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Wednesday September 12 | 2018


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

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Council chiefs give green light to charge for garden waste

Stealth tax But the levy on the garden waste collection has been a controversial innovation which is widely regarded as a ‘stealth tax’ across both boroughs. The council insists that the charge has allowed it to improve its service in other areas and says ‘the majority of local authorities now do [this]’. TMBC have calculated that it will save an anticipated £750,000 per annum if 40 per cent of residents decide to take up the option. It will be offered at a discounted £35 for each of the first two years to encourage participation. In Tunbridge Wells, residents will have to pay £52 a year. Cllr David Lettington, Cabinet Member for Street Scene and

Continued on page 2

Chasing Connor’s Cure stages new cycling events Page 13

PHOTO: Shilling Snaps

THE council’s Cabinet has approved a £40 annual charge for those who ‘opt in’ to have garden waste collected every fortnight. The scheme will form part of a new refuse and recycling contract adopted by the councils of Tonbridge & Malling [TMBC] and Tunbridge Wells, which will start next March. The joint Waste and Street Cleansing Service is described as providing ‘vastly improved kerbside collection services’. For the first time it will include a doorstep service for glass, plastics and cartons every fortnight. Paper and card will be picked up on the alternate week, and there will also be a weekly food waste collection.

COUNTRYSIDE RIDE

FIRST-CLASS RETURN How to help as your children go back to school Page 19

IN FULL FLOW: Boars with the Oars (foreground) win the Dragon Boat Race final on Sunday as hundreds watch. Turn to Page 2

£1m building for homeless in High Street is ‘a step forward’ By Andy Tong andy@timesoftonbridge.co.uk LOCAL charities have welcomed the news that Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council [TMBC] has bought a property in the High Street to provide temporary accommodation for the homeless. The £1.05million purchase was entirely funded by contributions from companies building private housing in the area. These ‘obligations’ come from Section 106 agreements under the Planning Act, requiring developers and local housing associations to put money back into the communities where they build. The premises have been converted into six apartments – five one-bedroom flats and one with two bedrooms.

They will be used to help individuals and families who are making a formal application to the council to find a home. The move will also help the local authority’s budget since it will reduce the high cost of current arrangements, such as bed-and-breakfasts.

‘The council has relied on nightly accommodation from private providers’ There is a statutory requirement for the council’s Housing Service to find temporary accommodation for local people. Currently it has found places for 24 households, and the number has ranged between 20 and 30 in recent years, with

the length of stay varying from a few nights to several months. TMBC issued a statement saying: “The council took the decision to purchase the property earlier this year following changes in legislation which are expected to result in a 50 per cent increase in demand for temporary accommodation. “Until now, the council has relied predominantly on nightly paid accommodation from private providers, so the purchase of its own temporary accommodation will ensure a more reliable supply of properties and reduce longterm costs.” The introduction of the Homelessness Reduction Act in April has placed greater responsibility on councils to prevent

Continued on page 2

FRENCH FANCIES?

Gallic cuisine doesn’t have to be too complicated Page 56

CUP AND RUNNING

Striker Read on top form for Tonbridge Angels Page 67


NEWS

Local News

GARDEN WASTE: Continued from page 1 Environment Services, said: “For some years, residents have been asking us to collect more materials for recycling from home and the new contract will give us the opportunity to do this. “Charging for green waste collections – as the majority of local authorities now do –means that we can greatly expand our kerbside collections to include plastics, cartons, cans and glass, and a separate weekly food waste collection.” He added: “We will also be able to offer other enhanced services including the kerbside collection of textiles, small electrical items and household batteries.” The garden waste charge is subject to the agreement of Full Council on September 18.

Man charged with attempted murder A MAN has been charged with attempted murder after Kent police investigated an assault in Meopham. Alexander Weston, 42, of Church Fields in West Malling, was charged with one count of attempted murder on Saturday [September 8]. The charge relates to an incident near Waterlow Road in Meopham on September 3. At around 12.45am a woman was reported to have been assaulted by a man known to her. The woman was taken to a local hospital suffering from head injuries. Mr Weston appeared before Medway Magistrates’ Court on Monday and has been remanded to appear before Maidstone Crown Court on October 8.

Help Good Companions THE Good Companions Club is looking to recruit new members in order to keep the club going. The organisation provides evenings out for senior citizens and is seeking volunteers in their 40s or 50s to join the management committee and assist many long-serving members who are now approaching their 80s. The club is also looking to recruit volunteer drivers so that housebound members can continue to enjoy the monthly social gatherings. Please phone the Chairman Jan Powis on 01732 355676 for further details.

CONTACTS EDITORIAL DIRECTOR RICHARD MOORE richard@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk | 01892 779615 DEPUTY EDITOR EILEEN LEAHY eileen@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk | 01892 576037 REPORTER ANDY TONG andy@timesoftonbridge.co.uk DESIGN/PRODUCTION LEE SMITH lsmith8@markerstudy.com SALES ENQUIRIES GHak@onemediauk.co.uk | 01892 779650 FIND US ONLINE facebook.com/timeslocalnews timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk twitter.com/timeslocalnews

Runcie Court, David Salomons Estate, Broomhill Road, Tunbridge Wells, Kent TN3 0TF

CLARIFICATIONS AND CORRECTIONS HERE at the Times of Tonbridge we strive to deliver fair, accurate and balanced reports. When we don’t meet our own high standards we will accept the responsibility and publish clarifications and corrections. If you would like to make a comment on any aspect of the newspaper, please write to the editor at 16 Lonsdale Gardens, Tunbridge Wells, Kent TN1 1NU, or email newsdesk@timesoftonbridge.co.uk Markerstudy Leisure is a trading name of One Media and Creative UK Limited registered in England and Wales under company number 5398960 with registered office at 45 Westerham Road, Sevenoaks, Kent TN13 2QB.

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Wednesday September 5 | 2018

Surf and smurf for Dragon Boat festival THE Dragon Boat Race, now in its sixth year, was hailed as ‘the best so far’ as hundreds of supporters lined the banks of the Medway by the Big Bridge to cheer on the competitors on Sunday [September 9]. The event, hosted by Tonbridge Town Team, is regarded as one of the highlights of the town’s calendar and coincided with the Medieval Fair on neighbouring Castle Lawn. There were 24 teams taking part in the six hours of racing, each consisting of 16 rowers along with a drummer to keep rhythm over the 200-metre course.

Schools The winner, for the second year running, were Boars with the Oars, a crew of teachers and staff from Tonbridge School. In second place were the Bidborough Dragons, comprising past and present parents of Bidborough Primary School, with Stocks Green Pre-School in Hildenborough coming third in the showpiece final. There was also a prize for the best-dressed team, which went to the Parkrun Smurfs from Manor Park Juniors parkrun in West Malling. All

DEEP BLUE The Parkrun Smurfs from West Malling were the best-dressed team

PHOTO: Shilling Snaps

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the teams were raising money for charities and worthy causes of their choice. Sarah Spence, Dragon Boat Race Director, said: “We were delighted with the turnout. The festival atmosphere has never been as tangible as it was on Sunday and everyone had a fantastic time. “Big thanks go to the teams that took part, the Town Team, the Mayor of Tonbridge & Malling Cllr Pam Bates for presenting the trophies, Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council for their

support and all our volunteers from the Lions who act as stewards. It was a brilliant day.” Howard Porter, Chairman of the Town Team, said: “A huge amount of effort goes into this and all the events we put on in the town. This year’s races where probably the best so far and turnout was fantastic. “This is a real team effort that brings so many people together to raise money for charity, have a great time and celebrate the wonderful community we have in Tonbridge.”

Twin milestones for veteran Lion Maurice Gilham MAURICE GILHAM has been recognised for half a century of service to the town’s Lions club – shortly before he and his wife Doreen celebrate their diamond wedding anniversary. The Gilhams, who were both born in Tonbridge, were introduced to the club by Ron Nutley. Mr Gilham, who was inducted at the Chequers Inn in 1968, was presented with his 50 years’ service award by the Zone Chairman James Lark. “I have special memories of the traction engine rallies and charity balls with themes such as The Wild West and PRIDE OF LIONS: The club’s Zone Chairman James Lark (left) Roman Scandals,” recalled Mr Gilham. presents Maurice Gilham with his 50-year service award “I have a long association with the Mr Gilham has held most of the offices with the Christmas barrel organ, having organised it for 12 Lions, and because President in 1981. He worked years and participated in the street collection for for Post Office Telecommunications and BT for 42 50 years consecutively.”

HOMELESS BUILDING: Continued from page 1 homelessness. TMBC believes this closer involvement could lead to a significant rise in demand for temporary accommodation. It is also looking to purchase another property in the north of the borough for the same purpose. At a full council meeting in July, the Leader Nicolas Heslop confirmed that TMBC had committed up to £1.6million for the two projects. The developer contributions ‘have been accrued from various developments over recent years’. Cllr Heslop said: “This is a positive move which will give us more options to help people who we have a duty to house temporarily.

Costs “It will also reduce our reliance on nightly paid accommodation and consequently help to manage and reduce our costs.” He added: “I’m very pleased that we have been able to use resources that the council has properly accrued from development in the borough to provide suitable homes that are fit for purpose for those who we need to help, and hope that some suitable accommodation in the north of the borough can also be identified.” Those who are waiting for a decision on being housed are often forced to move away from their families and their children’s schools. In May there were 32 households in temporary accommodation in Tonbridge & Malling, but less than a third of them were living in the borough

– one was rehoused in Sheerness on the northern tip of the Isle of Sheppey. There were 1,145 live applications for housing on the council’s waiting list – with 167 being allocated homes over the previous six months. John Handley, Chief Executive of The Bridge Trust, a homeless charity in Tonbridge, said: “Section 106 contributions from developers need to be spent on affordable housing solutions, and given the number of people in temporary accommodation I think that this is a good step.” “This is especially so as temporary accommodation tends to be in cheaper areas outside of towns or even relatively in the middle of nowhere. “It is certainly outside of the support networks that people need like schools and transport links. So having accommodation in the town is a definite step forward.” He added: “Putting people into temporary accommodation like bed-and-breakfasts costs a

AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROMISE The new Local Plan, which is expected to be adopted in January, will require developers to provide a minimum of 40 per cent of affordable homes in the borough up to 2031. Policy LP39 will impose the quota on qualifying schemes of 11 units or more, or those with a combined gross floor area over 1,000 square metres. In May it emerged that only eight affordable family homes – of three or four bedrooms – have been built in the town in 2016-17.

years and retired in 1990 as Regional Director of International Relations for Eastern Europe, Africa, Middle East and the Sub-continent. He believes the Tonbridge Lions have an excellent record in membership retention, which he attributes to the regular social events and the integral part that members’ partners play in all the activities. He says the club is well organised with a committee structure which encourages individuals to express themselves and deploy their talents. Mr Gilham is also the club’s official photographer, which he says ‘has involved me in all the fundraising and community service events’. He added: “I really enjoy taking the photos of cheques being presented to record how we distribute the money raised to those deserving our help.” lot, and if the council could buy more property to do this themselves, I think they would. So it’s just a matter of finances.” But he added a note of caution, saying: “Of course, there is never enough social housing or affordable private housing available. “Whatever type of homelessness you try and address, ultimately we need more housing and that’s been the case forever.” He pointed out that the scheme would not help those who are sleeping rough. “These are people that the council has a legal duty to house – such as families with dependent children. “The council is referring to homeless people in priority need only. This won’t be for our type of clients – rough sleepers, ‘sofa surfers’ and the like.” The Bridge Trust is one of many homeless charities who are facing funding problems, with contributions from Kent County Council likely to be reduced by 25 per cent. It has already suffered a one-off £7,000 cut which meant the Trust had to give up one of its own dedicated flats. Rob Marsh, Chief Executive of YMCA West Kent which has a base on Vale Rise, said: “Overall I warmly welcome this positive initiative, which can only help to meet real short-term needs that are highly likely to increase, and reduce running costs. Well done TMBC.” But he warned: “We still need more affordable long-term housing for single people, couples and families and more funding for such developments. “We also need funding for preventing homelessness and then, if it occurs, for support to return to mainstream long-term affordable housing.”


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

NEWS IN BRIEF

First Beer Weekend for Tunbridge Wells TALKS, tastings, open days and live music are all on offer at the inaugural Tunbridge Wells Beer Weekend. Events are taking place at: Fuggles Beer Café, The Pantiles Tap, Sankey’s, The George and Pig & Porter Brewery from Thursday [September 13] until Sunday [September 16]. See Page 21 for more coverage.

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By William Mata will@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk ANOTHER major road in Tunbridge Wells town centre is currently closed, with up to five days of disruption facing motorists. Kent Highways, a division of the county council, is completing a ‘pothole blitz’ on Grove Hill Road, which runs up from the railway station alongside

Hoopers. Work started on Monday [September 10] and is scheduled to be completed on or before Friday [September 14]. On Twitter, Cllr Tracy Moore, of Tunbridge Wells Borough Council, warned motorists to ‘avoid Grove Hill Road for four days if possible’. A section is closed from the junction of Camden Hill to the junction of Guildford Road. An alternative route is via Prospect Road, Calverley Road, Crescent Road and Mount Pleasant.

TWO extra classrooms have been added to Speldhust Primary to boost its intake to 30 pupils per year. In addition to the school’s starters, an extra ten children have joined the Year 1 and 2 forms. An extra ten pupils will be admitted to Years 4, 5 and 6 next September.

West Kent Jobs Fair

Triathlon’s tenth year THE tenth Hever Castle Triathlon, one of the UK’s most famous triathlons, is taking place this year on September 22-23. More than 6,000 competitors are expected to line up across the various length events, which traditionally consist of a swim, cycle ride and run. For entry and spectator details visit castletriathlonseries.co.uk

Vote for your park SIX parks or green spaces in Tunbridge Wells and two in Tonbridge are in the running for recognition at the national Green Flag Award People’s Choice Awards. Residents have the chance to vote for their favourite. There are 1,883 parks across the UK with a Green Flag, an award for management and environmental preservation. The top ten across the country will be announced on October 16, with voting open until September 30. Visit greenflagaward.org to cast your vote.

WORKS IN PROGRESS Grove Hill Road is subject to a pothole blitz

FARM shop Chegworth Valley has left The Pantiles, while neighbouring Chocolatl remains closed after floods in July. The fruit, vegetable and juice specialist has not made any official comment on the recent departure, but the Times understands business rates and lack of parking played a role. Chocolatl has been closed since July 6, when heavy rain caused its kitchen to flood, and a note on its Facebook page said the shop will remain shut ‘until further notice’. David Podbury owns Pantiles Cameras, which overlooks both shops and has been trading for more than 40 years. He called the lack of parking near the promenade a ‘massive issue’. “The Union House car park is now gone and the Fairground site is mostly used by commuters,” he said. “High streets, as a whole, are finding it difficult at the moment. As a destination shop we are okay because people come to look for us. “However, business rates are ridiculous. The High Street is struggling and more and more shops are empty, but we are still paying the same business rates or it gets higher.”

