Duper & The Yaa Yas at The Royal Oak and The Management at The Bedford. The Carpenters Story

The must-read guide to what’s on musically for the week ahead… paulduntonandguests.com

returns to The Assembly Hall, and the popular Boogie Nights takes place at The Forum. For an alternative rock fest, Death Remains and Bleed Again will be at The Sussex Arms Basement. For fans of Michael Jackson, the King of Pop tribute will be at The Assembly Hall on Sunday evening. The Tonbridge Folk Club returns to The Flying Dutchman, Hildenborough, on Monday with guests Melanie Crew and Ross Palmer, and The Duke of York host their Open Mic Session. The Vultures will be at The Punch & Judy in Tonbridge on Tuesday night.

Church Road All show details and tickets available at trinitytheatre.net Thursday Flamenco Express (See Going Out, page 52)

CASSIDY’S BAR

Friday Frisson (Ensemble)

THE BEAU NASH TAVERN

Castle Street Open all day, free entry Music from 8.30pm till late Thursday Open Jam Session

Mount Ephraim Open all day, free entry Music from 8.30pm Saturday Matt Bridle

THE BEDFORD

THE SUSSEX ARMS BASEMENT

2 High Street Open all day, free entry Music from 8.30pm till late Friday Ryan Weeks Saturday The Management

Sussex Mews Event information at twforum.co.uk Saturday Death Remains and Bleed Again

THE ASSEMBLY HALL

KING CHARLES THE MARTYR CHURCH Nevill Street Website: kcmtw.org

Cyrano

Chasing Shadows

Crescent Road All show details and tickets available at assemblyhalltheatre.co.uk Saturday The Carpenters Story Sunday The King of Pop

THE ROYAL OAK Prospect Road Open all day, free entry Music from 8.30pm till late Saturday Super Duper & The Ya Yas

THE DUKE OF YORK The Pantiles Open all day, free entry Music from 8pm till late Monday Open Mic Night

TONBRIDGE FOLK CLUB The Flying Dutchman, Hildenborough Hat collection with a suggested contribution of £7 (£5 concessions) Music from 8pm, all welcome. More information at tonbridgefolkclub.org Monday Melanie Crew & Ross Palmer

THE PUNCH & JUDY 11 St Stephen’s Street, Tonbridge Open all day, free entry, music from 8pm Tuesday The Vultures


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Meet the food blogger

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

ARE YOU SITTING COMFORTABLY? Making food fun

who’s serving up real food for thought when it comes to children’s nutrition

One of the highlights of the recent Tunbridge Wells Food and Drink Festival was Kent bloggerturned-businesswoman Alex Thurman’s Feed the Brood pop-up. Eileen Leahy caught up with the busy mother of three to find out about her mission to get all children eating healthily

S

o Alex, please can you tell us how you started Feed the Brood and why? I started it initially as a baby-led weaning blog after having my third child in 2016. However, I found that the people I chatted to were asking me questions about far broader topics, like fussy eating and meal planning. So I decided to branch out into running courses, classes and events that could inspire busy families to enjoy time in the kitchen and at the dinner table, too.

FEELING RIGHT AT HOME Alex in her favourite room

Do you have a background in the food and drink industry? I did a nutrition degree as an undergraduate, so I’ve always been a foodie. As a mum of three and former primary school teacher, I had a burning desire to combine my love of food, skills as a teacher and experience of cooking for my family to start my own business. Now I get such a buzz when I’m sent photos of families eating their tea together and enjoying home-cooked meals.

Do you regularly get out and about and meet the general public at events like this? This was my first festival with Feed the Brood and I loved it, so yes, I will certainly be doing more. I try to attend as many local events as possible, but it all has to fit in with my busy family life, too. Can you tell us a little bit about any collaborations you work on? I did one at the Tunbridge Wells Food Festival with Jo Banks from Alive with Flavour as we live near each other. She is passionate about inspiring and educating through food and often

What’s the inspiration behind your name? Well, I was originally called Baby Led Café, but I realised that what I was capable of offering was far broader, so I rebranded and took up the Feed the Brood mantle in early 2017. I want people to understand that my business is all about family. The great thing about the name is that it gives me the freedom to branch out into lots of different directions, like a podcast (coming soon), cookery book or even a food provider if I can find someone interested to take it on!

My sherry amour It’s sherries all round, says our drinks expert James Viner, as this classic and undervalued Iberian tipple is rightly heralded during this week’s International Sherry Week. Here are two of his top picks of Spain’s top fortified wine. Salud! 1. PUNGENTLY FRESH AND BONE DRY FINO: THE CLASSIC APÉRITIF WINE González Byass Tío Pepe Fino NV Sherry, Spain (75cl, 15%, £9-£10.50, Sainsbury’s/Waitrose/ Tesco/Ocado/Asda) The world’s best-selling, uncompromisingly dry fino brand, made from grapes planted in the dazzlingly white, water-retentive albariza chalk soils around the old Moorish-Christian frontier town of Jerez. Tío Pepe is completely delectable with its crisp, freshbaked sourdough, just-struck match, roasted almond, sour cream and tangy notes, plus a bit of citrus kick.

