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Localmotive: The Food Truck with a Plan Dave Nelson Skates For Change

Troy Davis

From Beyond the Fringe to Fringes Salon

oldmarket.com  January/February 2013

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“Forget love. I’d rather fall in chocolate!”

Handmade chocolates for your valentine (or yourself)

Spectacular holiday décor & more More than just Christmas, Tannenbaum celebrates the spirit of every season. Come browse our huge and colorful collection for: • • •

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The souvenir and traveler’s store

Like no other, our gourmet chocolates and fudge are handmade in our kitchen with the finest ingredients. Drop in today for a free sample of fudge!

Small in size but large on variety! Find essentials for travelers, Nebraska-made gifts, Heartland apparel, Husker items and souvenirs. We’ve been called “the hotel gift shop, without the hotel prices.”

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Old Market Downtown • Riverfront

January/February 2013 Editorial Staff

PREMIUM HOMEMADE ICE CREAM For over 25 year’s we’ve been using only the highest quality ingredients in our premium ice cream. Each artisan batch is crafted the old fashioned way with rock salt and ice.

Omaha Publications Editor Linda Persigehl

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The Old Market • 1120 Jackson Street • (402) 341-5827 • tedandwallys.com

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Furniture Architectural Items China Glassware Toys & Dolls Books Huge Selection of Vintage Clothing & Jewelry on our Lower Level





Over 30 Years in the Old Market

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Contributing Writers Leo Adam Biga • Joe Gudenrath Judy Horan • Niz Proskocil

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For Advertising Information: 402.884.2000 www.omahapublications.com Owned and managed by Omaha Magazine, LTD Comments? Send your letter to the editor to: editor@omahapublications.com All versions of The Encounter are published bimonthly by Omaha Magazine, LTD, P.O. Box 461208, Omaha, NE 68046-1208. Telephone: (402) 884-2000; fax (402) 884-2001. No whole or part of the contents herein may be reproduced without prior written permission of Omaha Magazine, excepting individually copyrighted articles and photographs. Unsolicited manuscripts are accepted; however, no responsibility will be assumed for such solicitations.

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contents check out Encounter Magazine online. Using flipbook technology to give you a whole new magazine reading experience.

J.P. COOKE COMPANY

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RUBBER STAMPS PRE-INKED STAMPS INTERIOR SIGNS DESK NAME PLATES NAME BADGES EMBOSSING SEALS

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“OLD MARKET”

1311 HOWARD OMAHA, NE 68102 (402) 342-7175 FAX: 402-342-9426

16 The Encounter: Editor’s Letter....................................................... 6 Downtown Art: Jo Anderson......................................................... 8 Downtown Living: When Less is More........................................ 10 Downtown Story: Localmotive.................................................... 14 Downtown Face: Dave Nelson.................................................... 16 Downtown Feature: DOI Gala..................................................... 19 Entertainment: Myth................................................................... 20 Downtown History: The DoubleTree Building.............................. 22 Cover Story: The Troy Davis Story............................................... 24 Advantage Coupons: Special Advertising Section....................... 27 ODID: The State of Downtown...................................................... 33 Downtown Face: Roger duRand................................................. 34 Downtown Dining: Jazz: A Louisana Kitchen.............................. 36

The Orig inal Old Market Irish Bar Nightly Specials Live Irish Music Weekends Open 12 p.m.

Old Market Map.......................................................................... 39

1205 Harney St.

Merchants & Attractions............................................................ 40

dublinerpubomaha.com

Calendar...................................................................................... 43 readonlinenow.com

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Dear Readers,

P

ICTURE A TALL brunette (or blonde. Or purple-haired. Pink has happened, too) striding up to you, hand outstretched, big grin. “Hi!” I say, “I’m Chris Wolfgang. Hey, have you heard about this awesome new thing downtown?”

That’s the feeling I hope you get every other month when you pick up a new issue of The Encounter, Omaha Publications’ downtown-focused magazine. I’m so excited to introduce myself as its new editor. My friends (who are family to this transplanted Hoosier here in The Big O) regularly ask what I’m working on because they’re nice and know I’m dying to tell them about a great place to drink craft beer downtown (Jazz: A Louisiana Kitchen, pg. 36), or yes, you can get gourmet food after midnight (Localmotive food truck, pg. 14), or Troy Davis, you know, the owner of Fringes Salon at 10th and Howard, well, he’s talking about his triumph over alcoholism and bringing the business to new heights of success (pg. 24). When I’m not rattling on about new shows and restaurants and businesses downtown, you can grab my attention with any mention of Ultimate Frisbee, the British sci-fi TV classic Doctor Who, or anything sautéed in butter. If you see me around downtown, feel free to come up and say hi! That’s what I’m doing here, after all, and it’s only polite.

Chris Wolfgang Editor, The Encounter Magazine

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Old Market Downtown • Riverfront

January/February 2013 Accounts & Operations

• Huge Selection of Loose Leaf Teas • Freshly Brewed Teas • Chai • Free WiFi

Publisher Todd Lemke

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Sales Associate

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DOWNTOWN ART

Jo Anderson:

Representing Fine Art Downtown

story by Niz Proskocil | photo by Bill Sitzmann

It’s very rewarding. It’s just a great life. -Jo Anderson 8

J

O ANDERSON ADORES Midlands art, and she loves showcasing the talent of those who create it. Anderson is founder and owner of Anderson O’Brien Fine Art, an upscale art dealer and gallery that has been a fixture of Countryside Village at 87th and Pacific streets for more than three decades. Two years ago, she opened a second location in Omaha’s Old Market. “I always had my eye on it,” Anderson says of the space at 1108 Jackson St., which housed Jackson Artworks for nearly 18 years. “Wouldn’t it be great to have a gallery downtown and have a broader audience?” When the owners of Jackson Artworks announced they were closing, Anderson stepped in and took over the space in summer 2010. It’s since become one of downtown’s leading galleries. The gallery in the Old Market has a different energy, audience, and atmosphere than the one in Countryside Village, says Anderson. Housed in a former warehouse, the downtown space is sleek and contemporary with white walls, exposed ductwork, concrete floors, and an open, airy feel. It’s also larger, so viewers have more room to get further back from the work and admire each piece fully, whether it’s an oil painting or sculpture.

january/february 2013 | the encounter omahapublications.com


Jo Anderson is proud to consistently offer the solid work of established artists at Anderson O’Brien Fine Art.

1415 Harney Street Telephone: 402.341.7576 www.cityviewdentalomaha.com

Anderson’s gallery represents about 60 artists from Nebraska and surrounding states. Many are professional artists and art educators from area universities and colleges. Anderson says she prefers to represent established artists rather than up-and-coming talent. “We have a consistency of work that is solid,” she says. Keeping the number at a manageable 60 allows Anderson and her staff to give artists the time, attention, and resources they need. She takes great joy from being around art all day. “You’re dealing in beauty,” she says. Anderson’s love of art goes back to childhood. She often accompanied her physician father to Indian reservations, where he treated patients. The visits sparked an interest in ethnographic art. Years later, Anderson opened the Plains Gallery at 78th and West Dodge Road, which she operated for more than a decade before selling it. She then opened a poster gallery/frame shop near 76th and Pacific streets with business partner Sharon O’Brien. They didn’t have enough money to invest in original art, so they sold poster art. In the early 1980s, the duo launched Anderson O’Brien Gallery in Countryside Village. They started out slow by representing a few artists, building clients, and upgrading their art collection. By the early ‘90s, O’Brien had gone on to pursue other ventures, leaving Anderson as sole owner. As gallery owner, she has a variety of responsibilities. She meets with artists to discuss details of current and future exhibits, including determining how many pieces to feature and choosing an image for the event invitation. Other duties include handling bookwork, waiting on customers, and scheduling delivery and pick-up of artwork. The gallery sells artwork to a mix of customers, from businesses to private collectors. It offers shipping, framing, hanging, appraisals, and other services. Anderson also works with interior designers and architects to place art in homes, offices, and other spaces. “Every day is different,” says. “It’s very rewarding. It’s just a great life.” For more on the gallery, its artists and information on upcoming shows, visit www.aobfineart.com.

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New Convenient Downtown Location

Cubby’s Old Market Grocery 601 S. 13th St.

the encounter | january/february 2013

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DOWNTOWN LIVING

This space had the most charm of those I looked at. -Trish Billotte

When Less Is More Downsizing to a condo meant a convenience upgrade.

story by Judy Horan | photos by Bill Sitzmann

10

T

RISH BILLOTTE DOWNSIZED from a large traditional house in Fair Acres to a smaller modern condo in Omaha’s Old Market in 2010. But some people would question whether the move was “downsizing.” The contemporary “smaller” home sprawls over 3,200 square feet. The downtown space was a big, barren area made up of two units when she bought it. She combined the empty shells into one residence. “I loved the brick walls,“ said Billotte. “This space had the most charm of those I looked at.” She found ample room to create a stunning home that features windows with wide views of the heart of the Old

january/february 2013 | the encounter omahapublications.com


A luxury kitchen is ideal for intimate gatherings and expanded holiday events alike with double the appliances: two refrigerators, two ovens, two dishwashers.

Kitchen cabinets are covered in thermofoil, offering the sleek look of a shiny automobile.

Market. Within 10 months, the space was transformed into a model of what an empty concrete box can look like with the help of architect Paul Nelson and interior designer Beth Putnam. Ceilings stretch up 17 feet leading to one pesky inconvenience—changing light bulbs. The man who changes the light bulbs requires a 12-foot ladder and lots of patience. The new condo is the third design project that Putnam has worked on with Billotte. She considered her client’s personality when planning the newest residence. “Trish likes color, and she likes unique things.” Coral is the color that stands out as you face the open kitchen, which has cabinet covers made of thermofoil. “It’s a lacquer look that isn’t lacquer,” said Putnam. “There’s an underlying wood core that incorporates a metal element similar to metallic paint used in the automobile industry.” People dream of owning a kitchen like Billotte’s. Two refrigerators. Two ovens. Two dishwashers. A warming drawer. A microwave hidden behind cabinet doors. readonlinenow.com

Tucked away behind the kitchen is a hallway where items needed for entertaining are stored, including an ice machine and an extra refrigerator that is especially useful during the holidays. The kitchen, living, and dining areas are ideal for entertaining. A long sectional couch and conversation nook of chairs in the living area tempt guests to relax and talk by the fireplace. The dining table can seat six (or 16 cozily). Rooms have unique lighting. Pendant lights in the kitchen focus on the kitchen island. Traditional crystal on a contemporary bar makes an interesting contrast in the guest bath. Mesh-covered lights float over the two suspended-base sinks in the bath adjoining the master bedroom. It’s also what you don’t see that makes the condo unusual. Storage. Lots and lots of storage. “One problem with condos is they normally don’t have storage space. We incorporated as >> the encounter | january/february 2013

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downtown living

From top to bottom: Unique lighting takes pride of place in the dining room, master bedroom, and master bath.