Diversify

A 67-year-old man has been charged on suspicion of assaulting a police officer and the manager of a Tunbridge Wells shop. David Richards, of Emerald Walk, Tunbridge Wells, was arrested at 5pm on Monday, September 3 after officers were called to a shop in Calverley Road. Richards will appear at Sevenoaks Magistrates Court on Tuesday, September 18.

The Pantiles has benefited from a boost in visitors with jazz and cultural events proving successful. The latest, The Pantiles Food Festival, attracted thousands once again last weekend [see page 21]. Mr Podbury was unsure about how the proposed Business Improvement District could impact on the area. This would see businesses pay a levy towards providing events or services to enhance an area. A spokesman from Targetfollow, who own and manage The Pantiles, said: “Over the summer, we have attracted tens of thousands of people to events with our active marketing and the flourishing events. “We are, however, aware of the changes in the way people live and shop which is affecting the general retail climate, but we are constantly seeking to evolve and diversify our offer. We have a number of exciting prospective tenants interested in the limited available space. “We are aware that there are constraints on parking, and we are working on a number of initiatives with the council and stakeholders.”

THE 17th Tonbridge Scout and Guide Band are inviting any children who play a musical instrument to come along to their open practice at Weald of Kent Grammar School on Tudeley Lane on Sunday, September 22. The event, which runs from 9am to 12pm, will allow local musicians to perform with more than 50 others. The morning will conclude with a concert for all the parents. For more information, call 07941 504836 or email sarah@17th.org.uk

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It follows summer works along Vale Road and Nevill Street, which led to queues of traffic through the town centre. Kent County Council has said the latest closure is necessary for carriageway patching to be completed.

Permanent This is all part of their £7.5million Pothole Blitz which has seen more than 50,000 repairs completed since March 1. The authority has prioritised roads that are most used or have the most severe issues. County Hall cabinet member Mike Whiting said: “People often assume these are quick and temporary fixes – and in emergency situations they will be to ensure the road is safe – but I can assure you these are revisited for a permanent fix. “All this work isn’t to suggest we don’t need people’s help in reporting potholes. We can’t be everywhere all the time and so I’d encourage people to go online and report potholes so we can arrange for them to be filled.” To report a pothole, visit kent.gov.uk/roadsand-travel

Parking, flooding and business rates questioned as shop shuts

Man ‘assaulted officer’

Open band practice

NEWS

Town centre road closes for five days

Primary school boost

WORKSEEKERS are invited to the West Kent Jobs & Training Fair, which takes place at The Assembly Hall theatre on Wednesday, September 19. From 10am to 2pm, the Tunbridge Wells venue is hosting the free event, which is aimed at anyone looking for work, seeking a new start or career change. Employers interested should email: karen.fretwell1@dwp.gsi.gov.uk

Local News

WINDOW ON SHOPPING: Chocolatl is currently closed, while Chegworth Valley has left The Pantiles


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NEWS

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Wednesday September 12 | 2018

£2m BID funding plan revealed but critics call levy cap ‘unfair’ By William Mata will@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk

SPEAKING IN SUPPORT Thomson Snell & Passmore Partner Gilbert Green

BUSINESS BREAKFAST Professionals learn more about the BID

MORE than £2million could be invested in Tunbridge Wells over five years if the proposed Business Improvement District [BID] plan goes ahead, it has been revealed. Many large firms are already backing a scheme for companies in the town centre to pay a levy towards a general fund dedicated to creating a better place to live and work, through events and improvement schemes. Royal Tunbridge Wells Together [RTWT] has committed to improving car parking and could also look to establish an arts festival as part of

BID. There may also be more markets and funding for established town festivals. The levy rate is to be calculated at 1.25 per cent of the business’s rateable value on April 1 next year. Firms with a rateable value of less than £15,000 will be exempt. Critics have called the project a ‘band-aid solution’ and ‘unfair’, with a levy cap per individual premises of £5,000 – which could see some smaller firms proportionally paying more. Further details about plans are set to be announced in the coming weeks, but the Times can reveal that through BID: • £635,000 would be spent on delivering events over five years

• £303,000 on supporting businesses • £495,000 on boosting town promotion • £200,000 improving accessibility, including parking All this will only happen if at least 50 per cent of businesses vote ‘yes’ to the proposal in a ballot that will run from October 11 to November 8. If a ‘yes’ vote is secured, the BID will start from April 1, 2019, and would be reviewed after five years, with a second ballot necessary to continue it for another five years. RTWT and associated firms made the case to business leaders at an event at One Warwick Park Hotel last week. Nicky Blanchard, centre Manager of Royal Victoria Place, told them: “Tunbridge Wells is


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Wednesday September 12 | 2018

fantastic, but we have not been immune to the economic challenges. “Our businesses’ retailers have suffered with the changing pace of consumer behaviour and the impact of online shopping. “I read an article recently that argued ‘physical retail is not dead, boring retail is’. We need to make our town different, give people reason to come here and provide experiences and leisure activities. “By creating a BID we can give businesses the power to make significant and sustained improvement to our town. We can stop the boring, undifferentiated and unremarkable.” The BID would be managed by a board of directors, set to include RTW Together, Tunbridge Wells Borough Council and representatives from other firms. Large businesses in Tunbridge Wells to have backed the BID already include AXA, Thomson Snell & Passmore, G Collins & Sons, Baldwins Travel Group, Handelsbanken and Childrensalon. Some smaller firms have pledged a ‘yes’ vote as well, including Fuggles Beer Café, whose proprietor, Alex Greig, said: “Having a BID is a

WHAT’S THE LIKELY OUTCOME OF THE VOTE? The manager of RTW Together, Karen Pengelly, said she is feeling ‘quietly confident’ about securing a ‘yes’ vote – which would require more than 50 per of the businesses involved to vote in favour. She said discussions would be held with firms who have more than one outlet within the BID zone. One owner almost certain to vote no is Matthew Sankey, who owns three premises in town under the Sankey’s banner. He said: “I like the idea of having a pot of cash to spend on events, but you can’t base it on business rates.” Ms Pengelly has said ‘there is no plan B’ in the event of a ‘no’ vote and stakeholders would discuss the future direction.

great way to have some influence as small businesses working together with the aim of delivering goals to benefit us all.” RTW Together now has a busy few weeks to convince firms who are undecided. Richard Simm, Manager of the Ragged Trousers pub, told the Times he was ‘optimistically sceptical’ about the proposal. “I’m behind the idea of BIDs and businesses working together, but I do have reservations,” he said. “There will be a cap on some larger businesses, so as a publican I might end up paying 50 per cent of what Sainsbury’s pays because ours will not be capped. “And how exactly is the money going to be spent? I don’t want to be paying for a Z-list celebrity to be turning on the town’s Christmas lights. “However, I am optimistic, there needs to be extra funding to support the Local & Live Music Festival and Jazz on The Pantiles. “But it has to be fair – and until I get assurances it is going to be fair, I am not going to vote in favour.” Karen Pengelly (right)

Local News

NEWS

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‘WHAT I HAVE LEARNED FROM BIDS IN OTHER TOWNS’ MORE than 300 BIDs have been established across the UK, the nearest being in Maidstone. One Tunbridge Wells trader, better placed than most to comment on the districts, is Peter Allinson. The founder of Whirligig Toys has seen BIDs established in the three other places he trades in: Canterbury, Chichester and Brighton. He told the Times: “BIDs work really well when everyone is really involved. The businesses who get the most out of it are the ones who put the most in. “It is about choosing the right priorities for the town we are in. “It works when shoppers have an experience – they are more likely to come back. “I think working together is a good idea. What we have to be careful of is [after some time] businesses doing the job for the council or BID leaders.”

Antony Pickthall (right) of The Assembly Hall Theatre


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NEWS

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Wednesday September 12 | 2018

How much might a business have to pay in a levy? Rateable Value Small – Rateable Value of £15,000 Medium – Rateable Value of £50,000

Levy per year Levy per day £187.50 £0.51 £625 £1.71

Large – Rateable Value of £150,000

£1,875

£5.13

There is a reduced rateable value for businesses offering ‘serviced accommodation’. This refers to any business operating from a location where there are multiple businesses. It could include The Pantiles Chambers, Corn Exchange and Royal Victoria Place. These reduced rates are as follows: Rateable Value Small – Rateable Value of £15,000 Medium – Rateable Value of £50,000 Large – Rateable Value of £150,000

Nicky Blanchard (left)

It is proposed that the BID would cover the town centre of Tunbridge Wells. This map shows the boundary

Cllr Jane March (centre)

Levy per year Levy per day £150 £0.41 £500 £1.40 £1500 £4.10

Trinity Theatre’s Alex Green with the council’s William Benson


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Major City executive stays upbeat in the face of Brexit By Adam Hignett THOSE fretting about any economic fallout from Brexit have forgotten how much ‘scarier’ it was in 2008 and should tone down the negativity, the Chief Executives of St James’s Place Wealth Management [SJP] has said. Andrew Croft, whose firm oversees nearly £100billion in assets, made the remarks in an interview with the Times in which he said a £300billion ‘savings gap’, constant government meddling and a Jeremy Corbyn-led government are just as threatening to future prosperity. The interview coincided with Mr Croft’s visit to Goudhurst last week to attend the formal opening of a new office run by Burfield’s House, a senior partner firm of SJP headquartered in the picturesque village. Mr Croft’s attendance is a sign of how highly he regards the practice and its director David Cole, despite it being just one of around 2,500 partnered businesses that operate autonomously under the SJP brand. However, despite listing several potential ‘headwinds’ facing the economy, both Mr Croft and Mr Cole are bullish about the future prospects of the wealth management industry. “If you look at the market, the market is huge. We have data showing 10.5 million people in the UK in our target demographic, this is

expected to grow to about 12.2million within two to three years,” Mr Croft said. The ‘target demographic’ is typically an individual with investible assets between £50,000 and £5million. As life gets more complex, many of these individuals will seek the services of financial advisers, be they independent or working for a large FTSE100 listed firm such as SJP, he explained. In addition to the expansion of the target demographic, a study by SJP predicts a £2.2trillion transfer of wealth from one generation to the next in the coming two decades. “That is exciting, not just for us but for anyone MEN ON MONEY David Cole [left] and Andrew Croft

in financial advice,” Mr Croft said. Although this will benefit millions of individuals, many are also falling behind and do not have enough saved up to guarantee a comfortable retirement. “There is a savings gap of £300billion in the UK. The younger you are, the more chance you have to fill some of your savings gap.

Appalling “But what it means is you are either going to retire on less than you expected, going to have to work longer than expected, or you are going to have to save more,” he said. Part of the blame for the ‘appalling’ rate of saving in the UK is constant government tinkering, making investments unpredictable and overly complex for individuals. “If you want the whole UK population to fill that savings gap, stop changing the rules each year. “What I always find terribly sad is regulation drove out the ‘Man from the Pru’, who was going around collecting £5 savings from people. But regulation then allowed the man from Wonga to go around and lend £5 to people. “We would be in a much better position if the Man from the Pru had still been around for the last 20 years.” One thing which can never be predicted with

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

any certainty is when the next big downturn will come, or what will cause it. “No one can call the end of the market. No one can time it,” Mr Croft said, adding: “We would talk about headwinds and tail winds, certainly in the last five years we have had some nice tail winds, we have had a bull market. “There could be a few headwinds. Market turbulence is one. A Corbyn government would probably be another. “But 2008 [which saw the banking crisis] was a lot scarier than Brexit because it was a world problem… our funds under management the day after the Brexit vote were higher than they were the day before.”

‘If you look at the market, the market is huge. We have data showing 10.5 million people in the UK in our target demographic’ His view is echoed by Mr Cole, who believes the overall debate around Britain’s departure from the EU is too pessimistic. “I think the biggest problem in the UK is the negativity we are constantly being pumped. It is all Brexit Brexit Brexit. Go outside of Europe and people ask: ‘What is Brexit?’ No one cares. And yet we are getting depressed about the outcome. “A good example is the UK stock market this year is negative territory, but our funds are certainly very much in plus territory. Why? Because the pound is weak, so our UK-based companies which earn in dollars are increasing in value. “And other economies, such as those in the Pacific Basin, and in particular America, are flying. That’s what our clients are enjoying. “So we have to stop being negative about the world. “We are an island and there is a lot of the planet out there which is very exciting. We are globalised now.”


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BUSINESS

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Sisters’ firm is seen by thousands thanks to Paphitis endorsement By William Mata will@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk RETAIL mogul Theo Paphitis has backed a family-run Speldhurst brand in his Small Business Sunday social media promotion. Sisters Evie Calder and Francesca Watson are behind Atlas & Ortus, which sells eco-friendly items such as toothbrushes, drinks bottles and bags.

Breakthrough Their village firm is now expected to make a major breakthrough thanks to the exposure gained through Small Business Sunday. Former Dragons’ Den star Paphitis, 58, holds the weekly competition on Twitter, where entrepreneurs can pitch their services to him. He will retweet a handful of his favourites out of firms who Tweet him entries under the hashtag #SBS.

These winners, usually five or six, will benefit from online exposure and invitations to events and conferences. Atlas & Ortus only formed five months ago and the sisters are operating from their parents’ house. But they are now featured on Paphitis’s website and their #SBS Tweet has been seen more than 11,000 times. Evie Calder said the support has been ‘amazing’, and the chance to make a difference to the environment had inspired them to start the company. She added: “There are so many new businesses trying to tackle the plastic pollution problem like we are, so it’s been incredible having Theo recognise our hard work and him helping to spread the word about what we do to his following.” Theo Paphitis said: “We are thrilled to welcome new #SBS members every week and highlight just how important it is to support our small businesses in the UK.” TWITTER SUPPORT Theo Paphitis

CREW SETS SAIL The clothing shop in the High Street has closed

NEWS IN BRIEF

Fenwick customers told store card is at an end CUSTOMERS at Fenwick, a staple of Royal Victoria Place in Tunbridge Wells, have been told their store card has ceased. This offered holders an alternative method of payment via credit and also provided discounts on some items at special events. The department store said the agreement was ‘no longer viable for business’. The last day to use the cards was August 31.