What did you enjoy most about taking part in last month’s Tunbridge Wells Food and Drink Festival at Calverley Grounds? All the lovely people of Tunbridge Wells made me feel so proud to be part of it! I had set up a toddler play area so that little people had somewhere to unwind and get creative – it was all food-related, of course! I also did my very first cooking on stage with a mic in the Live Kitchen and it was such a thrill! I definitely want to do that again.

2. DARK, NUTTY, FRAGRANT, FULL-BODIED & OXIDATIVE OLOROSO SHERRY

Bodegas Williams & Humbert 12-Year-Old Oloroso, Spain (37.5cl, 19%, £7.99-£8.79, Waitrose) Sherries are not vintage-dated in the way that most wines are; instead, the oldest casks are habitually topped up with wine from younger casks to maintain a steady style. This is an aged, dry, dark and rich oloroso sherry, fortified with grape spirit to a higher level of alcohol. Think raisins, hazelnuts, dried figs and burnt/oxidised fruit flavours. Exceptional value.

Find out more about International Sherry Week on Twitter @SherryWines • Follow James @QuixoticWine

hosts tents at festivals, and runs supper clubs. I also have a #visiblevegetables campaign with the children’s cookery school Cookie’s Kitchen. What’s the thinking behind your #visiblevegetables campaign? We want parents to know how important it is to get children seeing and experiencing vegetables from the start of their eating experience. Hiding vegetables in order to trick children into eating them won’t have a positive effect, and most probably won’t actually result in them eating veg. As part of my collaboration with Alive with Flavour, we are looking for sponsorship for food education at various community events. Local children would benefit hugely from getting hands-on with growing, cooking and


Wednesday October 10 | 2018

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk parents out there who are either embarking on the feeding journey with their babies, or have reached the end of their tether with fussy eating. I am also launching my new cookery classes and workshops into the Tunbridge Wells area. They’re called ‘Pimp My Menu’ and ‘What’s for Dinner?’ and are a more intimate affair with plenty of laughs to help parents gain confidence in the kitchen! If you could sum up your company’s ethos in a few lines, what would it be? Feed the Brood inspires and supports busy parents to enjoy cooking family meals and make happy memories at the dinner table! To find out more about Alex and her Feed the Brood business, or if you can provide support with any sponsorship, please visit feedthebrood.com

tasting foods. This really is the best possible way to help the future generation develop healthy lifestyles now. What’s next for Feed the Brood? I have such an exciting time coming up! Firstly, I have started a collaboration with an expert dietician, Sarah Almond-Bushell, who has most recently worked with the children’s food writer and nutritionist Annabel Karmel. Together we are hosting a series of Fussy Eater and Weaning events in the Tunbridge Wells area. What will the benefits of these sessions be? These are topics which we both blog about, have experience of, and are insanely passionate about! They should be a huge success, and will definitely provide help and support for

Food & Drink

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Raj Olive Chicken

On The Menu FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Koh-e-avadh

King Prawn Lahori

Onion Bhaji

Tanga Sea Bass

Lamb Shank Bash

Shashlik Tikka

Linguine de Mar

Garlic Naan

On The Menu…

RAJ PAVILION 20 Grove Hill Road, Tunbridge Wells TN1 1RZ Tel: 01892 533153 • Web: rajpavilion.net


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FOR Good EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk Look Good, Feel

When it comes to autumn accessories

we’ve got it in the bag!

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Marks and Spencer Collection Dress, £55; Collection Animal Print Cross Body Bag, £35

Katie Wright carries you through the best new, interesting and rather unusual choices when it comes to picking a new handbag to keep all your essentials in It’s all about animal print and seventies vibes on the fashion front for autumn, but what’s going down in the accessories department? When it comes to bags, some similar themes emerged on the catwalks, and now that the high street collections are landing, we can see how the designer looks have trickled down and what’s on offer in the more affordable price category. So if you are craving some new arm candy, here are the five major bag trends you need to know about, and where to buy them…

1

Saddle bags

Part of the season’s overarching seventies theme, saddle bags have galloped on to the fashion map for autumn – in no small part thanks to the return of Dior’s iconic design, which has been reinvented in a sleek, minimal style. Chloe’s equestrian-obsessed collection has been a big influence, too, so now the high street is awash with shiny semi-circle bags with gold ring details.

2

Animal print bags

Autumn’s biggest clothing trend extends to accessories, too, with leopard the dominant print on bags at Max Mara and Loewe, while zebra stripes and snakeskin were also popular on the catwalks. A feline frock is one of the key pieces of the season. Double down on the trend by teaming your midi dress with an animal print cross-body bag.

FAR LEFT: Dorothy Perkins Leopard Cross Body Bag, currently reduced to £20 from £25; Black Motif Sweat Top, £24; Indigo Billie High Waisted Straight Leg Jeans, reduced to £22.40 from £28; Wide Fit Leopard ‘Motion’ Ankle-Boots, £30

TOP LEFT: Simply Be Ring Detail Saddle Bag, £32 ABOVE: V by Very Priya Croc Saddle Bag, £25


FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk Look

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

3

Good, Feel Good

4

Sparkly bags

Mock croc bags

Leopard may be the print of the season but when it comes to texture, crocrodile is on top. Front row fashionistas have been snapping up glossy clutches and box bags from cult labels, like Rejina Pyo and Nanushka. The great thing about this trend is that your bag looks expensive even when it isn’t – a mock croc tote is the perfect workwear staple.