<< much as possible,” said Putnam. When planning storage, Billotte took into consideration her height—or lack of it. China and silverware are stored in lower cabinets. “I’m short. In my older home, I couldn’t reach them,” she said. Black and cream tile adorns the walk-in shower in the master bath. The bedroom’s huge walk-in closet and companion shoe closet adjoin a laundry room. Laundry is placed in baskets on shelves in the walk-in closet. The baskets can be passed through and reached on adjacent shelves in the laundry room. Windows in the guest bedroom in the second-story loft open to the master bedroom to bring natural light into the room. If you fear reptiles, you may want to forget showering in the guest bath. Ceramic tiles on the floor and in the shower appear to be leather-like reptile skin. It’s like bathing with a crocodile. But a very attractive crocodile. Artwork in the home is by local artists, including a painting by artist Steve Joy. A highgloss painting over the sleek gas fireplace in the living area was moved after it started bubbling from the heat. Billotte replaced it with sturdy ceramic pieces by artist Iggy Sumnik, who studied under internationally known artist Jun Kaneko. She has space for her children to visit. Son Chase, 28, is pursuing a doctorate in physical therapy at Emory University in Atlanta. He met his wife in Nicaragua when he served in the Peace Corps. Daughter Taylor, 31, is a technical producer for a New York City ad agency. Billotte now has a five-minute drive to work and is loving it. She is co-owner with her brother, Andy Cockle, of Cockle Legal Briefs. The third-generation business, which produces U.S. Supreme Court briefs, was founded in 1923 by their grandparents, Albert and Eda Cockle, both attorneys.

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ENTERTAINMENT...

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9th to 11th • Dodge to Capitol

The Results Are In!

The Complete Best of Omaha® 2013 list is available in the January/February issue of

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Christi Clark Hair Color

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Lexus of Omaha

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Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium

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the encounter | january/february 2013

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DOWNTOWN STORY Owners David Burr (left) and Patrick Favara (right) dish out another late night in the Old Market.

Localmotive: The Food Truck with a Plan

story by Chris Wolfgang | photos by Bill Sitzmann

We’re a fellow restaurant… [just] in a different facility. -David Burr 14

L

OCALMOTIVE HAS BEEN serving up made-from-scratch sandwiches and sourdough rounders on the corner of 12th and Jackson since March 2012, meanwhile building a loyal clientele. And the local food truck isn’t afraid of a little competition—in fact, they want other food trucks to follow their lead into Downtown Omaha. “We’re not crowding trucks in,” said Patrick Favara, one of Localmotive’s three owners. “There’s totally room for more.” Favara credited their truck’s successful first year in the Old Market to extensive research. “There’s very little here to look at,” he said, adding that food trucks are still a new concept to the Midwest. “And there’s not much in Nebraska’s books yet. If there’s a model to look at, it’s Kogi.” The five-truck fleet in Los Angeles communicates multiple times daily through Twitter, Facebook, and its own well-maintained website so that customers never have to wonder when or where a truck will be out. The Localmotive crew tries to do the same thing. “Communication is essential,” Favara said. “It determines your following.” Even though the truck can be found next to Ted and Wally’s ice cream shop from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. seven nights a week, a schedule is always available on localmotivefoodtruck.com. Localmotive also has an office manager who stays on top of the truck’s Twitter and Facebook accounts. “We make that a priority,” Favara said. “We get back to the people who talk to us.” You mean, it’s more than just Favara and David Burr in the truck and David Scott, sourdough king, in the kitchen?

january/february 2013 | the encounter omahapublications.com


Street Level

The Localmotive truck serves up sourdough rounders and gourmet sandwiches every night at 12th and Jackson.

Boutique

The Old Market’s Only Upscale Couples Store

readonlinenow.com

• Gifts • Shoes • Jewelry • Legwear • Costumes

• Lingerie • Bling Tee’s • Dancewear • Kama Sutra • Bath & Body

• Lubes • Stimulants • Bachelorette Gifts • Stripper Pole Rental • Adult Novelties & Toys • Party & Romance Games • Private Bachelorette Parties

Basement

“You get a staff,” Burr said with emphasis. “You don’t do it all on your own.” Even with a peak staff of 18 employees during the summer, Burr recalled weeks at the beginning of their debut that included 120 hours of work. “Consistently,” he said, laughing. “…for months.” The large staff is necessary, Favara explained, because unlike employees of a brick-and-mortar restaurant, truck workers can’t duck back to the kitchen to help with prep during slow times. “We staff as many people as a brick-and-mortar,” Favara said, “because they can’t do double duty.” Burr added that while the upfront cost of a food truck is lower than opening a storefront, running a mobile restaurant has its own set of challenges with licensing, permissions, and maintenance. “It’s demanding work,” he said, “and not cheap. We’re a fellow restaurant…[just] in a different facility.” After hitting many of their first-year goals (i.e. be a staple of late-night downtown; serve at the Farmers Market; be a source of good food for restaurant staff coming off the clock late), Burr, Favara, and Scott are focusing on their second year. Their 2013 goals include expanding their garden (even with the tough 2012 summer, they still used most of the produce they planted), have a regular beef supplier (“You’d think it would be easy to find local beef in Nebraska,” Burr said), and be more available to the young entrepreneurs of Omaha. “We love that crowd,” Favara said. The truck supplied a meal last May to attendees of Big Omaha, a convention produced by Silicon Prairie News. And years down the road? They’ve thought of a quick-service restaurant, just a little kitchen with a walk-up window. More trucks one day, like Kogi, and maybe a trailer for festivals. “We’re not limiting ourselves,” Favara said with a smile. “We’re not the first food truck in Omaha, but I think we’re setting the standard.”

512 S. 13th St. • Open Mon - Sat

402.991.2869 • www.BasicTease.com the encounter | january/february 2013

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DOWNTOWN FACE

Secret Penguinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dave Nelson Skates For Change story by Chris Wolfgang | photos by Bill Sitzmann

The kids needed a place that was genuine and safe. -Dave Nelson

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S

EVEN YEARS OF touring full-time as a sponsored skateboarder leaves you with A) a lot of skateboarding product from your sponsors and B) a definite magnetism for skater kids looking to channel their energy. “Skateboarders have an addictive personality,” confessed Dave Nelson, a former skateboarder for Untitled Skateboards and the owner of Downtown Omaha brand strategy and design firm Secret Penguin. “That’s all they think about…skating. They’re consuming, passionate people.” So when fellow skateboarder Mike Smith asked if he’d like to be on the board of a new nonprofit called Skate For Change, “I was like, yes, instantly. Completely excited about it.” In his TEDxOmaha presentation last October, Smith explained that a closing skate park had offered him its ramps while he was working with homeless teenagers in Lincoln (TEDxOmaha is a local conference inspired by world-renowned TED events, dedicated to spreading world-changing ideas). Taking the opportunity and running with it, Smith started Bay 198, an indoor skate park in a Lincoln mall. “It answered a missing point,” Nelson said. “The kids needed a place that was genuine and safe.” In the meantime, Smith had been skating through Lincoln on his lunch break, handing out socks and bottled water to the downtown homeless. Friends started joining him, then kids, then energy-drink maker Red Bull even stepped in with a launch party for the park and effort. “I’m just watching all of these skate kids pour their lives and their hearts and their souls >> readonlinenow.com

the encounter | january/february 2013

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<< into helping people,” Smith said at TEDxOmaha. “Feeding people.” Secret Penguin handled the branding of the new incarnation of the skate park (now simply called The Bay) at 20th and Y streets in Lincoln. The Bay’s new park is made out of cement and bricks, “so it would feel more like the street,” Nelson explained. Most indoor skate parks are made of wood. An indoor skate park for Omaha similar to Lincoln’s The Bay isn’t far from Nelson’s thoughts, but for now his typical haunt is Robert’s Skate Park at 78th and Cass streets. He’s there about three times a week, meeting new people and trying new tricks. “A few months ago,” he recalled, “I ran into this kid that I’d met at Roberts maybe 10 years ago.” The young man told Nelson that on that day, his parents were gone on yet another bender. His friends knew no one was home, so they broke into his house and stole all his stuff. The boy decided he was going to kill himself but first, one last skate at Roberts Park. He met Nelson there, who gave him one of the boards from his sponsors and talked with him. “He said when I gave him that board and took time to talk and skate with him, it made him realize that there are good people out there that do care about others,” Nelson remembered. “He said that was the first time he can remember feeling like someone cared. And that skateboard was a representation of hope to him throughout the years.” On Saturdays, Nelson meets interested skaters at either the Mastercraft building, 13th & Nicholas, or in front of The Slowdown for Omaha’s own version of Skate For Change. “We’ll go hand the stuff out to whomever,” he said, referring to the donations of bottled water or socks received at the Secret Penguin office or purchased with donations forwarded from Smith. “Kids just get behind something like this.” “We don’t need money,” he said, “just supplies.” Anyone wanting to donate water, socks, canned tuna, or hygiene kits can drop them off at the Secret Penguin office in the Mastercraft building.

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FEATURE (l-r): Hal and Mary Daub, and Mike Kelley, Carol Schrader, and Terry Moore were among the attendees at the 2011 DOI Gala.

DOI Gala Honors Those Committed to Bettering Downtown Omaha story by Linda Persigehl | photos provided by Downtown Omaha Inc.

