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The Art Issue

PHOTOGRAPHY WITH THE COLLECTIVE YOU . A HIS TORY OF CULTURE AT THE SAVOY SHAKESPEAREʼS GLOBE . IMPRESSIONIS TS IN LONDON . SOUTINEʼS PORTRAITS – ALSO INSIDE – Nathan Rollinson takes afternoon tea . New seasonal menu at Kasparʼs at The Savoy Exclusive interview with Charlotte Tilbury . A journey to Mauritius

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SAVOY

COVENT GARDEN

WELCOME ✦

RED PHOTOGRAPHIC

In it together…

W

elcome to our final issue of Savoy Magazine for 2017. As I write this, The Savoy is suitably festive, featuring a spectacular interactive Christmas showpiece in our Front Hall by Penhaligon’s, our partner brand for the season. We have always gone to great lengths to form lasting relationships with like-minded companies and brands such as Penhaligon’s. It is these relationships that inspire us, enhance our offering, and help position us at the centre of the community. As 2018 begins, we will continue to seek out new relationships in order to develop a winning cultural programme that showcases our passion for art, literature and charity; most recently, we embarked on a renewed partnership with the British Red Cross that you will hear more about in our next issue. The Savoy has always celebrated culture, and has had some of the most influential and creative minds over the centuries walk through our doors. In this edition, we explore our own history to discover the role this building has played in the creation of art, music, and literary works; along with the impact this city has had on some of the finest, and important, impressionist work of the era. We have had the pleasure of speaking with Shakespeare’s Globe, who have just celebrated their 20th anniversary in 2017, about how this iconic theatre has transformed the landscape of Shakespeare in performance, education and research.

And this issue provides the perfect opportunity to make an exciting announcement for 2018 – The Savoy’s collaboration with The Collective You, who will be providing a unique view through their camera lens. There needn’t be a wait for something new though. Kaspar’s have introduced a seasonal menu that is available now, and we have had the pleasure of savouring its delights, whilst London-based blogger Nathan Rollinson visited our Thames Foyer to experience the Afternoon Tea. Further afield, we have rounded up some of the world’s most sensational properties that have appeared on the market, as well as an exclusive interview with makeup artist extraordinaire, Charlotte Tilbury. I wish you all a healthy and happy New Year, and look forward to seeing you in 2018.

PHILIP M. BARNES REGIONAL VICE PRESIDENT & MANAGING DIRECTOR

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CONTENTS

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EVENTS Music to the ears

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INSIDER Our Christmas transformation

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CULTURE HUB A history of art at The Savoy

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LIFE THROUGH A LENS An image of what is to come

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THE RIGHT IMPRESSION Impressionist art in London

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COMPLEX REFLECTIONS Soutine’s portraits from Paris

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A CRUCIBLE OF ENERGY Then and now at The Globe

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LET US ENTERTAIN YOU Top picks for the season

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LIFE’S LITTLE LUXURIES Treats you never knew you needed

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THE REVOLUTION Interview with Charlotte Tilbury

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TEA TIME Nathan Rollinson takes Afternoon Tea

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TASTE THE SEASON Enjoy the new menu at Kaspar’s

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EDITOR Frederick Latty fredericklatty@gmail.com DEPUTY EDITOR Hannah Patterson hpatterson@markerstudy.com HEAD OF DESIGN Rowena Cremer-Price rcremer-price@markerstudy.com PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR Daniella Gavin dgavin@markerstudy.com COMMERCIAL Gemma Hak ghak@markerstudy.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Richard Moore rmoore@markerstudy.com COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR Nick Moore nmoore@markerstudy.com

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CONTRIBUTORS Adam Jacot de Boinod Estelle Lovatt Nathan Rollinson Emily Zemler Susan Scott Eileen Leahy Charlie Bond Valesca Ferrari COVER PHOTO The Collective You www.thecollectiveyou.com

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HEAVENLY INSPIRATION Adam Jacot de Boinod goes to Mauritius

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REGAL RESIDENCIES Stunning castles available for sale

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ONE MEDIA AND CREATIVE UK LTD 16 Lonsdale Gardens, Tunbridge Wells, Kent TN1 1NU +44 (0)1892 779 650 • www.one-media.co

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Savoy Magazine is owned by The Savoy and published/distributed by One Media and Creative UK Ltd. All rights reserved. The views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the owner or publisher. All prices are correct at the time of going to print. Neither the publisher nor the owner can accept responsibility for any errors or omissions relating to advertising or editorial. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written consent from the publisher or owner. No responsibility is taken for unsolicited materials or the return of these materials whilst in transit.

THE GRAND TOURER A test drive of the Aston Matin DB11

WINTER WARMERS Where to find the best hot drinks

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SAVOY EVENTS

A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY As a new year begins, now is the perfect time to try something different, and take advantage of these upcoming events...

Historical Tour MONDAY FEBRUARY 5 TO MONDAY MARCH 5 Follow in the famous footsteps of Winston Churchill and Marilyn Monroe by embarking on a historical tour led by Savoy hotel archivist Susan Scott. Listen to the innovative stories, secrets and discover the authentic heritage that truly hallmark the iconic identity of The Savoy, finishing up in our charming museum bar for a glass of Champagne. Savoy storytelling – our best-kept secret! £40 per person. Available for up to eight guests per tour.

Savoy Musicians THAMES FOYER ENTERTAINMENT DAILY, 7.30PM TO 12.00AM If music be the food of love, you’ll find no better place for it than the Thames Foyer. Showcasing an array of talent that embraces a range of musical genres, dinner time reaches new levels of enjoyment thanks to their live performances. From the easy swing of the Nicola Emmanuelle Trio, to the mesmerising piano of Guy Lederman, there is no act billed that should be missed.

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Afternoon Tea Master Class SUNDAY FEBRUARY 11 Uncover the secrets behind our signature British Afternoon Tea with Executive Pastry Chef Ludwig Hely. Master the skilled art of creating traditional éclairs and enjoy Champagne afternoon tea in the stunning surroundings of the Thames Foyer. You will also be able to take away The Savoy’s bespoke afternoon tea blends and a tea set exclusively designed by Wedgwood. £215 per person.

Coffee Master Class

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 18 Enjoy an introduction to home brewing with our coffee experts, who will show you how to create the perfect cup of coffee using the finest speciality Brazilian beans. Learn how to make an exceptional coffee at home, using different methods and techniques. £65 per person.

Bread Making Master Class SATURDAY MARCH 24 Our chefs know a thing or two about baking fresh bread daily. We invite guests behind the scenes to our historic kitchen for a private baking class with one of our skilled Executive Bakery Chefs. This experience includes a three course lunch at Kaspar’s at The Savoy. £115 per person.

To make a reservation, or for more details about the culinary events and master classes at The Savoy, please telephone +44 (0)20 7420 2111 or email savoy@fairmont.com

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SAVOY INSIDER

WINTER

WONDERLAND ✦

The Savoy seems to transform into a festive paradise overnight, but for Belinda Bowles, head floral designer at The Savoy, Christmas begins in February

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or some, it may seem too early when festive decorations adorn the streets of London in November, but Christmas has been on our mind for months. This year’s theme, Christmas in the Air, was not picked at random. The process begins in February, when Belinda and her team start brainstorming. An array of ideas are put forward and a number of luxury brands contacted to see if they would like to be involved. Once the associated brand has been selected, the painstakingly detailed process of developing many mood boards and illustrations begins, insuring every inch of The Savoy is reflective of the theme. It is when all this is finalised that the magic can truly begin and the ideas are brought to life. Yet all this requires meticulous planning. Hours upon hours are put into the logistical arrangements of bringing a vision to life. Although perhaps not all that glamorous, creating a mock up is a necessity for making sure installation is possible. Once it is ensured that the vision can go ahead logistically, the team liaise with all The Savoy’s food and beverage outlets, including Melba at The Savoy and Simpson's on the Strand, so that consistency is guaranteed throughout. The pastry chef is briefed on the theme in detail so they can get

to work on concocting the delicious festive Afternoon Tea that will be available throughout December. This year, our associated brand of choice is Penhaligon’s, who have worked closely with The Savoy to make Christmas in the Air a theme to remember. They have a beautiful story book that is available to view next to the 14ft tree in the foyer for all guests to read and enjoy. There is also an excellent photo opportunity in the form of a car that has been built next to the tree – the perfect shot of you driving home for Christmas - all set amongst the delightful pine scent of Penhaligon’s candles. During the overnight transformation, a team install all the decorations from midnight to 7am. Thirty hardworking individuals hang 3000 fairy lights, there are 260 designer Penhaligon’s baubles that are individually wired, and garlands are placed upon every mantle with red poinsettias. The Thames Foyer is also transformed into a winter garden featuring Victorian street lamps – oh, and keep an eye out for the mistletoe too. When all is said and done, the effort and dedication all pays off when The Savoy is revealed to be a truly magical place to spend Christmas – it really is in the air. Snow will fall from December 15th between 5pm-6pm daily until Christmas.

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SAVOY ART TRAVEL

DINNER DANCING AT THE SAVOY, 1912

CULTURE HUB ✦

The Savoy has always been a source of inspiration, and a place to call home, for some of the finest musicians, artists and writers. Here, we delve into the rich cultural past of London’s iconic hotel…

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B

uilt in the 1880s, and opened in 1889 by theatrical impresario Richard D’Oyly Carte, the producer of the comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan, The Savoy was

fated from the start to be the most theatrical of venues. After all, D’Oyly Carte even wrapped the river frontage of London’s first deluxe hotel in long cast-iron balconies which featured the nine Muses, the classical goddesses of culture and the arts. The balconies are long gone, but the influence of the Muses abides. For over 125 years, The Savoy has been a hotel rich in artistic associations, not simply as a magnet for the talented, but as an inspiration for their creativity through the decades. D’Oyly Carte’s old friend, James McNeill Whistler, was the first artist to draw The Savoy even before it was complete. He handed a scribbled impression of the building under scaffolding to the D’Oyly Cartes, with a note that the hotel would never look so well again. In fact, Whistler would return to The Savoy in the 1890s, to make further sketches of the wonderful river views, and the pigeons on his 6th floor balcony. These views inspired impressionist Claude Monet to do much the same; he painted the river repeatedly across three lengthy stays between 1899 and 1901, finally keeping only 37 canvasses which constitute his London Bridges series. Artists including Joseph Pennell, Christopher Nevinson, and Feliks Topolski have also painted the iconic bend in the river with – on a clear day – its view of seven bridges. D’Oyly Carte’s vision was of a hotel filled not only with tourists and travellers, but also with the cream of British aristocracy. The leader of society was the Prince of Wales - later King Edward VII - and his favourite hotelier was César Ritz. “Wherever Ritz goes, I go,” said the Prince; D’Oyly Carte promptly hired César Ritz for The Savoy. Ritz decreed that there should be live music playing constantly in the public areas. “Music,” he explained, “covers awkward gaps in the conversation”; and music there was. Led by the Prince of Wales, British and foreign high society flocked to The Savoy,