Next Dark Green Bucket Bag, £36

Obviously, we all need a roomy tote or shoulder bag for carrying around everyday essentials, but after dark is when we can really have fun with accessories. And that’s what the likes of Tom Ford, Chanel and Emilia Wickstead are encouraging us to do this season, with their tiny, glitzy purses. Covered in sequins and crystals, these bags are small on size but big on impact. Practical? No. Pretty? Oh yes!

Oliver Bonas Karine Patchwork Faux Fur Tote Bag, £49.50

Cath Kidston Snow White Apple Wristlet Bag, £48

Dune London Beauty BVag, £70

5

Faux fur bags

Faux fur coats are back in a major way for winter – and fluffy bags were big news on the catwalks, from Giambattista Valli and Dries Van Noten’s natural tones and textures to Balenciaga and Moschino’s fake fuchsia fluff. If you’re feeling the seventies vibes this season, then a tonal faux fur bag will serve you well, but if you just want a bit of fluff to play with, then a bright and cosy clutch is all you need.

Next Grey Faux Fur Hobo Bag, £36

RIGHT: Laura Ashley Morello Crocodile Tote Bag, currently reduced to £26 from £45

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Books

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Running Upon The Wires by Kate Tempest Published in hardback by Picador, priced £9.99 (ebook £6.49)

Autumn reads… Time to unwind and relax, and what better way than with a great book? Here are a few suggestions for your reading…

9/10

Lethal White by Robert Gailbraith

Published in hardback by Sphere, priced £20 (ebook £9.99) THE fourth novel in The Cormoran Strike series, under JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith pseudonym, picks up where Career Of Evil left off – Robin’s wedding to the infuriating Matthew. As always with Rowling’s writing, the plot is bursting with vivid characters and unnerving plot twists. Set throughout the summer of 2012 in London, two gruesome mysteries are entwined in Strike’s latest investigation. Delving into the corridors of Parliament, Strike and Robin follow twists and turns on a journey that meets myriad complex characters, including corrupt politicians, political activists and an aristocratic family who all have ridiculous public school nicknames. Unlike the previous three novels, the main plot in Lethal White is a pretty slow burn. But the fourth instalment does give us more details of Strike and Robin’s personal lives, which only add to the captivating storytelling. (Review by Rebecca Wilcock)

9/10

KATE TEMPEST is well known as a performance poet, and her boundary-crossing work so far has seen her both nominated for a Costa Book Award and the Mercury Music Prize. Running Upon The Wires, however, is poetry designed to stand alone, and its theme is personal, charting the journey from the end of one relationship to the beginning of another. Most of all, though, it deals with the grey area of mixed feelings that lies in between, or overlaps ‘the end’ and ‘the beginning’. Tempest’s distinctive voice is still here, in the urgent rhythms, unexpected shifts of tone and pace, emotional intensity and well-observed images – “Forget that your heart is a piece of brown meat/Feel nothing but love for those that have love” – but reading from the page, without accompaniment, allows her wordcraft to shine. (Review by Lucy Whetman)

And The Ocean Was Our Sky by Patrick Ness, illustrated by Rovina Cai Published in hardback by Walker Books, priced £12.99.

WONDERFUL Patrick Ness’s pared-back, mysterious and at times sinister reimagining of Moby-Dick. A pod of hunting whales, harpoons strapped to their hulking bodies, come across the boat trail of killer Toby Wick, who massacres all in his wake. It’s a topsy-turvy world where whales and men are locked in an ongoing war, each hunting the other. Bathsheba, the pod’s youngest apprentice, begins to question the way of things, asking whether war makes devils of us all in the end. Atmospheric, violent, dripping with grief and laced with an ever-present sense of dread, this is also peppered with kernels of hope and encourages us to always query the status quo. (Review by Ella Walker)

8/10


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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Kill ’Em All by John Niven Published in hardback by William Heinemann, priced £16.99 (ebook £9.99)

9/10

IN every alcove within the British arts scene, shock value pervades. The potter in drag; The Turner Prize nominee stained with bodily fluids. So, too, the relentless vulgarity that reeks on almost every page of Kill ’Em All, the triumphant sequel to former A&R man John Niven’s groundbreaking expose of the Britpop scene in Kill Your Friends. This time, mega-rich pop impresario Steven Stelfox is parachuted in to mastermind an on-the-wane star’s money-spinning comeback tour. It’s a tough gig, and then a revelation threatens to sink both the monkey and his wealthy organ grinder. The tale is full of cultural signposts that make it ‘of the time’ – a chance meeting with President Trump is particularly enjoyable. But Niven has skillfully mastered splicing themes of vanity, excess and nihilisim with laugh-out-loud humour. Suspend your disbelief and gorge on this. Don’t stop ’til you get enough. (Review by Ryan Hooper)

Wasted Calories and Ruined Nights: A

Journey Deeper Into Dining Hell by Jay Rayner

Published in paperback by Guardian Faber, priced £5 (ebook £4.07)

THE OBSERVER restaurant critic brings together 20 of his most damning reviews in a slimline stocking filler. Proving that being paid to eat is not an endless rollercoaster of joy, he shares some of his worst experiences from the past seven years in a second compendium of woe. Not all the eateries have merely inedible food; some are condemned for poor value, lack of tasteful décor or targeting/attracting a rich yet stupid clientele. Each review has a useful note explaining what happened after it ran. Many – but not all – suffered little or no ill effect, suggesting a limit to the critic’s power, or a ready supply of less discerning diners. For me, the reviews suffer from a lack of rancour. What comes through in the end feels more like an aggravated sadness. (Review by David Wilcock)