Bid for accessibility RAIL franchise holder Southeastern is asking passengers to nominate their local station for accessibility improvements. The firm, which operates along the Tunbridge Wells – Tonbridge – London line, needs to present a strong case to the government as to why investment, worth up to £300million, is needed across the network. To have your say, go to their website at southeasternrailway.co.uk

Business breakfasts

GREEN FOR GO: Fran Watson and Evie Calder are behind ethical business Atlas & Ortos, based in Speldhurst. Products include bags and bottles

TWO business breakfasts are being held in Tonbridge later this month. On Thursday, September 20, Tonbridge Business Breakfast is to be hosted inside Tonbridge Old Fire Station by the FSB [Federation of Small Businesses]. Tickets are £10-£15. For more information and to book, contact Sarah Lilly on 07976 434519, or email: sarah.lilly@fsb.org.uk And on Friday, September 28, the Tonbridge Chamber Breakfast Club will meet inside Tonbridge School. Tickets start from £16.80 and can be booked by visiting wkcci.com

Town buzzing as latest coffee shop opens up

Online focus played role in Crew decision to leave High Street CLOTHING retailer Crew says online growth has played a part in their decision to leave Tunbridge Wells High Street. The brand has departed after 13 years of trade in the store, and follows New Look and Cath Kidston out of the town. A spokesman explained: “We have made the difficult decision to close our existing Crew Clothing Company unit. “Our continuous online growth plays a part in this, as well as safeguarding the profitability of our retail fleet. “We know that we have a loyal and active customer base in the town, so we will continue to review other alternative options. In the near term, customers can shop the brand online.” Crew has not stated how many jobs could be affected. Their nearest store will now be in Sevenoaks, and the demise of the Tunbridge Wells branch does not appear to be part of a wider spate of closures. The company recently reported a two per cent rise in annual turnover, and has bought the 25-store Saltrock Surfwear retail brand.

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

By William Mata

TUNBRIDGE WELLS SPEAKERS’ CLUB has won the Toastmasters International Demeter Award to recognise its help for members. The friendly group of around 30 meet twice a month to develop skills in public speaking and leadership in a friendly environment. Toastmasters, a world leader in communication development, presented the award last month. To get involved with the club, email: hello@tunbridge-wells-speakers.org

Plaudits for Elaine ‘excelling’ in role THE achievements of Tunbridge Wellsbespoke management development based training professional Elaine programme that overcame complex Bolton have been recognised business and language barriers in a with an award. diverse workforce based in Kent. The Managing Director The award was sponsored by of Beckwith Consulting Gemma Farina HR, an was named Learning independent HR consultant. and Development Ms Farina said: “Elaine Professional of the has demonstrated what it Year 2018 by the takes to excel in learning Kent branch of the and development in Chartered Institute today’s climate. of Personnel “She has successfully and Development worked to deliver a [CIPD] at a recent programme that meets ceremony. the needs of the client, Elaine won and where they will see the award due a substantial return on WINNING FEELING investment through better to developing Elaine Bolton and Gemma Farina employee engagement.” and delivering a

ESQUIRES COFFEE has opened to become the eighth café chain in a single 500m stretch of Tunbridge Wells. The Mount Pleasant eatery became the 37th Esquires to trade in the UK when it opened its doors on Tuesday, August 29. Branding states it will be ‘not just another coffee shop’, but their business will be tested with Pret a Manger, Caffè Nero, Starbucks, Muffin Break, Patisserie Valerie and two branches of Costa just a short walk away. A unique selling point could be Esquires’ commitment to providing a unique menu to all of their outlets, and Tunbridge Wells will be no exception. A spokesman said: “Offering much-loved classics as well as healthy, vegan and vegetarian dishes, all dishes are available to eat in or take away.” Esquires has also pledged to source all fruit and vegetables locally to support the community by using independent suppliers.


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Community News

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Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Young and disabled are winners in charity match for Lord’s Taverners

PITCH PERFECT The two teams line up with Lorraine Chase (centre) at the Nevill

A CHARITY cricket match between estate agent Wood & Pilcher and a joint team comprising Matt Woolf and CooperBurnett solicitors raised £2,300 for the Lord’s Taverners, of which Mr Woolf is a patron. Both teams were joined by a celebrity guest, with Lorraine Chase adorning the Wood & Pilcher team and Paul Prichard, ex-Essex captain and Chairman of Cricket for the Lord’s Taverners, turning out for the opposition. Former Kent and England captain

Chris Cowdrey acted as umpire. The game was held at Tunbridge Wells Cricket Club’s county ground, The Nevill, with Wood & Pilcher slipping to defeat by three runs off the last ball. The Lord’s Taverners is a charity dedicated to creating opportunities for young people from deprived areas, and those with disabilities, to engage in sport and recreation in their local communities. Wood & Pilcher is a business partner of the West Kent region.

Stars of snow and ice are guests at sporting dinner THERE will be a touch of chill at Hospice in the Weald’s Sporting Dinner when stars of the Winter Olympics and Paralympics descend on The Spa Hotel in Tunbridge Wells on Thursday, September 20. Among the famous names will be Lizzy Yarnold, whose twin gold medals in skeleton racing made her the most successful UK athlete in Winter Olympics history. Lizzy, from West Kingsdown near Sevenoaks, said: “I am excited to be attending the Sporting Dinner in aid of Hospice in the Weald, which is such an important charity within our local community. “I hope that people will join me for an evening of fantastic entertainment, including a Q&A which I am participating in. This

will be a memorable event.” She will be joined by Millie Knight, who won two silvers and a bronze at the Paralympics in Pyeongchang this year, and is also Britain’s first world para ski champion. The partially-sighted skier from Canterbury won gold in the downhill event at the world championships in Tarvisio last year with her partner Brett Wild. TV commentator and former tennis player Andrew Castle will field questions from the diners, while former England cricket captain Chris Cowdrey will host the black-tie gala. Tickets cost £100 each or £1,000 for a table of ten. Contact Gemma Millen on 01892 820506 or email gemma.millen@ hospiceintheweald.org

COOL CATS: Paralympic skier Millie Knight (left) and skeleton legend Lizzy Yarnold at the Kent School Games this summer


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

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Chasing Connor’s Cure stages new cycle event By Andy Tong LOCAL charity Chasing Connor’s Cure has set up a new cycling event this year to raise money for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Team Connor Sportive this Sunday [September 16] will consist of three different routes which are designed to cater for all levels of cycling ability. All proceeds will go towards support research and enhanced therapy. Chasing Connor’s Cure was set up by Matt Crawford after his son Connor was diagnosed with a rare form of muscular dystrophy, called Duchenne, soon after his fourth birthday in 2016.

Family The Hildenborough charity has held the Duchenne Dash, a 24-hour bike ride from London to Paris, for the past six years. In June, the last marathon challenge raised £850,000. Looking closer to home, and starting at Tonbridge Old Fire Station, the latest event offers distances of 13.5, 40 and 60 miles through rural Kent. The shorter, ‘family friendly’ route heads along the cycle path to Hildenborough before turning left towards Leigh and on to Penshurst. After refreshments, riders climb out of the village to take in fine views before descending back to the river valley and rejoining the path in Haysden Country Park. Challenge 40 goes up to Shipbourne, Ivy Hatch and Stone Street, then along to Godden Green, before a steep descent down Carter’s Hill into Underriver and on to Charcott. The route climbs past Bough Beech reservoir to a feed station at Ide Hill, then past Emmetts Gardens to climb Toy’s Hill. A steep descent leads to Four Elms and Hever, then back to Tonbridge through the villages of Mark Beech, Chiddingstone Hoath, Penshurst and Leigh.

The Epic 60 follows the same route to Underriver but then heads off to Sevenoaks Weald and climbs Hubbard’s Hill. The steep descent of Bayley’s Hill takes riders past Bore Place before climbing past Bough Beech, Ide Hill and Toy’s Hill from the north side. After Four Elms and Hever, the elite riders will go to Ashdown Forest and the top of Chuck Hatch, returning via Groombridge and Speldhurst. Duchenne affects one in 3,500 boys in the UK. It attacks muscles, and in most cases mobility is lost around the age of ten. Eventually, it will attack the heart and lungs, resulting in premature loss of life – usually in the early 20s. There is no known cure, but researchers are confident that a breakthrough can be made and funds are vital to accelerate development. Email info@teamconnorsportive.com to enter the event. For more information about the charity, visit chasingconnorscure.co.uk

TOP TEAM: Matt and Emma Crawford with their children (l-r) George, Esmie, Connor and Harrison

Community News

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RIDE THE WAVE Bart’s Bash is the largest sailing race in the world

All aboard as Bart’s Bash returns to Bewl GLOBAL sailing event Bart’s Bash returns to Bewl Water for the fifth time on Sunday [September 16], encouraging the public to try their hand at the sport or come and watch the races. Founded in 2014, the event is verified by Guinness World Records as the largest sailing contest in the world, with hundreds of venues taking part around the planet. It commemorates the life of Andrew ‘Bart’ Simpson, a double Olympic medallist who was tragically killed while training for the America’s Cup in 2013. Entry is free – with the usual £3 parking charge for cars – but you can donate to the Andrew Simpson Foundation, which aims to increase participation in the sport and improve the lives of young people through sailing. Last year 22 vessels took to the water. This year the day’s briefing begins at 10.30am with the races starting at arond 11am. For more information, visit bartsbash.com or bewlwater.co.uk


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National News

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Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Online publishers to be made legally responsible for content A CRACKDOWN on online hate groups and fake news took a step forward with plans for a new law set out in Parliament. Labour MP Lucy Powell wants to see companies such as Facebook clamp down on secret groups spreading extremist hatred by making them responsible for published content, as newspapers and broadcasters are. The new law would also help stop the online radicalisation of vulnerable people, like terrorist Darren Osborne, Mrs Powell said.

Catch up Osborne killed a man and injured 12 others when he drove a van into a crowd outside a mosque on June 18 last year. “Just one month earlier Osborne was a different person with no history of extremist ideology or belief,” Mrs Powell told MPs. “His ex-partner said he had been radicalised in just three weeks.” The MP set out how Osborne had mental health problems and was addicted to alcohol, but the

catalyst was watching a documentary about grooming gangs in Rochdale. “This led Osborne to spend the next three weeks consuming anti-Muslim extremist propaganda online. After which he was ready to kill.” Regulation is needed to prevent the online world continuing as a ‘lawless Wild West’, she added. “Our laws desperately need to catch up.” “If 1,000 people met in a town hall inciting ­violence against a political opponent, or racism or hate, we would know about it and we would deal with it. “I’m proposing a small step establishing clear accountability in law for what’s published on online forums, forcing those who run the forums to no longer permit hate, disinformation and criminal activity.” There is cross-party support for Mrs Powell’s Online Forums Bill, which was passed unanimously and has been sponsored by MPs from Jacob Rees-Mogg to Anna Soubry and David Lammy. Mrs Powell asked for the second reading on October 26, but the bill is unlikely to progress in this form due to lack of Parliamentary time.

Trump’s visit to Ireland is called off US PRESIDENT Donald Trump’s visit to Ireland this autumn has been ‘postponed’ due to scheduling reasons, the Irish Government has said. He was due to hold a two-day trip during which he was expected to visit his golf course at Doonbeg in Co Clare on the west coast, and Dublin around the weekend of November 10-11. The White House announced on August 31 that Mr Trump will travel to Paris for a commemoration of the centenary of the Armistice which ended the fighting in World War I.

His visit to Ireland was due to coincide. It was to be Mr Trump’s first visit to Ireland since he assumed the office. A spokesman for the Irish Government said: “I can confirm that the proposed visit of the US president is postponed. The US side has cited scheduling reasons.” Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar has previously said news of the visit came a little bit out of the blue. Trump was originally invited by former ­Taoiseach Enda Kenny last year.


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Scene of chaos as tourist tried to save his wife THE first victim of the Westminster terror attack died after he stepped in to save his wife. American tourist Kurt Cochran and his wife Melissa were both struck by a vehicle on Westminster Bridge on March 22 last year. The car was driven by Khalid Masood, 52, who went to school in Tunbridge Wells and lived in the East Sussex village of Northiam. Mr Cochran, 54, pushed his wife away, bearing the full impact of the hired car, sending him over the balustrade on to the Embankment below. He was pronounced dead 17 minutes after a paramedic arrived as Big Ben struck 3pm, an Old Bailey inquest heard. Giving evidence, Mrs Cochran told how she and her husband had been visiting London as part of a tour of Europe for their wedding anniversary. She said: “I remember hearing a car revving. I remember seeing the front of the vehicle. The next thing I remember, being on the ground.” Mrs Cochran said she was badly injured and spent about a month in hospital. Kylie Smith, a teacher who was accompanying a group of teenage schoolchildren on a trip to London, said Masood had deliberately targeted Mr Cochran as he stood by a souvenir stand. “It was very clearly a deliberate act. The way he turned the car to change the direction,” she said.

VICTIM Kurt Cochran with his wife Melissa on Westminster Bridge

Shield “There was a couple walking hand in hand who I had previously been watching across the bridge, walking along having a nice time. “The car came towards them. The man tried to pull his girlfriend behind him, tried to shield her from the impact. “It was just chaos. People trying to get out of the way but nobody really had a chance.” Paramedic James Richards described arriving within minutes of the attack: “Initially we saw several abandoned vehicles, many people moving in different directions, casualties around clearly injured, generally a scene of chaos.” In the space of 82 seconds Masood, 52, killed four pedestrians before stabbing PC Keith Palmer to death at the gates to the Palace of Westminster. The rampage ended when Masood was shot dead by a plainclothes officer.

KHALID MASOOD: THE TUNBRIDGE WELLS CONNECTION The man behind the Westminster Bridge act of terror, Khalid Masood, grew up in Tunbridge Wells and lived with his family at a house in St James’ Park. He was a pupil at the former Huntleys Secondary School for Boys in the town from 1976-81. The MP for Tonbridge & Malling, Tom

Graduates who claim they are over-qualified lack basic skills ONE in four UK graduates has reported being overqualified for their jobs, but the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD] says this may partly be down to some of them lacking basic numeracy and literacy skills. A 2012 Survey of Adult Skills showed that university-educated adults in England or Northern Ireland were more likely to work in jobs that require lower qualifications, than on average across OECD countries. Some 28 per cent of university degree holders in England reported being overqualified for their jobs - compared to 14 per cent elsewhere. But Andreas Schleicher, OECD’s Director of Education and Skills, said: “Some people with degrees don’t have the right skills – numeracy and literacy.

“There are people who are not working in graduate jobs and when you test their skills, they don’t come up so well. “You would label them as overqualified, but they may not be overskilled.”

Surprising He said that one possible reason for this could be the degree having failed to teach graduates maths and literacy to the level they would need for a graduate job. Speaking at the launch of the OECD’s Education at a Glance report, Mr Schleicher said that in some cases it was surprising that students had managed to make it on to a degree course in the first place.