S

INCE THE FOUNDING of Downtown Omaha Inc. in 1967 as a nonprofit, privately funded corporation, the DOI has followed its mission statement “to inform, promote, and unite the downtown community.” Its ultimate goal: creating a world-class place for living, working, leisure, and the arts. Its board is composed primarily of presidents and CEOs from downtown businesses, though everyone in the downtown area—from merchants to workers to residents—is encouraged to become involved in activities that make Downtown Omaha a better place. The Holiday Lights Festival, the Heartland Walk for Warmth, and the new Wayfinding project are just a few of the efforts supported by DOI that have created economic opportunities for area businesses, supported local charities, and spawned new traditions for countless Omahans. Beginning in 1997, Downtown Omaha Inc. has recognized individuals, associations, and corporations in different categories for contributing to the growth of Downtown Omaha at its biannual Gala event. A list of past DOI Outstanding Achievement Winners reads like a Who’s Who of Omaha: Holland Performing Arts Center, Midtown Crossing, Hal Daub, River City Rodeo, and Joslyn Sculpture Garden, to name a few. The DOI will recognize 2013 honorees at its Gala event held at the Downtown DoubleTree Hotel on January 26th. Winners include: Architectural Planning - Don Prochaska of Old Market Place; Economic Development - America First Real Estate Group, DICON General Contractors, and Holland Basham Architects for the L14 Flats; Cultural Arts & Entertainment Omaha Children’s Museum; Spirit of Community - Paula Steenson of Paula Presents!; Visionary Pioneer - Frank McGree of Goodwill; Special Events/Festivals - Bobby Mancuso for Taste of Omaha; and Adaptive Reuse/Restoration - Scottish Rite. Award recipient Paula Steenson, owner of Paula Presents!, an event planning and graphic/web design firm based in Omaha, is an active member of the DOI, serving as vice president of the group and coordinator of this year’s Gala. She’s also reaped big rewards from being involved with the organization. “DOI has been a huge part of my professional life the last 15 years,” she said. “It’s given me the opportunity to meet and work with many of the people and businesses downtown and to grow my business.” Aggie DeRozza serves as secretary on DOI’s Board and also has great things to say about her involvement: “I’ve been with Bass & Associates for the last 18 years and our company has been a member of DOI during the entire time. DOI is instrumental in bringing quality programs and networking to its members monthly. It is a wonderful networking opportunity for companies and you find that you are conducting business with many of the people you meet there.”   The theme for this year’s Gala is “Back to the ’50s,” and will feature ’50s music, a silent auction, a menu reminiscent of the ’50s, and Omaha Publications’ own Gil Cohen as emcee. A ’50s era costume contest will also be held with mystery judges. Proceeds from the event will support
Downtown Omaha Inc.’s future endeavors to help downtown businesses and organizations grow. Speaking of the DOI Gala, DeRozza said, “It promises to be a fun event!” The DOI Gala 2013 will take place at the DoubleTree Hotel, 1616 Dodge St., at 5:30 p.m. For more information about becoming an event sponsor, Gala activities, or the organization, visit www.downtownomahainc.org or call 402-341-3700. Tickets are $75 each. RSVP no later than Jan. 22. readonlinenow.com

the encounter | january/february 2013

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ENTERTAINMENT

Owner Brian Murzyn is a familiar sight behind the bar, chatting with guests and pouring crafted cocktails.

Good Drinks, Good Music, Good People

Join the Regulars at Myth

story by Chris Wolfgang | photos by Bill Sitzmann

“W

We like to have a calm feel. -Joanna Murzyn, co-owner 20

E KEEP IT mellow but fun,” said Joanna Murzyn, one of the owners of Myth, a martini bar in the Old Market at 11th and Howard streets. “We like to have a calm feel. Nothing dancey or headbanging.” Guests sit back on chocolate-leather couches and converse over craft cocktails while acoustic or jazz sets play in the lounge’s front window every Thursday night. The club sends out events news and promotions to anyone who texts “Myth” to 402.965.0230, or guests can check Myth’s Facebook page to find out who’s playing next. If it’s the first Thursday of the month, you’ll find local musician Chris Saub with his guitar, a microphone, and folk rock sung with slight gravel. “It’s a sort of relaxed kind of rock,” said regular John Lewenthal. “He plays his own music, but occasionally he’ll mix in a cover.” Myth is a rewarding place to be a regular. “We have a great crowd here,” Murzyn said. “You really develop relationships over the years.” Regulars know they’ll have a place to escape the downtown crazy on New Year’s Eve, and a

january/february 2013 | the encounter omahapublications.com


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special rum stays behind the bar for the only patron who drinks it. “Only one customer wants it, and we get it for him,” she said. Murzyn credits her husband and co-owner, Brian, with a talent for bringing guests back for more. She recounted the story of someone freshly moved to Omaha who walked into Myth one night. “He said he knew he had to force himself to get out and meet people,” Murzyn recalled, “and there was Brian behind the bar. He’s been a regular for a couple years now.” Regulars and newcomers alike should feel free to ask the versatile bartenders to make them something off-menu if none of the Myth suggestions sound quite right. “They love that,” Murzyn said. She estimated that roughly 80 percent of the cocktails served over the stained concrete bar are unique to the lounge. The Mystique, for example, has been a favorite since Myth opened in May 2007. The sweet pink drink is comprised of X-Rated Fusion Liqueur, mango rum, and pineapple. “They have a really good feel for various drinks,” Lewenthal said. “They have such a large repertoire of things they’re able to put together, even for somebody that may not know they enjoy drinks like that.” The average cost of a Myth cocktail is $9, though there’s wine and beer (bottled and draft) for those with simpler tastes. A couple menus from next-door restaurants are kept under the bar in case patrons need a pizza from Zio’s or an appetizer from Stokes to go with their cocktails. There is one TV behind the bar, positively small in comparison to what you’d find at a sports bar, for taking a break in conversation to check a score. readonlinenow.com

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the encounter | january/february 2013

21


DOWNTOWN HISTORY

The DoubleTree Building:

The hotel that changed the landscape of Downtown Omaha has seen businesses come and go.

A Look Back at 40 Years

story by Judy Horan | photos by Bill SItzmann

B

LUEPRINTS WERE IN the planning stage in the mid-1960s when Hilton Hotel developers told city leaders they wanted to build a new hotel in downtown Omaha. Their target site was between 15th and 17th streets near the Omaha Civic Auditorium. They needed two blocks of downtown land owned by First National Bank to build what would be Nebraska’s largest hotel, Hilton developers said. What’s more they wanted to build smack in the middle of 16th Street. This brought gasps of dismay. “At the time, 16th Street was the main conduit to North Omaha,” said Mike Kosalka, director of operations for the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel that now occupies the space. “Many people were upset the street was closed and said that this would cut North Omaha off from the downtown area.” In 1968, when workers showed up to begin work on the new Hilton Hotel, the downtown area had lost a number of its old buildings as city leaders prepared for urban development. The Omaha Auditorium, where 19th century actress Sarah Bernhardt performed and Caruso sang, was torn down in 1963. The older auditorium had been replaced in 1954 by the Omaha Civic Auditorium, which now, itself ,faces closing. The Fontenelle Hotel, a social center for Omaha when built in 1914, was razed in 1983. It had closed in 1971. The elegant old Omaha post office at 16th and Dodge streets was razed in 1966.

22

Preservationists protested but couldn’t rescue the red sandstone post office. “The western half of the hotel development was built on the site of that old post office,” said Bill Gonzalez, photo archivist associate at the Durham Museum. The 414-room Hilton Hotel opened in 1970. It became the Red Lion in 1980. Today, the hotel is the DoubleTree by Hilton. The hotel’s exterior looks as it did the day of the 1970 ribbon-cutting. But an all-new hotel is inside thanks to a $20 million renovation, said General Manager Stephan Meier. In October, the renovated DoubleTree held a gala event with Omaha’s mayor Jim Suttle and other dignitaries on hand for a ribbon-cutting. “We reintroduced the grande dame to the city,” said Meier. “Every room, every public space was modernized.”

january/february 2013 | the encounter omahapublications.com


General Manager Stephan Meier shows off the hotel after a recent $20-million renovation.

Then and Now Since 1970 Over the years, considerable changes have taken place inside what is now Nebraska’s second-largest hotel. In 1970, doors were opened with a key. A card with a magnetic stripe was introduced in 1980. An RFID, a scanner code, became the way to open doors in 2012. “We’re the first in Omaha to have this new technology,” said Meier. Then there was hardwiring. “Hardwire is now less safe. Wireless is the way to go,” Meier said. “Guests have laptops, iPhones, iPads, and other electronic gear. We tripled outlets.” Previously, rooms had clunky televisions with few channels. Now they have flat-screen TVs with 150 channels. Then there was a rooftop restaurant with a revolving barroom floor—the Beef Baron in the 1970s, replaced by Maxine’s in the 1980s. Today the 19th floor is an executive meeting center. “There’s more need now for company meetings,” said Meier. Dining is now on the first floor. “Once brunch was ‘owned’ by the hotels. Now every little café has a brunch.” Gluten-free? Low fat? Chefs in the 1970s rarely prepared special foods. Now guests demand them. “People then didn’t worry about cholesterol,” said Meier. “Today, my son worries about his cholesterol. And he’s 7 years old.” The new emphasis on health is also served by the hotel’s high-tech fitness center and swimming pool. Then people didn’t know what “carbon footprint” meant. Today going green is part of the hotel’s business plan. What happens to the shampoo and soap that are half-used when guests leave? “We work with an organization called ‘Clean the World’ that collects all our discarded soap bars and shampoo bottles for a fee. They are recycled to create hygiene kits that are provided to third-world countries and organizations helping underprivileged children,” said Meier. “Our green-team committee looks for ways to reduce our carbon footprint. We recycle all trash. We bought 100 percent-recyclable cups. And we just banned Styrofoam, which sits in the landfills for hundreds of years.” readonlinenow.com

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the encounter | january/february 2013

23


COVER STORY The Troy Davis Story: From Beyond the Fringe to Fringes Salon story by Leo Adam Biga | photos by Bill Sitzmann

24

january/february 2013 | the encounter omahapublications.com


On a typical day at Fringes, Davis is chatting and laughing with his loyal clients.

L

EADING OMAHA HAIRDRESSER Troy Davis long ago showed an educational and entrepreneurial knack for his craft and for building the Edgeworthy brand at Fringes Salon & Spa in the Old Market. Now that his mentor and longtime business partner, Fringes founder Carol Cole, has sold her interest in the location, he has a new partner and a new focus on managing costs. The result is record profitability. “Fringes of the Old Market is the busiest and healthiest it’s ever been,” says Davis, who’s made Fringes an Omaha Fashion Week fixture. “Troy and Fringes have been a very important part of Omaha Fashion Week, as they style many of our veteran designers and constantly impress with their ability to interpret the latest hair and makeup trends on our runway,” says OFW producer Brook Hudson. Davis is glad to share in the success. He’s lately seen members of the Fringes team represent well in a recent competition and awards show. Never content to stay put, his Clear Salon Services business is a new generation, grassroots distributorship for independent hair-care brands. These professional triumphs have been happening as Davis addresses personal problems that “came to a head” last August readonlinenow.com

but that have their roots in the past. Growing up in Blair, Neb., he began drinking and using drugs to mask the sexual identity issues he confronted as a gay teen in an environment devoid of alternative lifestyles. “I felt so completely isolated. I lived in fear so badly that I hid it with drinking and weed,” he says. A healthier form of self-expression he excelled in, speech and drama, seemed a likely direction to pursue out of high school. But first he moved to Omaha to experience the diversity he craved back home. He briefly attended Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln, even landing the lead in the school’s fall production, before dropping out to attend beauty school in Omaha. From their first meeting, Davis and Cole knew they’d found a new best friend they could grow in their chosen field alongside. She says she immediately responded to his “passion and energy and drive,” adding, “Troy Davis has >>

I felt so completely isolated. I lived in fear so badly that I hid it with drinking and weed. -Troy Davis

the encounter | january/february 2013

25


cover story

I’ve always been a very honest and open person. -Troy Davis

<< definitely made me a better person and stylist and leader.” Within four years, he’d proven to be such a trusted asset that Cole partnered with him in opening the Old Market shop. “He earned that,” she says. “He just really wanted to be downtown. His heart was there. I finally said, ‘Look, if you want to be a partner, I’ll do it, but you’re going to have to step it up and find a location.’ And he did. I have to give him a lot of credit because he put a lot of grunt work into it to get it started.” The rest is history, as Fringes became a presence in the Old Market for its ultracontemporary, urban styles and high-end hair care and beauty services. Cole let him run things there so she could concentrate on Fringes’ West Dodge site. For Davis, Cole’s been more than just a business partner. “Carol and I are so close. We just absolutely click,” he says. “She’s a very intelligent, very professional business woman. There’s not a lot of partnerships that make it. In a lot of ways, our relationship is like a marriage, only platonic. I think it’s healthier or better than most marriages I know of. We are able to communicate in a way that most people are not. We can say anything to each other and even if it’s something that ends up hurting each other, we know that’s not our intention. Usually, it’s one of us misunderstanding something, and we’re always able to go back and clean it up.”