6/10

Books

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travel

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Travel

Get swept away by Morocco’s coolest adventure sport –

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

TAKING FLIGHT A kitesurfer performing tricks above a camel – who luckily didn’t get the hump

kite surfing

An opportunity to ride north Africa’s waves brings Stephen White to the pretty coastal town Essaouira READY TO BRAVE THE WAVES Stephen White with his surfboard

L

IKE a bolt from the blue, an unexpected sunbeam of an invitation to visit Morocco lands in my inbox and instantly brightens up my ever-darkening September. It promises sun, sea and sand, alongside the sights, sounds and tastes of the ancient port city of Essaouira. Oh, and the chance to learn kitesurfing… “Yes, please.” But as the date neared, I began to wonder how I, now the wrong side of 60, grey of hair, carrying more pounds than I’d like to admit, and more in the habit of drinking oceans than surfing them, would cope with it all? After a smooth as silk three-and-a-halfhour flight from Luton, we touched down at Essaouira’s beautiful airport (think mirrored walls and palm trees).

A minibus carried us past the beach where a line of camels was silhouetted perfectly against the sun just beginning to dip below the Atlantic, before dropping us outside the old maze-like medina close to our home for the next couple of nights, KiteWorldwide’s Riad Essaouira. WARMING HOSPITALITY Here, we enjoyed our first experience of Moroccan hospitality; an impressive and delicious dinner prepared in the tiny kitchen by locals Zahira and Reguraguia. It was a beautiful smorgasbord of traditional tagines – mixed vegetables, aubergine, lamb with prunes and apricots and, my favourite, chicken with tangy olives and lemon. In a flash, it was 5.45am the next day, and the still-dark silence was shattered by the piercing

voice of the muezzin from a nearby mosque, calling the faithful to prayer – as he does five times every day. After breakfast, we enjoyed a 15-minute walk in the sun to the wide undulating beach south of the city to meet Nasser, owner of the Explora Surf School, and his team of instructors. We changed into wetsuits and headed barefoot across the animal-packed beach, full of horses, camels and dogs. And I soon realised that the small, round, dark brown objects strewn everywhere, some of them shiny and new, weren’t pebbles! The wind was too light for the kites, so it was on to a bit of surfing. Our instructors were expert and keen – they demonstrated how to position yourself on our board, how to catch a wave, then slide to your A TASTE OF THE MOROCCAN BLUES Essaouira port after sunset at ‘blue hour’


Wednesday October 10 | 2018

knees, then up to your feet, while at all times adopting the correct posture. It sounded easy. It wasn’t, and it’s exhausting. These mini Atlantic rollers don’t look much but they pack a punch and, combined with the frantic paddling, quickly sap your energy. But most of us made it to our feet at least once or twice and experienced the thrill of being pushed along by nature. By 3pm, the wind had strengthened enough for us to experience flying a small kite. Harnesses that fit around your lower back and hips keep you connected to the kite. Control comes from your core. Helmets save your head from

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

bangs on the ocean floor or against other kiters – once you’re good enough to mix with them. Early instruction was all about how to set up the kite (inflating the leading edge and struts, fastening the lines), how to secure it to your harness, and what to do if things go wrong, as they inevitably will. It was also about learning how to control the kite – understanding the wind and the ‘safe’ and ‘power’ zones. Our instructor insisted kitesurfing is for people of all ages and abilities (even me!) He told us we were all doing well – giving us the confidence to allow relaxation and ‘feel’ take over from tight, tense grips and strength. THE LUNCH BUNCH Stephen (centre right) with the press group

Travel

Meanwhile, the experts were flying their huge, colourful kites and flashing about the ocean, many of them doing intricate tricks, jumping waves and sailing through the air. It looked impressive, effortless and great fun. APRÈS-SURF Dinner at the no-alcohol Mega Loft, a multifloored restaurant with a lovely roof terrace, was memorable. A guitar duo sang a mixture of Moroccan standards and Bob Marley classics as I sampled crunchy gambas (battered king prawns) and a lovely main of chicken pastilla; layers of thin, crispy pastry filled with savoury saffron chicken and spicy omelette, with a crunchy topping of toasted almonds sweetened with orange flower water and dusted with icing and cinnamon. A carrot and ginger juice matched it perfectly. Next morning, the stiffness and ache in my shoulders told me I probably took to the surfing a tad too enthusiastically. There was still little wind, so I decided to explore the narrow alleys of the medina, wondering at the quality (and low prices) of the lovely spices, fresh fruit, vegetables, ceramics, leather goods and fine woodwork. You could spend hours here just wandering and looking, and unlike some Moroccan cities, you will suffer little pressure to buy. There’s also the picturesque harbour filled with bright blue fishing boats and impressive 18thcentury ramparts.