Huge holes growing in NHS staff THE number of NHS staff vacancies has increased and is expected to rise further by the end of year, new figures show. There were 107,743 vacancies in England at the end of June, up from 98,475 in March and bucking a downward trend seen in 2017-18, according to a quarterly report. NHS Improvement said the rise, the result of increasing demand and high leaving rates, is forecast to continue through the financial year. Independent think tank The King’s Fund

warned growing nurse shortages ‘risk becoming a national emergency’ and are ‘symptomatic of a long-term failure in workforce planning’. Around 1.1million full-time staff are currently employed by the NHS, the figures from NHS Improvement show. There were 41,722 nursing vacancies across trusts in England at the end of June, 80 per cent of which were filled by bank or agency staff, and 11,576 unfilled posts for doctors, 85 per cent of which were plugged with temporary workers.

Tugendhat, writing in his regular column for the Times immediately after the incident, said: “Britons recognised the violence for what it truly was – the solitary act of a man who represented no-one but himself. “A deranged individual whose inspiration may have been religious but whose understanding was satanic. The terror failed, as it always will.”

National News

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BUSINESS

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NEWS IN BRIEF

Debenhams not insolvent Jobs warning from Jaguar THE chairman of Debenhams has denied that the department store is insolvent. Sir Ian Cheshire said reports of the firm embarking on a company voluntary agreement are ‘simply not true’. He spoke out a day after Debenhams shares plunged by 17 per cent, when it emerged auditors KPMG had been drafted in to help consider its options.

THE Chief Executive of Jaguar Land Rover, Britain’s biggest car manufacturer, has warned tens of thousands of jobs could be lost in a no-deal Brexit. Rath Speth said he could not ensure that the companies’ UK plants, which employ 40,000 people, would continue to operate after March 29, 2019.

Unilever set to leave UK

Carney will stay to 2020

CONSUMER goods giant Unilever will relocate its legal headquarters to Rotterdam in December as part of a transitional move. The firm has denied this is to do with EU withdrawal but the move has proved a blow for the government’s post-Brexit ambition.

BANK OF ENGLAND governor Mark Carney will stay in his role until January 2020. Chancellor Philip Hammond told MPs yesterday [Tuesday] the Canadian-born economist would remain in post for a transition after Brexit.

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Ryanair cancels German flights BUDGET airline Ryanair is set to cancel 150 out of 400 scheduled flights to and from Germany today [Wednesday] due to strike action. Employees are walking out over pay and conditions. It follows similar strikes this summer in Sweden, Ireland, Belgium and the Netherlands. Ryanair struck a deal with Irish pilots and said it was hopeful of securing further deals. But seven trade unions have threatened to strike later this month unless working conditions are improved. Affected passengers will be offered alternative flights. Ingolf Schumacher of the VC

GROUNDED Strikes mean 150 flights have been cancelled

German pilots’ union said: “Despite the clear signal sent with the strike in early August there’s still standstill at the negotiation table.” Ryanair responded: “The VC Union, which threatened this

strike late on Monday evening, has not consulted with Ryanair’s German pilots. “It has no basis for disrupting customers’ travel plans when Ryanair has agreed to negotiate contracts in Germany.”

Number of unemployed falls as earnings rise above inflation THE number of people in work has continued to rise while average earnings have grown slightly faster than inflation, official figures show. Employment increased by 3,000 in the three months to July to 32.4million, giving a rate of 75.5 per cent, according to the Office for National Statistics [ONS]. Workers also benefited as average earnings increased by 2.6 per cent in the year to July,

up from 2.4 per cent the previous month. The latest consumer prices index [CPI] rate of inflation was recorded at 2.5 per cent. It came as unemployment fell by 55,000 over the period to 1.36 million, giving a jobless rate of 4 per cent. Job vacancies, meanwhile, rose 14,000 on quarter to 833,000, a record high. ONS head of labour market statistics David Freeman said: “With the number of people

in work little changed, employment growth has weakened. “However, the labour market remains robust, with the number of people working still at historically high levels, unemployment down on the year and a record number of vacancies “Meanwhile, earnings have grown faster than prices for several months, especially looking at pay excluding bonuses.”

PUBLIC NOTICE LICENSING ACT 2003 An application has been made by: Timothy Maw of Maw (UK) Ltd for the premises: Frame Farm, Iden Green Road, Benenden, Kent TN174EZ. On the date of: 6th September 2018. Summary of the proposed licensable activities and the proposed hours of opening: Sale or supply of alcohol, and playing of recorded and live music. Monday to Sunday 0800 to 2300 hours. New Years Eve from 0800 to 0100 hours New Years Day. Bespoke private hire events or ticketed events by arrangement only. Hours are not public opening times. Any person wishing to view details of an application may contact the Licensing Partnership on 01732 227004 Any person wishing to make representation about the application should make them in writing on or before the : 4th October 2018. Licensing Partnership, PO BOX 182, Sevenoaks, Kent TN13 1GP licensing@sevenoaks.gov.uk http://pa.sevenoaks.gov.uk/online-licensing It is an offence knowingly or recklessly to make a false statement in connection with an application. The maximum fine for which a person is liable on summary conviction for the offence is £5000.


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Letters

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And another thing… This is the page where you, the reader, have your chance to express your views or comments on what’s going on in our part of the world. We like to hear from you. You can email us at newsdesk@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk or newsdesk@timesoftonbridge.co.uk or write to the Editor at Runcie Court, Salomons Estate, Tunbridge Wells TN3 0TG

FLY-BY-NIGHT Gatwick is not doing enough for communities Back in the summer of 2013, I could sit in my garden in Tunbridge Wells and enjoy the sun, birdsong and a little peace and quiet. It is now five years since Gatwick Airport surreptitiously altered their flightpaths, sending an endless stream of low-flying aircraft over our previously peaceful and lovely town. This goes on all day and, worse still, all evening long. Why? To maximise the number of commercial flights Gatwick PLC can handle, resulting in maximum profit for the airport’s foreign investors. The policy has proved stunningly successful; the airport was worth £1.5billion in 2009, and now at least £8billion, according to analysts. Unfortunately, it is the good citizens of Tunbridge Wells and surrounding areas who have paid for this commercial success with their wellbeing and quality of life. Sadly, they have also derived no financial benefit whatsoever from their continuing sacrifice and suffering. No one living in the town should underestimate the price we have all paid for Gatwick’s commercial success. Interrupted sleep patterns from constant noise: Recent studies have shown a direct link between this and Alzheimer’s disease, while the adverse effect on our children’s mental health and powers of concentration at school is truly terrifying. House prices: On average, low-flying aircraft noise has an adverse effect on property values of around 20 per cent, according to independent studies. With the average price of a house in Tunbridge Wells being around £448,500, this means every household has ‘contributed’ at least £100,000 to Gatwick’s success. I’m sure the airport management appreciate the gesture, especially as Tunbridge Wells citizens have nothing to show for this mandatory ‘investment’ other than broken sleep, constant stress and the removal of any joy and pleasure derived from sitting in our gardens. Health and wellbeing: We should all be aware of the proven carcinogenic properties

of aviation fuel and its appalling effect on the human respiratory system. Asthma, cancer, emphysema – you name it and Gatwick are currently supplying us all free of charge. Enough is enough. All Gatwick have done to address our legitimate complaints is to set up the smokescreen of a filibustering ‘Noise Management Board’ that achieves nothing and is, in reality, merely a PR stunt to make it ‘appear’ that Gatwick takes the matter seriously. Community members on this board are being shamelessly exploited and – through no fault of their own – find themselves blamed by the communities they represent for the abject failure of this glorified ‘chocolate teapot’. Gatwick CEO Stewart Wingate and the rest of his board must be laughing all the way to the bank, both personally and corporately. So, what is to be done? The only hope is that our MP, Greg Clark, finally brings political influence to bear and starts standing up for his constituents by enforcing government policy not to overfly heavily populated conurbations. Unfortunately, he has a long reputation for sitting on the fence and being all ‘jaw jaw’ rather than ‘war war’ – unlike his colleague Tom Tugendhat in Tonbridge, who genuinely seems to care for the welfare of his constituents and fights accordingly. Well done Tom. Yes, of course we need an airport, but this should operate with just a little consideration for those overflown – as it did successfully for 40 years prior to 2013. The fact that we in Tunbridge Wells and the surrounding area now live directly under a busy airplane motorway 24/7 – purely for the benefit of the personal enrichment of Gatwick management and shareholders – is a scandalous disgrace. Action please, Mr Clark – if you want to stay MP for Tunbridge Wells. Maximising Gatwick profits at the expense of quality of life for your constituents is not fair and not democratic. The airport must be forced to compromise. Norma Pinkerton Tunbridge Wells

So Tunbridge Wells Borough Council want to charge each household £52 a year (nearly twice the originally amount muted) for the fortnightly collection of garden rubbish, which is currently taken away free as part of our Council Tax. Those who opt in are to receive a new brown bin. What will happen to the old ones? Presumably they will be collected and recycled, at a cost both financial and environmental. Hopefully, those who opt out will be responsible enough to take their garden waste to the Recycling Centre at North Farm, resulting in more polluting car journeys. Oh, but to compensate we are all to get yet another bin for glass and a food waste caddy. Frankly, I find it easier to take a few bottles to the bottle bank when I go to the village than hump bags of cuttings down to the ‘dump’. Our households don’t, under any circumstances, want a waste food caddy; the health hazard of unwrapped food waste festering for a week must surely outweigh any environmental gains. I wager that having a receptacle for it will also encourage even more food to be wasted. I wonder if the council has allocated space for all these bins at the back of their new gin palace? I despair. Can’t we have some joined-up thinking for a change? John Baggott, Langton Green

Change course before it’s too late Cllr Base misrepresents the ability of Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council to face up to changing financial circumstances [August 29]. Far from being able to cover its costs, it is only able to balance the budget by selling off millions of pounds worth of property assets, and as we have seen at the Teen and Twenty Club, they have failed to raise the market value of our property there. The 2017-18 budget actually included a £1.6million deficit. The financial black hole is the reason a Garden Tax is now being levied, and the fact that his administration will be responsible for most Tonbridge residents paying nearly £100 more next year than three years ago when the charge for waste is added to Special Expenses. Value for money? Last year, Michael Base was discredited for misrepresenting Sevenoaks District Council’s finances; now he is doing so with his own council’s. Until it drastically changes course the cuts proposed will seriously affect services, including the proposals to charge community groups which threaten the summer programme of events in the town. Mark Hood Vice Chair, Tonbridge & Malling Green Party

Calverley

Observations on life and more important things

EACH morning Calverley drives to the office listening to BBC Radio 4 and the questions brainteaser at 6.50am. He has yet to get a single one right. But how alone is he? Dear readers are invited to try their hand for themselves. Here’s a typical question: One year, there were exactly four Tuesdays and exactly four Fridays in October. On what day of the week did Halloween [October 31] fall? See? Simples. The answer is at the bottom of this column. Lots of luck! IMAGE is everything these days. Take the case of the young mum leaving home in her Lycra gear and heading off to the gym one morning. Only problem was, she was not going to the gym – she was off to Juliet’s, the fashionable eatery in TW High Street, for her regular meet-up with friends. She was spotted in situ by a neighbour who saw her leave home, so she confided: “It’s not just me that dresses up for the gym and comes down here, lots of people do.” [Disclaimer: Calverley would point out it could equally have been a male dressing for the gym and going to an eatery instead.]

BODYGUARD the TV series looks set to become a real blockbuster. However, Calverley notes, with a wee bit of envy, the on-screen credits for the drama. Episodes have carried the voices of 13 BBC journalists, including John Humphrys and Martha Kearney. Hopefully they all received Equity’s going rate of £300. Being Beeb journos, they will need the cash. Right?

CALVERLEY is indebted to another veteran broadcaster, Alastair Stewart – ITV news – for the following guidance on terms of reference for the dispute between British and French fishermen: “It’s scallops, as in trollops, not scallops as in gallops.” Quite so. Now what about the word ‘scone’?

A whole new high street ‘experience’? Regarding Cllr Tracy Moore’s statement on your front page [August 29], where she says ‘The changing high street has been well documented with people increasingly looking for experiences’, is that council-speak for a member of the public trying to find a shop that is still open? Where, oh where, will the business rates come from to fund the Calverley folly? Richard Bell, Tunbridge Wells

We do our best to publish letters in full. However, the Editor reserves the right to edit any letter

October has 31 days, so in any year there will be three days of the week that occur five times and four days that occur four times. As there were exactly four Tuesdays and four Fridays, there could not have been five Wednesdays or five Thursdays, so the days that occurred five times were Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Therefore, October 1 must have been a Saturday, which means that October 31 was a Monday.

Aircraft noise: The nightmare just keeps on coming…

New food caddy is such a waste

Really! Calverley did not even understand the answer. Chin Chin, readers…


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

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EDUCATION Times WITH THE

Teaching us how to start school year successfully As the new term begins it can be a daunting prospect, for pupils and parents alike. Thankfully, however, the Tonbridge-based charity Parentkind has some top tips to share. Its Marketing and Communications Manager Sarah West reveals her thoughts on getting children – and you – off to a great start this term...