THE DIAMOND JUBILEE RIVER PAGEANT FROM THE ROOF OF THE SAVOY, DAVID DOWNES, 2012

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SAVOY ART

RISING FLOOR AT THE SAVOY, 1940

and at the peak of its popularity the Ballroom, crammed with up to a thousand dancers, was a hot, sweaty, and enormously fashionable venue. Every morning the cleaners swept up piles of glass fragments; the glass beads falling from the flappers’ chiffon dresses were stamped into the floor, and crushed to powder underfoot. During this period, some of the earliest transatlantic broadcasts were made by the BBC and the Marconi Company from the Savoy Ballroom. It was probably these experiments that attracted one wellknown American composer, George Gershwin, to hold the British premier of his “Rhapsody in Blue” at The Savoy in 1925. Gershwin played first piano, accompanied by the Savoy Orpheans, under the direction of bandleader Debroy Somers. The Savoy Orpheans went on to produce stand-out stars of its own. American trumpeter Rudy Vallée left the band for a Hollywood career as a movie heart-throb. Singer Al Bowlly also sought fame and

and while most of them ignored the background noise, one fateful evening in 1912, a couple dining in the restaurant boldly stood up and began to dance to a popular tune being played by the band in the corner. Other couples joined in, the waiters ran to move tables to make more space, and the tradition of dinner-dancing at The Savoy was born. Small speciality dance-bands were hired to offer a variety of entertainment, and as the hotel struggled through the First World War, the music played on. Eventually the war ended, and the hotel began to return to normal. In 1919, an ambitious young man made an appointment to see the directors of the hotel, making an offer that was music to their ears. William de Mornys promised that if he was put in charge of all the entertainments in the hotel, he could make them profitable. Swiftly hired, de Mornys set about hiring gifted young musicians from both the UK and US, who could play the kind of modern music popular with the ‘bright young things’ of the day. He also imported a complete Latin dance band directly from the States. The New York Havana Band were immediately re-branded as the Savoy Havana Band, while the new dance orchestra was christened the

fortune in the US, and is now considered the first “pop star”. Meanwhile, a quiet young man who turned up on spec in 1924 as a pianist, rose through the ranks to become the leader of the Savoy Hotel Orpheans when the orchestra was relaunched in 1931. Carroll Gibbons would remain at The Savoy, ultimately as Director of Entertainment, until his death in 1954. The most famous of the Savoy bandleaders, he made recordings, broadcast regularly on the BBC, and even appeared in one or two films. The ultimate tribute to his talent and professionalism was made by fellow musician and Savoy regular Frank Sinatra, who included Gibbons’ signature song “Garden in the Rain” as one of only a dozen tracks on the album “Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain” (1962). By the mid-1920s, the hotel buzzed with excitement in the evenings, but it was time for a change. The wall between the Thames Foyer and the then-Winter Garden was removed, and a permanent stage for the bands was built on the east side of the large new space. Dinner, dancing and cabaret all in one room was now the order of the day. One slight teething-problem was solved a few years later with the installation of the hydraulically-operated “rising floor” in

Savoy Orpheans. The two bands proved sensations, not only for those lucky enough to hear them at The Savoy, but nationally, as the newlyestablished British Broadcasting Company (BBC) set up its recording studios in Savoy Hill, just across the road from The Savoy. The BBC did not need to look far for a stable of talented musicians, and the Savoy bands were making regular broadcasts of dance music by 1923. The resultant public rush to the hotel for dinner and dancing had two outcomes. Firstly, The Savoy Restaurant was enlarged in the evenings and offered cabaret entertainment for those dining there; and the Ballroom was repurposed with a new fully-sprung dance floor installed, and the original royal box remodelled and turned into a small recessed stage at one end of the room. At the other end a raised platform offered a second stage. In the evenings there was continual music from one end of the room or the other. Tickets for dinner and dancing – or dancing only - were available,

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and “Imperial Palace”

front of the stage. This large platform rose three feet for cabaret acts,

(1930); and gave his

offering a good view from all corners of the room, and was lowered

name to the omelette

to provide the dance-floor between performances.

created for him as a

This set a template for entertainment at The Savoy that lasted until

regular in The Savoy

the nightly dinner-dances ended in 1980. Appearing in cabaret at

Grill.

The Savoy became a desirable badge of honour, and stars like Noel

And the hotel

Coward, Maurice Chevalier, Josephine Baker, Françoise Hardy,

continues to support

and Cilla Black all appeared on the rising floor. It was considered

writers too: a writer-

quite a coup to scoop recent British Eurovision winner Sandie Shaw

in-residence scheme

for the Savoy cabaret in the late 1960s. Sandie performed in her

saw Fay Weldon

trademark bare feet, and was bemused by the polite Savoy audience

(2003), Kathy Lette

who refrained from interrupting or applauding until the end of her

(2003), Frank

performance.

McCourt (2005), and

After music and art, what of literature? In some ways The Savoy

Michael Morpurgo

had a head start, since father of English literature Geoffrey Chaucer,

(2007) spend several

novelist Henry Fielding, and Romantic poet William Blake all lived

months living at The

(and in Blake’s case died) on the site where The Savoy was later built.

Savoy, offering each

Technically, the first writer-in-residence was Oscar Wilde, one of

of them an oasis of

the most famous personalities of his day when he moved into The

calm with a view of

Savoy, eventually leaving after his mounting bills became too large to ignore. Author Arnold Bennett wrote two novels centred around

SAVOY SCAFFOLDING

The Savoy, thinly disguised as “The Grand Babylon Hotel” (1902),

the River Thames, in which to work on their writing. For the

most part, this involved polishing drafts already written, but in the

“Appearing in cabaret at The Savoy

case of Michael Morpurgo, inspired by The Savoy’s beautiful art

became a desirable badge of honour,

Ionides, a book written after the residency had ended, “Kaspar,

and stars like Noel Coward, Maurice Chevalier, Josephine Baker, Françoise Hardy, and Cilla Black all appeared on the rising floor”

deco carved wooden cat, Kaspar, made in 1927 by designer Basil Prince of Cats”, was published in 2008. The book’s popularity saw Kaspar taking a prime spot in the Front Hall where he sits when not acting as the 14th guest at parties of 13. How, then, does The Savoy celebrate its cultural heritage in the 21st century? Well, we’re still very proud of our remarkable past, and equally keen to contribute to the cultural heritage of the future. The Savoy supports writers and literature with Damian Barr’s Literary Salon, which is hosted here twice a year. Meanwhile, on selected dates, the hotel offers a traditional dinner-

THE SAVOY ORPHEANS, 1925

dance, with music provided by Alex Mendham and his Orchestra following in the footsteps of Carroll Gibbons and The Savoy Hotel Orpheans. And since 2012, The Savoy has commissioned several pieces of original art for the hotel, including the set of eight panels in the Thames Foyer depicting some of our most famous guests, by pop-artist McAlpine Miller, a remarkable anamorphic model of Kaspar, which stands in our eponymous restaurant Kaspar’s at The Savoy, and a large painting in the Front Hall commemorating the Diamond Jubilee Flotilla of 2012, as it passed along the river in front of The Savoy. This sizeable canvas, by artist David Downes depicts the bend in the river with its view of seven bridges, where The Savoy has sat since 1889. There may perhaps be a few more modern features on the South Bank, but it is still very recognisably the same view that entranced Claude Monet and James McNeill Whistler back in the 1890s.

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SAVOY

PHOTOGRAPHY

SAVOY THROUGH A LENS The Savoy and The Collective You are thrilled to announce their 2018 collaboration that will offer truly unique photography experiences for guests. Both parties are excited to reveal all at the beginning of the New Year www.thecollectiveyou.com PHOTOS: THE COLLECTIVE YOU

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ART

THE RIGHT IMPRESSION Art critic Estelle Lovatt delves into the work of French artists in exile, who produced impressionist art in London from 1870 to 1904, which is currently being celebrated in a new exhibition at Tate Britain

T

his is the first exhibition to map the connections

Instantly recognisable views of the city of London are seen

between French and British artists, their patrons and

through French Impressionists’ eyes; capturing the British way of

art dealers. It illustrates how the French Impressionists

life and social ethos, which were, notably, very different to the

saw us, and the effect their bold, new and sometimes

Parisian café culture they were used to.

controversial style of painting, had on our own cadre of artists.

Highlights of the exhibition include six beautiful paintings

The years 1870-71, post one of Europe’s bloodiest conflicts,

by Monet, featuring the landmarks of Westminster, St Paul’s

the Franco-Prussian war, and the devastation that came to the

Cathedral and the Houses of Parliament. Monet came to London,

streets of Paris, brought these ‘refugee artists’ to London. The

with his wife and child, to avoid conscription. Although he could

exhibition is a rare glimpse into how, and why, exiled French

not speak the language, they settled here for seven months. After

artists came to paint what they did here in Britain.

his paints, brushes and canvasses were delayed on the way over

More than 100 stunning artworks chart the human stories of these artists fleeing the war in France, and coming to Britain. Monet, Pissarro, Sisley, Rodin, Derain, Carpeaux, Dalou, Legros and Tissot painted unforgettable scenes of their short-term home here, and their masterpieces return to London from galleries in Chicago and New York in America; Le Havre and Paris in France; and Krefeld in Germany. The 1870s was a time of horror in Paris,

from France, Monet replaced his art materials from shops on Charing Cross Road. Unfortunately, this practice left him broke. With no money, and lack of any potential interested collectors buying his pictures, poor Monet found the whole trip’s experience not at all conducive to painting. Also, with the death of his father back

which drove French artists to seek refuge

home in France, Monet became

across the Channel. They came to London

depressed, managing to paint

for different reasons; some to avoid army

just six works.

conscription, some for political reasons and others, in particular Sisley, because

Allegedly, he had a wretched time, complaining that the

they had lost everything in the conflict.

constantly changing weather

Their personal experiences of being in

conditions and choking thick fog made

London not only developed and influenced their own artwork, but also contributed

it impossible to even see London; never mind paint it; and the British buyers didn’t

to the British art scene in general,

want grey paintings of fog because they

making British work a part of the greater

found them too depressing to look at.

transnational story of art, informed by the world.

Then, Monet saw beauty in fog, and of painting, en plein air, sat out in it. From then on, Monet

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was drawn to London by its fog, rather than its architecture. Writing

Another, of people enjoying London parks, includes Pissarro’s Kew

to his wife, Alice, he noted, "London would be quite ugly if it was

Green. It irritated Monet, as the king of the Impressionists, that

not for the fog!" Monet became fascinated by the interplay of

British artists painted London, in the greatest of detail, brick by

sunlight through London's pea-soup smog, and found the beauty

brick, instead of brush stroke by brush stroke.

within it. As a result, Monet considered his Thames paintings as important as his Rouen cathedral series. Monet returned to London when he had become a successful artist back in France, and his paintings were in high demand. Considerably better off financially, he was able to afford to pay for a stay at The Savoy Hotel.