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Film buffs will love Essaouira. Scenes from the 1951 Orson Welles Palme d’Or-winning Othello, Ridley Scott’s Gladiator, Terry Gilliam’s Time Bandits, the epic Lawrence of Arabia and, more recently, Game of Thrones were all shot here. Back at the beach, the wind had still not shown up. We should have been taking in more practice with a kite, then moving on to the alarmingsounding body dragging, i.e. letting the kite, under control, pull you through the water. Then we might, just might, have been capable of connecting with a board and taking our first tentative steps on the water. Like all skills, it takes time, but we were told that after a week of lessons everyone would be out there among the waves. Not bad for something that could lead to a lifelong passion and take you all around the world. HOW TO GET THERE KiteWorldwide (kiteworldwide.com/en) is a kitesurfing travel specialist operating holidays to the world’s best kiting destinations. Their seven-night Essaouira package costs from £650 and includes a 12-hour kite course, kite rental at the end of the course and surfboard or stand up paddleboard rental. Flights extra. For more information, visit visitmorocco.com or muchmorocco.com


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Motoring

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Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Motoring News Car sales expected to dive after vehicles are pre-registered to dodge new emissions rules STRONG new car sales figures posted in August are likely to crash in September, after artificially high levels were caused by dealers preregistering vehicles. It’s suspected that highs of 94,094 registrations are a response to new Worldwide Harmonised Light Vehicle Testing Procedure [WLTP] regulations, with manufacturers keen to offload vehicles before they became non-compliant on September 1. All new vehicles registered after this date are required to conform to the system’s strict new testing procedure for fuel consumption, CO2 and pollutant emissions. However, rather than risk having hundreds of non-WLTP compliant cars, manufacturers have inundated dealers with pre-registered models. Pre-registering refers to car dealers registering cars themselves before selling them on as ultra-low

mileage used vehicles, normally at a large discount. In this case, it also allowed them to circumvent WLTP regulations, which would have seen a great number of cars left unable to be registered without being put through a costly testing process. New car registration data showed a 23.1 per cent jump in August over the previous year. Used car buying website Auto Trader saw a 22 per cent rise in the number of cars with fewer than 100 miles on the clock, further indicating large numbers of pre-reg cars. Auto Trader Director Ian Plummer said: “We’ve seen more tactically registered new cars advertised each month, and can only assume there are more out in the market.” Dealers are now expecting a sales plunge in September against the market’s usual upward trend, with it being one of two months when number plates change.

Ford pays for repairs of EcoBoost fault

BMW lifts the lid on changes in its new 3 Series, due out next spring THE seventh generation of BMW’s popular 3 Series saloon has been completely revised, and is due to go on sale from next March. With prices starting at £33,610, the revamped series offers more space and improved handling. The new car is now 85mm longer, 16mm wider and has a wheelbase extended by 41mm after being based on similar underpinnings as the larger 5 Series. And the large kidney grilles remain at the front are now framed by ‘notched’ headlights. Inside, it remains driver-focused. A large central screen dominates the cabin, aided by traditional button controls for functions such as heating and ventilation. A 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster replaces the traditional dials

behind the wheel, supplemented by the 10.3-in central screen, which uses BMW’s latest infotainment system. The popular 320d model remains, powered by an upgraded 2.0-litre four-cylinder diesel, and is available with both rear and all-wheel drive. The rear-driven 320d can hit 60mph in 6.9 seconds, with the xDrive version shaving that to 6.7 seconds. A powerful four-cylinder petrol will be used in the 330i and is capable of hitting 60mph in 5.6 seconds while delivering a claimed combined fuel consumption of 48.7mpg. Overall body rigidity is now up by 25 per cent, while the suspension spring rate has also been increased to help deliver a more sporting drive. The M Sport specification remains, too, offering a more dynamic look.

BIGGER AND BETTER The new 3 Series

FORD is to cover the costs of a fix to prevent an issue with overheating in its 1.0-litre EcoBoost engines. The fault lies in coolant hoses that can potentially fail at high speed, and is said to affect 44,682 cars in the UK built between October 2011 and October 2013. A recall issued in 2015 has seen 96 per cent of the vehicles reportedly fixed – although a BBC investigation found that many customers had still paid huge repair bills for the work, despite a contribution from the manufacturer. The firm has now committed to covering the costs of any outstanding repairs and will ‘reexamine previous cases to ensure that this policy of a 100 per cent contribution to the repair cost is applied consistently’. A Ford statement said: “Our website has carried details to encourage outstanding owners who have experienced an issue to get in touch. Ford has already made substantial contributions towards the cost of 1.0-litre repairs, but ongoing discussions with customers show that Ford needs to go further to ensure reasonable repair costs are covered. “With any future cases, subject to being assessed and linked to potential 1.0-litre engine overheating, we will contribute 100 per cent of the cost of repair at a Ford dealer.” Ford also highlighted an overheating issue for larger 1.6-litre EcoBoost engines, as found in the Fiesta ST, Focus, Kuga, C-Max and Transit. It says a lack of coolant circulation in affected vehicles can cause overheating, leading to a cracked cylinder head and pressurised oil leak. This means oil could come into contact with the hot engine and increase the risk of a fire. Ford is currently working with the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency to issue a recall, while also contacting customers for a new coolant sensor to be fitted.