KEEP SMILING Resilience will help your child settle in IT’S the beginning of a new school year and children up and down the country will probably be feeling a mix of emotions, from excitement and curiosity to nervousness and uncertainty. Whether they are starting school for the first time, moving up to a new school or into a new year, it’s a big step, and they will inevitably have to adjust and settle into a different routine… as you will, too. Here are some key pieces of advice to keep in mind over the coming weeks. BE POSITIVE At this important time, one of the best things you as a parent or carer can do is to be positive about school. It not only helps children feel at ease but allows you to open up a dialogue with them, encouraging them to share their thoughts and ask questions. By showing them you are interested in their learning, you are sending a strong message about the value you place on their education and aspirations for the future. GET INVOLVED By getting involved in your child’s learning, you are doing them a great turn. There is a lot of research that shows how parental participation can have a very positive impact on children academically, emotionally and behaviourally. In fact, education expert Professor John Hattie says: “The effect of parental engagement over a student’s school career is the equivalent of adding an extra two to three years to a student’s education.” When children are young and at primary school, it might seem a bit easier to get involved, getting to know other families at the school

gates and finding lots of opportunities through the PTA or other parent groups. When your child moves to secondary school, as they gain independence and confidence, it may feel like there are fewer opportunities. But in fact participating in your child’s learning, whatever their stage, can be done in lots of different ways. For example, mums and dads can read with children at home and volunteer to support teachers in the classroom or on school trips; or they can be part of a task force to help improve

‘The effect of parental engagement over a student’s school career is the equivalent of adding an extra two to three years to a student’s education’ the school garden or a classroom; join the school PTA; be a school governor or trustee; or even simply respond to surveys where they can share their views and opinions about school policy. But learning, of course, doesn’t just happen in school. By getting children involved in cooking, gardening, repairing and making things at home, as well as a raft of other activities that you do in your daily lives, you are teaching them basic life skills which will stand them in good stead for the future and help them to make sense of the world around them. BE THERE FOR THEM It’s completely natural to wonder how your child will get on at school and who their friends will

be. Most children settle into school really easily, but an important step in their learning is to help them build resilience. Knowing your child has the skills to cope with new situations and bounce back when things go wrong can help ease any worries. Encourage your child to talk about how they feel, teach them the names of different emotions and recognise how others might be feeling too. For younger children, there are plenty of books you can get from the library about making friends and getting used to a new environment, to help you get a conversation started. For older children, show them you are there for them, ready to listen and support them whenever they need you. It’s important to let your child know that sometimes things don’t always go to plan, and perhaps discuss ways they can handle themselves, taking time out or knowing when and who to ask for help. Children will be able to cope better in different situations if they know there is support around them, and indeed for you as a parent or carer, too. ENJOY YOURSELVES Schools bring communities together and provide families with the opportunity to make friends. By participating in your child’s education, no matter how you do it or how much time you can give, you will be supporting your child to achieve their potential, and most likely have fun along the way! For more tips on how to get involved in your child’s learning and education, log on to parentkind.org.uk

Education

NEWS

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NEWS

Weekly Comment

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Tom Tugendhat MP for Tonbridge & Malling

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Tom Tugendhat, MBE, left the British Army in July 2013 after a career in which he served on operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and as the military assistant to the Chief of the Defence Staff. As a Territorial Army officer, he worked on everything from those ops to establishing the Armed Forces Muslim Association, and also worked for the Foreign Office. He was first elected as a Member of Parliament in 2015, and was elected Chair of Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee in July 2017

How we take care of waste is important REDUCING the amount of waste we produce is essential. That’s why it is so important that recycling and disposal is not just easy, but sustainable. That’s why we have to work together. The council is going to do more – collecting more and more from our doorsteps – but it isn’t just about them. They can’t collect everything from our doorstep, we need to help. That’s why Household Waste Recycling Centres matter. Only a few miles away from us we can play our part and drop things off, sorting plastic, cardboard, grass cuttings, soil, or old bits of broken furniture. Kent County Council have said that more than 99 per cent of it is recycled, with just 1 per cent sent to landfill. And best of all, it’s all free – for now, that is. But this isn’t just about recycling, it’s about our homes and our communities. Because waste management is not about others, it’s about us. How can we continue to enjoy our countryside without fly-tipping, how can we ensure our food is clean and healthy, how can we know our community will be protected for our kids and grandchildren? We need to work together. Our countryside isn’t beautiful because the council made it so, but because we have together kept it the way we want. We have a shared responsibility to act and make sure that we are able

to live in the most beautiful part of the country. There’s nowhere better than Kent and I know we all love our home and want to keep it for generations to come. To make sure we can work together, Kent County Council is asking for views on the proposal to change the way non-commercial waste is paid for. How much should be a shared cost and how much should be according to use? For things like soil, rubble, hardcore and plasterboard – building materials – there’s a good argument to say the person doing the construction, or destruction, should pay for it, not everyone in the community. We need to change because the way we generate waste has changed. DIY is more common and that means more sacks of rubbish. And with our neighbouring councils now charging, if we don’t, we’ll have their rubbish in our tip. The consultation closes on November 1, so if you are someone who regularly uses the tips, I hope you will get in touch with Kent County Council. You can do this by completing the online questionnaire which can be found at kent.gov.uk/ wasteconsultation or by writing to: Freepost KCC WASTE MANAGEMENT. After November 1, the responses will be collated and the feedback will go to county councillors, so please make sure your councillor knows your views.

DIY DUMPING The Household Waste Recycling Centre at North Farm

Maria Heslop

Maria Heslop is Cabinet Member for Community Services at Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council, and Conservative representative of Vauxhall ward. She is married to the council’s Leader, Nicolas Heslop, and they have four children. A dedicated runner, she is a member of Tonbridge Athletic Club and came first in the women’s over-50s category at the London Marathon in April. She is Head of History and Classics at Beechwood Sacred Heart School in Tunbridge Wells

Councillor for Vauxhall ward

Running on empty? Time to make a fresh start it as a mental health group at all, but that’s the way it has developed for a lot of people. They get into running because it clears their mind. I’m a teacher, so when I’m running I sort out my day, my week. I can get quite a lot of done, away

improve your social life. It gives you pleasure as well, and that’s wonderful. It seems to be important for a sense of wellbeing. The parkrun is perfect because it’s not a big distance, it’s first thing on Saturday morning so you get it out of the way at the weekend, it’s non-competitive and it has that family/community element.

from the house or the working environment. So as this glorious summer comes to an end, don’t squirrel yourself away and hibernate. Just put on your trainers and open the door on a whole world of wellbeing waiting for you.

Lucky On the back of that, junior parkrun has just celebrated its second birthday. We’re lucky because we’ve got two of each in Tonbridge & Malling; we’re one of the few boroughs in the country with that. So the kids can join in and mature into the full-blow parkrun. You’ve also got Beginners to Runners, which was born on the back of parkrun. The desire to do parkrun might make people think: ‘Well actually I don’t know how to start and I’m a bit embarrassed about turning up when everyone else is running and I can’t’. So it’s filled that gap. And it’s never too late to start. Earlier this year, the Times did an article about the Sarah’s Runners group in Tunbridge Wells, which was nominated for BBC Radio 4’s All In The Mind awards. Sarah Russell, the founder, said she didn’t start

PHOTO: Scott Wishart

FINALLY, people are waking up to the fact that running is the cheapest option, and therefore the best solution, for a community to improve its physical and mental health. Tonbridge’s parkrun was recently used to launch the 70th birthday of the NHS nationwide, and it was entirely appropriate. It has just celebrated its 250th meeting, and in almost five years that it has been up and running, it has undoubtedly had an enormous effect on people’s attitude towards exercise. I began running when I had my fourth child 12 years ago, just to get out of the house where no one could find me for an hour! I used to go swimming a lot, but that was too time-consuming. Running keeps you fit at low to no cost, and it’s time-efficient: Out of the door and you’re gone. But when I started, I was a bit of a lonesome madwoman on the streets of Tonbridge and people were staring at me. Now you see someone running every two seconds – and there’s a lot of women. I reckon more of them have taken it up than men. And it has become a real way of life for people rather than being seen as something which is exclusive to athletes. It’s something that you do for recreation and to

PERFECT FIT Dame Kelly Holmes launches the NHS’s 70th birthday at Tonbridge parkrun


food&drink

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

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WITH THEFEATURES & Drink Going Out Food Move Times

A TASTE OF

TUNBRIDGE WELLS CHEERS TO SEPTEMBER: THE MONTH OF GOOD FOOD

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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FEATURES Food & Drink Move WITH THE Times

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Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Harvest Food Festival enjoyed as part of month-long celebration THOUSANDS packed into The Pantiles for the promenade’s annual Harvest Food Festival, one of the main meals on this year’s Royal Tunbridge Wells Food Month menu. Stallholders offered everything from bread and cheese to wine and beer at the event, now in its sixth year, which was held over last weekend. Also, Saturday saw the bi-monthly Farmers’ Market outside the Town Hall, offering yet more

locally-sourced fruit and veg and other products. It was all just the start of what promises to be a showcase of local culinary excellence. Other events lined up include a food festival inside Calverley Grounds, and the opportunity to train to be a community chef. Business group Royal Tunbridge Wells Together has organised Food Month as a chance to harvest a series of events to showcase local producers.

13-16 Sept

Tunbridge Wells Beer Weekend

Various

22-23 Sept

Calverley Grounds Food Festival

Calverley Grounds

23-Sep

The Art of Afternoon Drinking (Wine) With The Bottle Bitches

Fuggles

28 Sept, from 6pm Special Menu Dining Experience

Group manager Karen Pengelly said: “We are delighted to be working with and promoting local businesses as part of the Food Month initiative. “With so many superb food producers and restaurants in the town, this is the perfect opportunity to showcase their products and talents at a time of harvest and plenty. “We hope that all our local businesses will have a successful month.”

One Warwick Park

Throughout Sept

Signature Mushroom, Garlic & Butternut Squash Soup

Souper Juice

Throughout Sept

Signature Pistachio & Chocolate Frappistachio

Gusta

Throughout Sept

Train to be a Community Chef Course

Email Carol.Francis@tchg.org.uk for details

Throughout Sept

Prosecco Promotion

Giggling Squid

PHOTOS BY SARAH BOND

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Wednesday September 12 | 2018

WITH THE

Move Times

AVAILABLE EVER Y WEDNESDAY – A MUST-READ

ULTIMATE GUIDE

INSPIRATION FOR MOVING AND IMPROVING timeslocalnews.co.uk

TO ALL THE LOCAL PROPER TY BEST BUYS

Pretty in Penshurst with views Page 25

39

Going up in the world

A Victorian apartment on three floors – page 24

A WALK IN THE PARK FOR RAMBLERS


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Times

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Your at-a-glance guide to HAVENS VIEW LONDON ROAD SOUTHBOROUGH

GUIDE PRICE

£785,000

UNDER £400,000

n Kitchen/breakfast room

UNDER £600,000

n Breakfast/dining room

ST JOHN’S ROAD TUNBRIDGE WELLS

n Double bedroom with period fireplace

BIDBOROUGH COURT PENSHURST ROAD, BIDBOROUGH

n 2 further double bedrooms

GUIDE PRICE

n Bathroom with roll-top bath

£350,000 n Ground floor apartment with period features n Wide hallway/dining room n Elegant living room with marble fireplace

n Cloakroom n Cellar n Driveway offering parking CONTACT Flying Fish Properties Southborough 01892 514 189 flyingfishproperties.co.uk

GUIDE PRICE OFFERS IN EXCESS OF

£500,000

n Victorian apartment on 3 floors n Living room with doors to garden n 2nd reception room/bedroom 3 n Kitchen

n Bathroom n Study and attic room n Driveway, garage and parking n Private garden with terrace n Communal grounds with views CONTACT Flying Fish Properties Southborough 01892 514 189 flyingfishproperties.co.uk


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Budget

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WITH THE

Times 25

great properties by price range… UNDER £700,000 ROOKLEY CLOSE, HAWKENBURY TUNBRIDGE WELLS

£635,000 ■ Townhouse with large extension ■ Lounge ■ Kitchen with French doors to garden ■ Recently fitted ground-floor WC ■ 5 bedrooms spread over first and second floors ■ Bathroom ■ Good-sized garden with patio and shed ■ Integral garage ■ Driveway and off-road parking CONTACT Wood & Pilcher Tunbridge Wells 01892 511211 woodandpilcher.co.uk

UNDER £800,000 SMARTS HILL PENSHURST

GUIDE PRICE

£750,000 ■ Character home with leaded windows ■ Sitting room with doors to garden ■ Study/breakfast room ■ Dining room ■ Country-style kitchen ■ Utility room and cloakroom ■ Master bedroom with en suite ■ Bathroom ■ 3 further bedrooms ■ Garden, garage, workshop and studio CONTACT Wood & Pilcher Tonbridge 01732 351135 woodandpilcher.co.uk

UNDER £1MILLION LITTLE MOUNT SION TUNBRIDGE WELLS

UNDER £900,000 HAVENS VIEW LONDON ROAD SOUTHBOROUGH

GUIDE PRICE

£785,000 ■ Extended 1930s home with stained glass windows ■ Living room with decorative fireplace

■ 3 further bedrooms ■ Family bathroom ■ Garden with decked terrace and rural views

■ Kitchen with doors to terrace ■ Utility room and cloakroom ■ Master bedroom with en suite

■ Listed corner house in ‘village’ area ■ Sitting room with log-burning stove ■ Dining room

■ Summerhouse, studio and two sheds

■ Kitchen and utility room

■ Driveway and garage

■ 3 bedrooms

■ 0.4 acre plot

■ Shower room

■ Living room with oriel window and seat

■ Master suite with far-reaching views

■ Dining room ■ Home office/family room

£875,000

CONTACT Flying Fish Properties Southborough 01892 514 189 flyingfishproperties.co.uk

■ Courtyard garden CONTACT Knight Frank Tunbridge Wells 01892 515035 knightfrank.co.uk


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

AT A GLANCE RAMBLERS REST CHERRY GARDENS HILL GROOMBRIDGE n Improved and extended family home

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Ramblers Rest

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The property was constructed in 1986 and extended by the current owners, with improvements including a glass-covered dining area

n Covered entrance porch with full-height windows n Large open-plan reception hall leading to glass-covered dining room with extensive views over garden n Drawing room with open fireplace and doors to garden n Kitchen/breakfast/family room with range-style cooker and doors to garden n Study overlooking garden n Utility room with shower cubicle and door to garage n Cloakroom n Master bedroom with en-suite bathroom n 4 further bedrooms n Family bathroom/shower room n Mature park-like gardens with terrace and sweeping lawns n Pond, summerhouse and further outbuildings n Integral double garage n Driveway and off-road parking n In total, approximately 1.24 acres

ÂŁ1,250,000 Available for sale through Wood & Pilcher Tunbridge Wells 01892 511211 woodandpilcher.co.uk

Luxury barn-style country home surrounded by mature gardens


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

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WITH THE & Drink FEATURES Going Out Food Move Times

Q&A What you can enjoy throughout Food Month We catch up with Lauren Brook [pictured], from Royal Tunbridge Wells Together, on what the organisers are hoping to achieve throughout Food Month. Why did you organise Food Month last year, and how successful was it? We came up with the idea of September Food Month as a way to promote the local food and beverage offering in Tunbridge Wells at the most plentiful time of year. Kent is known for its outstanding local producers, and with so many independent restaurants, cafés and retailers in our town centre serving everything from fresh game to artisan cheeses, it was very successful. With the two food festivals on The Pantiles and Calverley Grounds tying the month together, there was a real focus on, and celebration of, local food and drink throughout the month. What is your role in helping to organise this year’s festival? Apart from making initial contact to ask businesses for their input into Food Month, it’s largely down to each individual business to make it happen. My role involves putting together the programme and then making sure we promote every business involved across our social media channels and website. Can you briefly explain what is happening over the course of the month? It’s a real mix of food events, talks, promotions and tastings across the town, starting with the Harvest Food Festival on The Pantiles and culminating in the Food Festival in Calverley Grounds. The Tunbridge Wells Beer Weekend is sandwiched in the middle, taking place across nine different venues from September 13-16, and there are promotions available throughout the month, including a signature soup at Souper Juice and a free glass of Prosecco with selected main meals at the Giggling Squid. We hope that residents and visitors will be encouraged throughout the month to support local, visit their local retailers and venues and enjoy what’s on offer in Tunbridge Wells. What are the highlights, in your opinion? I am very much looking forward to seeing what the Bottle Bitches have to say about wine at their event at Fuggles, and I will certainly be heading over to Gusta to try their special Frappistachio, too. Beer Weekend will also be a highlight for me – there’ll be some really interesting talks on home brewing, live music and tap takeovers from some fantastic local producers. Why is it important for a town like Tunbridge Wells to get behind an event of this kind? Food Month is mainly about celebrating and supporting the many outstanding local independents in Tunbridge Wells, which we believe is incredibly important in maintaining the vitality and vibrancy of our town centre. Is there still time for food and drink businesses to get involved with it? Absolutely. Businesses should contact me by emailing: lauren@tunbridgewellstogether.co.uk or calling 01892 531985. tunbridgewellstogether.co.uk/food-month

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Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Life&Times

ARTS & CULTURE LIFE & STYLE FOOD & DRINK MOTORING SPORT and MORE...