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january/february 2013 | the encounter

Davis has moved fast within the industry. While still in his 20s, he became one of 10 international creative team members for Rusk, a role that saw him flown all over the world to teach other hairdressers the use of the international distributor’s haircare products. He worked in the Omaha salon during the week and jetted around on weekends. It gave him the stage, the lights, the theatrics he felt called to. It also meant lots of money and partying. All the while, his addictions progressed. He was prepping for the always-stressful Omaha Fashion Week last summer when he and his life partner split for good. Amidst the breakup, the all-nighters, running his businesses, and leading an online advocacy campaign for a Fringes team that showed well in the national Battle of the Strands competition, Davis crashed. “By the time I hit bottom, I was drinking every day and drinking to black out three days a week and, you know, it just had to end. I finally realized I am an alcoholic. It was a real wake-up call.” He’s now actively working a 12-step program. “It’s definitely helped me get sober. I definitely thank my Higher Power for the strength I’ve had to get where I am today.” He’s not shy sharing his ups and downs. “I’ve always been a very honest and open person. I’ve actually shared publicly via Facebook some of my bottoms and what I’ve learned in my treatment. In order to achieve something you need support in your life, and there is a connection through Facebook with family and friends that I think is very useful. I see it as an opportunity to share with them what I’m going through and the choices I’m making for myself.” He calls his 12-step group “a new addition to my family,” adding, “They’re great people.” Like many addicts, he’s replaced his former addictions for a couple new, blessedly benign ones— Twitter and tattoos. As his recovery’s progressed, he’s grown in other ways, too, including taking charge of his Fringes store’s finances. “It’s absolutely the best thing that could have happened for this business. It’s given me a whole new level of accountability. I see things more clearly and because of that, we’ve broken through a plateau we were never able to get past.” He credits new business partner Sarah Pithan, a former assistant, for helping increase business by more than $4,000 a week. He also credits the “amazing team” he and Pithan have cultivated, including Omar Rodriguez, Kristina Lee, and Teresa Chaffin, for taking Fringes and Clear Salon Services to new levels. Visit www.fringessalon.com. Read more of Leo Adam Biga’s work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com. omahapublications.com


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Construction is underway at the historic Barker Building at 15th & Farnam.

The State of Downtown

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With 2012 in the rearview mirror and a strong 2013 ahead of us, we thought we’d bring to you the State of Downtown Omaha! Downtown Omaha is thriving. Major development and redevelopment projects are changing the landscape of the area. Projects such as the Hyatt Hotel, the Barker Building, the Marriott Hotel, the Highline, and the Gavilon headquarters building will bring people, jobs, housing, and businesses to the downtown. Small businesses continue to emerge. Le Wonderment and The Tea Smith have established themselves within the traditional small business center of the Old Market, while Café 100, The Tap House, Block 16, and McLovin—A Store for Men dot the downtown cityscape. The coming year will bring additional changes and isn’t without challenges. Opportunities to improve the public parking system, vehicular and pedestrian wayfinding, the Leahy Mall, and 16th Street are within reach. However, we must also remain vigilant in our efforts to tackle the challenges that exist on 16th Street, in the lack of short-distance transit options, and the periodic safety issues. This is a time in our city’s history when we should be proud of our downtown, its ongoing growth, and the bright future that lies ahead. Happy New Year! This column is part of a series detailing the activities and efforts of the Omaha Downtown Improvement District (DID) to further strengthen Downtown Omaha. Joe Gudenrath Executive Director Omaha Downtown Improvement District the encounter | january/february 2013

33


DOWNTOWN FACE

I had in mind kind of an arts neighborhood with lots of galleries and artist lofts. -Roger duRand

Old Market Pioneer Roger duRand

O

story by Leo Adam Biga | photos by Bill Sitzmann

MAHA DESIGNER ROGER duRand didn’t invent the Old Market, but he played a key role shaping the former wholesale produce and jobbing center into a lively arts-culture district. His imprint on this historic urban residential-commercial environment is everywhere. He’s designed everything from Old Market business logos to chic condos over the French Café and Vivace to shop interiors. He’s served as an “aesthetic consultant” to property and business owners. He’s been a business owner there himself. He once directed the Gallery at the Market. For decades, he made his home and office in the Old Market. The Omaha native goes back to the very start when the Old Market lacked a name and identity. It consisted of old, abandoned warehouses full of broken windows and pigeon and bat droppings. City leaders saw no future for the buildings and planned to tear them down. Only a few visionaries like duRand saw their potential. He had apprenticed under his engineer-architect father, the late William Durand (Roger amended the family name years ago), a Renaissance Man who also designed and flew experimental aircraft. The son had resettled in Omaha after cross-country road trips to connect with the burgeoning counter-culture movement, working odd jobs to support himself, from fry cook to folk singer to sign painter to construction worker. He even shot pool for money. He and a business partner, Wade Wright, ran the head shop The Farthest Outpost in midtown. A friend, Percy Roche, who had a British import store nearby, told them about the Old Market buildings owned by the Mercer family. Nicholas Bonham Carter, a nephew of Mercer family patriarch Samuel Mercer, led a tour. “We trudged through all the empty buildings and I was really charmed by how coherent the neighborhood was,” says duRand. “It was really intact. The buildings all had a relationship with each other. They were all of the same

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general age. They were all designed in a very unselfconsciously commercial style. “They were such an asset.” Remnants and rituals of the once-bustling marketplace remained. “When I first came down here, the space where M’s Pub is now was Subby Sortino’s potato warehouse and there were potatoes to the ceiling,” recalls duRand. “Across the street was his brother, John Sortino, an onion broker. There were produce brokerage offices in some of the upper floors. There were a couple cafes that catered to the truck drivers and railroad guys. There was a lot of jobbing with suppliers of all kinds of mechanical stuff—heating and cooling, plumbing and industrial supplies. The railroad cars would go up and down the alleys at night for freight to be loaded and unloaded. “A really interesting urban environment.” He thought this gritty, rich-in-character built domain could be transformed into Omaha’s Greenwich Village. “I had in mind kind of an arts neighborhood with lots of galleries and artist lofts.” That eventually happened, thanks to Ree (Schonlau) Kaneko and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. duRand and Wright’s head shop at 1106 Jackson St. was joined by more entrepreneurs and artists doing their thing. The early Market scene became an underground haven. “In 1968, it was really artsy, edgy, political, kind of druggy,” says duRand. Experimental art, film, theatre, and alternative newspapers flourished there. City officials looked with suspicion on the young, long-haired vendors and customers. “We had all kinds of trouble with building inspectors,” who he said resisted attempts to repurpose the structures. “The idea of a hippie neighborhood really troubled a lot of people. This was going to be the end of civilization as they knew it if they allowed hippies to get a foothold. It was quite a struggle the first few years. We really had a lot of obstacles thrown in our path, but we persevered. It succeeded in spite of the obstructionists. “And then it became more fashionable with the little clothing stores, bars, and gift shops. Adventuresome, young professionals would come down to have cocktails and to shop.” The French Café helped establish the Old Market as viable and respectable. The social experiment of the Old Market thrived, he says, “because it was genuine, it wasn’t really contrived, it evolved authentically,” which jives with his philosophy of “authentic design” that’s unobtrusive and rooted in the personality of the client or space. “Sometimes, the best thing to do is nothing at all. The main criterion wasn’t profit…It was for interesting things to happen. We made it very easy for interesting people to get a foothold here.” Having a hand in its transformation, he says, “was interesting, exciting, even exhilarating because it was all new and it was a creative process. The whole venture was kind of an artwork really. I do have a sense of accomplishment in making something out of nothing. That was really the fun part.” He fears as the Market has become gentrified—“really almost beyond recognition”—it’s lost some of its edge, though he concedes it remains a hipster hub. “I’m a little awed by the juggernaut it’s become. It’s taken on a much bigger life than I imagined it would. I never imagined I would be designing million-dollar condos in the Old Market or that a Hyatt hotel would go in.” duRand and his wife, Jody, don’t live in the Market anymore, but he still does work for clients there and it’s where he still prefers hanging out. Besides, all pathways seem to take this Old Market pioneer back to where it all began anyway. Learn about his authentic design at www.rogerdurand.com. Read more of Leo Adam Biga’s work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com. readonlinenow.com

Due in part to his own designs, duRand has watched the Old Market go from abandoned warehouses to cutting-edge hippie haven to juggernaut hipster hub.

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35


DOWNTOWN DINING

General manager Jordan Jackson wants Omahans to know Downtown Omaha is more than the Old Market.