68 Recruitment

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

WITH THE

FIND YOUR PERFECT JOB TODAY – A MUST-READ FOR THOSE LOOKING FOR WORK LOCALLY

OF TUNBRIDGE WELLS AND TONBRIDGE


CODEWORD 4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

R

M

A B C D E F G H I J K L MNO P Q R S T U VWX Y Z 4 7

21

20

R

2

15 25

26

14

25 7

1

4

11

19

26

26

14

13

22

9

26

14

M

2 2

6

3

12

9

25 7

9 20

22

M

R

12

22

M

10

9

2 15

16 25

14

9

20 2

14

R

15

R

15

26

14

8

15

20

23

2

2

22

25

15

M

2

16

14

19

9

7

25

4 9

12 7

R

10

10

19

19

Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Above the grid is the key with two letters solved. Try to complete the first few words to give you more letters, or look for a frequent number that might reveal a common letter. As you find letters, enter them in the key and into the grid. Cross off the letters in the A to Z list.

8

7 2

5 2 8

2

2

3 14

Codeword:

9 3

To complete Sudoku, fill the board by entering numbers 1 to 9 so that each row, column and 3x3 box contains every number uniquely.

16

15

6 3

4 3 1

5 8

6 7

20

7 9 2

5 1

19

24

14 2

R

7

26

2 14

3

18

14

1 26

9

2

14

20 7

12 17

15

3 8

5

3

6

1 3

7

© 2016 Syndicated Puzzles, Inc.

3

DIFFICULTY RATING:★✩✩✩

2

9

3 1

4

5 6

1

2

5 8 4 2 6

1 9

© 2016 Syndicated Puzzles

1

69

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTIONS

SUDOKU & JIGSAW SUDOKU

DIFFICULTY RATING: ★★✩✩

CLASSIFIEDS

Life&Times

Puzzles

In this Sudoku, the normal 3x3 boxes are now strangely odd shapes – but all the rules and logic of normal Sudoku apply. Fill the board by entering numbers 1 to 9 so that each row, column and box contains every number uniquely.

Puzzle solutions will be published in a forthcoming issue

B U F F A L L E V A L A MO Z T I E C U A D O R F R E N C H A L I S S U E R T A WH A T NO A L E Y O K E D

O J U X E F U R L O I R C L H D D O U P E S Q U N U T O U U T P R E C

D G E R A ON G V E E A R L B L Y R I R E T R T D O L D E D E

1 3 6 5 2 9 4 8 7

2 7 8 1 4 6 3 5 9

6 8 2 7 9 5 1 4 3

9 5 7 4 1 3 8 2 6

7 6 2 1 4 9 5 3 8

4 2 5 7 6 8 3 1 9

2 3 6 8 9 5 1 4 7

Sudoku:

5 2 1 9 8 7 6 3 4

8 4 3 6 5 1 7 9 2

7 6 9 2 3 4 5 1 8

4 9 5 3 7 8 2 6 1

3 1 4 8 6 2 9 7 5

Jigsaw Sudoku:

6 1 8 3 5 7 4 9 2

1 5 7 6 2 3 9 8 4

5 4 9 2 8 1 7 6 3

8 9 3 4 7 6 2 5 1

3 8 4 9 1 2 6 7 5

9 7 1 5 3 4 8 2 6

© 2016 Syndicated Puzzles

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Wednesday October 10 | 2018


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Life&Times

Sport

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk Please send sports stories to: newsdesk@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk or newsdesk@timesoftonbridge.co.uk

Wednesday October 10 | 2018

Record time for men and Heslop dominates again Tunbridge Wells Harriers with Charlotte Bates of Maidstone Harriers in third place. The men’s team competition was won by Tonbridge AC, who were represented by Bradley, Julian Rendall and Luke Hooper, with Sevenoaks AC as runners-up and Tunbridge Wells Harriers coming third. The ladies’ competition was won by Tunbridge Wells Harriers, consisting of Harriet Wooley, Pru Clements and Hayley Larkin, with Tonbridge AC in second place this time and Dartford Road Runners third. The organisers were once again grateful to SE Medical for providing outstanding first aid cover for the event with several mobile, highly qualified first aiders situated at key points around the course and two ambulances crews based in Leigh and at the finish line. There were more than 200 local volunteers who joined forces with them to make the event a great success, including the Tonbridge Lions and Tonbridge Rotary Club, the eighth Tonbridge Scouts from Hildenborough, 2250 Squadron Air Training Corps, the Fat Boy football team and Carers First. Nice Work managed the race again, and a full list of the results can be seen at nice-work.org.uk

By Andy Blundell ATHLETICS: THE eighth Tonbridge Half Marathon saw 800 runners take part across the 13.1-mile route around the town and surrounding country lanes on Sunday [October 7]. The competitors raised more than £50,000 for the race’s headline charities, The Bridge Trust and Aspen, and for their own nominated charities, with a further 48 different organisations set to benefit. The cool but sunny conditions proved ideal for the event. Daniel Gaffney of South London Harriers Athletics Club won the men’s race in a course record time of 1hr 11min 25sec, breaking the previous best by 75 seconds. The win earned himself an additional £150 in prize money, which was donated by DC Access, the event’s principal sponsors. Previous winner and record-holder Daniel Bradley of Tonbridge Athletic Club came second with Neil McClements in third place. The women’s race was once again dominated by Maria Heslop of Tonbridge AC in a time of 1:22.32 – she has now won five times. She completed the course nearly eight minutes ahead of second-placed Harriet Wooley of