IN PRINT AND ONLINE SEVEN DAYS A WEEK timeslocalnews.co.uk

Internet cook enjoys good korma

52

Alex Ainouz Page 56

Deep-seated frights

THE ONLY WAY IS SHAKESPEARE

58

The scary story of submarine The Meg Page 52

DALMATIA IS A HOLIDAY HOTSPOT

60

A magical ‘marvel’

Pete Firman’s tour comes to Trinity

LEGO’S TRAILBLAZING BUGATTI

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Page 50

THE RUMBLES OF WIMBLEDON…


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arts

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It’s a funny kind of magic

Comedian and magician Pete Firman brings his latest act, Marvels, to Trinity Theatre next week. The Times finds out more about what this talented trickster has up his sleeve

I

n the packed modern field of magic acts, Pete Firman certainly stands out. He’s recently appeared on the legendary stage of The London Palladium, handled some props that belonged to his comedy-magic hero in the ITV documentary Tommy Cooper Forever, and even exercised his vocal chords during a song and dance routine for Comic Relief. Is there no end to the man’s talents?

a reaction. You can’t watch someone hitting a nail into their face passively. You’re definitely engaged, whether it be disgusted or entranced.” For the best part of two decades, Pete Firman has certainly been engaging audiences with his brand of magic and comedy, with one-word live shows such as Hokum, Hoodwinker, Scoundrel and Trickster, as well as TV appearances on

‘A hundred years ago magicians were rock ‘n’ roll stars, but there’s not a lot that’s left undiscovered in the world now’ As he prepares to launch his new live show, Marvels, upon an unsuspecting public, Pete will promise one thing – he’s not going to be hammering nails or threading needles into his body. “I used to enjoy doing those things, and I’ve got a soft spot for that kind of material as it would always guarantee

Channel 5’s Monkey Magic, BBC’s The Magicians and ITV’s Tonight at the London Palladium. He’s also published a bestselling book, Tricks To Freak Out Your Friends. With Marvels, he’s aiming to amaze and enthral crowds across the country with an artform which never ceases to captivate despite its age. “What does magic mean in 2018?” Pete

SUCH A CARD Pete Firman

Wednesday September 12 | 2018


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

wonders. “A hundred years ago magicians were rock ‘n’ roll stars, but there’s not a lot that’s left undiscovered in the world now. Maybe that’s one of the reasons why the magic show is a popular form of entertainment, because it’s a rarity for an audience to be bamboozled. “I wouldn’t say that Google has ruined magic, but if someone is persistent enough they could probably find out how a trick works. These are the kind of things that a 21st-century magician has to deal with.” While he admits to not venturing out of an evening to see a great deal of live magic, when he does drop in on a show he always takes his seat with an open mind: “I still like seeing a good magic trick, and I do get fooled now and then.” He goes on to say: “It’s nice to have that feeling of being deceived because it doesn’t happen so much, especially the longer you’re in the game. “But it’s that sensation that got me hooked in the first place.” While David Blaine might avoid any elements of comedy in his act, most modern magicians realise that a welldelivered spot of banter goes down well with an audience already reeling from being astonished. Pete acknowledges that a master such as Tommy Cooper could never be emulated, but that shouldn’t stop him from inserting some good gags into his show. “I’m trying to do good tricks and make it as funny as I can. I’m not doing a trick and then doing five minutes of stand-up about airplane food; the jokes are interwoven and integrated into whatever it is that I’m doing. “You can get a lot of mileage out of that trope of borrowing a gentleman’s watch and smashing it up, but where it ends up right in the end. Not only is that a good trick, it’s a funny situation that you can create with someone.” Should you find yourself up on stage during Pete’s Marvels tour, don’t worry about your timepiece not making it back home with you, and please don’t be offended if he can’t keep hold of your name in his head. He has a lot going on in there during showtime. “I have a terrible memory. My biggest faux pas in performing is forgetting people’s names, and it’s really the worst thing that you can forget because people do take umbrage when you call a ‘Barry’ ‘Gary’, or something like that. Doing magic is a little bit like patting your head and

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk rubbing your belly – you’re doing different things at different times, and I just have a problem with remembering names.” Fortunately, Pete won’t have to worry too much about forgetting where he’s going on tour when he takes Marvels across the UK. “There’s a lot of driving and a lot of travelling involved, but luckily I have a tour manager with me, so he does the driving and I can have a kip. “Touring is tiring, but it’s nice in that each day is different; you can get different challenges from the venues because they’re not all the same. Some are theatre-theatres, some are arts centres, some are multi-purpose venues, so there’s a challenge when you arrive on the day and you have to tweak things slightly.”

Beatles Not that this sort of thing is ever likely to put an experienced performer like Pete Firman on edge. Indeed, he agrees that an overly-anxious magician is likely to be a notvery-good magician. “You want a certain level of nervousness because that gets you up and gets you going. If you didn’t have that it would mean you’re not bothered, and you should probably stop doing it. “I did something at The London Palladium last year which was a big deal for me because of that venue, and because you think: ‘Wow, The Beatles and Judy Garland and anyone who’s been anyone has been on that stage’, and you can just feel it in the room. So stuff like that I maybe work myself up over, but I’m not locking myself in the dressing room or vomiting or anything like that. The last thing you want as a magician is to get the shakes.” As his loyal fanbase continues to carry him through, he hopes to pick up some new followers with his new tour, even if they come in through the side entrance. “There was actually a conversation had about whether some [Marvel] comics fans might come along by accident. “But we thought it would probably be all right, and if we sold a few extra tickets because of the Marvel universe, then is that a bad thing?” Pete Firman brings his Marvels tour to Trinity Theatre at 8pm on Friday, September 21. Tickets cost £19 and can be booked via trinitytheatre.net You can find out more about his tour by visiting www.petefirman.co.uk

FOR PETE’S SAKE: Five fun facts about Mr Magic ■ Pete’s first big break came in 2002 when he responded to an advert from Objective Productions, who were searching for new magicians for a new television show, Monkey Magic, on Channel 5. ■ Since then, his skill for fusing magic and comedy has made Pete one of the most sought-after magicians, appearing on shows such as The Secret World of Magic (Sky One), Tonight at the Palladium (ITV) and the revamped version of The Generation Game on BBC 1 . ■ Pete’s UK bestseller Tricks to Freak Out Your Friends has also been phenomenally successful in the US. In the book, he teaches the everyday person how to crack one’s own nose and how to take a bite out of a glass. ■ Live performances have taken Pete all over the world, and his one-man shows have entertained sell-out audiences for ten years in a row at the Edinburgh Fringe. ■ He was born under the sign of Taurus, and has also done some acting alongside his blend of magic and comedy, appearing in pieces as varied as the TV series Dick and Dom’s Funny Business to the film about the Edinburgh Festival, Peacock Season.

Arts & Culture

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Going Out

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going ut Seven days of activities at a glance

By Eileen Leahy

PASHLEY MANOR GARDENS are enjoying Dahlia Days

WEDNESDAY

The Meg is a film about a deep sea submersible pilot who revisits his past fears in the Mariana Trench and accidentally unleashes the 70ft ancestor of the Great White Shark believed to be extinct. It’s still showing at the drive-in cinema at The Hop Farm tonight and tomorrow. Starring Jason Statham, it airs at 8pm. Tickets are £25 per vehicle and can be booked at moonlightcinema.com Pashley Manor is currently hosting its Dahlia Days event, which runs until this Saturday [September 15]. If you’re a fan of this fabulous flower, then make sure you pay these glorious gardens in Ticehurst a visit. You can see lots of

different varieties, pick up plenty of tips on how best to grow them, and of course buy some to plant in your own garden. For tickets and opening times, visit pashleymanorgardens.com The Merry Wives of Windsor, Shakespeare’s comedy of over-inflated egos, has been given a contemporary facelift courtesy of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s latest interpretation. It sees Sir John Falstaff planning to ‘hustle his way to comfortable retirement’ by seducing the wives of two wealthy men. Think of director Fiona Laird’s version more of a The Only Way is Essex as opposed to a traditional Stratford-upon-Avon version. It will be broadcast live this evening

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

from 7pm into the Odeon and Trinity Theatre in Tunbridge Wells and The Stag in Sevenoaks.

THURSDAY Trinity Theatre’s current exhibition is entitled More Rare Skills and exhibits the work of some of the most notable artists from Kent and Sussex. Included in the show are a ‘vibrant and varied’ collection of paintings, drawings and prints depicting everything from land and seascapes to wildlife and local landmarks. It’s on until this coming Sunday [September 16]. There’s still time to enjoy a Jazz on The Pantiles session before they finish at the end of this month. To make it a really special event, why not indulge in One Warwick Park Hotel’s Bubbles and Burger deal, which costs just £10 per person? For more details, see onewarwickpark.co.uk This evening there will be a dance extravaganza at the EM Forster Theatre in Tonbridge. Shift is the work of the Barely Methodical Troupe, who are ‘at the forefront of a new kind of physical performance, creating highly entertaining shows that mix the show-stopping acrobatics of circus with the emotional punch of theatre’. The action starts at 7.30pm, and tickets cost £16 from emtheatre.com You also have a chance to see the spectacular Puccini classic La Bohème from Sydney Harbour this evening – for one night only – from 7pm. The Odeon cinema is screening it in Tunbridge Wells

A FILM WITH PLENTY OF BITE Monsters of the deep loom in The Meg and tickets cost £20.75 per person. Over at Trinity Theatre, the creators of the 2016 Edinburgh Festival Fringe hit Meet Fred team up with clown supremoes Spymonkey to present The Flop – an anarchic slice of stupidity. It’s Paris 1657-ish and impotence is illegal – but when a member of the aristocracy is accused of being less than upstanding, his wounded pride leads him towards a monumental and very public flop. Tickets cost £15 and the show starts at 8pm. Book at trinitytheatre.net

FRIDAY

JAZZ UP JAZZ NIGHT: At One Warwick Park Hotel

The free annual Heritage Open Days events are still going on all weekend until Sunday. To pay a visit to one of the many special behind-thescenes events being organised by the Royal Tunbridge Wells Civic Society and Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council, in association with various partners, visit thecivicsociety.org or tmbc.gov.uk or heritageopendays.org.uk The Illyria theatre group will be performing The Merchant of Venice in the gorgeous gardens of Burrswood in Groombridge this evening. Shakespeare’s thrilling and dramatic courtroom drama, focusing on whether Antonio can pay


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Wednesday September 12 | 2018

back Shylock and thus avoid giving him a pound of his flesh, is set to see you on the edge of your seat thanks to this brilliant production. Gates open at 5.30pm with the performance at 7pm. Tickets cost £12 per person. For more details, see burrswood.org.uk There’s another of the EM Forster Theatre’s popular Comedy Nights on this evening. Tickets, which cost £12, sell out quickly, so make sure you get yours from emftheatre.com Espionage spoof The Spy Who Dumped Me is the story of Audrey and Morgan, two best friends who unwittingly become entangled in an international conspiracy when one of the women discovers the

boyfriend who dumped her was actually a spy. This hit comedy, which stars Mila Kunis, Kate McKinnon and Justin Theroux, starts its run at the Moonlight Drive-In Cinema at The Hop Farm this evening at 7.45pm. Tickets cost £25 per vehicle from moonlightcinema.com

SATURDAY

It’s the second annual Tunbridge Wells Food Month, so check out one of the numerous beer events happening this weekend at town venues including The Royal Oak and The Bedford pubs. This evening, Trinity Theatre will host one of its monthly comedy cafés from 8pm. The venue scours the country to

find the best emerging stand-up talent in the land to come and perform, so this is definitely one for the diary if you like a lot of laughs. Tonight’s comedians include Henry Parker and John Lynne. Tickets cost from £13. trinitytheatre.net

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PICK OF THE WEEK: Orchard Day at Smallhythe Place Saturday, September 15, 11am-4pm

SUNDAY Members from the south-east Contemporary Glass Society launch a major exhibition at Maidstone Museum today, which will run until November 10. In this their 20th Year, the society includes lots of members from the local area. There will also be a chance to meet some of the artists tomorrow evening at a special private view. For more information, see facebook.com/ cgssoutheast Scotney Castle is hosting a Hops and Harvest tour every weekend throughout September, so if you haven’t yet been down to see the hop gardens, hop farm and microbrewery, then what are you waiting for? Further information on entrance price and timings can be found at nationaltrust.org.uk/scotney-castle

MONDAY

The Sherlock Holmes adventure The Sign of Four is on tonight and tomorrow at the EM Forster Theatre. If you’re not familiar with this tale, then it’s about the disappearance of a young woman’s father and a mysterious note that appears years later upon her annual delivery of valuable pearls. Intrigued to find out what happens? Then go along at 7.30pm to find out. Tickets cost £16 per adult from emftheatre.com

TUESDAY

THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR: Live on screen as you’ve never seen them before!

Going Out

Every Tuesday at Christ Church in Tonbridge High Street, Les Puces French speaking classes take place. Aimed at pre-schoolers and primary pupils, the

If you’re a fan of the great outdoors, breathtaking scenery and natural produce, then make sure you head over to Smallhythe Place near Tenterden on Saturday, where where an orchard day event will be held between 11am and 4pm. The aim is to showcase and celebrate the annual harvest and Kent’s local offering in the late summer gardens of this National Trust property. From fresh produce straight off the orchards’ trees, to plants, tasty treats and garden gifts, this is a day out with a difference suitable for all the family. There will also be local stallholders, garden tours, historic talks, demonstrations and a variety of activities to enjoy. And best of all, entry is free! For more information, call 01580 762334 or visit nationaltrust.org.uk/smallhythe-place lessons are an hour long and are held at 9.30am and 4pm. Fees for half a term cost £60 per child. For more information, visit lespuces.co.uk Ocean’s 8, the latest instalment in the famous heist series, is being screened at Trinity Theatre today at 11am, 2pm and 8pm. Starring Sandra Bullock, Helena Bonham

Carter, Anne Hathaway and Cate Blanchett, it focuses on a group of criminal women aiming to steal a $150million Cartier necklace from New York’s infamous Met Ball. Will they pull it off under the gaze of its organiser, legendary US Vogue editor Anna Wintour (played by herself)? Tickets cost from £8.