This exhibition also looks at the mentorship these artists received from the artist Daubigny, the founding father of Impressionism, who introduced Monet to Durand-Ruel, a dealer who became the main buyer of works by these Impressionist artists. Durand-Ruel had first met Monet and Pissarro in London, during their exile from the Franco-Prussian War, in 1870-71. The French

Monet visited The Savoy three times to paint

artists gravitated towards art lovers who would help

views of the Thames, and other city landmarks,

them develop their careers, and provide them

from his balcony on the upper floors. He

with financial support. Durand-Ruel purchased

followed a strict and structured routine to

over 5000 Impressionist works over his lifetime

his day in the hotel. It would start with two

which, in Monet’s own words, “saved them

English breakfasts, followed by working on

from starving”.

his series of paintings, including the sun rising

There are also some very typical British

over ‘Waterloo Bridge’, and, ‘Charing Cross

scenes demonstrating how certain English

Bridge [with] Cleopatra’s Needle’, from his hotel room. Later in the day, he’d cross the river, and from a covered terrace at St Thomas' Hospital paint, ‘The House of Parliament’, through evening fog. Monet had about 100 canvases on the go at The Savoy. Each

social codes, cultural customs and traditional rituals, captured the imagination of the Impressionists, highlighting their engagement with British culture. There are scenes that might not have ever been recorded by British artists. With no preconceived notions of the city, they realistically

being painted, in rotation, at the same time of day and weather

represented the weather and climate of central London. It is

conditions. With so many canvases on the go, Monet took them

evident how much the air quality has changed, cleared and

unfinished from The Savoy and completed them back home in

improved since foggy Victorian London, yet the weather remains

Giverny. In 1904, he exhibited 37 views of the Thames in Paris.

a British preoccupation today. Exploring key moments in both

The results were a remarkable snap shot of London, and the

French and British art history, some of these remarkable artworks

exhibit was his most successful and profitable show to date.

are being shown in the UK for the first time.

These French artists were particularly fascinated by London’s parks. These were the places where different social classes mixed

The EY Exhibition: Impressionists in London, French

together, and visitors were allowed to stroll freely across the lush

Artists in Exile (1870-1904)

green grass – a stark contrast to France, where walking on the

Tate Britain

grass was strictly forbidden in the prim French gardens. One

Millbank, Westminster, London SW1P 4RG

creation that Monet painted of Hyde Park, shows people walking

2 November 2017 – 7 May 2018.

everywhere - apart from on the designated public pathways.

Part of the EY Tate Arts Partnership

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ART

Houses of Parliament c.1900, Oil paint on canvas, 812 x

Houses of Parliament, Sunlight Effect, 1903, Oil paint on

928 mm, Art Institute of Chicago

canvas, 1048 x 1156 mm, Brooklyn Museum of Art

Houses of Parliament, 1903, Oil paint on canvas,

Houses of Parliament, Fog Effect, 1903-1904, Oil paint

810 x 920mm, Musée Malraux

on canvas, 813 x 924 mm, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Houses of Parliament. Sun breaking through the fog,

Houses of Parliament, Sunset, 1904, Oil paint on

1904, Oil paint on canvas, 815 x 925 mm, Musée d’Orsay

canvas, 810 x 920 mm, Kaiser Wilhelm Museum

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James Tissot (1836-1902), The Ball on Shipboard c.1874,

Court, Morning, 1874, Oil paint on canvas, 511 x 688 mm,

Oil paint on canvas, 1012 x 1476 x 115 mm, Tate. Presented

National Galleries of Scotland (Edinburgh UK)

by the Trustees of the Chantrey Bequest 1937

Photo: ©Luc Chessex

Alfred Sisley (1839 - 1899), Molesey Weir, Hampton

Camille Pissarro (1830 – 1903), Kew Green, 1892,

Claude Monet (1840 – 1926), Leicester Square, 1901,

Oil paint on canvas, 460 x 550 mm,

Oil paint on canvas, 805 x 648 mm, Coll. Fondation Jean et

Musée d’Orsay (Paris, France)

Suzanne Planque (in deposit at Musée Granet, Aix-en-Provence)

Camille Pissarro (1830 – 1903), Saint Anne’s

Camille Pissarro, Charing Cross Bridge, 1890,

Church at Kew, London, 1892, Oil paint on

Oil paint on canvas, 600 x 924 mm, National

canvas, 548 x 460 mm, Private collection

Gallery of Art (Washington, USA)

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TRAVEL

© COURTAULD GALLERY

PASTRY COOK OF CAGNES (LE PÂTISSIER DE CAGNES) 1922, CHAIM SOUTINE

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THE WAITING MAID (LA JEUNE SERVANTE, ALSO KNOWN AS LA SOUBRETTE) C.1933, CHAIM SOUTINE

©COURTAULD GALLERY, PRIVATE COLLECTION.

© COURTAULD GALLERY

©COURTAULD GALLERY, PRIVATE COLLECTION.

ARTISTIC FOCUS

BUTCHER BOY (LE GARÇON BOUCHER) C.1919-1920, CHAIM SOUTINE

ROOM SERVICE WAITER (LE GARÇON D’ÉTAGE), 1928, CHAIM SOUTINE

COMPLEX

R E F LECTIONS Art critic Estelle Lovatt introduces us to Soutine’s expressive portraits of cooks, waiters and bellboys that come together for the first time in a new exhibition

F

ollowing World War I, the early 1920s and

in Russia (modern-day Belarus), emigrated to

1930s in France was a time of recuperation,

Montparnasse, in 1913. Living in poverty, as a

revision and reincarnation for a country totally

starving young artist, he was an Expressionist painter

devastated by war. This rebirth came about through the

concentrating on the recognisable, figurative,

cultural and leisurely pursuits of the French, through

representation of the world around him - at a

their hotels, restaurants and cafés, which helped foster

time when art was (pre)dominated by abstraction.

the leisure industries that restored the French economy.

Highly influenced by Rembrandt, Goya, Van Gogh,

Paris was full of energy that followed the ostentatious

Modigliani, Cezanne, Poussin and the French Old

pizzazz and opulence of the Roaring Twenties.

Masters in the Louvre, Soutine’s canvases reveal an

This exhibition brings together, for the very first time, Soutine’s mesmerising portraits of the members of staff working at some of France’s grandest hotels and

artist utterly and sincerely moved by the practice of portraiture, and painting from life. Soutine painted these portraits directly from

leading restaurants. Soutine was attracted to them

observation. Depicting the sitter weary from labour,

because he saw in them complex reflections of himself,

each worker sits slouched, too tired to sit up straight;

as a stranger in Paris. Like Soutine, some of these

looking lopsided in their uniforms.

workers were immigrants who had come to Paris, for a

Soutine took them from their corridors below stairs,

better life. Paris was the leading-edge forward-looking

away from the visual cacophony of their work. Instead,

most avant-garde city in Europe. Soutine, the tenth of

he painted them perhaps in staff quarters or his

11 children, was raised under extremely modest means

studio, against a plain quiet background bearing no

himself, which meant he had a genuine understanding

reference to their profession. They are on their break,

of, and affinity for, his sitters.

resting away from their labours. Still, they sit wearing

Penniless, Chaim Soutine (1893-1943), born

their uniform with great pride instead of feeling

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© COURTAULD GALLERY

©COURTAULD GALLERY, EDMUND HAYES FUND, ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY

ARTISTIC FOCUS

PAGE BOY AT MAXIM'S (LE CHASSEUR DE CHEZ MAXIM’S) C. 1927, CHAIM SOUTINE

COOK OF CAGNES (LE CUISINIER DE CAGNES) C.1924, CHAIM SOUTINE, COURTESY

embarrassed by it. They are grateful to be employed. Since they do not follow the high society, fine art, ritual of only

THE VALET (LE VALET DE CHAMBRE) C.1927, CHAIM SOUTINE

THE CHAMBERMAID (LA FEMME DE CHAMBRE) C.1930, CHAIM SOUTINE, COURTESY KUNSTMUSEUM LUCERNE

see-through washes, sprays, trickles and stains of veiled colour. Creamy lush applications of oil paint stand proud from Soutine's

‘the great and the good’ being suitable subjects to be captured

canvases transforming these workers into applied decorative motifs of

for posterity in portraits, maybe they feel like they don’t fit in with

modern art. As a result, in 1923, the American collector Dr. Albert C.

the sacramental devotion that’s historically always been worthy of

Barnes saw one of Soutine’s early portraits, ‘The Pastry Chef’, probably

traditional highly-established portraiture. But no, Soutine has given

his first portrait of a hotel worker in uniform, of a seventeen-year-old

them dignity and grace, presenting them as if from the best habits of

apprentice pastry cook at Céret’s Garetta Hotel. Barnes thought it the

portraiture as commissioned by royals and aristocrats. And yet, by

ultimate modern artwork and bought it. He then purchased more than

having them sat, posing in their industry apparel, they offer just as

fifty canvases. Catapulting Soutine from being an anonymous poor

much, if not more, than a conventional commissioned portrait does.

artist to respected moneyed celebrity in the Paris art world.

With Soutine purposely choosing to pose his subject wearing their

Highly individual, each portrait is ‘stamped’ with Soutine’s unique

work uniform, and not their regular personal wardrobe of choice, they

trademark style of impasto brushwork that twists along rhythmic

look to be maintaining a proud dignity for their own self-worth. Just

streams of thick paint as they erupt with momentous force and vigour

like a noble leader, without the majestic crown or rule of government.

across the surface of the picture plane. Looking as if it is sticky peaks of

Much like the constitution of these serving workers themselves,

beaten egg whites spooned from the head chef’s mixing bowl. Thick

Soutine’s paint is applied muscularly. This expostulating of paint

paint sponged on through brush marks and palette knife application is

was his unique way of presenting the inner psyche of the sitter; their

saturated with drama replicating these weary workers’ faces.

cultural uniqueness unyielding in their mixing with an international

These portraits started Soutine’s reputation as a great foreign artist

French exclusiveness. As if the soul of the sitter is reincarnated within

breaking in to a transcontinental society. He rose to become one of

the paint’s texture, forming a crusty skin across the pictorial surface.

the leading and prosperous modern painters in Paris, which was the

It’s this physicality in his paint that has become Soutine’s own

capital of the art world, and a highly-respected figure in the ‘School

personal language. His brushwork, stiff with oil, is thick and fatty,

of Paris’, during the height of the modern era in the 1920s to1930s.

almost like ‘human clay’, that he draws over the body. Fundamentally looking as naturalistic as possible, yet still, realising

His energetic work represents an important precursor to Action Painting and Abstract Expressionism, which he painted with great

a painterly likeness, not a photographic permanence, they secure

rapidity, which reflect the all-over compositions and gestural

a sense of something more perceptive and inborn about human

brushwork like Pollock and De Kooning. He went on to influence

personality, charisma and animation. Twisting veiled stains of

British portrait painters Lucian Freud, Auerbach and Kossoff.

transparent tone tracing the individual body under pressed clothes,

Soutine returns to London with this exhibition, for the first time

the pigments breathing life into the folds of their uniform. Every so

since his paintings were first shown here in 1919 in an exhibition

often, they appear to have shifting features, as if jumbled untidily from

of contemporary French art, at Heal & Son’s Mansard Gallery, in

lop-sided ear to lop-sided ear. All at once balanced by thin, sketchy,

Tottenham Court Road W1.

Soutine’s Portraits: Cooks, Waiters and Bellboys. Until 21 January 2018.

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The Courtauld Gallery, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

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PATRICK SPOTTISWOODE FKC, DLITT (H.C). DIRECTOR, GLOBE EDUCATION, SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE.