You want it spicy? I’ll add more cayenne. -Justino Gomez, head chef 36

Jazz: A Louisiana Kitchen Bringing a Cajun Taste to Omaha

story by Chris Wolfgang | photos by Bill Sitzmann and provided by Jazz: A Louisiana Kitchen

W

ALK THROUGH THE wrought-iron gates of Jazz: A Louisiana Kitchen, and the beads and feathers tell you you’re no longer on 15th and Farnam. You’re on Bourbon Street. “I’ve had more offers than I can count for that,” said Jordan Jackson, nodding at a huge white show cape

pinned to a wall. “Shangri La” it reads, letting diners know this is the place to laissez les bon temps rouler. Jackson has been letting the good times roll as the general manager of Omaha’s Jazz for two

january/february 2013 | the encounter omahapublications.com


(Top) The cape is one of many decorations found at Louisiana swap meets by Jazz owners. (Right) Food and drink are reevaluated about once a year after an annual trip to Louisiana.

years. “We have a full-on Cajun menu,” he said. “Like ètouffèe, it’s just not something you find much outside Louisiana.” The original Jazz in Lubbock, Texas, (and consequently all five other Jazzes scattered across the nation’s middle) was heavily inspired by celebrity chef Paul Prudhomme. The Louisiana native popularized Cajun cooking with his restaurant, cookbooks, and TV shows. Omahans can enjoy his time-honored flavors as prepared by head chef and co-owner Justino Gomez, who’s cooked for Jazz for 20 years. “I love the Cajun food,” Gomez said. “It’s healthy and it’s just good, you know?” How does the food compare to what you’ll find in The Big Easy? “This is a little more Midwestern,” Jackson admitted. “Cajun food is spicy, and that’s not what everyone up here is looking for.” Those looking for authentic heat need not sweat the Midwestern standard. Each dish is made to order down to the sauce. “You want it mild? I’ll just put in the garlic and chives,” Gomez said. “You want it spicy? I’ll add more cayenne.” Night owls know that finding decent food downtown can be a chore with most kitchens closing at 10 p.m. The Jazz’s full menu is available until two hours before closing (which is 1 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and midnight the rest of the week), but Jackson swears by the late-night menu. Basically the only part of the regular menu not included is anything using the sauté station, like pastas, house specialties, and the (of course) sauté menu. “You can still get a good meal late,” Jackson said. Get the crab cakes a la mer. The best appetizer, in his opinion. If you’re the type that insists on unique drinks to go with your unique food, Jackson makes sure local craft beer is in good supply. “Whoever’s got the better beer menu, that’s where I’m going >>

readonlinenow.com

the encounter | january/february 2013

37


Providing Quality Menswear & accessories

downtown dining

1010 S. 10th Street 402.915.4002 www.mclovinstore.com

Bands play jazz music on the weekends from an overhead stage.

<< for dinner,” he said. Usually all but two of the restaurant’s 12 taps are craft brews like Keg Creek, Chefs in Black, Blue Blood, and of course, Lucky Bucket. What is dinner without a little music? Jazz brings in local musicians to complete the ambience every Thursday through Saturday. “It’s mostly jazz and the blues,” Jackson said, “but we do have one Dixieland band.” The Street Railway Company performs every third Friday of the month. Bands play on a stage overlooking the dining area from 7 to 11 p.m. Diners looking for a mellower evening should come on Thursdays, when the music only lasts until 10 p.m. “Downtown’s becoming more than just the Old Market,” Jackson said. “If someone’s going to a show at the Orpheum, I want them to just know, oh yeah, the Jazz’s right around the corner.”

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S. 11th St S. 11th St

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Building, 1914-1915

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1892-1893 H9   Omaha Fire House, 1903-1904 H10  Windsor Hotel, 1885-1887 H11  Omaha Bemis Bag Company, 1887-1902 H12  Anheuser-Busch Beer Depot, 1887 H13  Union Pacific Passenger Terminal, 1931

H8   Morse Coe Building,

H7   Hotel Howard, 1909

1886-1887

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1879

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Building, 1880

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NORTH/SOUTH NUMBERS 10-19 (NUMBERS 1-9 ON PAGE 42)

39


Merchants Attractions OLD MARKET / DOWNTOWN / RIVERFRONT

ANTIQUES

Antique Annex...F16............................ 402.932.3229 Fairmont Antique Mall...E17.................402.345.9746 Flying Worm Vintage...E16...................402.594.7061 The Imaginarium...D16.........................402.594.7061 Joe’s Collectibles...F16......................... 402.612.1543 J & S Antiques...D16........................... 402.306.6231 Second Chance Antiques...F16........... 402.346.4930

ART

Anderson O’Brien Fine Art...F16...........402.884.0911 Artists’ Cooperative Gallery...G15..........402.342.9617 Bemis Ctr. for Contemporary Arts...E18.402.341.7130 FAME....................................................402.341-3930 Farrah Grant Photography...G16...........402.312.8262 Gallery 616...F17...................................402.214.3061 Garden Of The Zodiac...G15.................. 402.341.1877 Hot Shops Art Center...D2....................402.342.6452 Images of Nature Gallery...G14............. 402.341.8460 KANEKO...F17...................................... 402.341.3800 Love’s Jazz & Arts Center...(24th & Lake)..................... 402.502.5291 Old Market Artists Gallery...G15...........402.346.6569 Omaha ClayWorks...F17......................402.346.0560 Passageway Gallery...G15..................... 402.341.1910 Sirens at the Loft...F16.........................402.933.9333 White Crane Gallery...G15.....................402.345.1066

ATTRACTIONS & ENTERTAINMENT

621 Pacific St, Omaha • 402-345-3438

1101 HARNEY STREET in the OLD MARKET

LATE NIGHT FOOD SUN-THU: FULL MENU ‘TIL 10PM LATE NIGHT TIL MIDNIGHT FRI-SAT: FULL MENU TIL 11PM LATE NIGHT TIL 1:30AM OUR HAtPhPeYRHOCK

@

MON-THU: 3PM-6PM + 9PM-CLOSE FRI: 3PM-6PM + 10PM-CLOSE SAT 10PM-CLOSE www.facebook.com/rockbottomomaha

Serious about our Food. Crazy about our Beer. 40

january/february 2013 | the encounter

Blue Barn Theatre...F17.......................402.345.1576 Brigit Saint Brigit Theatre...F17............402.502.4910 CenturyLink Center Omaha...H7.......... 402.341.1500 The Durham Museum...H19.................402.444.5071 Film Streams...D4................................ 402.933.0259 Henry Doorly Zoo...(3701 S. 10th St.).402.733.8401 Holland Performing Arts Center...E12.402.345.0606 Joslyn Art Museum...(2200 Dodge St.)......................... 402.342.3300 KANEKO...F17......................................402.341.3800 Lauritzen Gardens...(100 Bancroft St.).402.346.4002 Love’s Jazz & Arts Center...(24th & Lake)...................... 402.502.5291 MJ Carriage Service...(11th & Howard).402.453.6745 Ollie the Trolley......................................402.597.3596 Omaha Children’s Museum...(500 S. 20th St.)............. 402.342.6164 Omaha Symphony...A16...................... 402.342.3560 Opera Omaha...(1850 Farnam St.)......402.346.7372 Orpheum Theater...B15....................... 402.345.0606 The Rose Theater...(2001 Farnam St.).402.345.4849 TD Ameritrade Park Omaha...E3..........402.546.1800 Ticket Omaha...(www.ticketomaha.org)........................ 402.345.0606

BARS, LOUNGES & PUBS

Bar 415...E15.......................................402.346.7455 BarryO’s...G15......................................402.341.8032 Billy Frogg’s Grill & Bar...F15................402.341.4427 Blue Sushi Sake Grill...E15.................. 402.408.5566 Capitol Lounge & Supper Club...G11... 402.934.5999 Denim & Diamonds...F14.....................402.504.4901 DJ’s Dugout Sports Bar/Blazin’ Pianos...G11................ 402.763.9974 The Dubliner Pub...E15........................ 402.342.5887 Eat the Worm...E16..............................402.614.4240 Embassy Suites Old Market...H16....... 402.346.9000 Farrell’s Bar & 9th St. Deli...H11...........402.884.8818 Havana Garage Cigar Bar...G15............402.614.3800 House of Loom...(1012 S. 10th St.).... 402.505.5494 J.D.Tucker’s...G15................................402.934.5190 Jackson St.Tavern...F14.......................402.991.5637 Julio’s Old Market...D16...................... 402.345.6921 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...G16........ 402.344.8627 M’s Pub...F15...................................... 402.342.2550 Mr.Toad’s...G15................................... 402.345.4488 Myth Lounge...F16.............................. 402.884.6985 Nosh Wine Lounge...G11...................... 402.614.2121 O Dining & Lounge...G14......................402.502.7888

O’Connor’s Irish Pub...E16...................402.934.9790 Old Chicago...F15..................................402.341.1616 Old Market Tavern...G16....................... 402.341.0191 Old Mattress Factory Bar & Grill...E6....402.346.9116 Rock Bottom Brewery...F15.................402.614.9333 Roja Old Market...E14...........................402.346.9190 Sake Bombers @ Blue...E15............... 402.408.5566 The Stadium Club Sports Bar & Grill...G15..................... 402.359.1290 The Slowdown...D4..............................402.345.7569 Stiles Pub...E15....................................402.991.9911 Stokes Bar & Grill...F15....................... 402.408.9000 T Henery’s Pub...F14........................... 402.345.3651 Twisted Fork Grill & Bar...G15.............. 402.932.9600 The Underground...G16........................402.341.3547 Union Pizzeria & Sports Bar...C2........ 402.932.2929 Upstream Brewing Company...F16..... 402.344.0200 Urban Wine Company...G18................ 402.934.0005 Waters Edge Lounge @ Embassy Suites...H16............. 402.346.9000 The Zin Room...B14..............................402.991.0660

Rock Bottom Brewery...F15..................402.614.9333 Roja Old Market...E14........................... 402.346.9190 Shuck’s Fish House...(19th & Leavenworth)................. 402.614.5544 Spaghetti Works...F16.......................... 402.422.0770 Spencer’s @ Hilton Garden Inn...G12...402.280.8888 The Stadium Club Sports Bar & Grill...G15.................... 402.359.1290 Stokes Bar & Grill…F15.......................402.408.9000 Subway...E15.. 402.341.8814 Sullivan’s Steakhouse...B13................. 402.342.0077 Trini’s Mexican Restaurant...G15..........402.346.8400 Twisted Fork Grill & Bar...G15...............402.932.9600 Union Pizzeria & Sports Bar...C2......... 402.932.2929 Upstream Brewing Company...F16......402.344.0200 V.Mertz...G15.......................................402.345.8980 Vincenzo’s Ristorante...E15...................402.342.4010 Vivace...F15..........................................402.342.2050 Wheatfields Express...F15.....................402.991.0917 The Zin Room...B14.............................. 402.991.0660 Zio’s Pizzeria...F16................................402.344.2222

BOOKSTORES

FLOWERS

Jackson St. Booksellers...F17..............402.341.2664 Soul Desires...G16 ...............................402.898.7600

CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES

All About Me Boutique...G15................402.505.6000 American Apparel...D4.........................402.346.3000 Basic Tease...D16................................. 402.991.2869 Curbside Clothing...G16 Drastic Plastic...E16.............................402.346.8843 Flying Worm Vintage...E16................... 402.594.7061 The Lotus...E16....................................402.346.8080 McLovin’... Nebraska Clothing Co...G15 .................402.346.6114 Nouvelle Eve...F15.................................402.345.4811 Old Market Sundries...G16................... 402.345.8198 Overland Outfitters...G16.....................402.345.2900 Reserve Goodwill in the Market...E16...402.342.4102 Second Chance Antiques...F16............402.346.4930 Souq, Ltd...G15.................................... 402.342.2972 Trocadero...E15....................................402.934.8389 Urban Outfitters...D4.............................402.280.1936

DINING

801 Chophouse at the Paxton...C14.... 402.341.1222 Ahmad’s Persian Cuisine...G15............402.341.9616 Billy Frogg’s Grill & Bar...F15................402.341.4427 Blue Sushi Sake Grill...E15.................. 402.408.5566 The Boiler Room...F17..........................402.916.9274 Capitol Lounge & Supper Club...G11... 402.934.5999 Denim & Diamonds...F14.....................402.504.4901 The Diner...F15.....................................402.341.9870 DJ’s Dugout Sports Bar/Blazin’ Pianos...G11................ 402.763.9974 Eat the Worm...E16..............................402.614.4240 Falling Water Grille @ Embassy Suites...H16................. 402.346.9000 Farrell’s Bar & 9th St. Deli...H11...........402.884.8818 The Flatiron Cafe...(17th & Howard).... 402.344.3040 Hiro 88...D16....................................... 402.933-5168 House of Lee & California Bowl...E16 ..402.991.9330 Indian Oven...G15................................ 402.342.4856 Jackson St. Tavern...F17......................402.991.5637 Jazz, A Louisiana Kitchen...C14.......... 402.342.3662 Joe Banana’s (1022 S.10th St.)...........402.346.7227 Julio’s Old Market...D16.........................402.345.692 Liberty Tavern...G7.............................. 402.998.4321 M’s Pub...F15...................................... 402.342.2550 Matsu Sushi...G14............................... 402.346.3988 Michael’s at the Market...F14...............402.346.1205 Nicola’s Italian Wine & Faire...E16....... 402.345.8466 O Dining & Lounge...G14......................402.502.7888 O’Connors Irish Pub...E16....................402.934.9790 Old Chicago...F15 .................................402.341.1616 Omaha Prime...G15..............................402.341.7040 PepperJax Grill...D16.............................402.315.1196 Rick’s Cafe Boatyard...K7.................... 402.345.4545

Garden Flowers...G16...........................402.614.5661 Old Market Habitat...G15..................... 402.342.0044 The Paisley Poppy...B14.......................402.991.6970

HEALTH & FITNESS

Acupunture Omaha Healing Arts Center...E15........................... 402.345.5078 David Bole L.Ac............................. 402.345.5078 Ellen Zinn L.Ac.............................. 402.345.5078 Elizabeth Harmon - Acupuncture...402.991.5753 Ayurvedic Healing (both at Omaha Healing Arts Center) Dr.Rajesh Kotecha...E15............... 402.345.5078 Joyce Librunner, LMT...E15...........402.740.0366 Dental Derek Fender, DDS...E15.............. 402.342.3901 James Polerecky, DDS...C15.........402.341.7576 Omaha Dental Spa (at the Loft)...F16...................... 402.505.4424 Fitness Anytime Fitness...F18....................402.991.2333 Kempo Karate...(19th & Farnam).. 402.905.6865 Omaha Yoga School...G15.............402.346.7813 Massage Therapy Old Market Massage...E15............402.850.6651 Omaha Healing Arts Center...E15...... 402.345.5078 Rachel Andress, LMT................... 402.345.5078 Sandy Aquila, LMT........................ 402.345.5078 Julia Beutler, LMT......................... 402.345.5078 Lisa Christensen, LMT...................402.850.6651 Kirstin Kluver, LMT........................ 402.345.5078 Joyce Linbrunner, LMT..................402.740.0366 Tara Thompson, LMT....................402.706.7398 Medical Commercial Optical Co...E16.........402.344.0219 Creighton Family Healthcare...D19.402.280.5500 Downtown Chiropractic...(21st & Douglas)............. 402.345.7500 Ritch Miller, DC............................. 402.345.7500 Heartland Pathology...A14.............402.346.0195 Physical Therapy Bobby Escolas, CMHT (Hypnotherapist).................. 402.990.2979 Jannette J. Davis, MS, CST...G13.402.341.2230 Cynthia Duggin, MSW, LCSW...E15........................ 402.345.5078 East & West Physical Therapy...E15........................ 402.345.5078 Chanell Jaramillo, MTP, CMH, HHP...E15.............. .. 402.689.0905 Jeff Stormberg, PhD...C14........... 402.393.0642 Tim Swisher, MHR, LMHP, LADC...G13.................. 402.341.2230 Pharmacy Depot Drug...C11.........402.544.DRUG

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NORTH/SOUTH NUMBERS 1-9 (NUMBERS 10-19 ON PAGE 40) Turner Blvd

Downtown Omaha Map

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CenturyLink Center Omaha


Merchants Attractions OLD MARKET / DOWNTOWN / RIVERFRONT

HOME FURNISHINGS

Habitat Restore...(24th & Leavenworth)..............402.342.0044 Iron Decor & More...F16......................................402.346.6123 Julia Russell...F12................................................402.891.0691 Niche...G15..........................................................402.344.4399 Room...G15.........................................................402.342.7666 Zongkers Custom Woods...(S. 3rd St.)...............402.344.7784

HOTELS

Courtyard by Marriott...H12 ...............................402.346.2200 DoubleTree Hotel...B/C10....................................402.346.7600 Embassy Suites Old Market...H16.......................402.346.9000 Fairfield Inn and Suites...C2.................................402.280.1516 Hampton Inn...E2.................................................402.345.5500 Hilton Garden Inn...C2 ........................................402.341.4400 Hilton Omaha...G7 ..............................................402.998.3400 Holiday Inn...E2.....................................................402.341.0124 Homewood Suites...D2 .......................................402.345.5100 Hotel DECO XV...B14........................................... 402.991.4981 Magnolia Hotel Omaha...A16 .............................402.342.2222

MIDTOWN CROSSING

Cibola

The Afternoon...W23...........................................402.933.3809 Arian’s Barber Shop...W23..................................402.505.8767 Blanc Burgers + Bottles...V23.............................402.502.3686 Callahan Financial Planning...V23.......................402.341.2000 Cantina Laredo...W21.........................................402.345.6000 Coldstone Creamery/Rocky Mountain Chocolate...X22.............. 402.359.1719 CRAVE...W22......................................................402.345.9999 Definitive Vision...W23.........................................402.502.7323 Delice European Bakery...W23............................402.505.9500 Element by Westin...X21.....................................402.614.8080 Fashion Cleaners...X22........................................402.916.1987 Glo Lounge...X23................................................402.342.4505 The Grey Plume...W22........................................402.763.4447 Ingredient...X23...................................................402.715.4444 Marcus Midtown Cinema...X23..........................402.345.0102 Pana 88...............................................................402.934.7262 Parmida Home Concepts....................................402.504.9267 Portovino Ristorante...W22.................................402.885.6800 Prairie Life Fitness...W22....................................402.916.5000 Republic of Couture...W22..................................402.933.7555 Three Dog Bakery...X23...................................... 402.715.4500 Tru Salon & Spa...X22.........................................402.933.8988 Wohlner’s Neighborhood Grocery and Deli...X21.402.551.6875 Verizon Wireless by Z Wireless...X23...................402.991.1180

MUSIC SHOPS

Antiquarium Records...D15................................402.345.0294 Homer’s Records...E15.......................................402.346.0264 Drastic Plastic...E16...........................................402.346.8843

OLD MARKET PROPERTIES

Visit us soon Contemporary & Traditional Southwestern Jewelry

Lilly Barrack-GL Miller-Calvin Begay and our Silversmith Jim Robinson

Expert repair work

Custom designs

Sterling Silver and 14K Gold

Old Market 509 S 11th St Omaha, NE 402-342-1200

42

Cibola Old Town 7236 1st Ave Scottsdale, AZ 480-990-1700

january/february 2013 | the encounter

902 Dodge Condos...G11................................... 402.215.7118 Brandeis Building...A13......................................402.345.6564 Farnam 1600 Building...(1905 Harney St.).........402.342.1616 Grubb/Ellis Pacific Realty...F15..........................402.345.5866 Harney Street Apartments...G18.........................402.934.7510 Old Market Lofts...K3......................................... 402.346.1000 Riverfront Place...C14..........................................402.397.4837 Shamrock Development/Paxton Building...C14..402.934.7711 Skinner Macaroni Apartments...D17..................402.346.2346 The Cornerstone Apartments...F15.................... 402.346.0510 The Greenhouse Apts...H13............................... 402.341.3200 TipTop Building...C2............................................402.345.8000

SPECIALTY FOODS & COFFEE

13th Street Coffee Co...E16.............................. 402.345.2883 Aromas Coffeehouse...G18................................402.614.7009 Bliss Bakery...G18...............................................402.934.7450 Blue Line Coffee...D3.........................................402.932.0294 Cubby’s Old Markey Grocery...E17..................... 402.341.2900 Hollywood Candy...D16...................................... 402.346.9746 La Buvette Wine & Grocery...G16.......................402.344.8627 Nosh Wine Lounge...G11.....................................402.614.2121 Old Market Candy Shop...G16............................402.344.8846 Patrick’s Market...C15.........................................402.884.1600 Red Mango...D4................................................. 402.933.8815 Scooter’s Coffeehouse...F16.............................. 402.991.9868

Soul Desires...G16 ............................................. 402.898.7600 The Tea Smith...F15...........................................402.932.3933 Ted & Wally’s Ice Cream...F16.............................402.341.5827 Urban Wine Company...G18...............................402.934.0005 Wheatfields Express...F15...................................402.991.0917