MILES OF SMILES Runners enjoy the scenic route around country lanes

Robinson digs deep to bury St Edmunds Bury St Edmunds 0 Tonbridge Juddians 10 RUGBY: IT WAS the Will Robinson show for Tonbridge Juddians as they shut out their hosts Bury St Edmunds on a wet, windy day in Suffolk. The victory kept TJs in fourth place in National Two South with the same number of wins as the top three [five out of six] but fewer bonus points. The visitors never looked like losing as they closed down everything Bury St Edmunds [BSE] threw at them, and Robinson scored all ten points with a converted first half try and a late penalty. The home side set their stall out early with a bash-it-up approach, but to no avail as TJs’ defence remained rock solid. Sides invariably have to kick as their attacks flounder but with a back three of Murray Galbraith-Lowe, Toby May and Hugo Watson they are simply inviting TJs back on to them. They duly unleashed wave after wave of pacey

WILL POWER Robinson scores the only try of the game

PHOTO: Adam Hookway

By Adam Hookway

Ruthless leaders hand out harsh lesson to Men

attacks despite the conditions. From one such foray Galbraith-Lowe and May combined to get behind the BSE defence. Will Colderick and his fellow scrummagers took it on and a deft pass to Robinson saw him cross under the sticks. Robinson converted and TJs had a deserved lead. As the half drew to a close Ryan Jackson was yellow-carded for an off-the-ball incident and BSE had a promising spell but could not make it count. A bright start to the second half by TJs mirrored the first period. They put BSE on the back foot and were rarely threatened inside their own 22. Any penalties the home side won were too far out and in a disciplined display TJs denied their hosts a single kick at goal all through the game. Good work by the TJ scrum gave them a platform for a series of drives which culminated in penalty of their own and Robinson kicked it successfully. It was one of Tonbridge’s best defensive performances for some time and the team spirit shone through as the whole squad put in a shift. Now TJs entertain Barnes at The Slade on Saturday [October 13, kick-off 3pm].

Old Cranleighans 6 Tunbridge Wells Men 1 By Francis Bridgeman HOCKEY: TUNBRIDGE WELLS Men are learning tough lessons in their first season back in South Premier League Division One for over a decade. At the start they did not look as nervous against one of the stronger sides in the league as they had in the first match of the season. The visitors played well early on and created a number of chances but were only able to convert one of them, from Harry Roberts, in the first half while the hosts scored three. The home side raised their game in the second half and proved a well drilled outfit that were able to adapt and reduce any threat Wells posed. They also continued to create chances, adding a further three goals to their first-half tally. Wells now face another stern test when they entertain Winchester, who are joint top of the league with Old Cranleighans, at Tonbridge School on Saturday [October 13, 1.30pm start].

Third home defeat on bounce for Wells By Roger Clarke RUGBY: TUNBRIDGE WELLS struggled to cope with wet conditions once again as they slipped to their third home defeat in succession in the London & South East Premier Division. For the first league meeting between the two teams, Wells had the elements in their favour in the first half and were looking to take advantage and build a sizeable lead. Frank Reynolds kicked a simple penalty after Brentwood’s Adam Thomas was sin-binned for team misdemeanours close to the visitors’ line. But despite pinning Brentwood back in their 22, it took until the 23rd minute for Wells to threaten. The ball was skilfully directed to George Montgomery for a converted try. It was the full-back’s first start since returning from London Irish. Five minutes before half-time left wing Jake Caddy beat his opposite number on the outside and fed Reynolds to score close to the posts and add the extras for a 17-0 lead. In their first visit to the Wells 22, Brentwood found space out wide for a diagonal kick to right

wing Liam Batty, who scored an unconverted try to reduce the deficit at the interval. Further bad news came for the hosts when Max Hobbs left the field with a serious shoulder injury. Within two minutes of the restart the home tackling was found wanting down the left as full-back Toby Simpson scored a converted try. Wells could not break out as the rain intensified and were hampered by a combination of inaccurate passing and poor technical kicking out of hand. On the hour the visitors spotted space on the right flank and another diagonal kick allowed Batty to score again, with Brad Burr converting from the touchline to put his side in the lead. In the 68th minute a poor clearance kick found Simpson in space and he moved the ball wide for

Honavar inspires Ladies to victory

HOLDING ON Tom Bailey clings on to the ball in the rain

Tunbridge Wells Ladies 2 Canterbury 0

Photo: Bruce Elliott

Tunbridge Wells 17 Brentwood 26

Batty to complete his hat trick and Burr to convert – Brentwood won the second half 21-0, showing how conditions affected the match. Wells, who are now third from bottom in the Premier Division, have a welcome week off before travelling to Sutton & Epsom on October 20 [kick-off 3pm].

HOCKEY: AFTER a difficult start to the season Wells put in a good performance against the newly promoted Canterbury side in East Region Division One South at Kent College. They started strongly, holding their new formation well and playing the ball around, and it was not long before they went 1-0 up. The youngest member of the squad, Amelia Honavar, dribbled round several opponents and delivered an exquisite ball from the back line to Harriet Alexander, who scored confidently. Then Becky Bradbury attacked the circle and slipped the ball to captain Amy Hare, who showed a combination of control and skill to fire in the second goal. Wells Ladies now travel to Ashford on Saturday [October 13, 1.30pm start].