JOHN WILDGOOSE

THEATRE

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G

. A Y C

It has been 20 years since Shakespeare’s Globe, as we know it today, opened to the public. Hannah Patterson delves into the past and present with Director of Globe Education, Patrick Spottiswoode

O F LE

T

C RU IB

E N R E

THEATRE

he story begins with an American.

that had no roof, no lights, and would have

Actor and director Sam Wanamaker

an audience of over 700 standing to watch

had an idea; one that he would

Shakespeare performed on a round stage.”

have to fight for during the final 23 years of

But this was not the only source of the

his life. At the time, the concept of rebuilding

apathy. “It bothered some that Sam was

a theatre from the 1500s that would be

American, like Walt Disney, and they believed

dedicated to the performance and teaching of

the Globe was simply going to be a Disney

Shakespeare’s work seemed utterly ludicrous.

product by the Thames, and that there would

After all, a National Theatre had finally been

be no theatrical or scholarly resonance. He

established in the 1970s, dedicated to the

was also facing what was, at the time, a very

immortal memory of William Shakespeare,

hostile Southwark Council.”

and the Royal Shakespeare Company had

So, why build the Globe? One of the key

taken up residence at the Barbican – surely

things that Wanamaker wanted the theatre

that was enough for London’s Theatreland?

to be was a place that made Shakespeare

Patrick Spottiswoode, Director of Globe

accessible to everyone. He didn’t believe that

Education, joined Sam on his mission in

the work should be a middleclass, intellectual,

1984, and worked with him for the nine years

theatre pursuit, but something for everyone to

prior to his death in 1993.

take ownership of, and take part in.

“It was considered a completely mad-cap

“What excited Sam was the fact that the first

idea. Very few people could understand why

Globe was a popular theatre. He believed that

Sam would want to rebuild a 1599 theatre

if the architecture reflected what it had been in

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PETE LE MAY

THEATRE

MARK RYLANCE AS KING PHILIPPE IN CLAIRE VAN KAMPEN’S FARINELLI AND THE KING, SAM WANAMAKER PLAYHOUSE, 2015.

Shakespeare’s time, we could make him even more popular than he was in the 1980s. A theatre with an open roof, that’s open to all.” Tragically, Wanamaker passed away in 1993, four years before he could see his vision become a reality. But even in 1997,

JONATHAN PRYCE AS SHYLOCK IN JONATHAN MUNBY’S PRODUCTION OF THE MERCHANT OF VENICE AT SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE.

English would love it too.” And they did. The Globe has changed

ELLIE KURTTZ

MARC BRENNER

HELENA

LADI EMERUWA AS HAMLET IN THE GLOBE’S SMALLSCALE TOURING PRODUCTION OF HAMLET, 2014-2016.

MANUEL HARLAN

SAM WANAMAKER PLAYHOUSE

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL PERFORMED IN GUJARATI BY ARPANA AT SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE, GLOBE TO GLOBE FESTIVAL, 2012.

there is a relevant relationship between Shakespeare’s plays, and the theatre for

the landscape, both nationally and

which he wrote them. The architecture makes

internationally, of Shakespeare in

his plays sound and play differently.”

performance, education and research. “Sometimes I feel I should be less

There is a lot to be said for the building itself, and the success it has experienced since

there were still those asking what difference

immodest," continues Patrick. "But I feel the

its opening. The energy that is channelled

The Globe was going to make.

organisation can claim this. The architecture

through the space thanks to the absence of

“I used to go to a lot of parties and events,

of The Globe, and the way it brings actor and

the more traditional ‘fourth wall’ excites both

and when I told other guests who I worked

audience together, sharing the same light, has

actors and audience members alike.

for, I would receive patronising looks." says

changed the performance of Shakespeare all

Patrick. "Often people would say to me, ‘I

around the world.

suppose the Americans will love it’, and all I could say in response was that I hoped the

“The theatrical world, the Shakespeare world in particular, have seen now that

“It’s the sharing of space. It’s a one-house space. It is a crucible of energy. The scenes are not presented in spite of you; they are for you; they are directed at you. Even with the

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THEATRE rest of the audience stood alongside you, you

like to perform?’ They’d look at you and

still feel like the action is for you,” says Patrick.

say: ‘well, if we can’t get anything else…’”

The Globe has influenced the style of

The Globe now works closely with all

architecture within some theatres in the

the leading drama schools, and there

country; going against the proscenium

is a real appetite in the graduates to

arch stage.

work at the theatre; and with another

“Even in theatres where you have the

actor Michelle Terry coming in as Artistic

proscenium arch with lights, and the

Director, following director Emma Rice,

audience are hidden from the actors in the

this is an exciting time to be a performer

dark, I’m increasingly seeing an attempt

at The Globe.

by the actor to engage directly with the

“I do feel The Globe is an actor’s theatre.

audience. There have been shows recently

What Dominic Dromgoole and Emma

that suddenly brought the lights up on the

Rice did here was phenomenal, but I’m

audience, so that the actor can see them.

very excited by Michelle. An actor works

It’s a nod to this incredible communication

with a company in a different way to how

between actor and audience, and even

a director does,” observes Patrick.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA IS GIVEN A TOUR OF SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE BY PATRICK SPOTTISWOODE ON THE ANNIVERSARY OF SHAKESPEARE’S DEATH, 23 APRIL 2016. PHOTO: PETE LE MAY

But it’s not just in the art of Shakespeare

from our MA programme and PHDs, about

experience when you break that wall and

performance that the Globe is leading the

performance practice in The Globe, as well

share the space,” Patrick states.

way. After joining in 1984, Patrick worked to

as the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, and

set up Globe Education in 1989.

what this is telling us about the plays of the

between audience and audience, which you

The Globe can boast two of the most truly unique performance spaces in the world. He adds “In my opinion, no one can replicate them.” The Sam Wanamaker Playhouse was opened four years ago, something that Wanamaker had always wanted. “He had said ‘if we are bringing people to The Globe, and we are introducing them to the theatre of Shakespeare’s time, it

“Education was at the heart of it. The Artistic Director and I are colleagues. The Globe is

period, are second to none.” The suspicion the scholars in the eighties

about education and performance, and it fits

and nineties felt towards The Globe is

together perfectly. It’s seamless.”

now a thing of the past, with a significant

The Globe does not educate for the box office. Following their annual audit, Globe Education can boast working with 138,000 individuals directly in workshops and courses. Patrick believes Shakespeare is an umbrella

stamp of approval coming from the World Shakespeare Congress in 2016. “The World Shakespeare Congress is a large jamboree conference where all leading Shakespeareans, from around the world,

would be remiss of us to imply that it was

that can adumbrate everyone. After all, no

gather together every five years. Having

only performed in outdoor spaces,”

one owns Shakespeare.

it here was a major endorsement for us,"

continues Patrick.

“This is not about Shakespeare being the

explains Patrick.

alter that we are all desperately trying to walk

“In 2016, we had the World Congress, a

with a capacity of 320 – but it is a stunning

up the aisle towards. He is the font. He is the

visit from President Barak Obama, and our

space. It’s lit by real candles, and is the ideal

beginning. We draw from him and work with

production of Hamlet returned from a two

venue for storytelling and Shakespeare’s

him to develop individuals, both children and

year tour. It was a huge year for us.”

lesser known work.

adults,” says Patrick.

The Playhouse is smaller in comparison –

What is possibly the most astounding about

And now actors are banging at the doors to

For Globe Education, learning doesn’t

how far The Globe has come since 1997, is

perform on these stages, but it was not always

begin or end in the classroom. They work

the fact that it has achieved all it has with no

so easy to find willing talent.

with children from three years old, through to

subsidies at all. They are able to offer 700

adults in their nineties, and there are currently

tickets at the price of £5, and have done

actor, Mark Rylance, now considered one of the

around 1200 undergraduates, as well as

since 1997, and their theatrical and scholarly

great British performers of his time. He will tell

post-graduate scholars.

reach is global.

"The Globe’s first Artistic Director was an

you himself that it was a struggle to find even newly budding actors to tread the boards. “It was wonderful beginning with Mark as Artistic Director - one of the greatest of

Wanamaker felt that everyone should meet

"That’s Sam – an extraordinary vision, and

Shakespeare, regardless of age, race, gender

resolve," Patrick concludes. It is the greatest

and socioeconomic standing.

sadness that he never got to see it. He’d

“It’s been a joy creating the MA program,

always be critical – you never got an A+ with

actors. When the acting community saw the

undergraduate courses, all the school

Sam – but I hope he’d be proud of everything

way he was engaging with the audience, and

programs, and doing a lot of events and

we are doing here. Although, he would say

the type of productions he was creating, they

productions for individuals and families in a

that we can always do better.”

sat up and took notice.

more informal setting," adds Patrick.

“In 1996, if you said to graduates, ‘I’m from The Globe. We open next year. Would you

“The books that are coming out of here, as well as the scholars we are producing,

For more information, visit www.shakespearesglobe.com

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Untitled-1 1

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CULTURE CLUB

MOLLY'S GAME STX ENTERTAINMENT

LET US

ENTERTAIN YOU

Quench your cultural thirst with our top picks for film, television, books and music

The silver screen

who ran a high-stakes poker game for

wrought novel, the film follows a

years before being indicted by the FBI.

young couple, played by Saoirse

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN

Ronan and Billy Howle, who struggle

IN CINEMAS 26 DECEMBER 2017

BLACK PANTHER

to consummate their marriage while

Hugh Jackman stars in a lively musical

IN CINEMAS 12 FEBRUARY 2018

on their honeymoon in Dorset.

inspired by P.T. Barnum, celebrating the

Marvel’s latest superhero adventure

birth of show business. An ornate visual

follows iconic character Black Panther

DARKEST HOUR

spectacular, not to be missed.

(Chadwick Boseman) as he fights to take

IN CINEMAS 12 JANUARY 2018

his rightful place as king of Wakanda.

Gary Oldman portrays Winston Churchill

MOLLY’S GAME

with uncanny likeness in this political

IN CINEMAS 1 JANUARY 2018

ON CHESIL BEACH

drama. The story follows the Prime Minister

Aaron Sorkin’s directorial debut follows the

IN CINEMAS 19 JANUARY 2018

as he determines whether or not to

true story of Molly Bloom (Jessica Chastain),

Adapted from Ian McEwan’s emotionally-

negotiate with Hitler during World War II.

DARKEST HOUR FOCUS FILMS

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN FOX

BBC FILMS

FOCUS FILMS

ON CHESIL BEACH BBC FILMS

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CULTURE CLUB

From the speakers FIRST AID KIT, RUINS AVAILABLE 19 JANUARY 2018

FRANZ FERDINAND, ALWAYS ASCENDING

AVAILABLE NOW

Sister duo Klara and Johanna

AVAILABLE 9 FEBRUARY 2018

Neil Young collaborates with Promise

Söderberg follow their 2014

Scottish rock band Franz

Of The Real for a second album,

hit album Stay Gold with Ruins,

Ferdinand return with their

which features 10 tracks, including

a compelling collection of indie

fifth album, an evolution of

“Already Great”, a dig at the current

folk numbers perfect for repeated

the group’s signature raucous

American President Donald Trump.

listens on your turntable.

post-punk style.

NETFLIX

NEIL YOUNG & PROMISE OF THE REAL,THE VISITOR

THE CROWN BEGINS 8 DECEMBER 2017

On the box

The second series of The

DOCTOR WHO CHRISTMAS SPECIAL

Crown heads into the 1960s,

AIRS 25 DECEMBER 2017

trailing Queen Elizabeth (Claire

Peter Capaldi finishes out his run as the

Foy) as she grapples with

Doctor in this year’s special, which will

shifting traditions and political

introduce Jodie Whittaker as the 13th

instability. The storyline includes

(and first female) star of the series. Entitled

the visit of American president

“Twice Upon a Time”, the episode will also

John F. Kennedy, and the

feature David Bradley, who returns as the

infamous Profumo Affair.

first Doctor.