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Going out

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk THE GREY LADY MUSIC LOUNGE

THE ASSEMBLY HALL THEATRE

The Pantiles Doors 7.15pm, entry £6/£7 Websites pdag.co.uk & thegreylady.co.uk Wednesday Joe Ackerley, Niamh McSmith, Jennifer Lee Ridley, James McMaster Friday Closed for a private party Saturday Project 5 Sunday Jack Leon Mackey, Dale Chapman, Rob Picazo, Peter Mercer

Crescent Road All show details and tickets available at assemblyhalltheatre.co.uk Thursday Genesis Legacy Friday Legend: The Music of Bob Marley Saturday The Doors Alive Sunday 80s Mania

THE TUNBRIDGE WELLS FORUM

live music With Paul Dunton

T

ONIGHT [Wednesday], The Stable returns to The Forum featuring Tight Puppet, Hounding, Righteous Sons and Spinner, and you can catch Joe Ackerley, Niamh McSmith, Jennifer Lee Ridley and James McMaster performing at The Grey Lady. This Thursday night, the superb Son Picante play Jazz on The Pantiles, Genesis Legacy are at The Assembly Hall Theatre, and Cassidy’s Bar are hosting their popular Jam Session. On Friday, Suncharmer frontman Paul Crisp will be performing at The White Hart in Wadhurst, and renowned DJ Tim Cullen hosts a

The must-read guide to what’s on musically for the week ahead… paulduntonandguests.com

stellar line-up of house and dance music at The Forum, with Muzz Khan, DJ Faz and DJ Pete Griffiths on the bill. On Saturday night you can catch Project 5 at The Grey Lady, The Doors Alive at The Assembly Hall, The Varlies at The Beau Nash, and The Heartbeats at The Royal Oak. For fans of acoustic music, Jack Leon Mackey, Dale Chapman, Rob Picazo, Peter Mercer are at The Grey Lady on Sunday night. Andrew McKay & Carole Etherton are at The Tonbridge Folk Club on Monday, and the excellent Snakes & Ladders will be at The Punch & Judy in Tonbridge on Tuesday night.

Event information at twforum.co.uk Wednesday The Stable: Tight Puppet, Hounding, Righteous Sons, Spinner Friday SWiTCH, DJ Tim Cullen, Muzz Khan, DJ Faz, DJ Pete Griffiths Saturday Space, The Gallerys Sunday Heritage Open Days (2pm start)

The Varlies

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Illyria perform The Merchant of Venice

JAZZ ON THE PANTILES

THE BEAU NASH TAVERN

The Bandstand Music from 8pm-10pm (donations welcomed) Thursday Son Picante

Mount Ephraim Open all day, free entry Music from 8.30pm till late Saturday The Varlies Sunday Open Mic Night

CASSIDY’S BAR Castle Street. Open all day, free entry, music from 8.30pm till late Thursday Jam session. All welcome

TRINITY THEATRE Church Road All show details and tickets available at trinitytheatre.net Friday Rock & Roll Revolution featuring The Bluejays

BURRSWOOD Groombridge Gates 5.30pm, performance 7pm Tickets: £12 per person. Gourmet picnic boxes bookable in advance. Full bar plus hot drinks for sale. Bring camping chairs and rugs. To book, call 01892 865988 or email: reservations@burrswood.org.uk Friday Open Air Theatre: The Merchant of Venice performed by Illyria

THE ROYAL OAK PUB Prospect Road Open all day, free entry, music from 8pm Saturday The Heartbeats

TONBRIDGE FOLK CLUB At The Flying Dutchman, Hildenborough Hat collection with a suggested contribution of £7 (£5 concessions) Music from 8pm. All welcome More information at tonbridgefolkclub.org Monday Andrew McKay & Carole Etherton

THE PUNCH & JUDY 11 St Stephen’s Street, Tonbridge Open all day, free entry, music from 8pm Tuesday Snakes & Ladders

THE WHITE HART Wadhurst High Street Open all day, free entry Music from 9pm Friday Paul Crisp

The Doors Alive


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

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food

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Food & Drink

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

This YouTuber might be called a French guy cooking, but don’t expect overly fancy food Internet chef Alexis Gabriel Aïnouz reveals how his family changed his creative habits

W

HEN you hear the book title Just a French Guy Cooking, you could be forgiven for assuming Alexis Gabriel Aïnouz’s recipes are about garlic snails, croissants and tons of butter. While there’s no denying Aïnouz is French, his cooking can’t be labelled so easily. In fact, despite the new book, he shrugs in typically Parisian fashion: “It is what it is” – instead of one cuisine, he draws inspirations from all over the world. He’s also happy to put his own quirky spin on traditional French dishes untouched for decades. Aïnouz’s career is unusual; instead of going the expected route of culinary school and years grafting in a kitchen, he’s completely self-taught. He’s also a decidedly modern cook who built a platform on YouTube and was catapulted into the limelight when he got the much-coveted Jamie Oliver seal of approval. Now, he is publishing his own cookbook.

THE PRACTICALITY OF COOKING

HIS INSPIRATIONS

Throughout Aïnouz’s travels, he noticed a recurring theme: “People admire French food, but everyone was intimidated because they don’t know the simple kind.” He wants to show the world that French recipes don’t have to be hugely complicated with obscure ingredients and numerous steps. His advice if you want a simple recipe to start with? A tartine. He says: “It’s nice, good-looking, a bargain in terms of flavour and simple to put together.” It’s basically an open sandwich – all you have to do is find good bread, a bit of butter and fresh ingredients and you’ve nailed it. “Everything’s so serious in France,” Aïnouz says, “I like a more relaxed approach to cooking.”

“I fell in love with food while travelling the world with my parents,” Aïnouz explains. “We would start in the market in every place we would visit, finding all the new and exotic food and exciting flavours we’d never heard about before – that’s what got me hooked on cooking.” He leaves few cuisines untouched, from Thai and Japanese to Italian and Hawaiian. It’s the history of food that also fascinates him: “Recipes are just recipes unless you give context to them – then they become stories.” It’s this global approach that means Aïnouz runs his YouTube channel in English, wanting to cross borders. Considering he has 750k followers, this plan has been pretty successful.

It was practicality that really forced Aïnouz to cook regularly. “When I moved in with my girlfriend about eight years ago, we officially divided the housework in half,” he recalls. “I started cooking for every meal, which I think is a good deal. I have a kid now, and cooking for three people on a daily basis is a completely different game.” The biggest challenge was making sure he didn’t get bored. He says: “It really changed my perception of cooking – it’s not about the fancy weekend meals, it’s about how you stay creative on a daily basis.” And this was how the book was born – out of Aïnouz’s desire to create new and exciting meals for his family every day.

FRENCH COOKING DOESN’T HAVE TO BE COMPLICATED


Food & Drink

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

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AÏNOUZ’S VEGGIE KORMA RECIPE INGREDIENTS (Serves 4) FOR THE NUT AND POPPY SEED PASTE: ■ 1tbsp poppy seeds ■ 50g whole blanched almonds ■ 50g unsalted cashew nuts FOR THE VEGETABLES: ■ 2 large carrots ■ 2 large potatoes, peeled ■ 1/2 cauliflower ■ 12 baby corn ■ 225g green peas FOR THE KORMA SAUCE: ■ 2tbsp ghee (clarified butter) ■ 4 spring onions, finely sliced ■ 1tbsp ginger and garlic paste (made by blitzing equal quantities of chopped root ginger and garlic with a little water until smooth) ■ 2-3 mild green chillies, e.g. jalapenos, chopped ■ 150g natural full-fat yogurt ■ 1tsp ground turmeric ■ 175ml double cream ■ 1tsp garam masala

Just A French Guy Cooking by Alexis Gabriel Aïnouz is published by Quadrille, priced £15. Photography Dan Jones. Available now.

TO FINISH ■ A few whole blanched almonds ■ A few unsalted cashews ■ Raisins ■ Chopped fresh mint and/or coriander

METHOD

1

For the nut and poppy seed paste, pour boiling water over the poppy seeds, almonds and cashews and leave to stand for 30 minutes. Drain the seeds and nuts and blitz them to a smooth paste in a food processor, adding 60ml water, if necessary.

2

For the vegetables, cut the carrots and potatoes into 2.5 cm pieces, break the cauliflower into small florets and cut the baby corn in half. Set aside with the peas.

3

For the korma sauce, heat the ghee in a large frying pan, add the onions and fry until golden.

4

Stir in the ginger and garlic paste and the chopped chillies. Turn the heat down to low, add the nut paste, yogurt and turmeric and stir until evenly combined.

5

Add all the vegetables, pour in 275ml water and stir well. Cover and leave over a low heat until the vegetables are cooked but not falling apart.

6 7

Take the pan off the heat and gently stir in the cream and garam masala.

Toast the almonds, cashews and raisins until the nuts are golden and scatter over the korma as a garnish. Finally, sprinkle with chopped mint and/ or coriander.


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travel

58

Travel

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Around the world in 80 ways with

plenty of holiday inspiration

T

HERE are little more than 100 days until Christmas, and with autumn rapidly approaching and the nights drawing in, why not start planning your next travel adventure to give yourself something to look forward to through those dark nights and dreary days? While the typical British weather may cause most of us to look to sunnier climes for a getaway, the weather in our destination of choice may also play an important part in deciding where to go.

THE GREATEST HUMAN FEAT IN HISTORY The Great Wall of China – one of the New Seven Wonders of the World

Festive

RISE TO THE CHALLENGE OF A STUNNING CANADIAN HIKE In Québec’s HautesGorges-de-la-RiviereMalbaie National Park

Some like it hot, but some also like it not – skiing, snowboarding and sledding are immensely popular and need to be booked up as soon as possible to get the best positions in the finest resorts, especially if you are looking to take a family. Heading north to see Father Christmas or to wonder at the magnificent Northern Lights are also key destinations, and with limited seasons need considering plenty of time in advance. Scandinavia, and Nordic Iceland, offer wonderful snowy options right through the winter season, and if you are brave enough you can even sleep in an ice hotel or bathe in thermal waters. Festive Christmas markets across Europe are packed full of character and glühwein – just make sure you reserve a generous luggage allowance for your flight home with all the

‘Touring is becoming increasingly popular, especially among solo travellers, and covers all corners of the world…’

gifts you are sure to purchase. Alternatively, let the train take the strain and sit back and enjoy the unfolding countryside as it whizzes past your window. As we have had the hottest summer in England on record, narrowly beating 1976, you may well start to consider that next summer you’ll stay closer to home and instead opt to spend your precious time and earnings seeking the sun

during our cooler months. Indeed, the southern hemisphere offers a multitude of options during our darkest days, with South Africa, Australia and New Zealand remaining extremely popular over our winter. Mauritius and other isles in the Indian Ocean are also excellent choices for the approaching time of year – especially as romantic honeymoon destinations for a late summer wedding.


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

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Travel

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THE WINNING #HOLIDAYINSPIRATIONS SHOW For hundreds more travel ideas, and a chance to speak to the experts, why not visit the Baldwins Travel Group #HolidayInspirations Show on Sunday, September 23 at Salomons Estate in Broomhill Road, Tunbridge Wells? The show is free to enter, with free parking, and just by registering attendance you will and admire the passing scenery. Touring is becoming increasingly popular, especially among solo travellers, and covers all corners of the world from Uluru ‘Down Under’ and the Great Wall of China to

CROATIAN CALM On Dalmatia’s Pelješac peninsula

Or the turn of year is a perfect time to look west towards the Caribbean. With such a relaxed way of life, delicious cuisine, and endless white sandy beaches, you can’t fail to be tempted. Take Antigua, for example – it has a beach for every day of the year. Keep reading to find out how one lucky winner could be spending a week with their person of choice on this island paradise. Springtime in Europe should not be underestimated. Exploring the Italian lakes, Swiss mountains or Croatian coasts will be scenic

and comfortable before the intense summer sun beats down. With heatwaves right across the continent becoming a more regular occurrence, spring would be the perfect time to take younger family members who are sensitive to the sun, or for more mature travellers who wish to explore the sights with ease. In the autumn, our attention often turns to North America to experience the ‘Fall’ and all the colours of Canada. Take a tour so you can sit back

CAN YOU CATCH SIGHT OF A TOUCAN? You may well in the Costa Rican rainforests

be entered into a prize draw where you can win that week for two at Blue Waters Resort & Spa in Antigua. What better reason do you need to go along between 10am and 3pm and peruse the 40+ stands on display? For more details, visit baldwinstravel.co.uk/ holidayinspirationsshow safaris in Kenya and the rainforests of Costa Rica. If you are looking to be more adventurous but in a supported and structured way, touring within a group is a great way to go.


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Motoring

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Motoring News Lego builds a driveable, full-size Bugatti Chiron LEGO’S new full-size replica of the Bugatti Chiron boasts something none of its other facsimilies do. Built using more than a million Lego Technic elements, this electric replica can actually be driven. Power comes from 2,304 motors and 4,032 Technic gears, producing 5.2bhp and 92Nm of torque. Weighing around 1.5 tonnes, the car is capable of ‘over’ 12mph – quite a bit shy of the real Chiron’s 261mph top speed. But it’s impressive that it’s made entirely out of Lego – save for the wheels and badges – without glue. There aren’t any plans for this Bugatti to go into production, but in theory you could buy the pieces to build one for yourself. Be prepared to lose a lot of time if you decide to do so: The experts at

Lego spent 13,438 hours developing and constructing the model, which features working lights, a retractable rear wing, functional speedometer and removable steering wheel. Lena Dixen, Senior Vice-President of Product and Marketing for the Lego Group, said: “This life-size model is a first of its kind in so many ways, and with it we wanted to push the boundaries of our own imagination. “For over 40 years, Lego Technic has allowed fans of all ages to test their creativity with a building system that challenges them to go beyond just creating new designs – to also engineer new functions. “It’s a fascinating example of the Lego Technic building system in action, and its potential for creative reinvention.”

The traditional London taxi bows out with a ‘Last of the Line’ edition LONDON taxi drivers may be rapidly switching to the latest hybrid TX5 model, but automotive design house Kahn Design has breathed some life into the outgoing TX4 by creating a special ‘Last of Line’ edition. Just five will be built, showing a luxurious side to the London taxi rarely seen before. For starters, the black paintwork is replaced by twotone shades from the Rolls-Royce colour palette. And black detailing, including colour-coded wheels and grille surround, finish the exterior. Under the skin, it’s still powered by a 2.5-litre, four-cylinder diesel, but Kahn Design has given it a moderate power upgrade from its

paltry 101bhp, though the final figure has been left undisclosed. It’s inside where the Last of Line TX4 is different. Most people would struggle to call the back of a London taxi luxurious, but these models have been decked out with quilted Nappa leather, an upholstered dashboard, leather-trimmed steering wheel and, best of all, an LED starlight headliner. Kahn Design founder Afzal Kahn said: “It is a great honour to redesign and celebrate what is truly one of the most famous cars in the world.” Three of the five £150,000 Last of Line TX4s have already been sold, and Kahn intends to hand-pick the owners of the last two.