Wednesday October 10 | 2018

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Sport

Prolific Burton seals first away win against Ladies’ arch rivals By Dan Couldridge FOOTBALL: TONBRIDGE ANGELS Ladies picked up their first away win of the season at fellow promoted side Thamesview and moved up to third place in Division One East with an impressive display. The teams had been close rivals the previous season with Thamesview pipping Tonbridge to the league title by a point while the Angels won a closely contested cup final in extra-time. The visitors looked confident and in control throughout. But clear-cut opportunities were scarce in the first half-hour however. The breakthrough arrived in the 32nd minute

when Maisie Gibb she sent in a cross from the left which was handled by a Thamesview defender in the box. Sam Burton placed the resulting penalty kick into the bottom corner. Tonbridge began carving open the Thamesview defence at will. Three minutes before half-time Becky Janes found herself through on goal, her shot was only half-cleared by goalkeeper Keisha Lemar and Megazn Akehurst hit the rebound on the volley with venom from 40 yards out to score. Becky Mackley played in Janes, who turned her defender before chipping Lemar from 20 yards. There was still time for the hosts to force a corner and Lydia Wills scrambled the ball over the line to reduce the arrears to 3-1 at half-time. Thamesview were a better side after the break but their hopes of a comeback were hindered by a second yellow card for Rachael Jestin-Cull. Flo Anastasiou was booked for a foul, and was

71

DOUBLE TROUBLE Sam Burton volleys home a corner for her second goal

Photo: David Couldridge

Thamesview 2 Tonbridge Angels Ladies 4

Life&Times

penalised again with 10 minutes left, the resulting free kick from Imogen Saunders sailing into the top corner, out of the reach of Angels goalkeeper Helena Fothergill. Having conceded a late equaliser the previous week, the Angels now had to hold their nerve. But

they sealed their victory on 86 minutes as Alex Weston’s corner was volleyed in from close range by Burton, taking her tally for the season to four. Tonbridge now look forward to a run of home games starting with the visit of Cray Valley to Hadlow College on Sunday [October 14].

Turner pulls strings as Angels return to form By Jim Rowe FOOTBALL: THE Bostik League Premier leaders got back to winning ways with a deserved victory but they were made to work hard for the points by a well-organised Potters defence. The home side enjoyed plenty of possession but they managed to carve out few genuine chances in the first half. Jack Richards sent in a low cross in the 21st minute which had to be cleared off the line. Just before the interval Joe Turner and Richards

combined well to set up Adem Ramadan but his effort just cleared the crossbar. Angels went in front after just a minute of the second period when Tom Parkinson converted Turner’s free kick. There was an immediate response from the Scholars, however, with Keegan Coles volleying his blocked free kick against the angle of bar and post and Eoin Casey knocking in the rebound for the equaliser. Tonbridge continued to dominate possession and their efforts were rewarded on 72 minutes when Turner forced his way through and finished with a superb shot to restore the lead. The home defence, which had been rock solid FINE FINISH Joe Turner (left) celebrates his winning goal

Rustics fail to convert chances Bearsted 4 Rusthall 2 By Joe Croker FOOTBALL: RUSTHALL suffered their fifth defeat in a row in the Southern Counties East League Premier Division despite having been the better side until the last 20 minutes. The first half was dominated by the visitors and they should have been leading by more goals than the one scored by Callum Ridley. The influential Ed Sharman saw an early header hit the post as the Rustics’ fluid play created numerous chances. Ridley was making penetrating runs through the middle while Regan Corke created problems down Bearsted’s left flank and supplied tempting crosses into the box.

He was well supported by left-back Robbie Bissett, and he struck the crossbar while Corke found the side netting in a positive start to the second half. They were left to rue their missed chances as a long ball into the Rusthall penalty area found Matt Garner, who scored to level the match. This gave Bearsted a lift and Rusthall seemed to be deflated as the home side went on to score three more in the next 15 minutes, through Reece Collins twice and Jonathan Rodgers. The visitors did recover their composure and managed to score a late goal with a curling shot from outside the box by Sharman but it was too little too late. Rusthall now have a break from league aciton as they travel to Newhaven for an FA Vase tie on Saturday [October 13, kick-off 3pm].

until the previous weekend’s defeat, stood firm with goalkeeper Jonny Henly not called upon to make a meaningful save. The Angels’ dominance was helped by a straight red card for Potters Bar’s Sean Grace for bringing down Tonbridge substitute Liam King when he was through on goal. Angels manager Steve McKimm said: “I was very pleased with our performance today, particularly during the second half when despite being pegged back immediately after our first goal, our heads didn’t drop and if anything we moved into a higher gear.” Tonbridge now face Bognor Regis Town at Longmead on Saturday [October 13, kick-off 3pm]. Photo: David Couldridge

Tonbridge Angels 2 Potters Bar Town 1

BOOT BOOST FOR SCHOOL Tonbridge Angels have donated 30 pairs of football boots to Long Mead Community Primary School, near the club’s stadium, to help pupils whose parents cannot afford the rising cost of sportswear. The scheme was run in association with another neighbour, Tonbridge Baptist Church. Its Community Work Coordinator, Jemma Graffin, said: “The boots are going to families from the school who would otherwise struggle to buy them. The PE teacher is hugely grateful so thank you very much for your kind gift.”


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Times of Tunbridge Wells 10th October 2018  

Times of Tunbridge Wells 10th October 2018  

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