STAR TREK: DISCOVERY BEGINS 8 JANUARY 2018 The second half of the latest Star Trek reboot arrives on Netflix in January, following the crew of the USS Discovery as they journey through space while at war with Klingon forces. Catch up on the first eight episodes, which aired this autumn.

On the shelves

LINCOLN IN THE BARDO, GEORGE SAUNDERS PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 2018

HOW TO BE HUMAN: THE MANUAL, RUBY WAX

If you missed American author George Saunders’ latest novel

PUBLISHED JANUARY 2018

Lincoln In The Bardo pick it up when it arrives in paperback 8

Ruby Wax investigates what it means to be human, examining

February. Set in 1862 in a Washington cemetery, the story is

every aspect of life from evolution to emotion to children and

unusual and witty, much like Saunders’ previous efforts.

relationships. It includes mindfulness exercises for those who need a little New Year boost.

STILL ME, JOJO MOYES PUBLISHED JANUARY 2018 Fictional favourite Lou Clark is back in Still Me, a sequel to Moyes’ popular novels Me Before You and After You. It’s the sort of heartwarming tale that’s great to dig into while travelling.

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ST ALBANS CATHEDRAL ST ALBANS

A royal visit

HORNSEY TOWN HALL, LONDON

Those who’ve loved seeing inside the Windsor's home on Netflix’s

Hornsey Town Hall, now a community arts centre, was

The Crown may also love visiting these real-life locations from

transformed into a hospital for the final episode of series two

series two…

(including a vintage ambulance).

LANCASTER HOUSE, LONDON Built by the Duke of York in 1825, this neo-classical mansion stood in for the State Rooms of Buckingham Palace on The

LANCASTER HOUSE LONDON

Crown (and also appeared in Downton Abbey).

WROTHAM HOUSE, HERTFORDSHIRE Located 30 minutes from central London in a picturesque park, Wrotham House appeared in series two as the Audience Room of Buckingham Palace.

ST ALBANS CATHEDRAL, ST ALBANS The Crown used St Albans Cathedral, which dates back to the 11th century and is situated north of London, as Westminster Abbey in a funeral scene.

GAZELLI ART HOUSE, LONDON This Mayfair gallery was used to showcase an exhibit by Tony Armstrong Jones, who became the husband of Princess Margaret in 1960.

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Life’s little

LUXURIES

We round up 10 must-have items that are not to be missed

Graham’s Ne Oublie 1882, £5,000 Wine connoisseurs will simply have to taste this extraordinary viticultural offering. One of only 656 individually numbered bottles available from the Symington family, this rare 1882 fortified wine (above) is poured into in a hand-made crystal and silver decanter and is presented in a bespoke Smythson of Bond Street presentation box. www.neoublie.grahams-port.com

Exclusive set of 12 Dipytque candles, £120

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Every fragrance aficionado will know that Dipytque is one of the

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sound that will perfectly match up to the acoustics in your home, too.

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www.linn.co.uk

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LUXURIES

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ordered, whilst appearing random, design, this ring is an absolute classic that has inspired the designs of many a ring maker. The design houses 1.5 carat of round-cut brilliant diamonds set in outstanding platinum. www.boodles.com

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BEAUTY

JOINTHE

REVOLUTION

She has taken the beauty industry by storm through her empowering ideals and business prowess. Now, Frederick Latty catches up with Charlotte Tilbury to discover what makes her, and her creations, a worldwide success

How did this all begin for you?

Cindy Crawford, Claudia Schiffer and Christy Turlington. She continues

My ambition and journey as a makeup artist is rooted in my childhood.

to be very supportive, and a great influence in my life.

I lived in bohemian Ibiza, with my parents Patsy and Lance, and my sister Leah. My surroundings were filled with iconic characters and

You've been known to have started your eponymous brand

places – a real melting pot of artists, writers, painters, and a culture

as a 'beauty revolution' to empower women - is that still the

that sparked my creativity. I was lucky as I was brought up in a state of

case and do you feel that you've achieved this?

freedom, of expression and being. It was a magical time. Steve Jobs

Absolutely! I’ve created a woman to woman brand that makes

once said, ‘when you look back you can connect up the dots...’

makeup easy for everyone of any age. I’m empowering everyone

At the age of 13, I discovered makeup and it changed my life. When I started wearing mascara, people reacted in a completely different way

everywhere with my expert tips, tools and tricks! I only ever launch products that I know are the absolute best in the

to me, seemingly overnight. Whilst at first it seemed like a superficial

industry, and will always continue to innovate and push forward with bold

realisation, I soon realised that makeup is powerful – it’s every

and break-through ideas. Everything in my brand has to earn its place.

woman’s secret weapon. My career started when I began working under Mary Greenwell. She

My beauty revolution gives women award-winning, easy to use, and easy to choose makeup and skincare that is confidence-boosting and

is an amazing woman, and I would definitely say that she has been a

woman to woman. All of my products are years in the making, with

guide and mentor. I have now been in this industry for 25 years, with

the sole aim of making women look and feel like the most beautiful

166 noted covers to date, and have won over 100 awards with my

version of themselves.

beauty brand. So it’s really been quite a journey!

My Hot Lips lipstick collection was inspired by some of the world’s most mesmerising women, and during the launch it helped support

You cited Mary Greenwell as your mentor - how big an

the amazing charity Women for Women International. This charity, and

impact has she had on your career, and what were the most

each of the incredible women involved, inspire me in so many ways!

valuable lessons you learned from her?

It’s the ultimate all-female collaboration with 12 incredible women:

When I became Mary’s assistant, she really opened my eyes to the

Miranda Kerr, Nicole Kidman, Salma Hayek, Kate Bosworth, Laura

world of makeup. I’d always been fascinated by the power a beautiful

Bailey, Cindy Crawford, Helena Bonham-Carter, Liv Tyler, Emily

woman has when she enters a room, and she helped me to understand

Ratakjowski, Carina Lau, Poppy Delevingne and Kim Kardashian-West.

that type of beauty and how its magnetic pull can command attention. Mary was, and still is, an incredible mentor. I started assisting her during the supermodel era of Linda Evangelista, Naomi Campbell,

I really admire each of the women who inspired the Hot Lips collection, and with them I want to spread the powerful, feel-good factor that comes with a gorgeous new lipstick shade. I have extracted their beauty

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DNA, mixing colours that really embody their style and personality, captured it and am now passing it on. You’ve worked with many high-profile style icons. What’s it like to collaborate with them? I’ve been lucky enough to work with countless wonderful women - from Kate Moss when I was starting out in the industry at 19, to stars of the amazing supermodel era of the 80s and 90s. Since then, I’ve worked with so many iconic actresses, models, and powerhouses that continue to inspire me – from Kim Kardashian-West, Sienna Miller, Penelope Cruz, Salma Hayek, Gigi Hadid and Amal Clooney, to Jennifer Aniston, J K Rowling, Nicole Kidman and Olivia Culpo. The list is endless. Who else continues to inspire you in your own personal journey and professional career? I have a mix of creatives, visionaries and rule breakers that I look to for inspiration; including Helena Rubenstein, Coco Chanel, Walt Disney, Steve Jobs, Winston Churchill and Estée Lauder. There are far too many to list. The creatives who push boundaries are who I aspire to be; the visionaries who make you dream and the rule-breakers who think differently. I’m constantly learning from what they’ve achieved and how they put their own ‘ding in the universe’! As a successful entrepreneur, what business tips or advice would you give to other women who are looking to make a name for themselves in your industry? When launching something new, you have to think about what people need. Necessity is the mother of all invention. If you see a blank space in the market, and you’re truly passionate about your idea, don’t give up until your vision becomes a reality! It’s also so important to have a single-minded focus and visualise success. I always talk about the power of visualisation. Visualise what you want and don’t give up until you get it. Dream big and dare to make your dreams a reality. What have been some of the biggest challenges you have had to overcome on your journey to where you are now? People often ask me which challenges I have faced when launching my own brand, and although there have been some difficult times over the past three and a half years, it really does depend on how you choose to perceive them. From the very beginning, I’ve always had a crystal-clear image of how I’ve wanted my brand to be and the process of making that vision a reality hasn’t always been easy. But I really believe in hard work and pushing yourself, because when you’re passionate about something, anything is possible! Rather than see those experiences as obstacles, I see them as opportunities and something to learn from. Self-belief is so important - it’s just our insecurities that stop us and block us. When someone tells me ‘no’, I instantly think, “It will be a ‘yes’!”

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As the first flagship store to stock your brand, how important has your relationship with Selfridges been in getting you to where you are now? I’m so excited to be part of such an iconic and world renowned store such as Selfridges. I’m proud to be a truly British brand, and what better department store to reflect this? When we launched in Selfridges, I’ll never forget the queue of over 200 women waiting to get their hands on the Magic Cream. It was the fastestselling beauty product in Selfridges’ history, which was an absolute dream! What, for you, should women look for from beauty, makeup and skincare to make them feel beautiful, powerful, confident and sexy? Beauty is all about confidence! Skincare and makeup should enhance what you naturally have and really dial up your assets. Makeup is my secret power – it’s every woman’s secret power. Everyone looks better with makeup - even if it’s a very natural look and you can’t tell the person is wearing any. If you look good, you feel good! My brand is all about using only the very best formulas – I’ve handpicked all the ingredients in my products, and colour-coded the shades to complement skin tone, hair colour and eye colour. What are your hopes for the future of your brand? To continue to totally revolutionise and disrupt the beauty industry! And I couldn’t be more excited about what’s happening next at Charlotte Tilbury. We recently launched my fabulous cinematic Hollywood Collection. I’ve bottled all my red carpet makeup secrets from the past 25 years, so every woman can become their Hollywood dream self! The range includes ten liquid matte lipsticks, which give lips the illusion of being full and digitally-enhanced. I can only liken it to the most beautiful, filtered Instagram version of yourself, but in real life. My Contour Wands and Beauty Light Wand give you celebrity cheekbones, and the most flawless, cinematic, Hollywood highlight which looks as good in daylight as in HD. Then there’s the new Instant Eye Palette - I call it the LBD for eyes, as it takes you from day to desk, to date to disco. It works for every woman in every situation. It’s a gorgeous mix of smokey and golden tones, each control-pressed to only release a certain amount of formula on your brush from the first stroke. Wear at your desk in the day for sophisticated, professional looks, then amp it up for an evening of dancing.