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Facelifted Juke is also cheaper A REVISED version of the Nissan Juke crossover is now on sale, which sees trim and personalisation upgrades come along with a price cut. The refreshed range now starts from £15,505, making it £300 cheaper than the previous entry-level model. The bulk of the updates come in the form of new styling items. All models come with air-conditioning, four electric windows and LED daytime running lights as standard, though you’ll need to step right up to topspec Tekna trim for safety kit such as blind spot warning or lane departure warning. All Jukes see the chrome trim on the exterior darkened, as well as tinted headlamps and indicators. Two new exterior colours are available – Vivid Blue and Chestnut Bronze – matched with two new colourful personalisation packs. Power Blue and Energy Orange bundles see highlights added to the bumpers, along with the door sills and mirrors. Finishing off the exterior changes are two-new 16-inch alloy wheel designs, and optional coloured inserts for the 18-inch items on top-spec Tekna trim. Inside, the orange and blue themes are carried over, with customers able to spec the centre console, air vents, door inserts and seat upholstery with highlights. Those of a more subdued disposition can opt for the original gloss black finish. A new trim level, named Bose Personal Edition brings a further improvement – the addition of a Bose sound system, as fitted to the Micra supermini. This exclusive system offers a pair of speakers built into the driver’s headrest for a more immersive experience.


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Recruitment

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

WITH THE

FIND YOUR PERFECT JOB TODAY – A MUST-READ FOR THOSE LOOKING FOR WORK LOCALLY

OF TUNBRIDGE WELLS AND TONBRIDGE


Join us this Christmas for a truly magical time at the Bewl Water Christmas Experience in association with Childrensalon...

Your adventure begins as soon as you arrive, families can enjoy festive fun with the cheeky Elves and spend quality time with Father Christmas in his cosy grotto. The magic doesn’t stop there, all the family can skate on the ‘Magic Ice’ rink. The children can make the most of the fairground rides, with unlimited turns and everyone can enjoy warming up by toasting marshmallows and making s ’mores at the fire pit. With our Magic Wishing Tree, Christmas themed crafts, soft play, secret woodland wonderland, and many more photo opportunities this really is the perfect festive experience to create magical memories with your family.

BOOK TODAY BY VISITING WWW.BEWLWATER.CO.UK £35 per child, £18 per adult Ticket price includes:  Visit to see Father Christmas in his grotto with a gift for every child  Explore the secret woodland wonderland with the jolly Elves  Christmas themed crafts and activity sheets for all children  Place a wish upon our Magic Wishing Tree  30 minutes skating on the ‘Magic’ rink  Unlimited fairground rides  Marshmallow toasting and s ’more making at the fire pit  Endless festive photo opportunities!

HEN & STAG PARTIES - ANNIVERSAIRIES - CHRISTMAS PARTIES ENGAGEMENT CELEBRATIONS - MILESTONE BIRTHDAYS BABY SHOWERS - CHRISTENINGS

DATES: 1ST, 2ND, 8TH, 9TH, 16TH, 17TH, 21ST, 22ND, 23RD, 24TH DECEMBER

BEWL WATER, BEWLBRIDGE LANE, LAMBERHURST, KENT, TN3 8JH


CODEWORD 4

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A B C D E F G H I J K L MNO P Q R S T U VWX Y Z 23

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16 9

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4

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17

18

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7

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9 1

8

8 12

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26

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26 1

15

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4 16

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8 25

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19 19

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14 16

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9 24

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4 20

L

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19 18

6

5

8 3 4 8 9

4

9 2 7 6 1 1

1 7

9

Codeword:

4 5

9 6

To complete Sudoku, fill the board by entering numbers 1 to 9 so that each row, column and 3x3 box contains every number uniquely.

9

9

21 11

26

8

11

2

5

9 17

9

13

S

9

9

7 6

© 2016 Syndicated Puzzles, Inc.

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DIFFICULTY RATING:★✩✩✩

2

S

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Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Above the grid is the key with two letters solved. Try to complete the first few words to give you more letters, or look for a frequent number that might reveal a common letter. As you find letters, enter them in the key and into the grid. Cross off the letters in the A to Z list.

5 7

6 2 7

5 1 9

3

4 9

2 3 4 1

1

2 3

© 2016 Syndicated Puzzles

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LAST WEEK’S SOLUTIONS

SUDOKU & JIGSAW SUDOKU

DIFFICULTY RATING: ★★✩✩

CLASSIFIEDS

Life&Times

Puzzles

In this Sudoku, the normal 3x3 boxes are now strangely odd shapes – but all the rules and logic of normal Sudoku apply. Fill the board by entering numbers 1 to 9 so that each row, column and box contains every number uniquely.

Puzzle solutions will be published in a forthcoming issue

B E R E F T R A R U N T R U E G H I E J E C T S S R S Q U U S M D A Y C R A V A T R T R E U R E K A A I E M A X I N E

I S T T R O P U A D R T O E P I M A T N E

S U E R N E OW E L E A R L E Y L S W P I N Z L AW R E D L

I G N I T E

Sudoku:

8 9 2 7 4 6 1 3 5

1 7 6 2 5 3 9 8 4

3 5 4 8 1 9 6 2 7

5 1 7 4 2 8 3 6 9

4 3 8 9 6 5 7 1 2

6 2 9 3 7 1 4 5 8

9 8 5 6 3 4 2 7 1

4 8 7 1 6 9 5 3 2

7 9 8 5 3 2 4 1 6

1 6 5 4 2 3 9 7 8

2 4 3 1 8 7 5 9 6

7 6 1 5 9 2 8 4 3

Jigsaw Sudoku:

3 7 1 6 5 4 2 8 9

9 5 4 3 1 6 8 2 7

5 1 2 8 9 7 6 4 3

6 2 3 9 4 8 7 5 1

8 3 6 2 7 5 1 9 4

2 4 9 7 8 1 3 6 5

© 2016 Syndicated Puzzles

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk

Wednesday September 12 | 2018


Sport

FOR EVEN MORE NEWS VISIT: timeslocalnews.co.uk Please send sports stories to: newsdesk@timesoftunbridgewells.co.uk or newsdesk@timesoftonbridge.co.uk

TJs struggle to find their feet Canterbury 29 Tonbridge Juddians 20 By Adam Hookway RUGBY: TONBRIDGE JUDDIANS suffered a defeat in their second game of the season in National Two South as they settle in a new squad and reshuffle the side because of niggling injuries. Canterbury had lost heavily in the opening match but are always a tough nut to crack, especially at their Merton Lane ground. The away side struggled to put their mark on a game that they could have edged, although a win would have been against the run of play. The home side scored first and they remained in front throughout the contest. Their 17-10 lead at half-time could have been more but for a disallowed try. TJs’ first try came

from Hugo Watson crashing over late on with Will Robinson adding the extras to an earlier penalty. Canterbury extend their lead to 24-10 through their impressive full-back Aiden Moss but TJs hit back as the hosts saw their lock sin binned and influential flanker Max Cantwell limping off. Will Colderick barged over and Robinson again added the extras after he had slotted another penalty. That made the score 24-20 and the game hung in the balance with 10 minutes to go. But TJs could not find another score and it was Canterbury who managed the ball better and secured a final try, which denied the visitors a losing bonus point. Only three clubs out of the 16 in the division have won both their opening games so TJs remain confident at the start of the campaign. London Irish Wild Geese, who have lost both their matches, are TJs’ next opponents at The Slade on Saturday [September 15, kick-off 3pm].

PHOTO: Bruce Elliott

Life&Times

TITANIC STRUGGLE Josh Pankhurst gets to work against Wimbledon

Tunbridge Wells 8 Wimbledon 52 By Owain Withers

COLD COMFORT Will Colderick crashes through to score for TJs

Wednesday September 12 | 2018

Wells brought down to earth

PHOTO: Adam Hookway

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RUGBY: TUNBRIDGE WELLS were soundly beaten by a strong Wimbledon side who were relegated from National Two South, despite taking some notable scalps at the higher level. The visitors confirmed their status as favourites for the London & South East Premier League with a 28-15 win over last season’s third-placed side, Tring, on the opening weekend. But Tunbridge Wells, who were fifth last time, were in buoyant mood after their bonus point win over Hertford, who were fourth in 2017-18. Wells were simply blown away in the first half. Wimbledon attacked from all areas through their lethal backline and there were several tries from inside their own half. Their platform was provided by a very large

pack that were dominant at the set-piece. An early Frank Reynolds penalty was all Wells had to show for their efforts with the away side ran away with seven tries and 45 points. It was a test of character for the home side and they regrouped at half-time. With instruction from coach Mav Anderson and the introductions of Luke Hawkins and Carl Straeche from the bench, Wells came out fighting. The home side had the majority of the possession and territory after the interval and went through a number of phases as both sides managed a single try in the second half. Toby Talbot went over for Wells in the right-hand corner after a crisp pass from Rich Webster following a long period of possession. The hosts had managed to up their game and showed plenty of grit and determination with Mike Hathaway as their man of the match. Tunbridge Wells now travel to Shelford on Saturday (September 15, kick-off 3pm).


Wednesday September 12 | 2018

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Read strikes twice to keep cup dream alive Hythe Town 0 Tonbridge Angels 2 striker bundled into the net after seven minutes. The Angels enjoyed a multitude of chances and set-pieces, but Hythe’s keeper George Kamarasi pulled off some commanding saves to keep the margin slim. The Cannons made a special effort to keep Joe Turner out of the game but that allowed Ramadan to capitalise on the lack of bodies on the other flank, and he made another good run that saw him come close again in the 24th minute.

PHOTO: David Couldridge

Slender lead

DOUBLE TROUBLE Alex Read scores the first of his two goals

By Max Meads FOOTBALL: TWO goals from Alex Read stole the show for Tonbridge Angels as they cruised into the second qualifying round of the FA Cup at Reachfields Stadium.

The visitors started with an attacking mindset and winger Adem Ramadan went close to scoring after cutting through the Hythe defence inside the first minute. Ramadan was soon involved again and he provided Read with an excellent cross that the

Angels keeper Jonny Henly was called into action once during the first half but it was otherwise uneventful as the visitors went in at half-time with their slender lead intact. Read came close just three minutes into the second half when a fine cross from Tommy Whitnell found him in the box but he was unable to head it home. The Angels had a good chance just before the hour-mark with a free kick just outside of the box, but it was cleared by an unflinching Hythe wall. Despite having three defenders glued to him whenever he saw the ball, Turner managed to get on the end of some excellent through-balls from Tom Parkinson, Jack Parter and Whitnell. Whitnell went off in the 75th minute after picking up a knock to his knee, but his replacement Liam King made an instant impact. He provided a deft cross that was met by Read

and he put the Angels 2-0 up in the 81st minute after slotting it into the bottom left corner. When Hythe threatened an attack, the Tonbridge defence remained as solid as they have been all season to see the game out. Angels manager Steve McKimm said: “We had to be on our game today. It’s all about making it through and we made it. “In the last five [minutes] they threw everything at us, but we’d done our homework on them and we came away with the win as a result.” The Angels, who are on top of the Bostik League Premier, return to league action with a visit to Brightlightsea Regent on Saturday (September 15, kick-off 3pm).

BRING ME YOUR ARROWS Charismatic darts pro Wayne Mardle, aka Hawaii 501, is coming to the Tonbridge Angels Marquee for an exhibition evening on Friday September 21 from 6.30pm. Tickets are available for £15 plus booking fee from eventbrite. co.uk in advance or £20 on the door. For £30 you can meet Wayne (pictured) from 5.30pm.

Mackley and Underhill hurry Ladies to victory FOOTBALL: TONBRIDGE ANGELS Ladies registered their first victory in Division One East of the South East Counties League in resounding fashion following their promotion. Tonbridge were in complete control at Longmead thanks to a trademark strong start, with two goals in the first six minutes. Last season’s top goalscorer Becky Janes got off the mark for the new campaign in the third minute with a cool finish after Courtney Smith sent a clever ball behind the defence. The lead was soon doubled as Megan Akehurst turned her defender and finished with ease from a throw-in by Alex Weston. The home side continued to show cool heads in front of goal, as first Becky Mackley and

Lauryn Underhill, on the half-hour, tucked home chances when one-on-one with the goalkeeper. The Angels continued to move the ball around well, and a swift attacking move after 57 minutes released Janes on the left. She quickly switched the ball over to Underhill on the right and the winger rifled a shot into the top corner. Mackley doubled her tally on 72 minutes after rounding the goalkeeper, but with a similar chance she suffered an injury scare and was taken off on a stretcher. Manager Dan Couldridge said: “We knew that if we started well, it would set the tone for the match and this proved to be the case. “I’m delighted with the clean sheet against a team that we knew were strong going forward.” The Ladies now play Margate in the Kent FA Women’s Cup at Hadlow College on Sunday (September 16, kick-off 2pm).

CRICKET: TUNBRIDGE WELLS Under-11 girls have been crowned champions of the U-11 Invicta Cricket League Championship South Division after winning eight of their 10 games in a fiercely competitive league. A total of 17 girls played in the side and they showed strong spirit and determination to win several closely fought matches. They overcame five strong boys’ teams in the process and were an excellent advertisement for girls’ cricket.

Bissett makes point after slow start Rusthall 2 Punjab United 2 By Jamie Poole

SEE YOU LATER Becky Mackley rounds the goalkeeper Kiara Gallagher

PHOTO: David Couldridge

Tonbridge Angels Ladies 6 Anchorians 0

FOOTBALL: RUSTHALL’S first home league game of the season finished all square as they remained in 18th place in the Southern Counties East League Premier Division. The home side started slowly against the promoted side and they conceded two goals in the first half-hour, both scored by Luke Adams. But Sam Murray scored shortly before half-time

to reduce the deficit, and the Rustics found their stride after the break, preventing the Gravesend outfit from scoring again. The hosts had a chance to equalise when they were awarded a penalty but it was saved by the Punjab United keeper Joe Hagen. With 10 minutes remaining, however, Robbie Bissett found the net and Rusthall held out to cling on to a valuable point. Rusthall face local rivals Tunbridge Wells at the Jockey Farm Stadium tonight (September 12, kick-off 7.45pm).


Times of Tonbridge 12th September 2018  
Times of Tonbridge 12th September 2018