SPECIALTY SHOPS

Ashley’s Collectibles...E15..................................402.934.3100 Basic Tease...E16...............................................402.991.2869 Cibola of Omaha...G16.......................................402.342.1200 City Limits...F16................................................. 402.345.3570 Cornerstone Gem & Bead Co...E16................... 402.346.4367 DSR Power Sports...E15..................................... 402.991.1383 Goldsmith/Silversmith...G16..............................402.342.1737 Green St. Cycles...D4........................................ 402.505.8002 Havana Garage Cigar Bar...G15..........................402.614.3800 Iron Decor & More...F16.....................................402.346.6123 J.P. Cooke Rubber Stamp Co...D16...................402.342.7175 Jay Welter Cigars...(18th & Jackson).................402.345.1965 Kessler’s...F17....................................................402.715.5888 The Lotus...D16..................................................402.347.8080 Machu Picchu Imports...D16 Nebraska at the Market...E19............................ 402.346.3975 Old Market Sundries...G16.................................402.345.8198 OM Gifts & Imports...E15.................................. 402.345.5078 Overland Outfitters...G16..................................402.345.2900 Perspective Jewelry...E15..................................402.934.4416 Red Square...G15.............................................. 402.342.8878 Reserve Goodwill in the Market...E16................402.342.4102 SG Roi Tobacconist...G16...................................402.341.9264 Simply Fabulous...E17........................................402.812.2193 Studio 13...(1736 S. 13th St.).............................402.934.1111 The Summit...(1601 Dodge St.).........................402.341.5555 Susie’s Baskets...E13.........................................402.341.4650 Takechi’s Jewelry...(17th & Harney)...................402.341.3044 Tannenbaum Christmas Shop...G16................. 402.934.8389 Visions Custom Framing Studio...E17............... 402.342.0020

SERVICES

Banking & Finance American National Bank...C14......................402.457.1070 First National Bank...F16.............................402.885.2574 Pinnacle Bank...G12....................................402.346.9180 Security National Bank...G16...................... 402.344.7300 Commercial Alliance Group...G18................................... 402.344.7700 Clark Creative Advertising...D16.................402.345.5800 J.P. Cooke Rubber Stamp Co...D16.............402.342.7175 Market Media.............................................. 402.346.4000 Vic Gutman & Associates............................ 402.345.5401 Information Downtown Omaha, Inc.................................402.341.3700 Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce...D15..................... 402.346.5000 The Encounter Magazine.............................402.884.2000 Old Market Business Association...(www.oldmarket.com) Omaha Convention & Visitors Bureau...G14.402.444.4660 Omaha Downtown Improvement District......402.916.1796 Omaha Public Library...C13.........................402.444.4800 Legal Boyle & Associates, PC...F16....................... 402.706.7810 Cullan & Cullan...F15.................................... 402.397.7600 Don Fiedler Law Offices...C14......................402.346.6263 Klein Law Offices...H16.................................402.391.1871 Stinson, Morrison, Hecker LLP...E14.............402.342.1700 Sutera & Sutera Law Office...F15.................402.342.3100 Other Big Brain Productions...F17..........................402.342.2885 Movers Not Shakers...H13............................ 402.614.9770 Old Market Mini Storage...(501 Pacific St.)..402.342.0022 Salon & Spa At the Loft Spa...F16..................................... 402.505.4100 Fringes of the Old Market Hair Salon...G16..402.345.0404 The Hair Market Salon...G14.........................402.345.3692 The Nail Shop...(9th & Douglas)...................402.595.8805 Rain Salon...(1006 S. 10th St.)......................402.991.9974 RARE...E15...................................................402.706.9673 Sirens Salon & Day Spa...F16.......................402.933.9333 Urbane Salon & Day Spa...D15.....................402.934.2909

omahapublications.com


Visit us in the historical RILEY BUILDING at 1016 Douglas On The Mall, 402.346.9180 or online at pinnbank.com.

T H E

W A Y

B A N K I N G

S H O U L D

B E MEMBER FDIC

Downtown and Council Bluffs ONGOING EVENTS Through 1/4: Agents of Change: Mexican Muralists and New Deal Artists. El Museo

Latino. The exhibit features works by artists from Mexico and the U.S. that reflect the Mexican Muralist movement, the Works Progress Administration (WPA), and the Taller de Gráfica Popular from the collection of the Sheldon Art Musseum at UNL. $5 general, $4 college students with ID, $3.50 seniors & students K-12, free for members. 4701 S. 25th St. M, W, F/10am-5pm; Tu, Th/1-5pm; Sat/10am-2pm. For more information, visit www.elmuseolatino.org or call 402-731-1137.

Through 1/4: Fine Art of Jazz.

Loves Jazz & Arts Center. Inspired to capture the faces and flavor of living Kansas City jazz, Pulitzerprize-winning photographer Dan White spent almost two decades photographing renowned Kansas City jazz musicians. Photographs on display at Loves Jazz & Arts Center. $5 general admission. 2510 N. 24th St. Tu-F/11am-5pm; Sat/11am-3pm. For more information, visit www.lovesjazzartcenter. org or call 402-502-5315.

Through 1/6: The American Soldier, From the Civil War to the War in Iraq: A Photographic Tribute. Durham Museum. A

dramatic display of photographs, The American Soldier display features over 116 photos dating from the Civil War all the way to the War in Iraq. Recurring daily. $8 adults, $6 seniors 62+, $5 children ages 3-12, free for members and children 2 & under. 801 S. 10th St. Tu/10am-8pm; W-Sat/10am-5pm; readonlinenow.com

Sun/1-5pm. For more information, visit www.durhammuseum.org or call 402-444-5071.

Through 1/31: Arte Popular – Folk Art. El Museo Latino. Works

in wood, metal, and paper. Transmitted from generation to generation, tends to be collective in communities, anonymous, decorative, natural materials found in the area or region. $5 general, $4 college students with ID, $3.50 seniors & students K-12, free for members. 4701 S. 25th St. M, W, F/10am-5pm; Tu, Th/1-5pm; Sat/10am-2pm. For more information, visit www.elmuseolatino.org or call 402-731-1137.

Through 2/3: Worn with Pride: Americans in Uniform. Dur-

ham Museum. Artifacts from the Civil War to present day Iraq and Afghanistan will be showcased to bring home the very personal experiences of war and how advances in technology has changed that experience over the last 150 years. Recurring daily. $8 adults, $6 seniors 62+, $5 children ages 3-12, free for member and children 2 & under. 801 S. 10th St. Tu/10am8pm; W-Sat/10am-5pm; Sun/15pm. For more information, visit www.durhammuseum.org or call 402-444-5071.

Through 5/1: The Met: Live in HD. Film Streams. Opera Omaha

and Film Streams have collaborated to bring the Metropolitan Opera’s award-winning series to Ruth Sokolof Theater with showings live on Saturday afternoon and encores on Wednesday night. Berlioz’s Les Troyens (Jan. 5 & 9), Donizetti’s Maria Stuarda (Jan. 19 & 23), Verdi’s Rigoletto (Feb. 16 & 20), Wagner’s Parisfal (Mar. 2 & 6),

January/February Calendar of Events Zandonai’s Francesca da Rimini (Mar. 16 & 20), and Handel’s Giulio Cesare (April 27 & May 1). $24 general admission, $20 Film Streams members and Opera Omaha subscribers, $10 full-time students with ID. 1340 Mike Fahey St. W/6pm; Sat/12pm. For more information, visit www.filmstreams.org

JANUARY 1/7-2/15: Chad Fonfara/Travis Hencey at the Fred Simon Gallery. Fred Simon Gallery. The

ceramics of Chad Fonfara and drawings of Travis Hencey are currently on display in the Fred Simon Gallery, which features exhibitions of contemporary Nebraska visual artists. Recurring daily. Free admission. 1004 Farnam St. MF/8am-5pm. For more information, visit www.nebraskaartscouncil.org or call 402-595-2142.

1/10: Omaha Consort: Partita Party. Entitled “Partita Party,” the

Omaha Consort presents a program, featuring music for wind ensemble, including Beethoven’s Octet in E-flat Major, played by members of the Omaha Symphony. It will also premiere an original composition for two oboes and bassoons by Omaha composer Phill Smith. The evening begins with complimentary wine and cheese at 6pm, followed by a preconcert talk from Jason DeWater, artistic director of Omaha Consort. $20 general, $ 10 students. 202 S. 20th St. 7pm. For more information, visit www.omahaconsort.org or call 402-502-5794.

1/10-13: Midlands International Auto Show. CenturyLink

Center Omaha. Chevrolet, Honda, Ford, Toyota, Dodge, Subaru, Mitsubishi, Jeep, and more! All the newest cars, trucks, motorcycles, and SUVs from all the major manufacturers will be on display. Buy a raffle ticket for a dollar, and you could win a 2013 Camaro convertible provided by the Heartland Chevy dealers. The entirety of the raffle revenue will go to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation. $9 adults, $6 seniors 65+, $5 children 7-12, free for children 6 & under. 455 N 10th St. Th/11am-9pm; FSat/10am-9pm; Sun/10am-5pm. For more information, visit www. omahaautoshow.com or 402-4441263.

1/11-12: Omaha Symphony: Daryl Stuermer of Genesis.

Holland Performing Arts Center. Michael Kamenski, conductor. Together with the Omaha Symphony, touring member of Genesis Daryl Stuermer brings his guitar and five-piece band to rock out to unique renditions of the greatest hits of Genesis and Phil Collins, including “Invisible Touch,” “I Can’t Dance,” “No Son of Mine,” and more! Tickets from $25-70. 1200 Douglas St. 8pm. For more information, visit www.omahasymphony.org or call 402-342-3560.

1/15-20: Memphis the Musical. Orpheum Theater. Inspired by

actual events, Memphis is about a white radio DJ who wants to change the world and a black club singer who is ready for her big break. Come along on their incredible journey to the ends of the airwaves—filled with laughter, soaring emotion, and roof-raising rock ‘n’ roll. Tickets from $25-95. 409 S.

the encounter | january/february 2013

43


Sponsored by Pinnacle Bank 16th St. Tu-Th/7:30pm; F/8pm; Sat/2&8pm; Sun/1:30&7pm. For more information, visit www.omahaperformingarts.org or call 402342-0606.

1/19: Lucky Peterson Live at the Holland. Holland Performing Arts Center.

Discovered by blues legend Willie Dixon, Peterson released his first record at five. With more than seven albums and performances with several blues greats, such as Etta James, Otis Rush, B.B. King, and Albert Collins, Peterson’s smokin’ blues is the perfect opener for the 1200 CLUB—Live at the Holland! 1200 Douglas St. 8pm. For more information, visit www.omahaperformingarts.org or call 402-345-0202.

1/20: Omaha Symphony: Breaking Tradition, New Frontiers in Art and Music. Joslyn Art Museum. Program includes

Beethoven’s Coriolan Overture, Schumann’s Cello Concerto in A Minor, Perle’s Serenade No. 2 for Eleven Players, and Weill’s Suite from Threepenny Opera. Tickets are $30. 2200 Dodge St. 2pm. For more information, visit www.omahasymphony.org or call 402342-3560.

1/21-2/1: All Catholic High School Exhibit. Creighton’s Lied Art Gallery. Area

Catholic high school students display their artwork. Attendees will have the chance to vote for the best artwork. Recurring daily. Free admission. 2500 California Plz. 1-4pm. For more information, call 402-280-2509.

DINE

> S H O P > P L AY > S TAY

1/25-26: Omaha Symphony: Dvorak Festival. Holland Performing Arts Center.