To find out more about Charlotte Tilbury, visit www.charlottetilbury.com

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SAVOY CUISINE

D ELE CTA BL E

DEL IG HT S London-based travel and lifestyle blogger Nathan Rollinson pulls up a seat to sample Afternoon Tea in the famous Thames Foyer

T

he Thames Foyer at The Savoy is the perfect setting for

coriander bread; and tender classic Coronation chicken on

afternoon tea; a grand Edwardian space filled with

olive-jewelled bread, simply spectacular. As the seasons change,

classical Art Nouveau and impressive Corinthian gilt

there are always one or two additional flavours, so be sure to

columns. The glass-domed ceiling floods the room with natural light and an impressive gazebo houses the finest Steinways & Son

look out for them. The best part of the afternoon tea experience is the warm and

grand piano in an elegant winter garden setting. Each table comes

hearty scented scones served in white linen with a choice of

with a polished silver vase of red roses set against a pristine white

homemade lemon curd, traditional strawberry jam and clotted

linen tablecloth, bespoke Wedgwood crockery - exclusive to The

cream. To be honest, you can never have too many. If you’ve

Savoy - and traditional silverware.

opted for the traditional Afternoon Tea, your sweet tooth will

Start your experience with a glass of Champagne – a rich Louis

be truly satisfied with a limitless cake tray. The cakes also

Roederer Vintage 2009, or perhaps something grander like the

change to reflect the season, and the current festive menu has

Cristal 2009 with a long finish? Alternatively, how about a delicate

to be tasted to be believed. If you’re not the biggest cake fan,

pink champagne? When your waiter hands over the menu, it can

opt for the high tea instead, as the pastry course is replaced by

be overwhelming, but someone is always on hand to guide you

smoked salmon and poached egg on a crisp brioche disc with

through the vast range of speciality teas and help you choose the

crème fraîche, lemon and herbs.

perfect blend for you. All sorts are featured, from traditional English

With its blissfully relaxing ambience, spectacular hospitality,

Breakfast to the more exotic herbal and floral flavours, carefully

delightful music and overflowing bubbly, this is the kind of

handpicked from individual countries, including the traditional

experience you will always enjoy at The Savoy Thames Foyer,

Chinese Oolong blend – Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth’s favourite.

in just the same way as Anna Russell, duchess of Bedford,

When it comes to sandwiches, you are truly spoilt for choice. A

who invented the afternoon tea back in the 19th century.

dainty finger sandwich, immaculately cut into a perfect rectangle

An afternoon tea to remember...

with an abundance of mouth-watering fillings. Soft basil bread with cucumber and minted cream cheese; Wiltshire (on the bone)

Keep up with Nathan on his blog,

ham with grainy mustard and apple chutney on fragrant carrot and

www.therollinsonlondon.com

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KASPAR’S HAS A PERSONALITY OF ITS OWN – RICH TEALS, HANGING SHARDS OF GLASS AND FISH-SCALED FLOOR TILES.

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SAVOY CUISINE

TASTE THE SEASON Hannah Patterson takes a seat at Kaspar’s at The Savoy to sample the delights of the new menu

A

lthough this is not my first visit to the

the restaurant from the Foyer. Kaspar’s has

hotel, I have never eaten at The Savoy.

a personality of its own – rich teals, hanging

This is my own fault – I never seem to get

shards of glass and fish-scaled floor tiles.

past the American Bar and their cocktail menu. My friend, who has accompanied me after not much convincing, has eaten here only once before after one too many drinks with author Damian Barr. “What did you order?” I ask. “Fish and chips,” he looks a little sheepish.

It is beautifully Art Deco and perfectly reminiscent of the 1920s. Although only midday, the restaurant is buzzing. Relaxed smiles can be seen at every table, and the atmosphere is natural and unconceited. No sooner have we sat down, a waiter

“Not an adventurous choice, I know, but it was

appears with menus in hand, and introduces

some of the best fish and chips I’ve ever had.”

us to the seasonal menu – a short, but varied

But today, we are after something specific – the new seasonal menu. Kaspar’s is tucked away on the Thames-side of

array of seafood, meat and vegetarian options. "Do you know about Kaspar?" My friend asks, nodding to a pretty illustration of a cat

the hotel, affording a stroll through the entrance

with a napkin tied round its neck on the front

lobby, past the imposing portrait of HRH Queen

of the menu.

Elizabeth II by Henry Ward, and into the light, bright and utterly impeccable Thames Foyer. "Can I take your coats?"

This is the moment when I fall in love with Kaspar’s – long before I taste the food, or drink the wine. The story is printed on the front of the menu, for

The hostess is all smiles and warmth when

every guest to read, and has become part of the

we reach the entrance to Kaspar’s – it is expert

tradition themselves. On any other day, I would

hospitality, without pretention – and we are

laugh off tales of superstition, but today is different.

swiftly shown to our table. We appear to be in another world when we enter

The South African diamond Magnate Woolf Joel died suddenly in 1898, not too long after

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SAVOY

MEETCUISINE THE TEAM

“Our waiter returns.

holding a dinner for fourteen guests at The Savoy. Last minute, the fourteenth guest cancelled leaving a table of thirteen. With

He recommends the pan

citrus nage.

roasted scallops to start,

left, another appears with the

superstition being rife at the time,

served with beetroot

one guest declared death would befall the first person to leave the table. Woolf Joel was first to

broccoli, cockles and anise-

risotto, hippo tops and

leave, and weeks later was killed

citrus gremolata.”

in Johannesburg. In an effort to not repeat such an ill-fate, an additional guest was provided for any table of thirteen – Kaspar the cat, sculpted into life in 1926

No sooner has the waiter bottle of wine we ordered. Being in our early thirties, and having developed a taste for wine during the noughties, we have a shared liking for bottles that grew significantly

in popularity at the time. In this case, it is a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. The Astrolabe ‘Province’ Sauvignon Blanc is a

by architect Basil Ionides, who joins guests with his

medium bodied wine from the Marlborough region,

own place setting and a napkin round his neck.

and our server is kind enough to tell us a little bit

"Are you ready to order?" Our waiter returns. He recommends the pan

about the bottle before I am offered a taste. The wine is made from grapes grown across

roasted scallops to start, served with beetroot

three Marlborough sub-regions — the Wairau

risotto, hippo tops and citrus gremolata.

Valley, the Awatere Valley and the Kekerengu

Unlike my friend, I am of the personal opinion

Coast, where they are harvested during the

that you can have too much seafood in one sitting,

cooler parts of the day in order to preserve the

so I let him order the recommended starter – we

intensity of the flavour.

never order the same - whilst I opt for the duck

It is a beautifully complex wine and elegantly

pastrami with date jam, apricot and walnut. It’s all

balanced, and goes down wonderfully with the

decided under the agreement that I get first choice

scallops in particular, as it would any seafood.

on the mains – crayfish ‘carbonara’ linguini with bacon and cured egg yolk. "Excellent choice!" The waiter declares once I order, and looks just as enthused when my friend requests the pan seared halibut with charred

My friend barely says a word as he tucks into his starter – I’m far less interesting than the scallops, after all – until he’s eaten enough to take a break. "It always amazes me just how soft quality scallops are. There’s soft, there’s melt-in-your mouth, and

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then there’s this." He says, slicing into another. I’m just as enamoured with my own first course.

for fear of it being overcooked – which can be easily done – and become dry. But he needn’t have

The dish is so fragrant that I can taste it without

worried, for the fish flakes apart under the slightest

lifting a fork – the tang of the meat softened by

pressure from his knife, with the natural flavours

date, peach and walnut. It’s a unique palette of

enhanced by the citrus.

flavour with mixed textures that make for a light but satisfying entrée. The wine, which is being topped up by our attentive waiter,

Once we finish, our waiter reappears with the menus. My friend says yes without delay, but I’m pleasantly full, although I take a menu to be polite. But my heart

perhaps was better suited to

overrules my head. In less time

my friend’s starter than my

than it takes a minute to pass,

own, but the lightness of the

both of us settle on a third course;

dish forgives drinking a fruity white with red meat. I am a little full already after the first course. My friend shakes his head in dismay and declares that a restaurant like this is wasted on an appetite like mine. But I am resolved. Like anyone who is eagerly anticipating a visit to a restaurant, I had looked at the menu beforehand. The crayfish linguine

salted caramel featuring vanilla foam, caramelised puff pastry and crystalised pecans for myself; Sao Palme 75% Molten Torte for him. These are desserts as they are meant to be done – perfect portion sizes, presented in a way that makes you feel guilty eating it, and sweet without being sickly. Both our orders are light and frothy. The puff

has been on my mind since then, and I plan to let

pastry is crisp enough to compliment the fluffy

nothing dampen my enjoyment.

vanilla foam, but not tough enough for you to

It does not disappoint. A mountain of thin

have to wrestle it with your spoon, and it is over all

linguine on a bed of cured egg is placed in front of

too quickly. No matter how much you eat at lunch

me, sprinkled with bright pink crayfish and perfectly

or dinner, there appears to always be room for

crisp bacon. It is an elegant twist, on an old

Kaspar’s puddings.

favourite. The crayfish has absorbed every flavour and it is an utter joy to eat. The waiter was right to recommend it, and I’m

“So,” my friend asks, after our plates have been cleared for the final time, “what did you think?” I do not manage an answer – I’m far too busy

feeling a little smug as my friend eyes it up – until

concocting a plan for how I can get to Kaspar’s

his arrives.

every single day.

The pan-seared halibut is a work of art. It is exquisitely presented, laid amongst the cockles and charred broccoli. He has always been weary of ordering halibut,

For more information, and to peruse the menu, visit www.kaspars.co.uk

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ADVERTORIAL

PLEASE RAISE YOUR GLASSES When it comes to planning your wedding, Corney & Barrow have just the tipples for making it perfect

W

eddings - an eye wateringly expensive,

Don’t overspend

stress-filled occasion, or a joy in

Unless your guests are an assortment of

the making?

professional wine experts, catering for

Assuming you’ve ticked off the big

weddings is the perfect opportunity to

three – date, venue, dress – there’s

explore the many outstanding wines at

much fun to be had for those planning

the cheaper end of the price spectrum.

a memorable reception that often depends on

Don’t write off the ‘house’ option.

the hospitality.

With the explosion of wine choices on the

Whether you’re a wine expert or simply an enthusiast, choosing what to serve can be a relatively simple affair as long as you follow the unwritten rules.

high street, own label wines have improved greatly and many now offer top quality and real value for money.

There are five important considerations to take into account when it comes to sourcing that perfect offering:

People will drink what they want, when they want Sometimes the ideal pairing for a particular dish you’re serving

Your guests

isn’t the perfect wine for your wedding. Yes, it may get you

It’s an obvious thing to say, but not everyone has the same taste.

plaudits from your oenophile friends, but many people just want

Whilst it’s always dangerous to generalise, people who developed

to drink what they like, whatever the time of day – and some

their taste for wine between the 1970s and 1990s tend to enjoy

wines really do need food to sing. You don’t want to serve Uncle

a more ‘classical’ style, as this is reflective of what was popular at

John, who only drinks red wine, a super tannic red at 1pm.

the time. This means leaner structures, lower alcohols and a more

The ideal wine is one that both matches your food and is easy

savoury flavour profile. Younger generations have grown up on

drinking enough to consume without.

a diet of bolshy, boozy and sweetly fruited wines (think Malbec or New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc) following the evolution of modern

Screwcap versus cork

winemaking. Let the demographics of your guest list guide your

This isn’t a rule as such, just something to consider. If you’ve got

choice, or make a statement by showing your favourites - after all, it

a big wedding with lots of guests and anticipate going through

is your big day.

wine quickly, it might be worth considering the merits of the screw cap versus pulling dozens of corks. Screw caps are also

Time of year

an easier way for guests to transport any leftovers home at the

Serving big, heavy wines, no matter the quality, in the height of

end of the night.

summer will make people very drowsy after they’ve had a good feed and a few glasses, so save these for winter weddings. Aim for

Need some inspiration? Here are some suggestions from our

seasonal, just as you would when choosing the food.

wine experts at Corney & Barrow.

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REDS

WHITES

Il Carretto Rosso 2016

Corney & Barrow Blanc 2015

Predominantly Sangiovese with a dash of Primitivo

Our Own Label Gascony white is the ultimate in value

thrown in, this light red from Puglia in southern Italy is

and quality and will seriously challenge perceptions of

aromatic and savoury, with juicy and ripe cherry fruit

‘house’. A refreshing, zingy blend of Colombard and

and a balsamic note on the finish. Perfect for a range

Ugni Blanc, this is a great aperitif but will match well

of dishes from charcuterie, tomato pasta dishes,

to lighter fish dishes and salads.

grilled vegetables and roast pork. Fiano Masseria Bianca 2016 Domaine de Saissac Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

Fiano is indigenous to Italy and produces aromatic and

From the sun-kissed vineyards of the Languedoc,

fruity wines that often have tropical notes – perfect for

this Cabernet is the ultimate partner to grilled or

summer! It’s one of the most versatile food wines,

barbequed red meats. Juicy and concentrated but with

easily pairing with seafood, soft cheeses and lighter

a deft touch, it has the happy coincidence of being

white meat dishes.

both delicious and amazing value. La Tunella Sauvignon Blanc 2015 Company Reserve Claret 2014

A great example of a popular grape variety, this comes

Our Own Label Reserve Claret should satisfy

from the north of Italy, showing finesse and elegance

those wanting a more traditional style (and presence at

alongside the variety's natural exuberance and aromatic

the table) but equally has a nice rounded texture and

flavour profile. Its pleasant minerality and refreshing,

integrated tannins to make it a delicious drop. Great with

delicate flavours make it a great partner for a range of

your classic roast beef or lamb as well as hard cheeses.

fish dishes, smoked salmon and goat’s cheese.

Eradus Pinot Noir 2016

Mâcon-Chaintre Domaine Dominique Cornin 2016

From New Zealand based Eradus Wines, this combines

This certified organic domaine in the south of Burgundy

earthy notes with dark, perfumed fruit and flowers.

is a great option if you’re looking for a classical style of

With a silky texture and ripe fruit notes, it’s a great

white to go with your wedding. It’s ripe, fresh and so

accompaniment to duck, or game dishes with a fruity

great on its own, as well as a great accompaniment to

sauce, and Pinot Noir tends to go well with white

poultry dishes. Worth paying the extra if your guests

meats and vegetarian dishes too.

are an appreciative bunch.

Corney & Barrow have been supplying wines to happy couples for over 200 years. They offer free tastings ahead of the event, alternative gift lists, drinks calculators and more. Visit www.corneyandbarrow.com/weddings for the full service.

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TRAVEL

Heavenly

inspiration Paradise can be found right here on earth, and it is closer than you think, as Adam Jacot de Boinod discovers when he travels to Mauritius…

I

t is not hard to see why the American writer Mark Twain

stunning, and the calm waters of the lagoon had a peaceful

wrote “Mauritius was made first, and then heaven, and

vibe. The trees included the glorious and quirky banyans, as

that heaven was copied after Mauritius”. The island is often

well as the expansive ‘travellers’ palms’ - so called from the

talked about in the same breath as the Seychelles and the

theory that if one broke its stem then there was water inside for

Maldives. However, the largest of the three Mascarene Islands - the other two being Rodrigues and Reunion - is the one they call the “Pearl of the Indian Ocean”.

the traveller. Descending to the south-western tip of the island, beneath the famous Le Morne promontory, there was a really special

It’s just such a beautiful island.

position from which to enjoy the blue from the sea against the

As Mauritius is such a fertile island with everything seemingly

setting of the sun and its changing palette of gold, pink and

growing at will, I felt it was a must to experience the local

orange. It’s along this beach that the leaves sough and the

markets. Housed under a vast vaulted roof was the massive

water laps. Unfortunately, the waves were too agitated for me

fruit and vegetable market at Flacq; bursting with fresh

to go and swim alongside the dolphins.

produce, bustling crowds and haggling vendors. After the

But it is not simply the scenery that makes Mauritius so unique

previous gentle days, I took the frantic nature of the market

– the culture is a rich one. Throughout the island, I found

in my stride by adorning myself with a wonderful garland of

myself impressed by the approach to religion. Half of the

bright orange marigolds.

residents here are Hindi, whilst the other half are principally

Elsewhere, across the island, I saw rows of pineapple and mango trees, lychee fields, and coffee plants. The scenery was

Christian and Muslim. Each Hindi house is visible from the road with the display of two red flags for purity, and a small

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“Elsewhere, across the island, I saw rows of pineapple and mango trees, lychee fields, and coffee plants. The scenery was stunning, and the calm waters of the lagoon had a peaceful vibe�

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TRAVEL

“Mauritius was made first, and then heaven, and that heaven was copied after Mauritius” shrine. There is a diverse range of religious buildings on display

It’s stunningly rich in vegetation, and from a high viewpoint I

across the island. Interestingly, Tamil temples are very colourful,

looked far beneath to see the gorge amid miles of dense, green

with all their Gods depicted on the exterior, whilst the Hindi

forest. My mind drifted to Samuel Taylor Coleridge and “Alph, the

temples portray their Gods discretely within, with only a red and

sacred river, ran. Through caverns measureless to man”.

white plain exterior.

Mark Twain was right, Mauritius was copied by heaven.

Whilst down in the south, it is a must to pop in to see the Grand Bassin, or Ganga Talao. It’s a lake that sits in isolated mountains, and is the destination of a pilgrimage in February for more than 400,000 Hindus. It is so refreshing that there is no religious discord. They live in peace, and rest in peace, as even their dead are all buried together in the same cemetery regardless of faith. There are also echoes of the days of slavery, visibly woven through the island’s culture. Slavery was the birth of the island’s

DISCOVER: MAURITIUS The Holiday Place has a wide range of holidays to Mauritius from just £1299 per person. Immerse yourself in boutique luxury right next to the amazing UNESCO World Heritage Site of Morne Braban Peak. To book call 020 7644 1770 or

most distinct cultural expression called – Sega. It’s the most

visit holidayplace.co.uk

evident form of local Creole culture. In the form of a song

Adam Jacot de Boinod worked on the first series of QI the

and dance, it was once a slave’s rallying call, but it has now evolved to incorporate a tambourine, a shaker and a triangle. Nowadays, the real rhythm of Sega has been lost, but it remains nonetheless the popular Mauritian dance form.

BBC programme and is the author of The Meaning of Tingo and Other Extraordinary Words from around the World, published by Penguin Books. Adam had support from Priority Pass and Gatwick Express

Back inland, I visited the Black River Gorges National Park.

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IMAGES MAURITIUS TOURIST BOARD

TRAVEL

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ADVERTORIAL LIDO COLLECTION TOWELS THE NEW LIDO TOWELS ARE WOVEN WITH SINGLE AMERICAN AND TURKISH COTTON YARN LOOP TO GUARANTEE A SOFT AND PLUSH UNIQUE TOUCH. THEY ARE MADE FROM 600 GSM WITH HIGH ABSORBENCE DETAILED WITH CLASSIC DIAMOND PIQUET BORDERS

Linen with love Mascioni are launching their new hotel collection perfect for wrapping up in this winter TABLE LINEN COLLECTION

ZEN GREY ROBE

LIDO INWOVEN LOGO AND RIVA TOWELS

THE JACQUARD TABLE LINENS ARE MADE IN ITALY WITH 100 PER CENT PREMIUM EXTRA LONG STAPLE COTTONS TO GUARANTEE LONG LASTING PRODUCTS THAT ARE WASHABLE AT VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE.

OUR NEW LIDO INWOVEN LOGO TOWELS, AND RIVA STRIPED TOWELS ARE WOVEN WITH TWO PLY AMERICAN AND TURKISH COTTON YARN LOOP TO PROPOSE A RICHER PRODUCT AND AN EXCLUSIVE TOUCH.

THE NEW COLLECTION OF ROBES INCLUDES THIS 100 PER CENT COTTON VELOUR AND SHAWL COLLAR STYLE DETAILED, WITH 100 PER CENT YARN DYED LINEN APPLIED BORDERS. THEY HAVE A GENEROUS FIT, RAGLAN SLEEVES, SQUARED POCKETS AND HANGING LOOP.

ELBA PLAIN 300TC SATEEN AND SORRENTO STRIPED 300TC SATEEN BED LINEN

PORTOFINO CABLE KNITTED THROW MADE WITH 100 PER CENT PURE MONGOLIAN CASHMERE, THESE BEAUTIFUL THROWS DELIVER A UNIQUE COMFORT FEEL WITH A SOPHISTICATED DRAPE, THAT YOU’LL WANT TO WRAP UP IN OVER AND OVER AGAIN.

THESE BED LINENS ARE MADE IN ITALY WITH SUPREME 100 PER CENT SUPIMA COTTON. OFTEN REFERRED TO AS ‘THE CASHMERE OF COTTONS’, SUPIMA SURPASSES OTHER COTTONS IN SOFTNESS, STRENGTH AND COLOR BRILLANCE.

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More than bedding ... fully living. www.ploh.com

‘Easy Breezy’ - A Ploh BedscapeTM

Delivering luxury sleep experiences at legendary hotels around the world (including The Savoy’s sister property - The Raffles Singapore.)

Enjoy the same at home.

Luxury Down Pillows . Duvets . Featherbeds . Bedlinens . Robes . Cashmere

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ADVERTORIAL

A LUXURY

LANDMARK

L

Barratt London presents a unique development that epitomises high-end London living andmark Place, the only riverside

London skyline. Recessed balconies provide a

residential development in the City of

seamless transition between the exterior and the

London, is one of the fastest selling sites

interior of the buildings, while the generosity of

in the capital, as prospective buyers, both investors

glazing – over 80 per cent of the building is glass –

and owner occupiers, recognise the unique

provides the widest of views.

opportunity that it offers.

The exceptional residents' facilities will include a 24

Bounded by three of the landmarks which have

hour concierge service, a private health suite with

come to symbolise London – the Thames, the

a 20 metre swimming pool, jacuzzi, sauna, steam

Tower of London and Tower Bridge – these homes

room and treatment room; a magnificent lounge

are a celebration of beautiful materials and expert

with river views, fully equipped with wifi, audio visual

craftsmanship with the highest quality interiors that

and catering facilities as well as elegant soft seating; a

are finished to a superior specification.

business suite complete with full audio visual services

The penthouses at Landmark Place, the pinnacle

and catering facilities; a glamourous cinema room,

of the development, could be classed amongst the

complete with wide-screen TV and surround sound;

finest ever created in London. They are a unique

and underground parking.

collection of spacious homes with floor-to-ceiling

Over 50 per cent of the project has been sold, with

windows and expansive terraces from which to

sales continuing to average one a week. The project

enjoy the timeless views across the River Thames.

is appealing to buyers across the prime spectrum,

Inspired by visionary architect Le Corbusier, a genius with light and space, the two interconnected buildings at Landmark Place, one of eight storeys

with as many properties selling at over £1 million as under £1 million. Landmark Place offers 165 one, two and three-

and the other of ten, appear to be wrapped in

bedroom apartments from £899,999, and the

glass, allowing wide vistas of the Thames and the

penthouses are available from £5,740,000.