The signature works of Dvorak fill two unforgettable programs. Friday night features his epic cello concerto, and Saturday brings us the iconic Symphony No. 9, “From the New World.” Tickets from $25-75. 1200 Douglas St. 8pm. For more information, visit www. omahasymphony.org or call 402-342-3560.

1/25-2/10: Tomás and the Library Lady.

It’s the gift you can use all across downtown for dining, entertainment, shopping and more. Buy yours online at OmahaDowntown.org or at these fine retailers: Patrick’s Market 1416 Howard St.

44

Nebraska At The Market 1215 Leavenworth St.

january/february 2013 | the encounter

Tannenbaum Christmas Shop 1007 Howard St.

Old Market Sundries 1003 Howard St.

The Rose Theater. To find work, Tomás and his family travel to Iowa, where the only home for them is a shack. His life is changed when he meets a librarian who opens up a new world of books. Learn how a scared boy became the celebrated Chicano poet, author, and educator Tomás Rivera. Best for ages 5 and older. $18 general, free for members. 2001 Farnam St. F/7pm; Sat/2&7pm; Sun/2pm. For more information, visit www. rosetheater.org or call 402-345-4849.

1/27: Omaha Symphony: When I Grow Up. Holland Performing Arts Center. What

do you want to be when you grow up? Come along with Music Director Thomas Wilkins as he tells the story of how orchestras came to be. Tickets from $8-10. 1200 Douglas St. 2pm. For more information, visit www.omahasymphony.org or call 402-342-3560. omahapublications.com


tradition,spot DRUMLINE LIVE The Old Market’sbrass favorite thrills audiences with its American Marching Band experience. dinner. lunch & Widely considered the world’s for

1/31: Savion Glover’s SoLe Sanctuary. Orpheum Theater.

finest tap dancer, Glover pays homage to the many tap greats, such as Gregory Hines and Sammy Davis, Jr. For this performance, Glover will be joined by fellow tap enthusiast Marshall Davis, Jr. Tickets from $25-59. 409 S. 16th St. 7:30pm. For more information, visit www.omahaperformingarts.org or call 402345-0606.

FEBRUARY 2/2: Omaha Symphony: James Bond & Beyond. Hol-

Tickets from $19-55. 409 S. 16th St. 7:30pm. For more information, visit www.omahaperformingarts.org or call 402-345-0606.

2/7-10: 48th Annual Omaha Home & Garden Expo and 15th Annual Flower & Patio Show. CenturyLink Center

Omaha. Step out of Winter and into Spring at Omaha’s most colorful and largest showcase of landscaping, home gardens, and outdoor living, as well as the latest products and services for the home. Recurring daily. 455 N. 10th St. For more information, visit www.centurylinkcenteromaha.com or call 402341-1500.

land Performing Arts Center. Featuring Debbie Gravitte, vocalist. Shaken, not stirred—join us for a cocktail of 007’s memorable music from Goldfinger to 2/7-10: Potted Potter: The Dr. No with a shot of other great Unauthorized Harry Experispy-inspired musical selections. Award-winning food & wine list – Tickets from $20-65. 1200 Doug- ence. Holland Performing Arts open late 7 nights a week. Center. Potted Potter takes on las St. 8pm. For more informathe ultimate challenge of conCall for reservations. tion, visit www.omahaperformingarts.org or call 402-345-0202. densing all seven Harry Potter a real life game of 422 books S. 11th(and Street • 342-2550 Quidditch) into seventy hilariwww.MsPubOmaha.com 2/6: Blues at the Crossroads ous minutes. This fantastically 2: Muddy and The Wolf. Hol- funny show features all your land Performing Arts Center. favorite characters, a special apBlues at the Crossroads returns pearance from a fire-breathing to celebrate two legends, Muddragon, endless costumes, brildy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. liant songs, ridiculous props Both musicians are considered ,and a generous helping of the inspiration of the 1960s Hogwarts magic! Tickets from British blues explosion. Tickets $48-55. 1200 Douglas St. Thfrom $25-55. 1200 Douglas St. F/7&9:30pm; Sat-Sun/2&7pm. 7:30pm. For more information, For more information, visit visit www.omahaperforminwww.omahaperformingarts.org garts.org or call 402-345-0606. or call 402-345-0202.

M’s Pub

2/6-10: Dames at Sea. Lied

Education Center for the Arts at Creighton University. A musical parody of the grand and glorious movie musicals of the 1930s. Calamity strikes when a group of performers, preparing for their upcoming show, needs to find a venue because their theater is demolished. $18 general, $15 seniors. 2500 California Plz. W-Sat/7:30pm; Sun/2pm. For more information, visit www.creighton.edu or call 402280-2509.

2/7: Drumline Live. Orpheum

Theater. This versatile group of musicians and dancers brings an explosive energy and athleticism to an eclectic mix of sounds. With hip hop, R&B, classic Motown tunes, and the rousing sounds of the great readonlinenow.com

Italian & Mediterranean specialties served in“the Old Market’s most beautiful dining room,” complemented with the area’s largest selection of Italian wines.

1108 Howard Street

342-2050

www.VivaceOmaha.com

The Old Market’s favorite spot for lunch & dinner.

2/8-10: “Best in the MidWest” Tattoo Convention.

Mid-America Center. At the “Best in the MidWest” tattoo convention, there will be more than 200 artists tattooing all weekend. All artists are licensed by the Iowa Board of Health and have been trained in blood borne pathogens, first aid, and safe tattooing techniques. One Arena Way, Council Bluffs. F-Sat/12-10pm; Sun/12-8pm. For more information, visit www.midamericacenter.com or call 856-258-4953.

2/9-10: Omaha Symphony: John Pizzarelli. Holland Per-

forming Arts Center. This worldrenowned jazz guitarist and singer has been called “hip with a wink” by Town and Country and “madly creative” by the L.A.

Award-winning food & wine list – open late 7 nights a week. Call for reservations.

M’s Pub

422 S. 11th Street

342-2550

www.MsPubOmaha.com

the encounter | january/february 2013

45


Sponsored by Pinnacle Bank Times. A recent smash success with the Boston Pops, he will perform a treasure trove of great American songs in his own “impossibly cool” style. Tickets from $15-78. 1200 Douglas St. Sat/8pm; Sun/2pm. For more information, visit www.omahaperformingarts. org or call 402-345-0202.

2/13: Omaha Consort: Schubert’s Octet in F Major.

Scottish Rite Masonic Lodge. The Omaha Consort presents Schubert’s Octet in F Major. The evening begins with complimentary wine and cheese at 6pm, followed by a pre-concert talk from Jason DeWater, artistic director of Omaha Consort. $20 general, $ 10 students. 202 S. 20th St. 7pm. For more information, visit www. omahaconsort.org or call 402502-5794.

2/19: The Chieftains with Paddy Moloney. Holland Perform-

ing Arts Center. Six-time Grammy winners, The Chieftains are recognized for bringing traditional Irish music to the world’s attention. The Chieftains have taken traditional Irish music and made it their own with a style that is as exhilarating as it is definitive. Tickets from $25-60. 1200 Douglas St. 7:30pm. For more information, visit www. omahaperformingarts.org or call 402-345-0202.

2/21-3/16: A Behanding in Spokane. Blue Barn Theatre.

With the most delectable

contemporary american cuisine in the Old Market, V.Mertz has something for everyone.

In this darkly comical new work from the acclaimed playwright Martin McDonagh, the mysterious gun-toting Carmichael has been searching for his missing left hand for decades. Enter two bickering lovebirds with a hand to sell, and a hotel clerk with an aversion to gunfire, and soon life and death are up for grabs. A Behanding in Spokane turns over American daily existence, exposing the obsessions, prejudices, madness, horrors, and above all, the absurdities that crawl beneath it. 614

S. 11th St. For more information, visit www.bluebarn.org or call 402-345-1576.

2/22: Donny McCaslin Group Live at the Holland. Holland

Performing Arts Center. Tenor saxophonist Donny McCaslin is known for his emotionally charged playing. As distinctive a composer as he is a jazz saxophonist, McCaslin has nine albums to his credit. 1200 Douglas St. 8pm. For more information, visit www.omahaperformingarts. org or call 402-345-0606.

2/23-5/26: We Want the Vote: Women’s Suffrage on the Great Plains. Durham Museum.

Learn how the region contributed to the suffrage movement. Though it was a fairly radical concept in 1848, as the decades passed women from all backgrounds began to understand they needed the vote. Recurring daily. $8 adults, $6 seniors 62+, $5 children ages 3-12, free for members and children 2 & under. 801 S. 10th St. Tu/10am-8pm; WSat/10am-5pm; Sun/1-5pm. For more information, visit www.durhammuseum.org or call 402-4445071.

2/24: Archaeological Institute of America Lecture Series: Brian Rose. Joslyn Art Museum.

Assessing the Historicity of the Trojan War: Excavations at Troy 1988-2010. Free with admission. 2200 Dodge St. 2pm. For more information, visit www.joslyn.org or call 402-280-2509.

2/25-3/2: Omaha Fashion Week. KANEKO. Join us for the Midwest’s Premier Fashion Event. Strut the red carpet and sit front row to premier the 2013 fall/winter collections designed by the region’s top independent fashion designers. Tickets from $20-65. 1111 Jones St. 6-10pm. For more information, visit www.omahafashionweek.com or call 402-5993283.

$35 Three-Course Prix Fixe Menu • Tues. - Thurs. Award Winning Wine List Old Market Passageway • 1022 Howard St. Reservations Recommended • Call 402.345.8980 Reservations Online • www.vmertz.com General Manager • Certified Sommelier Matthew E. Brown Certified Sommeliers David Eckler, Chris Walter Executive Chef Jon Seymour Sous Chef Jacob Newton

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january/february 2013 | the encounter

omahapublications.com


Not Exactly

PUB GRUB.

Photo: Š 2011 Bryce Bridges Photographic

Sophisticated American cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere. Classy, but unpretentious. Creative, but approachable. Lunch, dinner, fresh daily specials, Sunday brunch and late night tapas. Live piano Thursday - Saturday. Open 11AM Tuesday - Saturday (Closed Monday) | Brunch 10AM - 2PM Sunday Happy Hour 4PM - 6PM Tuesday - Friday & 10PM - 12AM Friday - Saturday 1125 Jackson St. | Old Market, Omaha, NE | 402.991.5637 | JacksonStreetTavern.com


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Old Market 11th & JacksOn 402-344-0200

West Omaha 171st & W. center 402-778-0100

“Best brewery we’ve experienced.”

“I got the shrimp white pizza. I could have licked the plate it was so good!”


January/February 2013 The Encounter Magazine