B A R R AT T LONDON For more information and prices please contact the sales suite on 020 7423 1211 or visit: www.landmarkplaceec3.com

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Regal RESIDENCIES Live out your most opulent fairytale dreams with this stunning array of castles situated around the world

VIEW FROM MANORIAL PALACE IN DALT VILA, IBIZA

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PROPERTY

MANORIAL PALACE, DALT VILA, IBIZA Priced at 9.5million EUR

In an extraordinary, sun-soaked setting, lies Manorial Palace, a beautiful historical property located in a UNESCO World Heritage site. This palace was built in 1740 and is located within the walls of Dalt Vila. It has been renovated in the last few years and boasts an amazing roof terrace with views over the town, harbour, the sea and Ibizan countryside. Its magnificent features include a great reception hall, grand stairway, cinema room and dining room with views to the cathedral. The seven bedroom

property also has a swimming pool, separate independent apartment, wine cellar, spa and hot tub and home theatre. A closed two car garage completes the property. The outlook from the terrace is stunning, especially at night, while the interiors are equally impressive – the contemporary renovations have been completed using only the best quality materials, and every room is spectacular. +34 971 310 799 ibiza-sothebysrealty.com

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CASTLE LOUDEAC IN RENNES, BRITTANY Priced at 1.155million EUR

If tranquillity and the chance to escape the hustle and bustle of life appeals, then this beautiful castle in central Brittany could be your dream sanctuary. Surrounded by greenery, this stunning property is in excellent condition, and boasts three reception rooms with parquet floors, fireplaces and wooden panelling, 10 bedrooms and several bath/shower rooms. For those looking to enjoy leisure facilities, the castle comes complete with games room, fitness room, sauna and an adjacent heated and covered pool. A variety of outbuildings can also be found within the grounds, including a building with office, meeting room, wine cellar, and caretaker’s lodge with three bedrooms to refresh, a renovated orangery and a shelter for several cars. The castle is protected by its 37 acres, with a forest, two lakes and landscaped park designed by Erwan Tymen, and really is an oasis waiting to be discovered. +33 (0) 297 35 00 10 sothebysrealty.com

CRAIGCROOK CASTLE IN EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND Priced at £6million

Craigcrook Castle is a Grade B Listed property set only three miles from the city centre of Edinburgh. Built originally by William Adamson in 1542, it was transferred through a number of owners before John Strachan, Writer to the Signet acquired the castle and left it to Craigcrook Mortification Trust in 1719. During its time the castle has played host to a number of famous visitors. The castle is set over three storeys and includes a stunning round tower that offers views of Costorphine Hill, Blackhall and The Firth of Forth. With six bedrooms and three bathrooms, this spacious property also contains a gatehouse, and stables with a two storey building which lends itself to conversion. The castle is set within extensive grounds of more than four acres with landscaped gardens, a small area of mature woodland and the original walled garden. It is a real hidden gem close to one of the UK’s most exceptional cities. +44 (0) 1932 860 537 sothebysrealty.com

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PROPERTY

BRENTWOOD MANOR IN CONNECTICUT, USA Priced at $8.5million USD

Park-like tranquillity sets the stage for this majestic Old World stone castle style dwellings amidst more than 12 acres of rolling countryside. Painstakingly renovated, this six-bedroomed richly detailed residence exudes warm magnificence with eight fireplaces, marquetry floors, sumptuous marble and elegant chandeliers. At the heart of the house, the baronial cathedralceiling style great room is anchored by monumental fireplaces on both sides and opens through beveled-glass French doors to an immense sunset terrace.

Malachite-hued lacquered panelling adorns the opulent library, while the beautiful family room adjoins the sleek Snaidero gourmet kitchen. Capturing lush long views, an expansive upstairs wing is devoted to the romantic master suite with marble double bath, customised dressing areas and turret room. To the lower level you’ll discover a spacious seven-car garage, wine cellar and staff quarters. This spectacular country domain is further enhanced by a heated pool and tennis court. +1 203 618 3165 sothebysrealty.com

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MOTORING

THE

GRAND

TOURER The DB11 is now available with an AMG-sourced V8. Simon Davis heads to Spain to put the eye-catching GT through its paces WHAT IS IT?

WHAT’S NEW?

To dismiss the DB11 V8 as an entry-level

The clue is in the name. The most important

WHAT’S UNDER THE BONNET?

version of Aston Martin’s latest grand tourer

change with the DB11 V8 is, well, the V8.

Although the DB11’s V8 engine may have

wouldn’t be entirely fair. Sure, with a retail price

Aston Martin got its hands on the AMG-

been sourced from Mercedes’ slightly mad

of £144,900 it’s £13,000 cheaper than its

sourced unit thanks to its working relationship

in-house tuners AMG, it hasn’t just been

V12-powered stablemate, but according to

with the Daimler Group. But more on this

dropped into the British grand tourer as is.

Aston this is an entirely different beast.

phenomenal engine later.

Aston Martin has fitted its own air

Aside from that new engine, the changes

intake, exhaust and wet sump lubrication

for crossing continents in supreme comfort at a

you get with the DB11 V8 are rather subtle.

systems, and has worked to “Astonise” the

significant rate of knots, Aston Martin claims the

Aesthetically, its darker headlamp

German engine.

V8 model is the one to go for if you’re a keen

bezels, different vents in the bonnet,

driver. Yes, it’s about 100bhp down on the V12,

and darker tail lights are the main

twin-turbocharged V8 that develops 503bhp

but the lack of those four extra cylinders right

alterations the more eagle-eyed will

and 675Nm of torque. This allows the DB11

over the front of the car mean the V8 is 115kg

pick out. These changes have been

to complete the benchmark sprint from

lighter, and it also means this particular Aston

introduced to give the DB11 V8 a slightly

0-60mph in just 3.8 seconds, while its top

Martin has a weight distribution of 49:51 as

more sporting and athletic image than

speed sits at 187mph. For perspective, the

opposed to its big brother’s 51:49.

the V12 model.

V12 DB11 will complete the same sprint in

While the full-fat DB11 V12 was designed

The result of this tinkering is a 4.0-litre,

“If there’s one thing an Aston Martin has to be, it’s beautiful, and the DB11 is certainly a stunning thing to look at” 01 \

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FACTS AT A GLANCE MODEL: Aston Martin DB11 V8

MAX SPEED: 187mph

PRICE AS TESTED: £144,900

0-60MPH: 3.8 seconds

ENGINE: 4.0-litre twin-turbocharged V8

MPG: 28.5mpg

POWER: 503bhp

EMISSIONS: 230g/km

TORQUE: 675Nm

3.7 seconds, so the V8 won’t exactly be left for dead by its more expensive stablemate.

WHAT’S IT LIKE INSIDE? Anyone who has spent time in a Mercedes will no

While this likely won’t be a huge concern for

doubt be met with a sense of déjà vu, due to the

Aston Martin owners, the DB11 V8 trumps the

infotainment system being lifted straight from the

V12 model as far as fuel economy and CO2

German manufacturer’s model line-up (another

emissions are concerned. Where the V12

fruit of Aston and Daimler’s relationship).

manages 24.8mpg on the combined cycle, the V8

Past that, though, the DB11 is all Aston Martin.

will do 28.5mpg. CO2 emissions for the V8 stand

There’s leather all over the place, which has

at 230g/km, while the V12 rises to 265g/km.

been sourced from cows raised in fields that

WHAT’S IT LIKE TO DRIVE?

aren’t fenced in with barbed wire. According to Aston Martin, this helps to ensure the leather is

In a word, the DB11 V8 is sublime. Aston Martin

of the highest quality. One thing’s for sure: the

has built a thoroughly accomplished GT car that’s

DB11’s cabin is a great place to spend time.

not only devastatingly quick in a straight line, but seriously impressive through the twisty stuff as well. The steering is precise and has a healthy

WHAT’S THE SPEC LIKE? The DB11 V8 bears a recommended retail price

weight to it, allowing you to point the car’s nose

of £144,900, so it’s certainly not cheap. That

into a bend safe in the knowledge that it won’t

said, it is intended to be an exclusive, luxurious

suddenly wash out. Aston has also worked a

GT car, so an affordable price tag was never

trick with the DB11’s damping. The set-up is

going to be on the table.

soft enough to allow the car to ride comfortably

As far as equipment goes, there’s a full leather

over imperfections in the surface of the road,

interior, an infotainment system with 12-inch

but firm enough to minimise body roll through

LCD display, satellite navigation and 360-degree

fast corners.

parking camera, to name but a few features. And

Out on the motorway, the DB11 really

if you think you’ll tire of listening to the car’s V8

comes into its element. It simply eats the

soundtrack, you can also order your DB11 with a

miles up, and is an incredibly comfortable

premium Bang & Olufsen audio system.

car to cover great distances in. The V8 engine has power on tap, and even in seventh gear it pulls astonishingly well.

HOW DOES IT LOOK?

VERDICT: Although the DB11 V8 may be down four cylinders compared with the range-topping V12, by no means should you think that it’s

If there’s one thing an Aston Martin has to

in any form a lesser car. Like the DB11 V12, it’s

be, it’s beautiful, and the DB11 is certainly a

a marvellous cross-continental grand tourer, but

stunning thing to look at. Where its sister car,

thanks to its new lightweight engine, the DB11

the Vanquish, is far more aggressive in its

V8 is now more agile than ever. For those who

appearance, the DB11 is a much more elegant

value outright dynamic ability over challenging

and classy GT.

roads, this might just be the car to go for.

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SAVOY RECOMMENDS

WINTER WARMERS London may be frosty, but luckily there are plenty of hot spots for a cup of something tasty to fend off the chills Melba at The Savoy

Located on the Strand, this gourmet coffee and take-away counter is serving up a real treat with its delectable signature hot chocolates throughout the colder months. They are sure to lift the spirits with a wide selection of toppings including crushed macaroons, caramalised nuts, popping candy, and cookie dough. With a truly personalised, not to mention indulgent, drink in your hands, who cares about the weather? The Savoy Hotel, Strand, London

Pennethorne’s at Somerset House

One of the first things that pops into one's head when thinking of winter in London is the skating rink at Somerset House. After carving up the ice in this iconic setting, why not settle down for a warm drink at Pennethorne’s. Named after architect Sir James Pennethorne, and inspired by his journey across Europe in the 19th century, this haunt is a unique locale to enjoy a mulled gin – wine is so last year, after all. Somerset House, London

Covent Garden Grind

Having only opened in early 2016, it is all the more impressive that this coffee shop has established itself as a favourite amongst both locals and visitors. Only a stone’s throw away from the famous markets, this neon gem is an ideal break from all that hectic shopping. With some deliciously spiced mulled wine making a seasonal appearance, this is a must visit for any festive shoppers. 42 Maiden Lane, Covent Garden, London

Nordic Bakery

Another Covent Garden favourite, this diamond of a bakery boasts all the Scandavian charm you would expect. Step out of the cold, and away from the busy streets, for a warm cup of mulled wine or hot chocolate. They are known for their dark rye bread and cinnamon buns, so make sure there’s room for them, too. 55 Neal Street, Seven Dials, Covent Garden, London

SOHO Coffee Co.

Enjoy a hot drink, without the guilt. Proud of their sense of social responsibility, you can drink up one of their coffees safe in the knowledge that it is all Fair Trade. Although, don’t shy away from their festive hot chocolates – the mince pie option is a particular favourite. With two convenient locations along the Strand, a short stroll from The Savoy, there really is no excuse to miss out. 140 Strand, London WC2R 1QA 215 Strand, London WC2R 1AP

HOT CHOCOLATE, MELBA AT THE SAVOY

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Savoy Magazine November17  
Savoy Magazine November17